History Main / StrangersOnATrainPlotMurder

15th Jul '17 5:05:28 PM RighteousFury
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A non-lethal version of the trope exists on sitcoms, in which two characters who can't bring themselves to tell loved ones something that will hurt them will swap duties thinking it will be less painful coming from the other character. A similarly non-lethal ([[AlwaysMurder or at least "non-lethal" at first]]) variation is people exploiting their apparent lack of connection to get alibis for crimes like insider trading. Another variation can come in {{Villain Team Up}}s where the villains in question belong to two separate heroes' {{Rogues Gallery}}s.

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A non-lethal version of the trope exists on sitcoms, in which two characters who can't bring themselves to tell loved ones something that will hurt them will swap duties thinking it will be less painful coming from the other character. A similarly non-lethal ([[AlwaysMurder or at least "non-lethal" at first]]) variation is people exploiting their apparent lack of connection to get alibis for crimes like insider trading. Another variation can come in {{Villain Team Up}}s [[VillainTeamUp Villain Team-Ups]] where the villains in question belong to two separate heroes' {{Rogues Gallery}}s.
[[RoguesGallery Rogues Galleries]].
15th Jul '17 5:01:20 PM RighteousFury
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A non-lethal version of the trope exists on sitcoms, in which two characters who can't bring themselves to tell loved ones something that will hurt them will swap duties thinking it will be less painful coming from the other character. A similarly non-lethal ([[AlwaysMurder or at least "non-lethal" at first]]) variation is people exploiting their apparent lack of connection to get alibis for crimes like insider trading. Another variation can come in {{Villain Team-Up}}s where the villains in question belong to two separate heroes' {{Rogues Gallery}}s.

to:

A non-lethal version of the trope exists on sitcoms, in which two characters who can't bring themselves to tell loved ones something that will hurt them will swap duties thinking it will be less painful coming from the other character. A similarly non-lethal ([[AlwaysMurder or at least "non-lethal" at first]]) variation is people exploiting their apparent lack of connection to get alibis for crimes like insider trading. Another variation can come in {{Villain Team-Up}}s Team Up}}s where the villains in question belong to two separate heroes' {{Rogues Gallery}}s.
15th Jul '17 5:00:56 PM RighteousFury
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A non-lethal version of the trope exists on sitcoms, in which two characters who can't bring themselves to tell loved ones something that will hurt them will swap duties thinking it will be less painful coming from the other character. A similarly non-lethal ([[AlwaysMurder or at least "non-lethal" at first]]) variation is people exploiting their apparent lack of connection to get alibis for crimes like insider trading.

to:

A non-lethal version of the trope exists on sitcoms, in which two characters who can't bring themselves to tell loved ones something that will hurt them will swap duties thinking it will be less painful coming from the other character. A similarly non-lethal ([[AlwaysMurder or at least "non-lethal" at first]]) variation is people exploiting their apparent lack of connection to get alibis for crimes like insider trading.
trading. Another variation can come in {{Villain Team-Up}}s where the villains in question belong to two separate heroes' {{Rogues Gallery}}s.
16th May '17 4:32:59 AM foxley
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* ''Series/{{Motive}}'': The murder in "Undertow" turns out to be a case of this. However, the second man gets cold feet and cannot go through with his part of the bargain.
10th Apr '17 12:08:26 PM marcoasalazarm
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A non-lethal version of the trope exists on sitcoms, in which two characters who can't bring themselves to tell loved ones something that will hurt them will swap duties thinking it will be less painful coming from the other character.

to:

A non-lethal version of the trope exists on sitcoms, in which two characters who can't bring themselves to tell loved ones something that will hurt them will swap duties thinking it will be less painful coming from the other character.
character. A similarly non-lethal ([[AlwaysMurder or at least "non-lethal" at first]]) variation is people exploiting their apparent lack of connection to get alibis for crimes like insider trading.
31st Mar '17 9:38:14 AM Gosicrystal
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31st Mar '17 9:37:22 AM Gosicrystal
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[[folder:Anime & Manga]]
* ''Manga/DetectiveConan'' has a filler episode in which this is used as the plot.
[[/folder]]

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[[folder:Anime %%[[folder:Anime & Manga]]
* %%* ''Manga/DetectiveConan'' has a filler episode in which this is used as the plot.
[[/folder]]
%%[[/folder]]



* ''Film/TheStrangeViceOfMrsWard''. They also employ a third accomplice though.

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* %%* ''Film/TheStrangeViceOfMrsWard''. They also employ a third accomplice though.accomplice.



* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' episode "The Inside Man," it was Strangers on a Commuter Train... although the crime was insider trading rather than murder, at least to start with.
** And [[GenreSavvy Tony]] explicitly draws the connection to the TropeNamer.
** Interestingly, this one, and the above ''Castle'' incidence originally aired within the same two-week timespan, if memory serves.
** The episode "Alibi" has this again with Strangers at an AA Meeting. In fact, the suspect in a hit-and-run tries to alibi out to his attorney by explaining that he was [[spoiler:stabbing a guy to death in another town during the hit-and-run]], and she can't tell anyone due to the attorney-client privilege (she still finds a way to leave a hint for Gibbs).

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* ''Series/{{NCIS}}'':
**
In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' episode "The Inside Man," Man", it was Strangers on a Commuter Train... although the crime was insider trading rather than murder, at least to start with.
** And [[GenreSavvy Tony]] explicitly draws the connection to the TropeNamer.
** Interestingly, this one, and the above ''Castle'' incidence originally aired within the same two-week timespan, if memory serves.
** The episode "Alibi" has this again with Strangers at an AA Meeting. In fact, the suspect in a hit-and-run tries to alibi out to his attorney by explaining that he was [[spoiler:stabbing a guy to death in another town during the hit-and-run]], and she can't tell anyone due to the attorney-client privilege (she still finds a way to leave a hint for Gibbs).



* ''Series/{{Bones}}'' did a three way "[[NewMediaAreEvil Strangers on the Internet]]" version of this once [[spoiler: in "The Bodies in the Book"]].
* ''Series/LawAndOrder'': "C.O.D." has Strangers in a Coffee Shop.
* ''Series/DueSouth'' does a version with one murder in Chicago and the other in Toronto.

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* ''Series/{{Bones}}'' did a three way "[[NewMediaAreEvil Strangers on the Internet]]" version of this once [[spoiler: in [[spoiler:in "The Bodies in the Book"]].
* %%* ''Series/LawAndOrder'': "C.O.D." has Strangers in a Coffee Shop.
* %%* ''Series/DueSouth'' does a version with one murder in Chicago and the other in Toronto.



* An episode of ''Series/{{Supertrain}}'' did a literal "Strangers on a Train" [[strike: rip-off]] homage with Creator/DickVanDyke as the psycho.
** Creator/DickVanDyke also subverted this trope in an episode of ''Series/DiagnosisMurder''. A deranged psychiatrist killed a hospital administrator who was going to recommend that Dr. Sloan(Van Dyke) be dismissed from Community General when he protested her bone-deep budget cut recommendations. The psychiatrist then called up Dr. Sloan and told him, "Now you owe me a favor." Dr. Sloan refused to play along.

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* An episode of ''Series/{{Supertrain}}'' did a literal "Strangers on a Train" [[strike: rip-off]] homage with Creator/DickVanDyke as the psycho.
** * Creator/DickVanDyke also subverted this trope in an episode of ''Series/DiagnosisMurder''. A deranged psychiatrist killed a hospital administrator who was going to recommend that Dr. Sloan(Van Dyke) be dismissed from Community General when he protested her bone-deep budget cut recommendations. The psychiatrist then called up Dr. Sloan and told him, "Now you owe me a favor." Dr. Sloan refused to play along.
11th Mar '17 9:31:38 AM nombretomado
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* ''{{Fillmore}}'' had an episode where it looked like a vigilante was [[BullyHunter going after bullies]]. It turned out that the victims of various bullies had decided to fight back, but they swapped targets so that each of them would have an alibi when the bully they had reason to hate was targeted.

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* ''{{Fillmore}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Fillmore}}'' had an episode where it looked like a vigilante was [[BullyHunter going after bullies]]. It turned out that the victims of various bullies had decided to fight back, but they swapped targets so that each of them would have an alibi when the bully they had reason to hate was targeted.
20th Oct '16 11:49:50 AM benda
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* ''Film/TheStrangeViceOfMrsWard''. They also employ a third accomplice though.
27th Aug '16 12:09:21 PM RighteousFury
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* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Hercules}}'' {{Crossover}} episode with ''WesternAnimation/AladdinTheSeries'' had Jafar and Hades try this at first to deal with Herc and Al. Once it became clear that Hercules' strength was enough to overpower Jafar's sorcery and Genie [[CurbStompBattle one-shotted]] Pain and Panic, Jafar suggests a LetsYouAndHimFight scenario instead.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.StrangersOnATrainPlotMurder