History Main / StarTrekMovieCurse

11th Mar '17 3:53:17 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MicrosoftWindows has had the curse since Windows 3.1, at least when it comes to their major public releases. Windows 98, Windows XP, and Windows 7 were all popular and well-received, while Windows 95, Windows ME, Windows Vista, and Windows 8 made rather controversial changes, were unstable, or had other problems which made it difficult to recommend upgrading. (Even the UnFavorite releases have their fans, of course.) Windows releases tend to follow a pattern of "revolutionary" - in which many changes are made at once - followed by "evolutionary", or mostly polishing what was in the last one. Thus, every other version has a lot of new bugs ''and'' new features, and takes some getting used to; by the time the next version comes out, these issues have mostly been resolved (by patches and service packs for the software, and by users getting used how it looks and works). Another way of looking at it is that Microsoft puts out a "public beta", followed a couple of years later by the final, mostly-working-as-advertised version, charging their customers for both (and for the privilege of testing their software for them). Microsoft followed Windows 8 with Windows 10 (skipping Windows 9), which was better received than its predecessor by major reviewers and generally continuing the pattern, though with [[BigBrotherIsWatching concerns over privacy]] with the new telemetry system, Microsoft's [[UnwantedAssistance rather pushy efforts]] to get Windows 7 and 8 users to upgrade, and the even more pushier automatic update systems within Windows 10 itself (basically barring hacking, you can't set Windows 10 updates to manual control)

to:

* MicrosoftWindows UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows has had the curse since Windows 3.1, at least when it comes to their major public releases. Windows 98, Windows XP, and Windows 7 were all popular and well-received, while Windows 95, Windows ME, Windows Vista, and Windows 8 made rather controversial changes, were unstable, or had other problems which made it difficult to recommend upgrading. (Even the UnFavorite releases have their fans, of course.) Windows releases tend to follow a pattern of "revolutionary" - in which many changes are made at once - followed by "evolutionary", or mostly polishing what was in the last one. Thus, every other version has a lot of new bugs ''and'' new features, and takes some getting used to; by the time the next version comes out, these issues have mostly been resolved (by patches and service packs for the software, and by users getting used how it looks and works). Another way of looking at it is that Microsoft puts out a "public beta", followed a couple of years later by the final, mostly-working-as-advertised version, charging their customers for both (and for the privilege of testing their software for them). Microsoft followed Windows 8 with Windows 10 (skipping Windows 9), which was better received than its predecessor by major reviewers and generally continuing the pattern, though with [[BigBrotherIsWatching concerns over privacy]] with the new telemetry system, Microsoft's [[UnwantedAssistance rather pushy efforts]] to get Windows 7 and 8 users to upgrade, and the even more pushier automatic update systems within Windows 10 itself (basically barring hacking, you can't set Windows 10 updates to manual control)
1st Mar '17 1:30:44 PM LaptopGuy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The best remembered seasons of the original version of Wrestling/WWENXT are the odd-numbered seasons. The first was universally considered the best, back when the NXT concept was being taken seriously. It directly led to Wrestling/TheNexus, one of the most iconic angles in WWE history, and also launched the short-lived but hugely memorable WWE career of [[Wrestling/BryanDanielson Daniel Bryan]]. The third season is remembered for being the only all-female season and for its SoBadItsGood nature, to the point that [[Wrestling/NXT3 the season got a page all to itself]]. The fifth was the year-long season with a noticeable retool that, for better or worse, gave the product a different image. The second and fourth seasons, however? They were forgotten almost instantly.

to:

* The best remembered seasons of the original version of Wrestling/WWENXT Wrestling/{{WWENXT}} are the odd-numbered seasons. The first was universally considered the best, back when the NXT concept was being taken seriously. It directly led to Wrestling/TheNexus, one of the most iconic angles in WWE history, and also launched the short-lived but hugely memorable WWE career of [[Wrestling/BryanDanielson Daniel Bryan]]. The third season is remembered for being the only all-female season and for its SoBadItsGood nature, to the point that [[Wrestling/NXT3 the season got a TV Tropes page all to itself]]. The fifth was the year-long season with a noticeable retool that, for better or worse, gave the product a different image. The second and fourth seasons, however? They were forgotten almost instantly.



* ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'': Also seems to have this curse with (Not counting the spin-offs or upgrades) 1, 3 and 5 being considered great while 2, 4 and 6 was decent at best.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'': Also seems to have this curse with (Not counting the spin-offs or upgrades) 1, 3 and 5 being considered great while 2, 4 and 6 was decent at best.
best. For the Tag Tournament games, the first was seen as great and the second was OK.



** Secondly, fans have noted that the third case in any given game usually tends to be the worst, mostly due to the overwhelmingly hated third cases in (ironically enough) the second and fourth games. ''Dual Destinies'' is the major exception, as most seem to regard the second case as the weakest; some fans also feel that the first game's first case is weaker than the third, for essentially being a glorified tutorial which doesn't even fully explain the game mechanics.

to:

** Secondly, fans have noted that the third case in any given game usually tends to be the worst, mostly due to the overwhelmingly hated third cases case in (ironically enough) the second and fourth games.game. ''Dual Destinies'' is the major exception, as most seem to regard the second case as the weakest; some fans also feel that the first game's first case is weaker than the third, for essentially being a glorified tutorial which doesn't even fully explain the game mechanics.
31st Jan '17 10:10:59 AM Meyers07TheTroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MicrosoftWindows has had the curse since Windows 3.1, at least when it comes to their major public releases. Windows 98, Windows XP, and Windows 7 were all popular and well-received, while Windows 95, Windows ME, Windows Vista, and Windows 8 made rather controversial changes, were unstable, or had other problems which made it difficult to recommend upgrading. (Even the UnFavorite releases have their fans, of course.) Windows releases tend to follow a pattern of "revolutionary" - in which many changes are made at once - followed by "evolutionary", or mostly polishing what was in the last one. Thus, every other version has a lot of new bugs ''and'' new features, and takes some getting used to; by the time the next version comes out, these issues have mostly been resolved (by patches and service packs for the software, and by users getting used how it looks and works). Another way of looking at it is that Microsoft puts out a "public beta", followed a couple of years later by the final, mostly-working-as-advertised version, charging their customers for both (and for the privilege of testing their software for them). Microsoft followed Windows 8 with Windows 10 (skipping Windows 9), which was better received than its predecessor, generally continuing the pattern, though with [[BigBrotherIsWatching concerns over privacy]] and Microsoft's [[UnwantedAssistance rather pushy efforts]] to get Windows 7 and 8 users to upgrade.

to:

* MicrosoftWindows has had the curse since Windows 3.1, at least when it comes to their major public releases. Windows 98, Windows XP, and Windows 7 were all popular and well-received, while Windows 95, Windows ME, Windows Vista, and Windows 8 made rather controversial changes, were unstable, or had other problems which made it difficult to recommend upgrading. (Even the UnFavorite releases have their fans, of course.) Windows releases tend to follow a pattern of "revolutionary" - in which many changes are made at once - followed by "evolutionary", or mostly polishing what was in the last one. Thus, every other version has a lot of new bugs ''and'' new features, and takes some getting used to; by the time the next version comes out, these issues have mostly been resolved (by patches and service packs for the software, and by users getting used how it looks and works). Another way of looking at it is that Microsoft puts out a "public beta", followed a couple of years later by the final, mostly-working-as-advertised version, charging their customers for both (and for the privilege of testing their software for them). Microsoft followed Windows 8 with Windows 10 (skipping Windows 9), which was better received than its predecessor, predecessor by major reviewers and generally continuing the pattern, though with [[BigBrotherIsWatching concerns over privacy]] and with the new telemetry system, Microsoft's [[UnwantedAssistance rather pushy efforts]] to get Windows 7 and 8 users to upgrade.upgrade, and the even more pushier automatic update systems within Windows 10 itself (basically barring hacking, you can't set Windows 10 updates to manual control)
13th Jan '17 11:19:39 PM jjeffrey01
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MicrosoftWindows has had the curse since Windows 3.1, at least when it comes to their major public releases. Windows 98, Windows XP, and Windows 7 have all been popular, while Windows 95, Windows ME, Windows Vista, and Windows 8 all made rather controversial changes, were unstable, or had other problems which made it difficult to recommend upgrading. (Even the UnFavorite releases have their fans, of course.) Windows releases tend to follow a pattern of "revolutionary" - in which many changes are made at once - followed by "evolutionary", or mostly polishing what was in the last one. Thus, every other version has a lot of new bugs ''and'' new features, and takes some getting used to; by the time the next version comes out, these issues have mostly been resolved (by patches and service packs for the software, and by users getting used how it looks and works). Another way of looking at it is that Microsoft puts out a "public beta", followed a couple of years later by the final, mostly-working-as-advertised version, charging their customers for both (and for the privilege of testing their software for them). Microsoft then announced that the follow-up to Windows 8 would be called Windows 10. It got positive reviews upon release, making it look like the curse has been broken. However, [[BigBrotherIsWatching concerns over privacy]] and Microsoft's [[UnwantedAssistance rather pushy efforts]] to get Windows 7 and 8 users to upgrade may lead to it being played straight again.

to:

* MicrosoftWindows has had the curse since Windows 3.1, at least when it comes to their major public releases. Windows 98, Windows XP, and Windows 7 have were all been popular, popular and well-received, while Windows 95, Windows ME, Windows Vista, and Windows 8 all made rather controversial changes, were unstable, or had other problems which made it difficult to recommend upgrading. (Even the UnFavorite releases have their fans, of course.) Windows releases tend to follow a pattern of "revolutionary" - in which many changes are made at once - followed by "evolutionary", or mostly polishing what was in the last one. Thus, every other version has a lot of new bugs ''and'' new features, and takes some getting used to; by the time the next version comes out, these issues have mostly been resolved (by patches and service packs for the software, and by users getting used how it looks and works). Another way of looking at it is that Microsoft puts out a "public beta", followed a couple of years later by the final, mostly-working-as-advertised version, charging their customers for both (and for the privilege of testing their software for them). Microsoft then announced that the follow-up to followed Windows 8 would be called with Windows 10. It got positive reviews upon release, making it look like 10 (skipping Windows 9), which was better received than its predecessor, generally continuing the curse has been broken. However, pattern, though with [[BigBrotherIsWatching concerns over privacy]] and Microsoft's [[UnwantedAssistance rather pushy efforts]] to get Windows 7 and 8 users to upgrade may lead to it being played straight again.upgrade.
2nd Jan '17 6:40:53 AM jimi13
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Videogame/Tekken'': Also seems to have this with (Not counting the spin-offs or upgrades) 1, 3 and 5 being considered great while 2,4 and 6 was decent at best.

to:

* ''Videogame/Tekken'': ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'': Also seems to have this curse with (Not counting the spin-offs or upgrades) 1, 3 and 5 being considered great while 2,4 2, 4 and 6 was decent at best.
2nd Jan '17 6:37:04 AM jimi13
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* ''Videogame/Tekken'': Also seems to have this with (Not counting the spin-offs or upgrades) 1, 3 and 5 being considered great while 2,4 and 6 was decent at best.
28th Dec '16 9:32:49 AM babyhenchy1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The ''Film/MadMax'' series, despite being one of the more consistent film franchises has this kind of pattern: While ''[[Film/MadMax2TheRoadWarrior The Road Warrior]]'' and ''[[Film/MadMaxFuryRoad Fury Road]]'' are widely considered to be classics, the odd-numbered entries tend to be [[BrokenBase more divisive]], for different reasons: ''Film/MadMax'' because [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness it is an entirely different genre altogether]], and ''[[Film/MadMaxBeyondThunderdome Beyond Thunderdome]]'' for its LighterAndSofter tone and its relative lack of car chases. Sure enough, the fourth film in the series ''Film/MadMaxFuryRoad'' was very well-received indeed.

to:

* The ''Film/MadMax'' series, despite being one of the more consistent film franchises has this kind of pattern: While ''[[Film/MadMax2TheRoadWarrior The Road Warrior]]'' and ''[[Film/MadMaxFuryRoad Fury Road]]'' are widely considered to be classics, classics and essential viewing for action movie fans, the odd-numbered entries tend to be [[BrokenBase more divisive]], for different reasons: ''Film/MadMax'' because [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness it is an entirely different genre altogether]], and ''[[Film/MadMaxBeyondThunderdome Beyond Thunderdome]]'' for its LighterAndSofter tone and its relative lack of car chases. Sure enough, the fourth film in the series ''Film/MadMaxFuryRoad'' was very well-received indeed.chases.
18th Dec '16 4:47:32 AM Killerikala
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* ''Film/TransformersFilmSeries''. The first film is considered the best, the second one the worst, the third one to be better than the second and the fourth film got reviews as bad as the second film. It seems that Bay and co. are trying to make the fifth film good, but we'll see.
9th Dec '16 12:29:01 PM MyFinalEdits
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': In the 20th century, the page-naming curse was fairly consistent (to the point where ''Insurrection's'' crew made a point of calling the film "Nine of Ten" on set to stave off the odd number's influence, not that it helped). But this century the Curse seems to have gone off the rails -- 2002's ''Film/StarTrekNemesis'' flopped while 2009's ''Film/StarTrek'' was a hit, contrary to their positions in the series. It is unknown whether this anomaly means the curse has actually been broken, or merely inverted.
** Among those who do consider ''10'' bad and ''11'' good, there are several commonly proposed methods to realign the curse with "reality". One is using the sum of the digits as an indicator (10; '''1'''+'''0'''=1, an odd number and 11; '''1'''+'''1'''=2, an even number), or alternatively including the AffectionateParody ''Film/GalaxyQuest'' as a "''Star Trek'' movie", inserting it between 9 (''[[Film/StarTrekInsurrection Insurrection]]'') and 10 (''Nemesis'') as [[http://qntm.org/odd put by]] [[Website/ThingsOfInterest Sam Hughes]]. Another theory states that ''Nemesis'' wasn't good because it was a multiple of five, and thus, like ''Film/{{Star Trek V|The Final Frontier}}'', was bad; in other words, the curse has a previously-undiscovered [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fizzbuzz FizzBuzz property]]. This is followed by the explanation that ''Film/StarTrek'' doesn't follow the pattern because of the interference of time-traveling Romulans -- besides, it wasn't made by the same crew as the rest. Some have also taken to referring the [[ContinuityReboot reboot]] film as "''Star Trek 0''," thus placing it in an arguably even spot.
*** The following film, ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'', muddies the waters even further; it was successful critically and financially, but created a BrokenBase among fans. Some still maintain the curse is now inverted as they felt ''Into Darkness'' wasn't as fresh as the 2009 reboot.
*** The film following ''Into Darkness'', ''Film/StarTrekBeyond'', also critically and commercially successful, was better received by fans then the previous two films, even further highlighting the likelihood of the theory that the curse had simply inverted.

to:

* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
**
In the 20th century, the page-naming curse was fairly consistent (to the point where ''Insurrection's'' crew made a point of calling the film "Nine of Ten" on set to stave off the odd number's influence, not that it helped). But this century the Curse seems to have gone off the rails -- 2002's ''Film/StarTrekNemesis'' flopped while 2009's ''Film/StarTrek'' was a hit, contrary to their positions in the series. It is unknown whether this anomaly means the curse has actually been broken, or merely inverted.
** Among those who do consider ''10'' bad and ''11'' good, there are several commonly proposed methods to realign the curse with "reality". One is using the sum of the digits as an indicator (10; '''1'''+'''0'''=1, an odd number and 11; '''1'''+'''1'''=2, an even number), or alternatively including the AffectionateParody ''Film/GalaxyQuest'' as a "''Star Trek'' movie", inserting it between 9 (''[[Film/StarTrekInsurrection Insurrection]]'') and 10 (''Nemesis'') as [[http://qntm.org/odd put by]] [[Website/ThingsOfInterest Sam Hughes]]. Another theory states that ''Nemesis'' wasn't good because it was a multiple of five, and thus, like ''Film/{{Star Trek V|The Final Frontier}}'', was bad; in other words, the curse has a previously-undiscovered [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fizzbuzz FizzBuzz property]]. This is followed by the explanation that ''Film/StarTrek'' doesn't follow the pattern because of the interference of time-traveling Romulans -- besides, it wasn't made by the same crew as the rest. Some have also taken to referring the [[ContinuityReboot reboot]] film as "''Star Trek 0''," thus placing it in an arguably even spot.
*** ** The following film, ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'', muddies the waters even further; it was successful critically and financially, but created a BrokenBase among fans. Some still maintain the curse is now inverted as they felt ''Into Darkness'' wasn't as fresh as the 2009 reboot.
*** ** The film following ''Into Darkness'', ''Film/StarTrekBeyond'', also critically and commercially successful, was better received by fans then the previous two films, even further highlighting the likelihood of the theory that the curse had simply inverted.



* So far this seems to be the case with ''Series/AmericanHorrorStory''. ''Asylum'' and ''Freak Show'' (even-numbered) have been better-received than ''Murder House'' and ''Coven'' (odd-numbered). Something to note is that ''Asylum'' and ''Freak Show'' take place in the past (1964 and 1952 respectively, although ''Asylum'' did flash to the present occasionally), while the others are set in the present-day.
** ''Hotel'', before it even premiered, became "the season without Jessica Lange." Notably it was the first season with lower premiere ratings than its predecessor.

to:

* So far this seems to be the case with ''Series/AmericanHorrorStory''. ''Asylum'' and ''Freak Show'' (even-numbered) have been better-received than ''Murder House'' and ''Coven'' (odd-numbered). Something to note is that ''Asylum'' and ''Freak Show'' take place in the past (1964 and 1952 respectively, although ''Asylum'' did flash to the present occasionally), while the others are set in the present-day. \n** ''Hotel'', before it even premiered, became "the season without Jessica Lange." Notably it was the first season with lower premiere ratings than its predecessor.



* Similar to Gundam, most Franchise/SpiderMan games have the distinction where direct sequels to a game are thought of as weaker than their predecessors. This includes ''[[VideoGame/SpiderMan2EnterElectro Enter Electro]]'' to [[VideoGame/SpiderMan the first Playstation title]], ''Separation Anxiety'' to ''VideoGame/MaximumCarnage'', ''[[VideoGame/SpiderManEdgeOfTime Edge of Time]]'' to ''[[VideoGame/SpiderManShatteredDimensions Shattered Dimensions]]'', and ''VideoGame/TheAmazingSpiderMan2'' to the [[VideoGame/TheAmazingSpiderMan first]]. The games based off the [[VideoGame/SpiderManTrilogy Sam Raimi trilogy]] zig-zag this: ''VideoGame/SpiderMan2'' is considered an EvenBetterSequel to the first due to its GenreShift, but ''Spider-Man 3'' more directly follows up on the second by also adopting the Sandbox gameplay style, and is similarly thought of as a disappointment.
* Early ''FinalFantasy'' titles followed a pattern where odd numbered games were more gameplay focused than the even ones, which were more story driven. ''FinalFantasyVII'' broke this pattern, and all games afterwards tended to be very story heavy.

to:

* Similar to Gundam, most Most Franchise/SpiderMan games have the distinction where direct sequels to a game are thought of as weaker than their predecessors. This includes ''[[VideoGame/SpiderMan2EnterElectro Enter Electro]]'' to [[VideoGame/SpiderMan the first Playstation title]], ''Separation Anxiety'' to ''VideoGame/MaximumCarnage'', ''[[VideoGame/SpiderManEdgeOfTime Edge of Time]]'' to ''[[VideoGame/SpiderManShatteredDimensions Shattered Dimensions]]'', and ''VideoGame/TheAmazingSpiderMan2'' to the [[VideoGame/TheAmazingSpiderMan first]]. The games based off the [[VideoGame/SpiderManTrilogy Sam Raimi trilogy]] zig-zag this: ''VideoGame/SpiderMan2'' is considered an EvenBetterSequel to the first due to its GenreShift, but ''Spider-Man 3'' more directly follows up on the second by also adopting the Sandbox gameplay style, and is similarly thought of as a disappointment.
* Early ''FinalFantasy'' ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' titles followed a pattern where odd numbered games were more gameplay focused than the even ones, which were more story driven. ''FinalFantasyVII'' ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' broke this pattern, and all games afterwards tended to be very story heavy.



* ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'': The even ones win out here: the first installment was seen as an upstart fighting game that has yet to find its voice. ''Melee'' is considered a substantial improvement and widely considered to be the best four-player party fighter of all time. ''Brawl'' was still tons of fun for most gamers, but many people thought the gameplay wasn't nearly as competitive-friendly as ''Melee'' was. The fourth game was widely seen as a return to ''Melee''s form, keeping some of ''Brawl'''s more liked changes while reverting the less popular ones back to how they were in ''Melee''.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'': The even ones win out here: the first installment was seen as an upstart fighting game that has had yet to find its voice. ''Melee'' is considered a substantial improvement and widely considered to be the best four-player party fighter of all time. ''Brawl'' was still tons of fun for most gamers, but many people thought the gameplay wasn't nearly as competitive-friendly as ''Melee'' was. The fourth game was widely seen as a return to ''Melee''s form, keeping some of ''Brawl'''s more liked changes while reverting the less popular ones back to how they were in ''Melee''.



*** Since the release of the Investigation 2 FanTranslation, it seems to have completely inverted both cases, since fans trend to think that the game is much better than the first ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigations'', and the third case is actually considered the best by some fans.

to:

*** Since the release of the Investigation 2 FanTranslation, it seems to have completely inverted both cases, since fans trend to think that the game is much better than the first ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigations'', and the third case is actually considered the best by some fans.



* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' followed this for a while. While season 1 is by no means considered ''bad'', it suffered from EarlyInstallmentWeirdness and a much more restrictive [[AnAesop Aesop]] format. Season 2 is generally considered to be where the show [[GrowingTheBeard grew the beard]] (although it had far more controversial episodes than season 1 did), but was followed by season 3, which is the most controversial and poorly received so far (especially the finale). Then season 4 was mostly well-received ([[HolyShitQuotient especially the finale]]). Season 5 broke this trend by being generally well-received. So far Season 6 has lead to a bit of a BrokenBase though, meaning it could be that the curse has either been fully lifted or merely inverted, depending on who you ask.
** The spinoff [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls Equestria Girls]] also follows this, with the second movie being much better received than the first or third.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' followed this for a while. While season 1 is by no means considered ''bad'', it suffered from EarlyInstallmentWeirdness and a much more restrictive [[AnAesop Aesop]] format. Season 2 is generally considered to be where the show [[GrowingTheBeard grew the beard]] (although it had far more controversial episodes than season 1 did), but was followed by season 3, which is the most controversial and poorly received so far (especially the finale). Then season 4 was mostly well-received ([[HolyShitQuotient especially the finale]]). Season 5 broke this trend by being generally well-received. So far Season 6 has lead to a bit of a BrokenBase though, meaning it could be that the curse has either been fully lifted or merely inverted, depending on who you ask. \n** The spinoff [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls Equestria Girls]] also follows this, with the second movie being much better received than the first or third.third.



* MicrosoftWindows has had the curse since Windows 3.1, at least when it comes to their major public releases. Windows 98, Windows XP, and Windows 7 have all been popular, while Windows 95, Windows ME, Windows Vista, and Windows 8 all made rather controversial changes, were unstable, or had other problems which made it difficult to recommend upgrading. (Even the UnFavorite releases have their fans, of course.) Windows releases tend to follow a pattern of "revolutionary" - in which many changes are made at once - followed by "evolutionary", or mostly polishing what was in the last one. Thus, every other version has a lot of new bugs ''and'' new features, and takes some getting used to; by the time the next version comes out, these issues have mostly been resolved (by patches and service packs for the software, and by users getting used how it looks and works). Another way of looking at it is that Microsoft puts out a "public beta", followed a couple of years later by the final, mostly-working-as-advertised version, charging their customers for both (and for the privilege of testing their software for them).
** Microsoft have announced that the follow-up to Windows 8 will be called Windows 10. Some detractors have suggested this means they're skipping the next good version and going straight to another broken mess.
*** It's still too early to say for sure, but Windows 10 got positive reviews upon release, making it look like the curse has been broken. However, [[BigBrotherIsWatching concerns over privacy]] and Microsoft's [[UnwantedAssistance rather pushy efforts]] to get Windows 7 and 8 users to upgrade may lead to it being played straight again.
* The [[UsefulNotes/MLBTeams San Francisco Giants]] and "Even Year Magic" (or "Even Year Bullshit" to the rest of the league). They won a World Series in 2010, finished 4 games back of a playoff spot in 2011, won a World Series in 2012, finished fourth in their division in 2013, and won a World Series in 2014.
** After a 3-1 loss to the Cubs in the 2016 National League Division Series, the Giants no longer benefit from this effect.

to:

* MicrosoftWindows has had the curse since Windows 3.1, at least when it comes to their major public releases. Windows 98, Windows XP, and Windows 7 have all been popular, while Windows 95, Windows ME, Windows Vista, and Windows 8 all made rather controversial changes, were unstable, or had other problems which made it difficult to recommend upgrading. (Even the UnFavorite releases have their fans, of course.) Windows releases tend to follow a pattern of "revolutionary" - in which many changes are made at once - followed by "evolutionary", or mostly polishing what was in the last one. Thus, every other version has a lot of new bugs ''and'' new features, and takes some getting used to; by the time the next version comes out, these issues have mostly been resolved (by patches and service packs for the software, and by users getting used how it looks and works). Another way of looking at it is that Microsoft puts out a "public beta", followed a couple of years later by the final, mostly-working-as-advertised version, charging their customers for both (and for the privilege of testing their software for them).
**
them). Microsoft have then announced that the follow-up to Windows 8 will would be called Windows 10. Some detractors have suggested this means they're skipping the next good version and going straight to another broken mess.
*** It's still too early to say for sure, but Windows 10
It got positive reviews upon release, making it look like the curse has been broken. However, [[BigBrotherIsWatching concerns over privacy]] and Microsoft's [[UnwantedAssistance rather pushy efforts]] to get Windows 7 and 8 users to upgrade may lead to it being played straight again.
* The [[UsefulNotes/MLBTeams San Francisco Giants]] and "Even Year Magic" (or "Even Year Bullshit" to the rest of the league). They won a World Series in 2010, finished 4 games back of a playoff spot in 2011, won a World Series in 2012, finished fourth in their division in 2013, and won a World Series in 2014.
**
2014. After a 3-1 loss to the Cubs in the 2016 National League Division Series, the Giants no longer benefit from this effect.
12th Oct '16 3:18:24 PM tehbranmuffin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The [[UsefulNotes/MLBTeams San Francisco Giants]] and "Even Year Magic." They won a World Series in 2010, finished 4 games back of a playoff spot in 2011, won a World Series in 2012, finished fourth in their division in 2013, and won a World Series in 2014.

to:

* The [[UsefulNotes/MLBTeams San Francisco Giants]] and "Even Year Magic." Magic" (or "Even Year Bullshit" to the rest of the league). They won a World Series in 2010, finished 4 games back of a playoff spot in 2011, won a World Series in 2012, finished fourth in their division in 2013, and won a World Series in 2014.
2014.
** After a 3-1 loss to the Cubs in the 2016 National League Division Series, the Giants no longer benefit from this effect.
This list shows the last 10 events of 167. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.StarTrekMovieCurse