History Main / StepfordSuburbia

14th Dec '17 8:24:21 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Film/TheBigHit'': Establishing shots of the suburban neighborhood are stylized to show all the neighbors doing everything in robotic unison.
10th Dec '17 3:19:57 PM lakingsif
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* In the ''Series/BlackMirror'' episode "Nosedive", the world in which Lacie lives is scarily perfect, with almost everyone under the same smiley, ratings-obsessed spell. Public outrages are seen as felonies, people buy coffee just to photograph, and you must disregard certain acts - such as being kind to service workers and colleagues - to keep those precious stars intact. There's even a ratings expert that Lacie visits who is similar to a psychiatrist or a counselor in the real world. [[SanitySlippage It's easy to see why she ends up snapping halfway through the episode.]]

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* In the ''Series/BlackMirror'' episode "Nosedive", "[[Recap/BlackMirrorNosedive Nosedive]]", the world in which Lacie lives is scarily perfect, with almost everyone under the same smiley, ratings-obsessed spell. Public outrages are seen as felonies, people buy coffee just to photograph, and you must disregard certain acts - such as being kind to service workers and colleagues - to keep those precious stars intact. There's even a ratings expert that Lacie visits who is similar to a psychiatrist or a counselor in the real world. [[SanitySlippage It's easy to see why she ends up snapping halfway through the episode.]]
25th Nov '17 11:09:47 PM TheGreatConversation
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* In ''Film/IndianaJonesAndTheKingdomOfTheCrystalSkull'', Indi finds himself in one only to realize [[spoiler:[[ItsGoingDown it's about to be blown to smithereens]] as part of a nuclear test.]]
6th Nov '17 4:01:51 AM DragonQuestZ
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When they are too perfect to be true, the suburbs can be downright ''creepy''. Mom baking fresh apple pies every day, the kids getting A's in every subject on their report card, neighbors who [[SlasherSmile grin like their teeth are wired open]]... there's something [[UncannyValley unsettling]] about it. Extra points if the houses were [[CutAndPasteSuburbs built on the same floorplan]] with relatively minor differences between them, making each house look eerily similar. In the United States, whose suburbs largely inspired this trope, many of these too-perfect towns sprang up in TheFifties during the post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII housing boom. That's why this trope is commonly associated with the 50's and the cultural mindsets--for better or for worse--that went with the decade. Even if the show is set in the present day, the neighborhood will still have a decidedly old-fashioned vibe.

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When they are too perfect to be true, the suburbs can be downright ''creepy''. Mom baking fresh apple pies every day, the kids getting A's in every subject on their report card, neighbors who [[SlasherSmile grin like their teeth are wired open]]... there's something [[UncannyValley unsettling]] about it. Extra points if the houses were [[CutAndPasteSuburbs [[CutAndPasteSuburb built on the same floorplan]] with relatively minor differences between them, making each house look eerily similar. In the United States, whose suburbs largely inspired this trope, many of these too-perfect towns sprang up in TheFifties during the post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII housing boom. That's why this trope is commonly associated with the 50's and the cultural mindsets--for better or for worse--that went with the decade. Even if the show is set in the present day, the neighborhood will still have a decidedly old-fashioned vibe.
6th Nov '17 4:00:07 AM DragonQuestZ
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When they are too perfect to be true, the suburbs can be downright ''creepy''. Mom baking fresh apple pies every day, the kids getting A's in every subject on their report card, neighbors who [[SlasherSmile grin like their teeth are wired open]]... there's something [[UncannyValley unsettling]] about it. Extra points if the houses were [[CutAndPastSuburbs built on the same floorplan]] with relatively minor differences between them, making each house look eerily similar. In the United States, whose suburbs largely inspired this trope, many of these too-perfect towns sprang up in TheFifties during the post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII housing boom. That's why this trope is commonly associated with the 50's and the cultural mindsets--for better or for worse--that went with the decade. Even if the show is set in the present day, the neighborhood will still have a decidedly old-fashioned vibe.

to:

When they are too perfect to be true, the suburbs can be downright ''creepy''. Mom baking fresh apple pies every day, the kids getting A's in every subject on their report card, neighbors who [[SlasherSmile grin like their teeth are wired open]]... there's something [[UncannyValley unsettling]] about it. Extra points if the houses were [[CutAndPastSuburbs [[CutAndPasteSuburbs built on the same floorplan]] with relatively minor differences between them, making each house look eerily similar. In the United States, whose suburbs largely inspired this trope, many of these too-perfect towns sprang up in TheFifties during the post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII housing boom. That's why this trope is commonly associated with the 50's and the cultural mindsets--for better or for worse--that went with the decade. Even if the show is set in the present day, the neighborhood will still have a decidedly old-fashioned vibe.
6th Nov '17 3:59:33 AM DragonQuestZ
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When they are too perfect to be true, the suburbs can be downright ''creepy''. Mom baking fresh apple pies every day, the kids getting A's in every subject on their report card, neighbors who [[SlasherSmile grin like their teeth are wired open]]... there's something [[UncannyValley unsettling]] about it. Extra points if the houses were [[CopyAndPastSuburbs built on the same floorplan]] with relatively minor differences between them, making each house look eerily similar. In the United States, whose suburbs largely inspired this trope, many of these too-perfect towns sprang up in TheFifties during the post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII housing boom. That's why this trope is commonly associated with the 50's and the cultural mindsets--for better or for worse--that went with the decade. Even if the show is set in the present day, the neighborhood will still have a decidedly old-fashioned vibe.

to:

When they are too perfect to be true, the suburbs can be downright ''creepy''. Mom baking fresh apple pies every day, the kids getting A's in every subject on their report card, neighbors who [[SlasherSmile grin like their teeth are wired open]]... there's something [[UncannyValley unsettling]] about it. Extra points if the houses were [[CopyAndPastSuburbs [[CutAndPastSuburbs built on the same floorplan]] with relatively minor differences between them, making each house look eerily similar. In the United States, whose suburbs largely inspired this trope, many of these too-perfect towns sprang up in TheFifties during the post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII housing boom. That's why this trope is commonly associated with the 50's and the cultural mindsets--for better or for worse--that went with the decade. Even if the show is set in the present day, the neighborhood will still have a decidedly old-fashioned vibe.
7th Oct '17 5:44:10 AM DesertDragon
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* In the American East Coast and Midwest, many of the major cities' picturesque outer surburbs sprang up in the 50's from farmland and wilderness during the post-World War II housing boom. Their dark secret? Most of them were the result of "White Flight," white people fleeing the city proper when African Americans started moving north for work en masse. In fact, before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, many of these neighborhoods ''forbade'' minorities from buying homes there. Even today, many of these town still carry a reputation of not being friendly for minorities.

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* In the American East Coast and Midwest, many of the major cities' picturesque outer surburbs sprang up in the 50's from farmland and wilderness during the post-World War II housing boom. Their dark secret? Most of them were the result of "White Flight," White Flight: white people fleeing the city proper when African Americans started moving north for work en masse.masse in the 40's-60's. In fact, before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, many of these neighborhoods ''forbade'' minorities from buying homes there. Even today, many of these town towns still carry a reputation of not being friendly for minorities.minority-friendly
7th Oct '17 5:41:24 AM DesertDragon
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* In the American East Coast and Midwest, many of their picturesque outer surburbs sprang up in the 50's from farmland and wilderness during the post-World War II housing boom. Their dark secret? Most of them were the result of "White Flight," white people fleeing the cities when African Americans started moving north for work en masse. In fact, before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, many of these neighborhoods ''forbade'' minorities from buying homes there.

to:

* In the American East Coast and Midwest, many of their the major cities' picturesque outer surburbs sprang up in the 50's from farmland and wilderness during the post-World War II housing boom. Their dark secret? Most of them were the result of "White Flight," white people fleeing the cities city proper when African Americans started moving north for work en masse. In fact, before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, many of these neighborhoods ''forbade'' minorities from buying homes there. Even today, many of these town still carry a reputation of not being friendly for minorities.
27th Sep '17 7:59:04 PM DesertDragon
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* In the industrial cities of the [[FlyoverCountry midwestern United States]] like UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, and UsefulNOtes/{{Milwaukee}}, many of their surburbs sprang up in the 50's from farmland and wilderness during the post-World War II housing boom. Their dark secret? Most of them were the result of "White Flight:" white people fleeing the cities when African Americans started moving north for work en masse. In fact, before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, many of these neighborhoods ''forbade'' minorities from living there. Go to any Midwestern city's Wikipedia page and look under Demographics; if the city proper is majority black while the greater metro area is overwhelmingly white, this is why.

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* In the industrial cities of the [[FlyoverCountry midwestern United States]] like UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, American East Coast and UsefulNOtes/{{Milwaukee}}, Midwest, many of their picturesque outer surburbs sprang up in the 50's from farmland and wilderness during the post-World War II housing boom. Their dark secret? Most of them were the result of "White Flight:" Flight," white people fleeing the cities when African Americans started moving north for work en masse. In fact, before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, many of these neighborhoods ''forbade'' minorities from living buying homes there. Go to any Midwestern city's Wikipedia page and look under Demographics; if the city proper is majority black while the greater metro area is overwhelmingly white, this is why.
27th Sep '17 7:49:01 PM DesertDragon
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* In the industrial cities of the [[FlyoverCountry midwestern United States]] like UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, and UsefulNOtes/{{Milwaukee}}, many of their surburbs sprang up in 50's from farmland and wilderness during the post-World War II housing boom. Their dark secret? Most of them were the result of "White Flight:" white people fleeing the cities when African Americans started moving north for work en masse. In fact, before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, many of these neighborhoods ''forbade'' minorities from living there. Go to any Midwestern city's Wikipedia page and look under Demographics; if the city proper is majority black while the greater metro area is overwhelmingly white, this is why.

to:

* In the industrial cities of the [[FlyoverCountry midwestern United States]] like UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}}, UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, and UsefulNOtes/{{Milwaukee}}, many of their surburbs sprang up in the 50's from farmland and wilderness during the post-World War II housing boom. Their dark secret? Most of them were the result of "White Flight:" white people fleeing the cities when African Americans started moving north for work en masse. In fact, before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, many of these neighborhoods ''forbade'' minorities from living there. Go to any Midwestern city's Wikipedia page and look under Demographics; if the city proper is majority black while the greater metro area is overwhelmingly white, this is why.
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