History Main / StrangledByTheRedString

20th May '18 9:43:23 AM cherrychels
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Buffy and Riley had no hope right from the start. Granted, the writers ''tried'', but they tried so badly to make Riley [[ReplacementScrappy "not Angel"]] that they forgot to give him any interesting character traits of his own -- or any that would make him even the slightest bit compatible with Buffy. The timing of this relationship didn't help much -- shortly after Buffy's dramatic and defining relationship ends with Angel and Angel leaves Sunnydale, the writers tried introducing Buffy into a brand new romantic relationship with a brand new character (Riley).

to:

** Buffy and Riley had no hope right from the start. Granted, the writers ''tried'', but they tried so badly to make Riley [[ReplacementScrappy "not Angel"]] that they forgot to give him any interesting character traits of his own -- or any that would make him even the slightest bit compatible with Buffy. The timing of this relationship didn't help much -- shortly after Buffy's dramatic and defining relationship ends with Angel ends and Angel leaves Sunnydale, the writers tried introducing Buffy into a brand new romantic relationship with a brand new character (Riley). (Riley) without giving much recovery time for the end of the Buffy/Angel relationship, which had been a primary storyline of Seasons 1-3.
20th May '18 9:40:49 AM cherrychels
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Buffy and Riley had no hope right from the start. Granted, the writers ''tried'', but they tried so badly to make Riley [[ReplacementScrappy "not Angel"]] that they forgot to give him any interesting character traits of his own -- or any that would make him even the slightest bit compatible with Buffy.

to:

** Buffy and Riley had no hope right from the start. Granted, the writers ''tried'', but they tried so badly to make Riley [[ReplacementScrappy "not Angel"]] that they forgot to give him any interesting character traits of his own -- or any that would make him even the slightest bit compatible with Buffy. The timing of this relationship didn't help much -- shortly after Buffy's dramatic and defining relationship ends with Angel and Angel leaves Sunnydale, the writers tried introducing Buffy into a brand new romantic relationship with a brand new character (Riley).



** The infamous [[NoSparks Joey and Rachel]] romance. Season 8 has Joey developing feelings for Rachel, which was kind of unbelievable but, thanks to Matt's acting skill, pretty emotive. Rachel gently turned him down and the incident was barely mentioned again until Season 9 when Joey got a new girlfriend and all of a sudden, Rachel gets a crush on Joey! They hooked up in the finale, stayed together for maybe 3 episodes...and then broke up because, they uh, couldn't do it 'sexually'. What? Made worse as Rachel had ''exactly'' the same problem with Ross in S2 but made it through. However, the writers always planned to get Ross and Rachel together in the end, making the whole thing a ShaggyDogStory. About the only thing it achieved was making Rachel look unnecessarily shallow and fickle.

to:

** The infamous [[NoSparks Joey and Rachel]] romance. Season 8 has Joey developing feelings for Rachel, which was kind of unbelievable but, thanks to Matt's acting skill, pretty emotive. Rachel gently turned him down and the incident was barely mentioned again until Season 9 when Joey got a new girlfriend and all of a sudden, Rachel gets a crush on Joey! Joey. They hooked up in the finale, stayed together for maybe 3 episodes...and episodes... And then broke up because, they uh, couldn't do it 'sexually'. What? Made worse as Rachel had ''exactly'' the same problem with Ross in S2 Season 2 but made it through. However, the writers always planned to get Ross and Rachel together in the end, making the whole thing a ShaggyDogStory. About the only thing it achieved was making Rachel look unnecessarily shallow and fickle.



** Daenerys Targaryen and Jon Snow's romantic relationship was rushed due to the compressed Season 7 episode count. The showrunners, writers, actors, and other characters insist from the moment these two meet that Dany and Jon are attracted to one another. Their chemistry is a point of divide among the fandom -- some feel Jon and Dany have chemistry, while others feel they lack it. Both have already been involved in serious relationships (Dany for love and politics more than once) and being royalty in a time of crisis, the two of them developing crushes on one another can come across as immature to some viewers. Now that it's been confirmed that, as many book readers surmised, Daenerys, Jon, and their eventual relationship are one of the things that the ''Song of Ice and Fire'' title refers to, their coming together to defeat the white walkers is the ultimate point of the series. As a result, their relationship is one thing which absolutely should ''not'' have been rushed and should have been handled by the showrunners more carefully.

to:

** Though their meeting was long-awaited, Daenerys Targaryen and Jon Snow's romantic relationship was ended up being rushed due to the compressed Season 7 episode count. The showrunners, writers, actors, and other characters insist interview from the moment these two meet that meet, Dany and Jon are attracted to one another. Their chemistry is a point of divide among the fandom -- some feel Jon and Dany have chemistry, while others feel they lack it. Both have already been involved in serious relationships (Dany for love and politics more than once) and being royalty in a time of crisis, the two of them developing crushes on one another can come across as immature to some viewers. Now that it's been confirmed that, as many book readers surmised, Daenerys, Jon, and their eventual relationship are one of the things that the ''Song of Ice and Fire'' title refers to, their coming together to defeat the white walkers is the ultimate point of the series. As a result, their relationship is one thing which absolutely should ''not'' have been rushed and should have been handled by the showrunners more carefully.
20th May '18 8:10:27 AM cherrychels
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Chief and Cally. After a TimeSkip of one year they go from being friends and co-workers to married. The last time they were seen interacting was when Chief smashed Cally's face in after she woke him from a suicidal dream. This one at least had some hints prior to the time skip, as Cally was clearly seen crushing on the Chief on several occassions prior to the beatdown.

to:

** Chief and Cally. After a TimeSkip of one year they go from being friends and co-workers to married. The last time they were seen interacting was when Chief smashed Cally's face in after she woke him from a suicidal dream. This one at least had some hints prior to the time skip, as Cally was clearly seen crushing on the Chief on several occassions occasions prior to the beatdown.



** Buffy and Riley had no hope right from the start. Granted, the writers ''tried'', but they tried so badly to make Riley [[ReplacementScrappy "not Angel"]] that they forgot to give him any interesting character traits of his own - or any that would make him even the slightest bit compatible with Buffy.

to:

** Buffy and Riley had no hope right from the start. Granted, the writers ''tried'', but they tried so badly to make Riley [[ReplacementScrappy "not Angel"]] that they forgot to give him any interesting character traits of his own - -- or any that would make him even the slightest bit compatible with Buffy.Buffy.



** Chandler and Monica are a perfect example of this and TropesAreNotBad. No matters what the shippers think, in the first four seasons they were not attracted to each other: they were close friends but just as close as ''anyone else in the group.'' They have a few sweet moments ("The One With The Birth", "The One With The Flashback", "The One With The Jellyfish") just like pretty much every girl/guy pairing on the show, but it was always platonic. Also, for most of season 4 they rarely have a one-to-one interaction... until the last episode when they spend a night together in London: this was the start of the Chandler/Monica era. Luckily, it was very well written and it becomes immediately popular with fans. We see their relationship gradually evolving from sexual to romantic and Chandler gradually overcoming his fear of commitment and become HappilyMarried. It helps they have great chemistry.

to:

** Chandler and Monica are a perfect example of this and TropesAreNotBad. No matters what the shippers think, in In the first four seasons they seasons, there were not attracted to each other: no evident romantic feelings between the characters, they were close friends but just as close as ''anyone else in the group.'' They have a few sweet moments ("The One With The Birth", "The One With The Flashback", "The One With The Jellyfish") just like pretty much every girl/guy pairing on the show, but it was always platonic. Also, for most of season 4 they rarely have a one-to-one interaction... until the last episode when they spend a night together in London: this was the start of the Chandler/Monica era. Luckily, it was very well written and it becomes immediately popular with fans. We see their relationship gradually evolving from sexual to romantic and Chandler gradually overcoming his fear of commitment and become HappilyMarried. It helps they have great chemistry.



** Robb Stark and Talisa Maegyr in the second and third season. The show's FourLinesAllWaiting structure meant there wasn't nearly enough time to develop a proper romance between them, yet we're still supposed to accept that, after just a few conversations, Robb is so in love with Talisa that he's willing to risk his entire war campaign falling apart to marry her. It doesn't help that, in [[Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire the source material]], Robb marrying Jeyne Westerling ([[ReplacementLoveInterest whom Talisa replaced in the show]]) had less to do with love and more to do with preserving her honor after he'd taken her virginity, and the whole relationship was portrayed as not nearly worth the problems it caused.
** Daenerys and Jon Snow are even worse. The showrunners, writers, the actors, and other characters insist from the moment these two meet that Dany and Jon are obviously already crushing on one another. The actual on-screen chemistry however is extremely lacking and even antagonistic. Not only that but both have already been involved in serious relationships (Dany for love and politics and more than once) and being royalty in a time of crisis, for the two of them to suddenly develop spontaneous crushes on one another comes across as painfully immature. This is a particularly irritating example because it's now been confirmed that, as many book readers surmised, Daenerys and Jon and their eventual relationship are one of the things that the ''Song of Ice and Fire'' title refers to and their coming together to defeat the white walkers is the ultimate point of the series. So their relationship is one thing which absolutely should ''not'' have been handled ham-fistedly.

to:

** Robb Stark and Talisa Maegyr in the second and third season. The show's FourLinesAllWaiting structure meant there wasn't nearly enough time to develop a proper romance between them, yet we're still supposed to accept that, but after just a few conversations, Robb is so in love with Talisa that he's willing to risk his entire war campaign falling apart to marry her. It doesn't help that, in [[Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire the source material]], Robb marrying Jeyne Westerling ([[ReplacementLoveInterest whom Talisa replaced in the show]]) had less to do with love and more to do with preserving her honor after he'd taken they slept together and she lost her virginity, virginity to him.
** Daenerys Targaryen
and the whole Jon Snow's romantic relationship was portrayed as not nearly worth rushed due to the problems it caused.
** Daenerys and Jon Snow are even worse.
compressed Season 7 episode count. The showrunners, writers, the actors, and other characters insist from the moment these two meet that Dany and Jon are obviously already crushing on attracted to one another. The actual on-screen Their chemistry however is extremely lacking a point of divide among the fandom -- some feel Jon and even antagonistic. Not only that but both Dany have chemistry, while others feel they lack it. Both have already been involved in serious relationships (Dany for love and politics and more than once) and being royalty in a time of crisis, for the two of them to suddenly develop spontaneous developing crushes on one another comes can come across as painfully immature. This is a particularly irritating example because immature to some viewers. Now that it's now been confirmed that, as many book readers surmised, Daenerys and Jon Daenerys, Jon, and their eventual relationship are one of the things that the ''Song of Ice and Fire'' title refers to and to, their coming together to defeat the white walkers is the ultimate point of the series. So As a result, their relationship is one thing which absolutely should ''not'' have been rushed and should have been handled ham-fistedly.by the showrunners more carefully.



* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' had Matt Parkman and Daphne in Volume 3, because Matt saw a future vision of himself married to her, and started going after her BecauseDestinySaysSo. She even asked what they had in common. Despite this, people prefer Daphne to Janice, Matt's wife/exwife/wife. Them getting back together is kind of an example because she reveals her baby is his and despite her cheating on him with his best friend, he immediately forgives her.

to:

* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' had Matt Parkman and Daphne in Volume 3, because Matt saw a future vision of himself married to her, and started going after her BecauseDestinySaysSo. She even asked what they had in common. Despite this, people prefer Daphne to Janice, Matt's wife/exwife/wife.wife/ex-wife/wife. Them getting back together is kind of an example because she reveals her baby is his and despite her cheating on him with his best friend, he immediately forgives her.



** Alfie has this with Piper, which makes sense because Piper was only on the show for three episodes. It's downplayed, in that he had originally believed she was Patricia, her twin, who he knew for years, and they had a few scenes together that showed them growing closer, which makes their short lived relationship more believable.

to:

** Alfie has this with Piper, which makes sense because Piper was only on the show for three episodes. It's downplayed, in that he had originally believed she was Patricia, her twin, who he knew for years, and they had a few scenes together that showed them growing closer, which makes their short lived short-lived relationship more believable.



** ''Megaforce''/''Super Megaforce'' has it arguably worse. Though it's shown Jake has a crush on Gia in the first season, it's an unrequited crush (also trying to be helped by the fact that their counterparts in ''Goseiger'' were ''brother and sister'' and, thus, they belonged to the same clan, which derived their ground motifs and had their mechs work in tandem a lot). After that, Gia apparently shows reciprocation of his feelings, but ''doesn't even bother to tell him''. By the time ''Super'' comes around, the show was ''way'' too focused on cannibalizing the ''Gokaiger'' footage and plots it was adapting to try to make on seamless continuity between it and the previous season to focus on ''anything'' in that direction, not helped by the fact that none of ''Gokaiger's'' characters had romantic feelings for each other. By the time the finale came around, there was ''nothing'' suggesting that they were going to get together, so when Gia kisses Jake on the cheek, it comes right the hell out of nowhere, which is arguably worse than ''Samurai's'' situation, since it was given a bit of development, dropped, then picked back up at the ending of the season, where as ''Samurai'' just had it barely established, then had it dropped into the last episode.

to:

** ''Megaforce''/''Super Megaforce'' has it arguably worse. Though it's shown Jake has a crush on Gia in the first season, it's an unrequited crush (also trying to be helped by the fact that their counterparts in ''Goseiger'' were ''brother and sister'' and, thus, they belonged to the same clan, which derived their ground motifs and had their mechs work in tandem a lot). After that, Gia apparently shows reciprocation of his feelings, but ''doesn't even bother to tell him''. By the time ''Super'' comes around, the show was ''way'' too focused on cannibalizing the ''Gokaiger'' footage and plots it was adapting to try to make on seamless continuity between it and the previous season to focus on ''anything'' in that direction, not helped by the fact that none of ''Gokaiger's'' characters had romantic feelings for each other. By the time the finale came around, there was ''nothing'' suggesting that they were going to get together, so when Gia kisses Jake on the cheek, it comes right the hell out of nowhere, which is arguably worse than ''Samurai's'' situation, since it was given a bit of development, dropped, then picked back up at the ending of the season, where as whereas ''Samurai'' just had it barely established, then had it dropped into the last episode.



* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'s'' one example that's almost-universally agreed upon is the Clana (Clark and Lana) ship, which was arguably kept on way past the point of its usefulness to the plot, interfered with other plotlines that fans wanted to see, and seemed to slow down Clark's growth.

to:

* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'s'' one example that's almost-universally almost universally agreed upon is the Clana (Clark and Lana) ship, which was arguably kept on way past the point of its usefulness to the plot, interfered with other plotlines that fans wanted to see, and seemed to slow down Clark's growth.



* In ''Series/Supergirl2015,'' several relationships in Series 2 occur almost instaneously or with very little buildup, such as Winn/Lyra, J'onn/M'gann, and Kara/Mon-El. This can be justified in Winn's case due to how much of a SociallyAwkwardHero he is, but Kara, despite being angry at Mon-El, suddenly decides to forgive him and fall in love, even though his CharacterDevelopment has been spotty at best. The writers even acknowledged that they put them together to give Kara someone to fix. There was quite a bit of FanBacklash, especially since Kara had spent all of Season 1 building up to a relationship with James Olsen, which had been overall better received, but is dumped quickly so that she can fall for Mon-El, and seemingly for no good reason. James himself goes OutOfFocus for much of the rest of the season, making it even worse.

to:

* In ''Series/Supergirl2015,'' several relationships in Series 2 occur almost instaneously instantaneously or with very little buildup, such as Winn/Lyra, J'onn/M'gann, and Kara/Mon-El. This can be justified in Winn's case due to how much of a SociallyAwkwardHero he is, but Kara, despite being angry at Mon-El, suddenly decides to forgive him and fall in love, even though his CharacterDevelopment has been spotty at best. The writers even acknowledged that they put them together to give Kara someone to fix. There was quite a bit of FanBacklash, especially since Kara had spent all of Season 1 building up to a relationship with James Olsen, which had been overall better received, but is dumped quickly so that she can fall for Mon-El, and seemingly for no good reason. James himself goes OutOfFocus for much of the rest of the season, making it even worse.
14th May '18 8:11:43 PM MBG159
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Vegeta and Bulma actually became a fan favorite relationship partly due to this trope. The romantic competition (poor Yamcha) was dumped so suddenly, and the sudden hook up was so unlikely (they had barely spoken, and he had killed her boyfriend and many of her friends) that it ended up being hilarious. It helps that they didn't actually get legally married - they just hooked up and had a kid together, and it took a while for their relationship to become an actual loving one.

to:

** Vegeta and Bulma actually became a fan favorite relationship partly due to this trope. The romantic competition (poor Yamcha) was dumped so suddenly, and the sudden hook up was so unlikely (they had barely spoken, and he had killed her boyfriend and many of her friends) that it ended up being hilarious.hilarious, and [[FanficFuel left a lot of space for people to make stuff up]]. It helps that they didn't actually get legally married - they just hooked up and had a kid together, and it took a while for their relationship to become an actual loving one.
12th May '18 12:45:33 PM DrOO7
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/BlueBloods'': A rare positive example with Jamie and Edie, who ''get engaged'' after a NearDeathExperience finally makes them acknowledge their feelings for each other, opting to skip over all that pesky dating. Which actually makes sense, as they've been friends and partners for years and don't really need to date, as they already know everything about each other.
10th May '18 5:44:48 AM catmuto
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'': Season 1 was only twelve episodes, with no others originally planned, and had to introduce and conclude a complicated plot about FantasticRacism and a war against {{Well Intentioned Extremist}}s. A romance plot would inevitably have been bereft of necessary screentime to begin with, but then the writers decided to tack on a love ''quadrangle'' seemingly just for the hell of it. The end result is that ''all'' the attractions and romances were rushed, forced, glossed over, [[ShowDontTell told instead of shown]], or quickly buried. The ambiguity of whether Mako and Asami broke up during the season or whether or not Bolin was over Korra didn't help matters. Subverted in Season 2, [[spoiler:where Korra and Mako's personalities clash resulting in Mako breaking up with Korra. And by the end of the season, both accept that a romantic relationship between them won't work and end it for good]]. A Season 4 BreatherEpisode is partially devoted to [[SelfDeprecation mocking how poorly it went]], with Mako's friends and relatives pointing out to him how badly he screwed things up as he tells the sordid story.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'': ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra''
**
Season 1 was only twelve episodes, with no others originally planned, and had to introduce and conclude a complicated plot about FantasticRacism and a war against {{Well Intentioned Extremist}}s. A romance plot would inevitably have been bereft of necessary screentime to begin with, but then the writers decided to tack on a love ''quadrangle'' seemingly just for the hell of it. The end result is that ''all'' the attractions and romances were rushed, forced, glossed over, [[ShowDontTell told instead of shown]], or quickly buried. The ambiguity of whether Mako and Asami broke up during the season or whether or not Bolin was over Korra didn't help matters. Subverted in Season 2, [[spoiler:where Korra and Mako's personalities clash resulting in Mako breaking up with Korra. And by the end of the season, both accept that a romantic relationship between them won't work and end it for good]]. A Season 4 BreatherEpisode is partially devoted to [[SelfDeprecation mocking how poorly it went]], with Mako's friends and relatives pointing out to him how badly he screwed things up as he tells the sordid story.story.
** The official partner for Korra turning out to be [[spoiler:Asami]] can appear like this. They had a relationship that altered over the course of three seasons, starting off as being mere acquaintances [[spoiler:and romantic rivals]], but eventually developed a deep friendship with another. Come the last few minutes of the series finale, the two of them head off to the spirit realm while holding hands, their status as OfficialCouple sealed with WordOfGod later on. The oddness of the couple likely stems from the fact that the third and fourth season had a TimeSkip, so viewers are led to believe that anything that pushed [[spoiler:Asami and Korra]] to see each other in a romantic light to have occured off-screen during that time.
29th Apr '18 3:55:22 PM MasterFuzzy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Martha Jones and Mickey Smith, two characters who before "Journey's End" had never even met, and had only been onscreen together in the scene where ''everybody from the new series ever'' flies the TARDIS, are shown in their "happy ending" vignette in "The End of Time" as a married couple, freelancers, and fighting a Sontaran. This is despite the fact that Martha had been shown to be engaged in a previous appearance (though her fiancé never showed up). It ends up looking like a bad case of PairTheSpares, and an even worse case of the TokenMinorityCouple.
** In their early days, River and Eleven fell into this trope for some fans due to the main gimmick of their relationship being that [[HaveWeMetYet they meet in the wrong order and therefore one tends to gain affection as the other loses it]]. Post-"The Wedding of River Song" they were on the same wavelength, alleviating this aspect of their relationship.

to:

** Martha Jones and Mickey Smith, two characters who before "Journey's End" had never even met, and had only been onscreen together in the scene where ''everybody from the new series ever'' flies the TARDIS, are shown in their "happy ending" vignette in "The End of Time" Time"[[note]] a story about a year later in-universe, assuming that time travel isn't involved[[/note]] as a married couple, freelancers, and fighting a Sontaran. This is despite the fact that Martha had been shown to be engaged in a previous appearance (though her fiancé never showed up). It ends up looking like a bad case of PairTheSpares, and an even worse case of the TokenMinorityCouple.
** In their early days, River and Eleven fell into this trope for some fans due to the main gimmick of their relationship being that [[HaveWeMetYet they meet
TokenMinorityCouple-or, in the wrong order and therefore one tends to gain affection as best case scenario, the other loses it]]. Post-"The Wedding of River Song" they were on the same wavelength, alleviating this aspect of their relationship.writer just flat-out forgetting about things.



** The Twelfth Doctor and River Song are sometimes criticized as undergoing this due to the "wrong time in the narrative" issue. In the 2015 ChristmasEpisode "The Husbands of River Song", it's revealed that River Song still had doubts that the Doctor truly loved her, not thinking it was in his nature; the story also did a {{Retcon}} of the Eleven-era short "Last Night" ([[spoiler: Eleven didn't take her to the Singing Towers after all]]). Twelve doesn't hide his attraction to her, and the ending of this story reveals [[spoiler: Twelve was with River at the Singing Towers, and the "night" they spent there lasted twenty-four years, effectively making him her "true" husband]]. The problem with this is that "Husbands" aired just ''three weeks'' after the tragic three-part Series 9 finale that saw his long and well-established relationship with Clara Oswald come to a sad end, and many fans felt it was too soon for him to be so attracted to another even with his previous selves' established history with River. In Twelve's defense, however, 1) his relationship with Clara was codependently toxic by the end and they were forced to realize it was doing everyone more harm than good (after all, he [[spoiler: risked the space-time continuum to undo her death]]), and 2) he [[spoiler: was effectively mind-wiped of his love for her]], so he wasn't brooding (much) over its dissolution by the time he met River again. Also, the ExpandedUniverse went on to establish he traveled on his own or with CanonForeigner companions for quite a while between "Hell Bent" and "Husbands", again giving him time to move beyond Clara.

to:

** The Twelfth In their early days, River and the Doctor and River Song are sometimes criticized as undergoing fell into this trope for some fans due to the "wrong time main gimmick of their relationship being that [[HaveWeMetYet they meet in the narrative" issue. In wrong order and therefore one tends to gain affection as the other loses it]]. Post-"The Wedding of River Song" they were on the same wavelength, alleviating this aspect of their relationship. However, in the 2015 ChristmasEpisode "The Husbands of River Song", it's revealed that River Song still had doubts that the Doctor truly loved her, not thinking it was in his nature; the story also did a {{Retcon}} of the Eleven-era short "Last Night" ([[spoiler: Eleven didn't take her to the Singing Towers after all]]). Twelve doesn't hide his attraction to her, and the ending of this story reveals [[spoiler: Twelve was with River at the Singing Towers, and the "night" they spent there lasted twenty-four years, effectively making him her "true" husband]]. husband]].
**
The problem with this is that "Husbands" aired just ''three weeks'' after the tragic three-part Series 9 finale that saw his long and well-established relationship with Clara Oswald come to a sad end, and many fans felt it was too soon for him to be so attracted to another even with his previous selves' established history with River. In Twelve's defense, however, 1) his relationship with Clara was codependently toxic by the end and they were forced to realize it was doing everyone more harm than good (after all, he [[spoiler: risked the space-time continuum to undo her death]]), and 2) he [[spoiler: was effectively mind-wiped of his love for her]], so he wasn't brooding (much) over its dissolution by the time he met River again. Also, the ExpandedUniverse went on to establish he traveled on his own or with CanonForeigner companions for quite a while between "Hell Bent" and "Husbands", again giving him time to move beyond Clara.


Added DiffLines:

* In ''Series/Supergirl2015,'' several relationships in Series 2 occur almost instaneously or with very little buildup, such as Winn/Lyra, J'onn/M'gann, and Kara/Mon-El. This can be justified in Winn's case due to how much of a SociallyAwkwardHero he is, but Kara, despite being angry at Mon-El, suddenly decides to forgive him and fall in love, even though his CharacterDevelopment has been spotty at best. The writers even acknowledged that they put them together to give Kara someone to fix. There was quite a bit of FanBacklash, especially since Kara had spent all of Season 1 building up to a relationship with James Olsen, which had been overall better received, but is dumped quickly so that she can fall for Mon-El, and seemingly for no good reason. James himself goes OutOfFocus for much of the rest of the season, making it even worse.
29th Apr '18 10:43:51 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Thumbelina}}'' has a definite example of this trope with respect to the main character and her love interest Prince Cornelius. They only spent one night together flying around in the starlit sky and singing about how much they loved each other. This is made even more poignant when you take into account that the night they did all that was the night they met for the very first time.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Thumbelina}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Thumbelina|1994}}'' has a definite example of this trope with respect to the main character and her love interest Prince Cornelius. They only spent one night together flying around in the starlit sky and singing about how much they loved each other. This is made even more poignant when you take into account that the night they did all that was the night they met for the very first time.
26th Apr '18 3:51:44 PM sanfranman91
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''Anime/DarlingInTheFranxx'', Hiro and 02 have known each other for about a week before the power of their love cures [[spoiler:Hiro]]'s cancer. Admittedly, SuperpowerfulGenetics helped, but the guy was coughing up blood before his LoveEpiphany somehow made the tumor recede within ''seconds''. Then he got up and defeated a klaxosaur ten times his size. In a series otherwise completely devoid of magic, this development came off as [[{{Asspull}} implausible]] and saccharine.
12th Apr '18 11:29:39 AM Sapphirea2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Twelfth Doctor and River Song are sometimes criticized as undergoing this due to the "wrong time in the narrative" issue. In the 2015 ChristmasEpisode "The Husbands of River Song", it's revealed that River Song still had doubts that the Doctor truly loved her, not thinking it was in his nature; the story also did a {{Retcon}} of the Eleven-era short "Last Night" ([[spoiler: Eleven didn't take her to the Singing Towers after all]]). Twelve doesn't hide his attraction to her, and the ending of this story reveals [[spoiler: Twelve was with River at the Singing Towers, and the "night" they spent there lasted twenty-four years, effectively making him her "true" husband]]. The problem with this is that "Husbands" aired just ''three weeks'' after the tragic, three-part Series 9 finale that saw his long and well-established relationship with Clara Oswald come to a sad end, and many fans felt it was too soon for him to be so attracted to another even with his previous selves' established history with River. In Twelve's defense, however, 1) his relationship with Clara was codependently toxic by the end, and 2) he [[spoiler: was effectively mind-wiped of his love for her]], so he wasn't brooding (much) over its dissolution by the time he met River again.

to:

** The Twelfth Doctor and River Song are sometimes criticized as undergoing this due to the "wrong time in the narrative" issue. In the 2015 ChristmasEpisode "The Husbands of River Song", it's revealed that River Song still had doubts that the Doctor truly loved her, not thinking it was in his nature; the story also did a {{Retcon}} of the Eleven-era short "Last Night" ([[spoiler: Eleven didn't take her to the Singing Towers after all]]). Twelve doesn't hide his attraction to her, and the ending of this story reveals [[spoiler: Twelve was with River at the Singing Towers, and the "night" they spent there lasted twenty-four years, effectively making him her "true" husband]]. The problem with this is that "Husbands" aired just ''three weeks'' after the tragic, tragic three-part Series 9 finale that saw his long and well-established relationship with Clara Oswald come to a sad end, and many fans felt it was too soon for him to be so attracted to another even with his previous selves' established history with River. In Twelve's defense, however, 1) his relationship with Clara was codependently toxic by the end, end and they were forced to realize it was doing everyone more harm than good (after all, he [[spoiler: risked the space-time continuum to undo her death]]), and 2) he [[spoiler: was effectively mind-wiped of his love for her]], so he wasn't brooding (much) over its dissolution by the time he met River again.again. Also, the ExpandedUniverse went on to establish he traveled on his own or with CanonForeigner companions for quite a while between "Hell Bent" and "Husbands", again giving him time to move beyond Clara.
This list shows the last 10 events of 811. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.StrangledByTheRedString