History Main / StrawFeminist

17th Jun '17 4:41:34 AM Morgenthaler
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** An intentional, in-universe example is found in ''ComicBook/EmperorJoker'' where ComicBook/TheJoker manages to gain the powers of Mr. Mxyzptlk and creates a WorldGoneMad. Most of the superheroes of the Justice League are turned into parodies of themselves, with Wonder Woman becoming a man-hating criminal with internal misogyny and a [[RollingPinOfDoom rolling pin]] as her primary weapon.
22nd May '17 1:31:18 PM Scabbard
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* {{Subverted}} in J. Courtney Sullivan's ''Commencement'' with a ''sympathetic'' portrayal of a radical feminist: April, one of the main characters, is a self-described [=MacKinnonite=] who sees organizations like NOW as "not doing enough." However, she's shown to be more of a WellIntentionedExtremist, a good person who perhaps is a bit too idealistic [[spoiler:which she's abandoned by the end of the novel after she learns the hard way that some people like to take advantage of wide-eyed young guns]]. Even the de rigeur anti-male attitude gets a FreudianExcuse in April's case: her father [[DisappearedDad abandoned April and her mom]], and when April was 13 [[spoiler:a middle-aged family friend [[BreakTheCutie raped]] and [[CrossesTheLineTwice impregnated]] her]]) The other three main characters, April's friends, each represent more moderate variations on feminism (one even works for NOW). April's boss, Ronnie Munro, could be seen as a straight-playing of the trope, if the novel didn't go out of its way to acknowledge that her brand of "feminism" is far from the most prevalent or consistent one.

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* {{Subverted}} in J. Courtney Sullivan's ''Commencement'' with a ''sympathetic'' portrayal of a radical feminist: April, one of the main characters, is a self-described [=MacKinnonite=] who sees organizations like NOW as "not doing enough." However, she's shown to be more of a WellIntentionedExtremist, a good person who perhaps is a bit too idealistic [[spoiler:which she's abandoned by the end of the novel after she learns the hard way that some people like to take advantage of wide-eyed young guns]]. Even the de rigeur anti-male attitude gets a FreudianExcuse in April's case: her father [[DisappearedDad abandoned April and her mom]], and when April was 13 [[spoiler:a middle-aged family friend [[BreakTheCutie raped]] and [[CrossesTheLineTwice impregnated]] her]]) her]]). The other three main characters, April's friends, each represent more moderate variations on feminism (one even works for NOW). April's boss, Ronnie Munro, could be seen as a straight-playing of the trope, if the novel didn't go out of its way to acknowledge that her brand of "feminism" is far from the most prevalent or consistent one.
2nd May '17 2:55:42 PM HighCrate
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** The episode "Night Five" features an intern with Straw Feminist tendencies who takes umbrage at a joke Sam makes towards Ainsley Hayes which sends him into a defensive frenzy all episode, and who eventually gets torn a new one by Ainsley herself by the end. Considering this was written not long after Sorkin's public spat with the moderators and commentators on the Website/TelevisionWithoutPity boards, in which the possibility of sexism in his writing had been the topic of intense discussion, many have taken the existence of this character as a device to be torn down solely to show that his writing was not sexist. It doesn't help that, in the context of the episode, [[StrawmanHasAPoint the woman kind of had a point]].
** Ainsley herself is an aversion of the trope. Amy Gardner even more so.

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** The episode "Night Five" features an intern with Straw Feminist tendencies who takes umbrage at a joke Sam makes towards Ainsley Hayes which sends him into a defensive frenzy all episode, and who eventually gets torn a new one by Ainsley herself by the end. Considering this was written not long after Sorkin's public spat with the moderators and commentators on the Website/TelevisionWithoutPity boards, in which the possibility of sexism in his writing had been the topic of intense discussion, many have taken the existence of this character as a device to be torn down solely to show that his writing was not sexist. It doesn't help that, in the context of the episode, [[StrawmanHasAPoint the woman kind of had a point]].
** Ainsley herself is an aversion of the trope. Amy Gardner even more so.



** The episode "Equal Fights" had a villain named Femme Fatale, a man-hating criminal who only stole Susan B. Anthony coins and [[StrawHypocrite liked to use the fact that she's a woman as an excuse to avoid punishment]]. She tried to convince the girls to stop helping men but her flawed logic is countered at the end by the more mainstream equality-based feminism of Sara Bellum and Miss Keane who teach the girls the difference between feminism and misandry. Not helping Femme Fatale's case were the fact that women were also hurt by her actions and that she ''didn't even know who Susan B. Anthony was'', or that said woman fought for the equality of '''both''' women and men alike (leading to a very good ShutUpHannibal moment by the girls). Writer Creator/LaurenFaust, herself a staunch feminist, later decided that the subject of feminism was too heavy for such a lighthearted family show and regretted writing it. It doesn't help that some viewers have used Femme Fatale--a cartoon character that's deliberately over-the-top--as an example of "bad" feminism and an excuse to bash the ideology.
** Ironically, Blossom was portrayed as having misandrist opinions in the 2009 special "The Powerpuff Girls Rule", where her idea of a perfect world involved women being in charge of everything and all the men being forced to stay at home and do housework.

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** The episode "Equal Fights" had a villain named Femme Fatale, a man-hating criminal who only stole Susan B. Anthony coins and [[StrawHypocrite liked to use the fact that she's a woman as an excuse to avoid punishment]]. She tried to convince the girls to stop helping men but her flawed logic is countered at the end by the more mainstream equality-based feminism of Sara Bellum and Miss Keane who teach the girls the difference between feminism and misandry. Not helping Femme Fatale's case were the fact that women were also hurt by her actions and that she ''didn't even know who Susan B. Anthony was'', or that said woman fought for the equality of '''both''' women and men alike (leading to a very good ShutUpHannibal moment by the girls). Writer Creator/LaurenFaust, herself a staunch feminist, later decided that the subject of feminism was too heavy for such a lighthearted family show and regretted writing it. It doesn't help that some viewers have used Femme Fatale--a cartoon character that's deliberately over-the-top--as an example of "bad" feminism and an excuse to bash the ideology.
** Ironically, Blossom was portrayed as having misandrist opinions in the 2009 special "The Powerpuff Girls Rule", where her idea of a perfect world involved women being in charge of everything and all the men being forced to stay at home and do housework.
1st May '17 7:45:40 PM DesertDragon
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** The episode "Equal Fights" had a villain named Femme Fatale, a man-hating criminal who only stole Susan B. Anthony coins and [[StrawHypocrite liked to use the fact that she's a woman as an excuse to avoid punishment]]. She tried to convince the girls to stop helping men but her flawed logic is countered at the end by the more mainstream equality-based feminism of Sara Bellum and Miss Keane who teach the girls the difference between feminism and misandry. Not helping Femme Fatale's case were the fact that women were also hurt by her actions and that she ''didn't even know who Susan B. Anthony was'', or that said woman fought for the equality of '''both''' women and men alike (leading to a very good ShutUpHannibal moment by the girls). Writer Creator/LaurenFaust, herself a staunch feminist, later decided that the subject of feminism was too heavy for such a lighthearted family show and regretted writing it. Fans, however, felt that it handled the subject as well as it could.

to:

** The episode "Equal Fights" had a villain named Femme Fatale, a man-hating criminal who only stole Susan B. Anthony coins and [[StrawHypocrite liked to use the fact that she's a woman as an excuse to avoid punishment]]. She tried to convince the girls to stop helping men but her flawed logic is countered at the end by the more mainstream equality-based feminism of Sara Bellum and Miss Keane who teach the girls the difference between feminism and misandry. Not helping Femme Fatale's case were the fact that women were also hurt by her actions and that she ''didn't even know who Susan B. Anthony was'', or that said woman fought for the equality of '''both''' women and men alike (leading to a very good ShutUpHannibal moment by the girls). Writer Creator/LaurenFaust, herself a staunch feminist, later decided that the subject of feminism was too heavy for such a lighthearted family show and regretted writing it. Fans, however, felt It doesn't help that it handled some viewers have used Femme Fatale--a cartoon character that's deliberately over-the-top--as an example of "bad" feminism and an excuse to bash the subject as well as it could.ideology.
1st May '17 7:40:32 PM DesertDragon
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Due to the polarizing nature of straw tropes such as this, RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment should be considering to avoid possibility of FlameWar. Even though some feminists act in this manner--all political factions have their bad seeds that shine a negative light on the others--[[Administrivia/NoRealLifeExamplesPlease this trope is about examples in media only, making real life examples pointless]].

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Due to the polarizing nature of straw tropes such as this, RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment should be considering to avoid possibility of FlameWar. Even though some feminists act in this manner--all political factions In real life, all ideologies have their a few bad seeds that shine a negative light on the others--[[Administrivia/NoRealLifeExamplesPlease this others.
[[Administrivia/NoRealLifeExamplesPlease This
trope is about examples in media only, making real life examples pointless]].
28th Apr '17 11:31:45 AM MagBas
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* Paperinika, Daisy Duck DistaffCounterpart of Donald superhero-alter ego in ''Comic/DisneyDucksComicUniverse''. Character featured in old Italian and Brazilian comics, she claim that female genre is totally superior to male. Indeed, she take initially this identity just to avenge abuses received by male people. This is also one of reason because the character was abandoned for years by Italian authors (this and because Brazilian authors made her in pretty much TheAce who constantly one-upped and humiliated Paperinik). Thankfully this trait is toned down in the modern appearances.
27th Apr '17 6:48:46 AM MitchellProductions
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Due to the polarizing nature of straw tropes such as this, RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment should be considering to avoid possibility of FlameWar. Even though some feminists act in this manner--all political factions have their bad seeds that shine a negative light on the others--[[Administrivia/NoRealLifeExamplesPlease this trope is about examples in media only]].

to:

Due to the polarizing nature of straw tropes such as this, RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment should be considering to avoid possibility of FlameWar. Even though some feminists act in this manner--all political factions have their bad seeds that shine a negative light on the others--[[Administrivia/NoRealLifeExamplesPlease this trope is about examples in media only]].
only, making real life examples pointless]].
25th Apr '17 8:26:32 PM TFSyndicate
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* ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'': The female inhabitants of planet Gazorpazorp are these, in ''sharp'' contrast to the ultra-violent males that dwell on the outer surface of the planet. Naturally, they assume that ''all'' male species are like this.
14th Apr '17 10:00:20 AM DoctorCooper
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Due to the polarizing nature of straw tropes such as this, RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment should be considering to avoid possibility of FlameWar. Even though some feminists act in this manner--all political factions have their bad seeds that shine a negative light on the others--[[Administrivia/NoRealLifeExamplesPlease this trope is about fictional examples only]].

to:

Due to the polarizing nature of straw tropes such as this, RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment should be considering to avoid possibility of FlameWar. Even though some feminists act in this manner--all political factions have their bad seeds that shine a negative light on the others--[[Administrivia/NoRealLifeExamplesPlease this trope is about fictional examples in media only]].
13th Apr '17 11:00:42 AM DaibhidC
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* The ''Series/MurdochMysteries'' episode "Hades Has No Fury" is set at a sort of unofficial women's shelter. While it's established that the place has good reason to exist, the three members we see most of are Athena, who wants to shut herself and her fellows away from any contact with men whatsoever; Artemis, who wants to declare war on all men; and Demeter, who hopes that in vitro fertilisation and chromosome mapping will eventually eradicate men altogether.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.StrawFeminist