History Main / StrangeSyntaxSpeaker

17th May '17 8:38:33 PM AthenaBlue
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** In one episode of ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'', Yoda uses a JediMindTrick to get one of Padme's guards to agree with him. [[CrowningMomentOfFunny Hysterically, this leads to the guard talking in the same way as him]]. Padme sees right through it, but goes along with it.
** In the prequels, [[TheScrappy Jar Jar Binks]], and to a lesser extent the other Gungans, speaks a pidgin Galactic Basic that involves [[HulkSpeak dropping articles such as "the" and using "me" in place of "I"]] and adding random syllables to otherwise standard words ("meesa" instead of "I am," "looky" to mean "look," etc.). As the Gungans were widely interpreted as {{expies}} of people of recent African descent or indigenous peoples in general, this was rife with UnfortunateImplications.

to:

** In one episode of ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'', Yoda uses a JediMindTrick to get one of Padme's Padmé's guards to agree with him. [[CrowningMomentOfFunny Hysterically, this leads to the guard talking in the same way as him]]. Padme Padmé sees right through it, but goes along with it.
** In the prequels, [[TheScrappy Jar Jar Binks]], and to a lesser extent the other Gungans, speaks a pidgin Galactic Basic that involves [[HulkSpeak dropping articles such as "the" and using "me" in place of "I"]] and adding random syllables to otherwise standard words ("meesa" instead of "I am," am", "looky" to mean "look," "look", etc.). As the Gungans were widely interpreted as {{expies}} of people of recent African descent or indigenous peoples in general, this was rife with UnfortunateImplications.



* Jeanne from Charles Baxter's ''Shadow Play'' invents her own language, with words like "corilineal", "zarklike", "descorbitant", "housarara". And it's just a small part of her {{Cloudcuckoolander}} madness.
* Abigail from ''[[Literature/GlovesOfVirtue Gloves of Virtue]]'', yet another {{Cloudcuckoolander}}.
* The aliens in Creator/TheodoreSturgeon's novella "The [Widget], the [Wadget], and Boff" use this in written form. It's implied that the words in brackets represent alternative translations of alien words that have more than one common meaning, or nonsense words for concepts inherently untranslatable. The alternatives are often hilariously incompatible, like [escape|die].
* NewSpeak, from George Orwell's ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'', uses strange syntax in an effort to simplify the language and reduce the number of words. However, most of the novel is written in standard English, or "Oldspeak."
* The teens from ''Literature/AClockworkOrange'' speak Nadsat, which includes Cockney rhyming slang, Anglicized Russian and German words, and a generally unsual syntax, such as Dim's assertion, "Bedways is rightways now..."
--> '''Alex''': There was me, that is Alex, and my three [[FutureSlang droogs]], that is Pete, Georgie, and Dim, [[ShapedLikeItself Dim being really dim]], and we sat in the Korova Milkbar making up our rassoodocks what to do with the evening, [[ConLang a flip dark chill winter bastard]] though dry.
* ''Literature/FinnegansWake''.
-->"Behove this sound of Irish sense. Really? Here English might be seen. Royally? One sovereign punned to petery pence. Regally? The silence speaks the scene. Fake!"

to:

* Jeanne from Charles Baxter's ''Shadow Play'' invents her own language, with words like "corilineal", "zarklike", "descorbitant", "housarara". And it's just a small part of her {{Cloudcuckoolander}} madness.
* Abigail from ''[[Literature/GlovesOfVirtue Gloves of Virtue]]'', yet another {{Cloudcuckoolander}}.
* The aliens in Creator/TheodoreSturgeon's novella "The [Widget], the [Wadget], and Boff" use this in written form. It's implied that the words in brackets represent alternative translations of alien words that have more than one common meaning, or nonsense words for concepts inherently untranslatable. The alternatives are often hilariously incompatible, like [escape|die].
* NewSpeak,
{{Newspeak}}, from George Orwell's ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'', uses strange syntax in an effort to simplify the language and reduce the number of words. However, most of the novel is written in standard English, or "Oldspeak."
"Oldspeak".
* The teens from ''Literature/AClockworkOrange'' ''Literature/Babel17'' by Creator/SamuelRDelany, a novel that's all about language, a privateer, called Butcher, never uses the words "I" or "you". Which is strange to start with, but when Wong, the language expert, is intrigued, and decides to try and help him with this problem, the results are, at first, truly strange, as Butcher struggles to figure out how to use these words properly.
* Creator/AnthonyBoucher's story "Barrier" has an entire future society that speaks "Farthingized" English, named after the author of the (in-story) book "This Bees English". All irregular verb forms have been eliminated, as have articles, and pronouns no longer indicate case. Same thing haves happened to other remaining major languages. It bees actually illegal to
speak Nadsat, which includes Cockney rhyming slang, Anglicized Russian and German words, and a generally unsual syntax, such as Dim's assertion, "Bedways is rightways now..."
--> '''Alex''': There was me, that is Alex, and my three [[FutureSlang droogs]], that is Pete, Georgie, and Dim, [[ShapedLikeItself Dim being really dim]], and we sat
irregular English, enforced by police ("Stappers", from "Gestapo" ... story beed written in the Korova Milkbar making up our rassoodocks what to do with the evening, [[ConLang a flip dark chill winter bastard]] though dry.
* ''Literature/FinnegansWake''.
-->"Behove this sound of Irish sense. Really? Here
1942).
** Farthingized
English might be seen. Royally? One sovereign punned to petery pence. Regally? The silence speaks is odd but comprehensible, unlike that of the scene. Fake!"Venusian from the far future whose society has painstakingly excavated scraps of literature from ruins and reconstructed "langue Earthly" without realizing that that the scraps are not all from a single language.



* The teens from ''Literature/AClockworkOrange'' speak Nadsat, which includes Cockney rhyming slang, Anglicized Russian and German words, and a generally unusual syntax, such as Dim's assertion, "Bedways is rightways now..."
-->'''Alex''': There was me, that is Alex, and my three [[FutureSlang droogs]], that is Pete, Georgie, and Dim, [[ShapedLikeItself Dim being really dim]], and we sat in the Korova Milkbar making up our rassoodocks what to do with the evening, [[ConLang a flip dark chill winter bastard]] though dry.
* The Trofts from ''Literature/TheCobraTrilogy''. [The noun, they place it first].
* ''Literature/TheCrownJewels'' by Walter Jon Williams has Count Quik, a Troxan, whose species seems to have difficulty with both Human and Kholasi languages. When he first meets Drake, he explains, "On unbusiness I am inning this system. Humanity is me interested. I big tour taking am. Am on Earth big finishing, acquaintance making."
* In Creator/KurtVonnegut's ''Deadeye Dick'', Haitian Creole is said to only have a present tense, leading to some very odd grammar. Of course, it's implied that the Haitians simply don't bother trying to teach the American proper grammar.
-->"He is dead?" he said in Creole. "He is dead," I agreed. "What does he do?" he said. "He paints," I said. "I like him," he said.
* The first book from the {{Literature/Eisenhorn}} trilogy gave us the alien Saruthi, who did this when they spoke [[strike:English]] Gothic. Ironically, that was probably the [[StarfishAliens least strange]] thing about [[EldritchAbomination them]].
* ''Literature/FinnegansWake''.
-->"Behove this sound of Irish sense. Really? Here English might be seen. Royally? One sovereign punned to petery pence. Regally? The silence speaks the scene. Fake!"
* Abigail from ''[[Literature/GlovesOfVirtue Gloves of Virtue]]'', yet another {{Cloudcuckoolander}}.



* The Chur, from Katherine Kerr's ''Snare'', typically speak at a frequency so low humans can't hear it, but can speak human languages if they strain. When doing so they use then-now-next strange grammar, including giving verbs a suffix indicating time ("they say-then", "we go-soon"), and presenting alternatives when asking a question or when uncertain ("We know-not if you lie not lie", "You understand not-understand?").
** Interestingly, the last two examples are very similar to how a native Mandarin speaker would speak English, since that is almost exactly the way it is said in Mandarin ("we not know" rather than "we know-not").
* Mr [[ConMan Jingle]] in ''Literature/ThePickwickPapers'' - strangely incoherent speech - talks like a telegram - rum fellow - very.
* Creator/TerryPratchett:
** Both Foul Ole Ron in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels and Mrs Tachyon in ''[[Literature/JohnnyMaxwellTrilogy Johnny and the Bomb]]'' speak in nonsense phrases, a favorite being "Millenium hand and shrimp". Whether their mutterings actually have a coherent underlying syntax is undetermined, though Gaspode (Ron's talking dog) clearly understands him. 'Millenium hand and shrimp' itself apparently came from a Chinese food menu and the lyrics to "[[Music/{{Flood}} Particle Man]]" in a random word selector.
** In ''Discworld/{{Sourcery}}'', the captain of the ship that carries Rincewind and Conina to Al-Khali talks like a less-educated version of Yoda.
* Mannie in ''Literature/TheMoonIsAHarshMistress'' speaks (and narrates the entire novel) without using articles or other "nulls" (what he considers meaningless words), as well as Russian and Australian slang. This is justified by both the fact that the Russian language lacks articles, and the People's Republic of China in this future now has an empire which includes both Australia and much of the Asian part of the Soviet Union, and has shipped a lot of 'undesirables' off to the moon. Mannie, being a native "Loonie," has ancestry from both on both sides, and has picked up shards of every language sent to Luna.
* Most aliens in ''Literature/{{Retief}}'' speak in odd ways.
** The example of the Groaci. To begin all sentences with either abstract nouns or verbs in the infinitive.
* A peripheral alien character in the ''Literature/StarTrekTitan'' series of books started out speaking in mangled syntax (which makes no sense; as a Starfleet officer, he would have a universal translator). He's since stopped doing that.



* In KurtVonnegut's ''Deadeye Dick'', Haitian Creole is said to only have a present tense, leading to some very odd grammar. Of course, it's implied that the Haitians simply don't bother trying to teach the American proper grammar.
-->"He is dead?" he said in Creole. "He is dead," I agreed. "What does he do?" he said. "He paints," I said. "I like him," he said.
* The cockroaches from ''Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles'' tend to mix up verb and subject placement as well as using repetition of certain sentence elements, such as "Do it, I can, do it," or "be small Human, be?"
* The first book from the {{Literature/Eisenhorn}} trilogy gave us the alien Saruthi, who did this when they spoke [[strike:English]] Gothic. Ironically, that was probably the [[StarfishAliens least strange]] thing about [[EldritchAbomination them]]
* In ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'', everyone raised in Illian uses "do be" instead of conjugating "is."
** Taraboners often state everything as questions, yes?

to:

* In KurtVonnegut's ''Deadeye Dick'', Haitian Creole is said to only have a present tense, leading to some very odd grammar. Of course, it's implied that ''Literature/KushielsLegacy'': the Haitians simply don't bother trying to teach the American proper grammar.
-->"He is dead?" he said in Creole. "He is dead," I agreed. "What does he do?" he said. "He paints," I said. "I like him," he said.
* The cockroaches from ''Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles'' tend to mix up verb and subject placement as well as using
second book, ''Kushiel's Chosen'', gives us [[IstanbulNotConstantinople Illyrian]] pirate Kazan Atrabiades, who often ends his sentences with a repetition of certain sentence elements, such as "Do it, an earlier pronoun used. Granted, he's not speaking his native language when he does this.
-->'''Kazan:'''
I can, do it," or "be small Human, be?"
* The first book from the {{Literature/Eisenhorn}} trilogy
almost think you gave us the alien Saruthi, who did this when they spoke [[strike:English]] Gothic. Ironically, that was probably the [[StarfishAliens least strange]] an order, you. It is a good thing about [[EldritchAbomination them]]
I am a pirate, and do not heed such things, I.
* In ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'', everyone raised in Illian uses "do be" Tad Williams' ''Literature/MemorySorrowAndThorn'' gives us Binabik, whose slightly unusual speech is partly defined by an excessive use of the present participle to the exclusion of the present tense. For example, he would say "is being" instead of conjugating "is."
** Taraboners often state everything as questions, yes?
simply "is".



* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'':
** Jaqen H'ghar has an odd type of ThirdPersonPerson in which he never uses "I", but instead will use "A Man". So like instead of saying "I'm called Jaqen H'ghar" he would say "A man calls himself Jaqen H'ghar". He even seems to do something similar when referring to other people: When addressing Arya Stark, the one character he has extensive dialogue with, he will say "a girl" instead of "you". This may be because he belongs to a faction whose members give up their personal identities, although it seems more like an individual VerbalTic.
** For what it's worth, none of the others in the sect use the same syntax, nor does Jaqen once he assumes another disguise. According to ''Literature/TheWorldOfIceAndFire'', this is actually a cultural speech pattern typical to the Free City of Lorath, where Jaqen claims to hail from.
** Salladhor Saan is using the gerund form whenever the situation is calling for a verb, as well as being another ThirdPersonPerson.
* The Trofts from ''Literature/TheCobraTrilogy''. [The noun, they place it first].
* In Literature/TheSwordOfTruth, Adie never declines the verb "be". It is a trait of her home language. Others from the same land were shown to speak in a similar manner, but occasionally use ordinary grammar.

to:

* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'':
** Jaqen H'ghar has an odd type of ThirdPersonPerson
Mannie in which he never uses "I", but instead will use "A Man". So like instead of saying "I'm called Jaqen H'ghar" he would say "A man calls himself Jaqen H'ghar". He even seems to do something similar when referring to ''Literature/TheMoonIsAHarshMistress'' speaks (and narrates the entire novel) without using articles or other people: When addressing Arya Stark, the one character "nulls" (what he has extensive dialogue with, he will say "a girl" instead of "you". This may be because he belongs to a faction whose members give up their personal identities, although it seems more like an individual VerbalTic.
** For what it's worth, none of the others in the sect use the same syntax, nor does Jaqen once he assumes another disguise. According to ''Literature/TheWorldOfIceAndFire'', this is actually a cultural speech pattern typical to the Free City of Lorath, where Jaqen claims to hail from.
** Salladhor Saan is using the gerund form whenever the situation is calling for a verb,
considers meaningless words), as well as Russian and Australian slang. This is justified by both the fact that the Russian language lacks articles, and the People's Republic of China in this future now has an empire which includes both Australia and much of the Asian part of the Soviet Union, and has shipped a lot of 'undesirables' off to the moon. Mannie, being another ThirdPersonPerson.
* The Trofts
a native "Loonie", has ancestry from ''Literature/TheCobraTrilogy''. [The noun, they place it first].
both on both sides, and has picked up shards of every language sent to Luna.
* In Literature/TheSwordOfTruth, Adie never declines ''Literature/MyFamilyAndOtherAnimals'': Spiro's sentences tend to be fairly well-arranged -- well within the verb "be". It is a trait syntactical range of her home language. Others from the same land normal English -- except for pluralisation applied entirely at random. Phrases like "I remembers when you were shown to speak in a similar manner, but occasionally use ordinary grammar.fineds two thousands drachmas for dynamitings fish" are par for the course.



* ''Literature/KushielsLegacy'': the second book, Kushiel's Chosen, gives us [[IstanbulNotConstantinople Illyrian]] pirate Kazan Atrabiades, who often ends his sentences with a repetition of an earlier pronoun used. Granted, he's not speaking his native language when he does this.
-->'''Kazan:''' I almost think you gave an order, you. It is a good thing I am a pirate, and do not heed such things, I.
* ''Literature/StarCarrier'': A small example with the Agletsch, although this is more a feature of their [[TranslatorMicrobes translation devices]]. Specifically, their questions are statements with a "yes-no" added at the end. It's not much different from an English sentence ending in "isn't it?", although that implies that the Agletsch are unable to ask an open-ended question.
* In the very first regular ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'' short story, A Scandal in Bohemia, Holmes identifies the writer of a letter as German (which language has a somewhat fluid word order) by the sentence "This account of you we have from all quarters received." Holmes explains this deduction by saying that speakers of the other major European languages are, in general, not so "discourteous," in his words, to their verbs.
* ''Literature/MyFamilyAndOtherAnimals'': Spiro's sentences tend to be fairly well-arranged -- well within the syntactical range of normal English -- except for pluralisation applied entirely at random. Phrases like "I remembers when you were fineds two thousands drachmas for dynamitings fish" are par for the course.
* In the [[Franchise/StarWarsLegends Clone Wars]] novel ''Literature/{{Shatterpoint}},'' the natives of Mace Windu's homeworld Haruun Kal place the subject last -- "Go now to the jungle, I" -- when speaking Basic. When Mace, who previously visited the world as a teenager, uses what he remembers of the local language, the TranslationConvention renders his words in the same order.
* Creator/AnthonyBoucher's story "Barrier" has an entire future society that speaks "Farthingized" English, named after the author of the (in-story) book "This Bees English". All irregular verb forms have been eliminated, as have articles, and pronouns no longer indicate case. Same thing haves happened to other remaining major languages. It bees actually illegal to speak irregular English, enforced by police ("Stappers", from "Gestapo" ... story beed written in 1942).
** Farthingized English is odd but comprehensible, unlike that of the Venusian from the far future whose society has painstakingly excavated scraps of literature from ruins and reconstructed "langue Earthly" without realizing that that the scraps are not all from a single language.



* ''Literature/Babel17'' by Creator/SamuelRDelany, a novel that's all about language, a privateer, called Butcher, never uses the words "I" or "you". Which is strange to start with, but when Wong, the language expert, is intrigued, and decides to try and help him with this problem, the results are, at first, truly strange, as Butcher struggles to figure out how to use these words properly.
* ''Literature/TheCrownJewels'' by Walter Jon Williams has Count Quik, a Troxan, whose species seems to have difficulty with both Human and Kholasi languages. When he first meets Drake, he explains, "On unbusiness I am inning this system. Humanity is me interested. I big tour taking am. Am on Earth big finishing, acquaintance making."
* Tad Williams' ''Literature/MemorySorrowAndThorn'' gives us Binabik, whose slightly unusual speech is partly defined by an excessive use of the present participle to the exclusion of the present tense. For example, he would say "is being" instead of simply "is".

to:

* ''Literature/Babel17'' by Creator/SamuelRDelany, Mr. [[ConMan Jingle]] in ''Literature/ThePickwickPapers'' - strangely incoherent speech - talks like a novel that's telegram - rum fellow - very.
* Creator/TerryPratchett:
** Both Foul Ole Ron in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels and Mrs Tachyon in ''[[Literature/JohnnyMaxwellTrilogy Johnny and the Bomb]]'' speak in nonsense phrases, a favorite being "Millenium hand and shrimp". Whether their mutterings actually have a coherent underlying syntax is undetermined, though Gaspode (Ron's talking dog) clearly understands him. 'Millenium hand and shrimp' itself apparently came from a Chinese food menu and the lyrics to "[[Music/{{Flood}} Particle Man]]" in a random word selector.
** In ''Discworld/{{Sourcery}}'', the captain of the ship that carries Rincewind and Conina to Al-Khali talks like a less-educated version of Yoda.
* Most aliens in ''Literature/{{Retief}}'' speak in odd ways.
** The example of the Groaci. To begin
all about sentences with either abstract nouns or verbs in the infinitive.
* Jeanne from Charles Baxter's ''Shadow Play'' invents her own
language, with words like "corilineal", "zarklike", "descorbitant", "housarara". And it's just a privateer, called Butcher, small part of her {{Cloudcuckoolander}} madness.
* In the very first regular ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'' short story, "A Scandal in Bohemia", Holmes identifies the writer of a letter as German (which language has a somewhat fluid word order) by the sentence "This account of you we have from all quarters received." Holmes explains this deduction by saying that speakers of the other major European languages are, in general, not so "discourteous", in his words, to their verbs.
* The Chur, from Katherine Kerr's ''Snare'', typically speak at a frequency so low humans can't hear it, but can speak human languages if they strain. When doing so they use then-now-next strange grammar, including giving verbs a suffix indicating time ("they say-then", "we go-soon"), and presenting alternatives when asking a question or when uncertain ("We know-not if you lie not lie", "You understand not-understand?").
** Interestingly, the last two examples are very similar to how a native Mandarin speaker would speak English, since that is almost exactly the way it is said in Mandarin ("we not know" rather than "we know-not").
* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'':
** Jaqen H'ghar has an odd type of ThirdPersonPerson in which he
never uses "I", but instead will use "A Man". So like instead of saying "I'm called Jaqen H'ghar" he would say "A man calls himself Jaqen H'ghar". He even seems to do something similar when referring to other people: When addressing Arya Stark, the words "I" or one character he has extensive dialogue with, he will say "a girl" instead of "you". Which is strange This may be because he belongs to start with, but when Wong, the language expert, is intrigued, and decides to try and help him with this problem, the results are, at first, truly strange, as Butcher struggles to figure out how to use these words properly.
* ''Literature/TheCrownJewels'' by Walter Jon Williams has Count Quik,
a Troxan, faction whose species members give up their personal identities, although it seems more like an individual VerbalTic.
** For what it's worth, none of the others in the sect use the same syntax, nor does Jaqen once he assumes another disguise. According
to have difficulty with both Human and Kholasi languages. When he first meets Drake, he explains, "On unbusiness I am inning ''Literature/TheWorldOfIceAndFire'', this system. Humanity is me interested. I big tour taking am. Am on Earth big finishing, acquaintance making."
* Tad Williams' ''Literature/MemorySorrowAndThorn'' gives us Binabik, whose slightly unusual
actually a cultural speech is partly defined by an excessive use of the present participle pattern typical to the exclusion Free City of Lorath, where Jaqen claims to hail from.
** Salladhor Saan is using
the present tense. For example, gerund form whenever the situation is calling for a verb, as well as being another ThirdPersonPerson.
* ''Literature/StarCarrier'': A small example with the Agletsch, although this is more a feature of their [[TranslatorMicrobes translation devices]]. Specifically, their questions are statements with a "yes-no" added at the end. It's not much different from an English sentence ending in "isn't it?", although that implies that the Agletsch are unable to ask an open-ended question.
* A peripheral alien character in the ''Literature/StarTrekTitan'' series of books started out speaking in mangled syntax (which makes no sense; as a Starfleet officer,
he would say "is being" have a universal translator). He's since stopped doing that.
* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'':
** In ''Literature/{{Shatterpoint}}'', the natives of Mace Windu's homeworld Haruun Kal place the subject last -- "Go now to the jungle, I" -- when speaking Basic. When Mace, who previously visited the world as a teenager, uses what he remembers of the local language, the TranslationConvention renders his words in the same order.
* In Literature/TheSwordOfTruth, Adie never declines the verb "be". It is a trait of her home language. Others from the same land were shown to speak in a similar manner, but occasionally use ordinary grammar.
* The cockroaches from ''Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles'' tend to mix up verb and subject placement as well as using repetition of certain sentence elements, such as "Do it, I can, do it," or "be small Human, be?"
* In ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'', everyone raised in Illian uses "do be"
instead of simply "is". conjugating "is".
** Taraboners often state everything as questions, yes?
* The aliens in Creator/TheodoreSturgeon's novella "The [Widget], the [Wadget], and Boff" use this in written form. It's implied that the words in brackets represent alternative translations of alien words that have more than one common meaning, or nonsense words for concepts inherently untranslatable. The alternatives are often hilariously incompatible, like [escape|die].



-->'''The 456''': Speak.\\
'''Frobisher''': I am speaking!\\
'''The 456''': We would speak.\\
'''The 456''': Soon.\\
'''Frobisher''': I'm sorry?\\
'''The 456''': Return...soon.

to:

-->'''The 456''': 456:''' Speak.\\
'''Frobisher''': '''Frobisher:''' I am speaking!\\
'''The 456''': 456:''' We would speak.\\
'''The 456''': 456:''' Soon.\\
'''Frobisher''': '''Frobisher:''' I'm sorry?\\
'''The 456''': Return...456:''' Return... soon.



-->'''[=SpongeBob=]:''' Mr. Krabs, hello. Do you how do?
-->'''Mr. Krabs:''' Why you talking funny, lad?
-->'''[=SpongeBob=]:''' I anything can't do right since because pickles.
-->'''Mr. Krabs:''' Nonsense. You'll be back making Krabby Patties like your old self in no time.
-->'''[=SpongeBob=]:''' I think don't ready back to go to work, Mr. Krabs.

to:

-->'''[=SpongeBob=]:''' Mr. Krabs, hello. Do you how do?
-->'''Mr.
do?\\
'''Mr.
Krabs:''' Why you talking funny, lad?
-->'''[=SpongeBob=]:'''
lad?\\
'''[=SpongeBob=]:'''
I anything can't do right since because pickles.
-->'''Mr.
pickles.\\
'''Mr.
Krabs:''' Nonsense. You'll be back making Krabby Patties like your old self in no time.
-->'''[=SpongeBob=]:'''
time.\\
'''[=SpongeBob=]:'''
I think don't ready back to go to work, Mr. Krabs.



* "Milwaukeese." In some parts of Wisconsin, people will speak English using German syntax. Examples:

to:

* "Milwaukeese." "Milwaukeese". In some parts of Wisconsin, people will speak English using German syntax. Examples:



** Throwing a random 'once' into the sentence.
** Using 'by' in place of any 'preposition of spatial relation'.

to:

** Throwing a random 'once' "once" into the sentence.
** Using 'by' "by" in place of any 'preposition "preposition of spatial relation'.relation".



* English isn't unique in using "do" as a placeholder, but it's pretty darn unusual. It makes learning English somewhat confusing (among other odd features of a language that's basically a mish-mash of German, French, Celtic, and Old Norse).

to:

* English isn't unique in using "do" as a placeholder, but it's pretty darn unusual. It makes learning English somewhat confusing (among other odd features of a language that's basically a mish-mash mishmash of German, French, Celtic, Celtic and Old Norse).
14th May '17 11:40:43 PM AthenaBlue
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* ''Manga/MyBrideIsAMermaid'': Shark Fujishiro speaks as if all sentences are questions.



* Early Viz translations of ''DragonBallZ'' have Piccolo speaking in a very bizarre, [[AntiquatedLinguistics old-fashioned]] dialect until it's dropped after a couple of volumes.

to:

* Early Viz translations of ''DragonBallZ'' ''Manga/DragonBallZ'' have Piccolo speaking in a very bizarre, [[AntiquatedLinguistics old-fashioned]] dialect until it's dropped after a couple of volumes.volumes.
* ''Manga/MyBrideIsAMermaid'': Shark Fujishiro speaks as if all sentences are questions.



* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Home}}'', the Boov (especially Oh) regularly mix up tenses, verbs, nouns, and English grammar in general with phrases like "Can I come in to the out now?" and "It should to hover much better now."
* Zig Zag the Grand Vizier from ''WesternAnimation/TheThiefAndTheCobbler'' speaks entirely in rhyme. Since he's voiced by Creator/VincentPrice, it's all kinds of awesome.
--> '''Zig Zag:''' [[BadassBoast ONE mistake will suffice!!! Don't treat me lightly twice!!!]]



--->'''Wheelie:''' Friend find, look behind! You go wrong way, you fool I say.
--->'''Grimlock:''' Me Grimlock fool?
--->'''Wheelie:''' Picture you got, now fool you not!
* Zig Zag the Grand Vizier from ''WesternAnimation/TheThiefAndTheCobbler'' speaks entirely in rhyme. Since he's voiced by Creator/VincentPrice, it's all kinds of awesome.
--> '''Zig Zag:''' [[BadassBoast ONE mistake will suffice!!! Don't treat me lightly twice!!!]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Home}}'', the Boov (especially Oh) regularly mix up tenses, verbs, nouns, and English grammar in general with phrases like "Can I come in to the out now?" and "It should to hover much better now."

to:

--->'''Wheelie:''' Friend find, look behind! You go wrong way, you fool I say.
--->'''Grimlock:'''
say.\\
'''Grimlock:'''
Me Grimlock fool?
--->'''Wheelie:'''
fool?\\
'''Wheelie:'''
Picture you got, now fool you not!
* Zig Zag the Grand Vizier from ''WesternAnimation/TheThiefAndTheCobbler'' speaks entirely in rhyme. Since he's voiced by Creator/VincentPrice, it's all kinds of awesome.
--> '''Zig Zag:''' [[BadassBoast ONE mistake will suffice!!! Don't treat me lightly twice!!!]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Home}}'', the Boov (especially Oh) regularly mix up tenses, verbs, nouns, and English grammar in general with phrases like "Can I come in to the out now?" and "It should to hover much better now."
not!



* In ''Franchise/StarWars'', [[BadassGrandpa Master Yoda]] usually speaks with a [[http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/002173.html Object-Subject-Verb word order]]. A defining characteristic, his strange syntax is, and often parodied.
** He was much less rigid with this in the original trilogy, and could sometimes even turn an eloquent phrase here and there (like "Once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny!" or "do or do not, there is no try"). It mostly comes in during his first few scenes, when he's using ObfuscatingStupidity and actively screwing with Luke. In the prequels it's [[{{Flanderization}} Flanderized]] and he almost never speaks in any other order, [[SelfDemonstratingArticle regardless if horribly butchered the resulting language becomes]] ("Not if anything to say about it I have!"/"Around the survivors a perimeter create!").
** It's been speculated that Yoda's speech is essentially that of a Galactic Basic speaker from 8-900 years ago, [[FridgeBrilliance when Yoda was young]]. This would explain why the member of Yoda's species in ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', who's otherwise a Yoda {{expy}}, uses the same syntax as everyone else. If the ancient dialect is thought of as being "translated" to "modern Galactic Basic" for the convenience of the audience, then Vandar Tokare's syntax didn't stand out from that of other characters because ''everybody was using more Yoda-like syntax''.
** In one episode of the ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'', Yoda uses a JediMindTrick to get one of Padme's guards to agree with him. [[CrowningMomentOfFunny Hysterically, this leads to the guard talking in the same way as him]]. Padme sees right through it, but goes along with it.
** In the prequels, [[TheScrappy Jar Jar Binks]], and to a lesser extent the other Gungans, speaks a pidgin Galactic Basic that involves [[HulkSpeak dropping articles such as "the" and using "me" in place of "I"]] and adding random syllables to otherwise standard words ("meesa" instead of "I am," "looky" to mean "look," etc.). As the Gungans were widely interpreted as {{expies}} of people of recent African descent or indigenous peoples in general, this was rife with UnfortunateImplications.



* ''Film/VForVendetta'': V's vernacular vigilantly vexes viewers via very variant vocabulary.[[note]]'V' tends to speak in words featuring the letter V, although not exclusively.[[/note]]
-->'''Evey:''' ...Are you like, a crazy person?
-->'''V:''' I am sure they will say so.



-->'''Sheriff:''' "KING ILLEGAL FOREST TO PIG WILD KILL IN IT A IS!"
-->'''Everyone:''' "What?"
-->'''Sheriff:''' "It is illegal to kill a wild pig in the King's forest!"

to:

-->'''Sheriff:''' "KING KING ILLEGAL FOREST TO PIG WILD KILL IN IT A IS!"
-->'''Everyone:''' "What?"
-->'''Sheriff:''' "It
IS!\\
'''Everyone:''' What?\\
'''Sheriff:''' It
is illegal to kill a wild pig in the King's forest!"forest!
* ''Franchise/StarWars'': [[BadassGrandpa Master Yoda]] usually speaks with a [[http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/002173.html Object-Subject-Verb word order]]. A defining characteristic, his strange syntax is, and often parodied.
** He was much less rigid with this in the original trilogy, and could sometimes even turn an eloquent phrase here and there (like "Once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny!" or "do or do not, there is no try"). It mostly comes in during his first few scenes, when he's using ObfuscatingStupidity and actively screwing with Luke. In the prequels it's [[{{Flanderization}} Flanderized]] and he almost never speaks in any other order, [[SelfDemonstratingArticle regardless if horribly butchered the resulting language becomes]] ("Not if anything to say about it I have!"/"Around the survivors a perimeter create!").
** It's been speculated that Yoda's speech is essentially that of a Galactic Basic speaker from 8-900 years ago, [[FridgeBrilliance when Yoda was young]]. This would explain why the member of Yoda's species in ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', who's otherwise a Yoda {{expy}}, uses the same syntax as everyone else. If the ancient dialect is thought of as being "translated" to "modern Galactic Basic" for the convenience of the audience, then Vandar Tokare's syntax didn't stand out from that of other characters because ''everybody was using more Yoda-like syntax''.
** In one episode of ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'', Yoda uses a JediMindTrick to get one of Padme's guards to agree with him. [[CrowningMomentOfFunny Hysterically, this leads to the guard talking in the same way as him]]. Padme sees right through it, but goes along with it.
** In the prequels, [[TheScrappy Jar Jar Binks]], and to a lesser extent the other Gungans, speaks a pidgin Galactic Basic that involves [[HulkSpeak dropping articles such as "the" and using "me" in place of "I"]] and adding random syllables to otherwise standard words ("meesa" instead of "I am," "looky" to mean "look," etc.). As the Gungans were widely interpreted as {{expies}} of people of recent African descent or indigenous peoples in general, this was rife with UnfortunateImplications.
* ''Film/VForVendetta'': V's vernacular vigilantly vexes viewers via very variant vocabulary.[[note]]'V' tends to speak in words featuring the letter V, although not exclusively.[[/note]]
-->'''Evey:''' ...Are you like, a crazy person?\\
'''V:''' I am sure they will say so.



[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Jaqen H'ghar refers to everyone―first, second, or third person―by indefinite phrases such as "a man" or "a girl," although sometimes he suffers from OohMeAccentsSlipping such as when he says "And you pour water for one of them now. Why is this right for you and wrong for me?"

to:

[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* In "Bargaining", the first episode of Season 6 of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', the Buffybot's [[BondOneLiner punning]] still isn't working properly. When she finally stakes the vamp, she exclaims, "That'll put marzipan in your pie plate, bingo!" Perhaps it was stuck on dadaist humor.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS22E2VengeanceOnVaros "Vengeance on Varos"]], Sil has a quirky translator which results in sentences such as, "Like this Governor we do not. Replace you must arrange most soon," and "Intolerable all of this Doctor being allowed to live!"
--->'''Sil:''' You agents of Amorb are!\\
'''Peri:''' I don't know what that is or even what he says.\\
'''Governor:''' Sil's language transposer has an eccentric communication circuit. But, don't tell him, it's my only amusement.
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E11Utopia "Utopia"]], the alien Chantho begins every sentence with Chan, and ends it with Tho. Apparently, to not do this is rude, the equivalent of swearing in her language. (Compare Japanese use of ''{{keigo}}'' words such as ''desu'' or ''-masu''.) This also means that she says her name as "Chan-Chantho-Tho".
* River Tam from ''Series/{{Firefly}}.'' It's uncertain whether she's speaking from some consistent internal syntax, or her dialogue is a result of her [[IllGirl traumatic background]]. It generally sounds like she automatically says whatever pops into her head before her thoughts are finished. Simon says something to that effect in one episode.
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Jaqen H'ghar refers to everyone―first, second, or third person―by indefinite phrases such as "a man" or "a girl," girl", although sometimes he suffers from OohMeAccentsSlipping such as when he says "And you pour water for one of them now. Why is this right for you and wrong for me?"me?"
* In ''Series/{{House}} M.D.'', House once had a patient with a form of aphasia who replaced every word with a word somehow related to but separate from what he meant. The connections were fuzzy enough that they got him to correctly say yes and no, and finally figured out that [[spoiler:when he said "bear" he meant "bipolar", as in "polar bear"]]. This makes it a CurseOfBabel plot.
* Michael Harris in ''Series/{{Newhart}}'' speaks in alliteration.



* In the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Darmok," Captain Picard is stranded with an alien who speaks a language [[SpeaksInShoutOuts composed entirely of figurative phrases]]. The Universal Translator gets their ''literal'' meaning just fine, but without knowing the stories they're alluding to, it's impossible to decipher what they're actually talking about.
* River Tam from ''Series/{{Firefly}}.'' It's uncertain whether she's speaking from some consistent internal syntax, or her dialogue is a result of her [[IllGirl traumatic background]]. It generally sounds like she automatically says whatever pops into her head before her thoughts are finished. Simon says something to that effect in one episode.
* ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'' episode "Wordplay" is based on this trope. A man has an unusual experience: The people around him are suddenly using words incorrectly, ''e.g.'', saying "dinosaur" when they mean "lunch". More and more words get replaced, until other people's speech becomes complete gibberish to him. He ends up having to re-learn the meaning of words out of a children's book.
* In ''Series/{{House}} M.D.'', House once had a patient with a form of aphasia who replaced every word with a word somehow related to but separate from what he meant. The connections were fuzzy enough that they got him to correctly say yes and no, and finally figured out that [[spoiler:when he said "bear" he meant "bipolar", as in "polar bear"]]. This makes it a CurseOfBabel plot.
* In "Bargaining," the first episode of Season 6 of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', the Buffybot's [[BondOneLiner punning]] still isn't working properly. When she finally stakes the vamp, she exclaims, "That'll put marzipan in your pie plate, bingo!" Perhaps it was stuck on dadaist humor.

to:

* ''Series/StargateSG1'': Colonel Jack O'Neill does this the second time he has the [[NeglectfulPrecursors Ancients']] knowledge downloaded into his brain. Subverted in that he does it just to make fun of Daniel's lack of clarity when trying to explain what Jack has been doing.
-->'''Daniel:''' Sphere. Planet. Label. Name.\\
'''Jack:''' Following. You. Still. Not.
* In the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Darmok," "Darmok", Captain Picard is stranded with an alien who speaks a language [[SpeaksInShoutOuts composed entirely of figurative phrases]]. The Universal Translator gets their ''literal'' meaning just fine, but without knowing the stories they're alluding to, it's impossible to decipher what they're actually talking about.
* River Tam from ''Series/{{Firefly}}.'' It's uncertain whether In an episode of ''Series/{{Titus}}'', Christopher knows Erin is hiding something because, when she's speaking from some consistent internal syntax, or her dialogue is a result of her [[IllGirl traumatic background]]. It generally sounds like she automatically says whatever pops into her head before her thoughts are finished. Simon says something to that effect in one episode.
* ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'' episode "Wordplay" is based on this trope. A man has an unusual experience: The people around him are suddenly using
lying, words incorrectly, ''e.g.'', saying "dinosaur" when they mean "lunch". More and more words get replaced, until other people's speech becomes complete gibberish to him. He ends up having to re-learn the meaning of words out of a children's book.
* In ''Series/{{House}} M.D.'', House once had a patient with a form of aphasia who replaced every word with a word somehow related to but separate
not flow from what he meant. The connections were fuzzy enough her mouth good.
-->'''Erin Fitzpatrick''': Hey! Car drive not work me, everything think
that they got him to correctly say yes and no, and finally figured out that [[spoiler:when he said "bear" he meant "bipolar", as in "polar bear"]]. This makes it a CurseOfBabel plot.
* In "Bargaining," the first episode of Season 6 of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', the Buffybot's [[BondOneLiner punning]] still isn't working properly. When she finally stakes the vamp, she exclaims, "That'll put marzipan in your pie plate, bingo!" Perhaps it was stuck on dadaist humor.
solves you?\\
'''Christopher Titus''': (pause) Something from me hiding you are?



--> '''The 456''': Speak.\\

to:

--> '''The -->'''The 456''': Speak.\\



'''The 456''': We would speak.
-->'''The 456''': Soon.\\

to:

'''The 456''': We would speak.
-->'''The
speak.\\
'''The
456''': Soon.\\



* In an episode of ''Series/{{Titus}}'', Christopher knows Erin is hiding something because, when she's lying, words not flow from her mouth good.
-->'''Erin Fitzpatrick''': Hey! Car drive not work me, everything think that solves you?
-->'''Christopher Titus''': (pause) Something from me hiding you are?
* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', the alien Chantho begins every sentence with Chan, and ends it with Tho. Apparently, to not do this is rude, the equivalent of swearing in her language. (Compare Japanese use of ''{{keigo}}'' words such as ''desu'' or ''-masu''.)
** This also means that she says her name as "Chan-Chantho-Tho".
* In another ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode, "Vengeance on Varos," Sil has a quirky translator which results in sentences such as, "Like this Governor we do not. Replace you must arrange most soon," and "Intolerable all of this Doctor being allowed to live!"
-->'''Sil''': You agents of Amorb are!\\
'''Peri''': I don't know what that is or even what he says.\\
'''Governor''': Sil's language transposer has an eccentric communication circuit. But, don't tell him, it's my only amusement.
* Michael Harris in ''Series/{{Newhart}}'' speaks in alliteration.
* O'Neill from ''Series/StargateSG1'' does this the second time he has the [[NeglectfulPrecursors Ancients]]' knowledge downloaded into his brain. Subverted in that he does it just to make fun of Daniel's lack of clarity when trying to explain what Jack has been doing.
-->Daniel: Sphere. Planet. Label. Name.
-->Jack: Following. You. Still. Not.

to:

* In an ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'' episode of ''Series/{{Titus}}'', Christopher knows Erin "Wordplay" is hiding something because, when she's lying, words not flow from her mouth good.
-->'''Erin Fitzpatrick''': Hey! Car drive not work me, everything think that solves you?
-->'''Christopher Titus''': (pause) Something from me hiding you are?
* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', the alien Chantho begins every sentence with Chan, and ends it with Tho. Apparently, to not do
based on this is rude, the equivalent of swearing in her language. (Compare Japanese use of ''{{keigo}}'' words such as ''desu'' or ''-masu''.)
** This also means that she says her name as "Chan-Chantho-Tho".
* In another ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode, "Vengeance on Varos," Sil has a quirky translator which results in sentences such as, "Like this Governor we do not. Replace you must arrange most soon," and "Intolerable all of this Doctor being allowed to live!"
-->'''Sil''': You agents of Amorb are!\\
'''Peri''': I don't know what that is or even what he says.\\
'''Governor''': Sil's language transposer
trope. A man has an eccentric communication circuit. But, don't tell him, it's my only amusement.
* Michael Harris in ''Series/{{Newhart}}'' speaks in alliteration.
* O'Neill from ''Series/StargateSG1'' does this the second time he has the [[NeglectfulPrecursors Ancients]]' knowledge downloaded into his brain. Subverted in that he does it just to make fun of Daniel's lack of clarity
unusual experience: The people around him are suddenly using words incorrectly, ''e.g.'', saying "dinosaur" when trying they mean "lunch". More and more words get replaced, until other people's speech becomes complete gibberish to explain what Jack has been doing.
-->Daniel: Sphere. Planet. Label. Name.
-->Jack: Following. You. Still. Not.
him. He ends up having to re-learn the meaning of words out of a children's book.



* ''Webcomic/TerrorIsland'' applies alliteration when [[http://terrorisland.net/strips/148.html flaunting flashbacks.]]

to:

* ''Webcomic/TerrorIsland'' applies alliteration when [[http://terrorisland.net/strips/148.html flaunting flashbacks.]]Ars and the other imps, a small dragonic species, from ''Webcomic/{{Gaia}}'' [[http://www.sandraandwoo.com/gaia/2011/12/20/the-red-hall-024/ always speak in third-person, future tense]].
* Vodka from ''Webcomic/EveryButtonHurtsTheOtherGuy'' has a poor (and inconsistent) grasp of English syntax, but is exceptional in this despite his being from a comic with an international cast. Russel sometimes gets in on this too, which is especially odd considering he's one of the few native English speakers.



* In ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'', the space station manager Mister Aliss speaks in a very odd dialect characterized by using a lot of unnecessary "-ings", poor understanding of metaphors, and painfully arranged grammar (example: "You suspect? What is of the suspectings?"). From that Tagon identifies him [[spoiler:(wrongly)]] as a part of a class of diplomats raised underwater among the Celeschul native species who grew up speaking Galstandard Peroxide, the preferred language of aquatic sophonts.
** The Oafa from the "Broken Wind" arc have their own dialect, although Tagon refers to it as a form of Peroxide accent early on. It features a number of odd terms that appear to derive from common English idioms translated via [[LanguageEqualsThought the mindset of flying jellyfish creatures]] ("perambulatory limb-stretchings" instead of "stretch their legs", for example, or "underfooted" instead of "crushed underfoot"), and uses somewhat odd plural forms for verbs ("And general, thank you for the most persuasive invitings of your famously victorious son to lead it") and time units ("fifty-two of centuries").
* ''Webcomic/{{Starslip}}'': after a conversation with Mr. Jinx about how laughably simple human languages are, a fellow Cirbozoid speaks with total disregard for word order.
* [[http://www.neorice.com/aptgg_215 Lacey]] from ''Webcomic/APathToGreaterGood''. Later subverted when he no longer has to impress people and speaks normally instead.



--> '''Mungu''': mungu rather finish grammar lesson for today.
--> '''Crong''': yes, crong hope crong get to verbal conjugation before end of week.
--> '''Gok''': gok look forward to first-person pronouns.
--> '''Mungu''': capital letters intrigue mungu.

to:

--> '''Mungu''': -->'''Mungu''': mungu rather finish grammar lesson for today.
-->
today.\\
'''Crong''': yes, crong hope crong get to verbal conjugation before end of week.
-->
week.\\
'''Gok''': gok look forward to first-person pronouns.
-->
pronouns.\\
'''Mungu''': capital letters intrigue mungu.



--> '''Kikitik-27-Tikhak-Tikkukit''': Abnormality it is communication with [The Enemy Forces] when the situation is shown to be abnormal by [[[GeneralRipper The Storm-Witch]]] known to us that does not retreat when attacked which is abnormal and the existence of [The Object In Question] that cannot be obtained by direct action which is abnormal... We do not expect success of communication however there is nothing to be lost by communication when the time becomes irrevocable as it has...
* Ars and the other imps, a small dragonic species, from ''Webcomic/{{Gaia}}'' [[http://www.sandraandwoo.com/gaia/2011/12/20/the-red-hall-024/ always speak in third-person, future tense]].
* Vodka from ''Webcomic/EveryButtonHurtsTheOtherGuy'' has a poor (and inconsistent) grasp of English syntax, but is exceptional in this despite his being from a comic with an international cast. Russel sometimes gets in on this too, which is especially odd considering he's one of the few native English speakers.

to:

--> '''Kikitik-27-Tikhak-Tikkukit''': -->'''Kikitik-27-Tikhak-Tikkukit''': Abnormality it is communication with [The Enemy Forces] when the situation is shown to be abnormal by [[[GeneralRipper The Storm-Witch]]] known to us that does not retreat when attacked which is abnormal and the existence of [The Object In Question] that cannot be obtained by direct action which is abnormal... We do not expect success of communication however there is nothing to be lost by communication when the time becomes irrevocable as it has...
* Ars and the other imps, a small dragonic species, from ''Webcomic/{{Gaia}}'' [[http://www.sandraandwoo.com/gaia/2011/12/20/the-red-hall-024/ always speak in third-person, future tense]].
* Vodka
neorice.com/aptgg_215 Lacey]] from ''Webcomic/EveryButtonHurtsTheOtherGuy'' ''Webcomic/APathToGreaterGood''. Later subverted when he no longer has to impress people and speaks normally instead.
* In ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'', the space station manager Mister Aliss speaks in
a very odd dialect characterized by using a lot of unnecessary "-ings", poor (and inconsistent) grasp understanding of metaphors, and painfully arranged grammar (example: "You suspect? What is of the suspectings?"). From that Tagon identifies him [[spoiler:(wrongly)]] as a part of a class of diplomats raised underwater among the Celeschul native species who grew up speaking Galstandard Peroxide, the preferred language of aquatic sophonts.
** The Oafa from the "Broken Wind" arc have their own dialect, although Tagon refers to it as a form of Peroxide accent early on. It features a number of odd terms that appear to derive from common
English syntax, but is exceptional in this despite his being from idioms translated via [[LanguageEqualsThought the mindset of flying jellyfish creatures]] ("perambulatory limb-stretchings" instead of "stretch their legs", for example, or "underfooted" instead of "crushed underfoot"), and uses somewhat odd plural forms for verbs ("And general, thank you for the most persuasive invitings of your famously victorious son to lead it") and time units ("fifty-two of centuries").
* ''Webcomic/{{Starslip}}'': after
a comic conversation with an international cast. Russel sometimes gets in on this too, which is especially odd considering he's one of the few native English speakers.Mr. Jinx about how laughably simple human languages are, a fellow Cirbozoid speaks with total disregard for word order.
* ''Webcomic/TerrorIsland'' applies alliteration when [[http://terrorisland.net/strips/148.html flaunting flashbacks.]]



-->'''Emily:''' Little family, wedding ring, scissors. ''["My parents are getting divorced."]''
-->'''Emily's friend:''' Smiling poop, sweat droplets. ''["That's hard shit."]''
-->'''Dad:''' Adult woman face, pointy finger a-okay hand, offensive racial stereotype! So, little angel boy! ''["Your mother was sleeping with Mr. Chan! [[NeverMyFault It's not my fault!]]"]''

to:

-->'''Emily:''' Little family, wedding ring, scissors. ''["My parents are getting divorced."]''
-->'''Emily's
"]''\\
'''Emily's
friend:''' Smiling poop, sweat droplets. ''["That's hard shit."]''
-->'''Dad:'''
"]''\\
'''Dad:'''
Adult woman face, pointy finger a-okay hand, offensive racial stereotype! So, little angel boy! ''["Your mother was sleeping with Mr. Chan! [[NeverMyFault It's not my fault!]]"]''



* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/SonicSatAM'', the wizard Lazar speaks similarly to Yoda, reversing nouns and verbs.
* As established in ''WesternAnimation/TransformersTheMovie'', [[TransformersGeneration1 Junkions]] on the television series speak in odd mishmashes of television quotes.
-->'''Wreck-Gar:''' "You are in danger of being cancelled or losing your time slot!"\\
'''Ultra Magnus:''' "What'd he say?!"\\
'''Rodimus Prime:''' "We're gonna get killed."



-->'''Eddy:''' Hey, where's Double D?
-->'''Ed:''' Do not adjust your set! (''runs after Edd'')

to:

-->'''Eddy:''' Hey, where's Double D?
-->'''Ed:'''
D?\\
'''Ed:'''
Do not adjust your set! (''runs after Edd'')



---> '''Rolf:''' Rolf's eyes fool the brain of Rolf!
---> '''Kevin:''' What are you talking about, dude?
---> '''Rolf:''' "Rolf's eyes fool the brain of Rolf", must I spell it?
* The [[HiveMind Kraang]] in ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2012'' have a manner of speaking that defies any real explanation. Just have some examples:
--> '''Kraang 1:''' Kraang, are those who are coming to this place coming to this place?
--> '''Kraang 2:''' I like that knowledge, Kraang. I will inquire of Kraang about that knowledge. ''(turns to other Kraangs)'' Do you have the knowledge if those coming to this place are near this place, Kraang?
--> '''Snake:''' THEY'RE TURTLES!!! Call them Turtles! "Are the Turtles here?!"
--> '''Kraang 3:''' There are lights of a vehicle which contain that what you wish us to call "The Turtles" coming to this place which you wish us to call "here".

to:

---> '''Rolf:''' --->'''Rolf:''' Rolf's eyes fool the brain of Rolf!
--->
Rolf!\\
'''Kevin:''' What are you talking about, dude?
--->
dude?\\\
'''Rolf:''' "Rolf's eyes fool the brain of Rolf", must I spell it?
* The [[HiveMind Kraang]] in ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2012'' have a manner In an episode of speaking that defies any real explanation. Just have some examples:
--> '''Kraang 1:''' Kraang, are those who are coming to this place coming to this place?
--> '''Kraang 2:''' I like that knowledge, Kraang. I will inquire of Kraang about that knowledge. ''(turns to other Kraangs)'' Do you have
''WesternAnimation/SonicSatAM'', the knowledge if those coming wizard Lazar speaks similarly to this place are near this place, Kraang?
--> '''Snake:''' THEY'RE TURTLES!!! Call them Turtles! "Are the Turtles here?!"
--> '''Kraang 3:''' There are lights of a vehicle which contain that what you wish us to call "The Turtles" coming to this place which you wish us to call "here".
Yoda, reversing nouns and verbs.


Added DiffLines:

* The [[HiveMind Kraang]] in ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2012'' have a manner of speaking that defies any real explanation. Just have some examples:
-->'''Kraang 1:''' Kraang, are those who are coming to this place coming to this place?\\
'''Kraang 2:''' I like that knowledge, Kraang. I will inquire of Kraang about that knowledge. ''(turns to other Kraangs)'' Do you have the knowledge if those coming to this place are near this place, Kraang?\\
'''Snake:''' THEY'RE TURTLES!!! Call them Turtles! "Are the Turtles here?!"\\
'''Kraang 3:''' There are lights of a vehicle which contain that what you wish us to call "The Turtles" coming to this place which you wish us to call "here".
* As established in ''WesternAnimation/TransformersTheMovie'', [[TransformersGeneration1 Junkions]] on the television series speak in odd mishmashes of television quotes.
-->'''Wreck-Gar:''' "You are in danger of being cancelled or losing your time slot!"\\
'''Ultra Magnus:''' "What'd he say?!"\\
'''Rodimus Prime:''' "We're gonna get killed."
5th May '17 4:12:06 AM Cryoclaste
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the English translations of the latest ''{{Pokemon}}'' games, International Police Agent Looker speaks with weird syntax, suggesting that [[EloquentInMyNativeTongue his native tongue]] is not the local language in [[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl Sinnoh]] or [[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite Unova]]; he averts this in [[VideoGame/PokemonXAndY Kalos]], giving us a likely candidate for his native region. This is not present in the Japanese versions.

to:

* In the English translations of the latest ''{{Pokemon}}'' ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games, International Police Agent Looker speaks with weird syntax, suggesting that [[EloquentInMyNativeTongue his native tongue]] is not the local language in [[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl Sinnoh]] or [[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite Unova]]; he averts this in [[VideoGame/PokemonXAndY Kalos]], giving us a likely candidate for his native region. This is not present in the Japanese versions.
10th Mar '17 1:21:30 PM DaibhidC
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* In the original ComicBook/{{Asterix}} and the Britons, all the Britons came off as this, due to speaking in French but keeping the words in the English order.

to:

* In the original ComicBook/{{Asterix}} ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}} and the Britons, Britons'', all the Britons came off as this, due to speaking in French but keeping the words in the English order.
10th Mar '17 1:20:43 PM DaibhidC
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the Comicbook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'' miniseries ''Guardians of Infinity'', Aerolite of the Guardians of 1000 AD has strange speech patterns which he blames on his TranslatorMicrobes. "Fighting is not on my list of liking things. But it ''is'' on my list of things I am good at doing."

to:

* In the Comicbook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'' ''Comicbook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'' miniseries ''Guardians of Infinity'', Aerolite of the Guardians of 1000 AD has strange speech patterns which he blames on his TranslatorMicrobes. "Fighting is not on my list of liking things. But it ''is'' on my list of things I am good at doing."
10th Mar '17 1:20:25 PM DaibhidC
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Added DiffLines:

* In the Comicbook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'' miniseries ''Guardians of Infinity'', Aerolite of the Guardians of 1000 AD has strange speech patterns which he blames on his TranslatorMicrobes. "Fighting is not on my list of liking things. But it ''is'' on my list of things I am good at doing."
8th Mar '17 6:02:52 PM nombretomado
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* Herald Alberich from MercedesLackey's ''Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar'' series routinely speaks Valdemaran with Karsite word order, which is usually Object-Subject-Verb similar to Yoda's. He was born and raised in Karse and only ended up in Valdemar after being kidnapped/rescued by a [[IntellectualAnimal Companion]], who eventually [[ExpositionBeam psychically fed Valdemarian vocabulary into his head]] ... and ''only'' vocabulary, leading Alberich to use Valdemarian words with Karsite grammar.

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* Herald Alberich from MercedesLackey's Creator/MercedesLackey's ''Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar'' series routinely speaks Valdemaran with Karsite word order, which is usually Object-Subject-Verb similar to Yoda's. He was born and raised in Karse and only ended up in Valdemar after being kidnapped/rescued by a [[IntellectualAnimal Companion]], who eventually [[ExpositionBeam psychically fed Valdemarian vocabulary into his head]] ... and ''only'' vocabulary, leading Alberich to use Valdemarian words with Karsite grammar.
5th Mar '17 9:34:19 PM Fireblood
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-->'''Evey:''' ...are you like, a crazy person?

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-->'''Evey:''' ...are Are you like, a crazy person?
4th Mar '17 2:22:55 PM gb00393
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Jaqen H'ghar refers to everyone―first, second, or third person―by indefinite phrases such as "a man" or "a girl," although sometimes he suffers from OohMeAccentsSlipping such as when he says "And you pour water for one of them now. Why is this right for you and wrong for me?"
20th Jan '17 10:46:38 AM Morgenthaler
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** For what it's worth, none of the others in the sect use the same syntax, nor does Jaqen once he assumes another disguise.
*** According to ''TheWorldOfIceAndFire'', this is actually a cultural speech pattern typical to the Free City of Lorath, where Jaqen claims to hail from.

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** For what it's worth, none of the others in the sect use the same syntax, nor does Jaqen once he assumes another disguise. \n*** According to ''TheWorldOfIceAndFire'', ''Literature/TheWorldOfIceAndFire'', this is actually a cultural speech pattern typical to the Free City of Lorath, where Jaqen claims to hail from.
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