History Main / StabletimeLoop

4th Dec '16 12:34:00 PM SgtFrog1
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->''"Warp: One cannot damage history, because history cannot be changed. [Holds up Clock of Eternity] I went back in time to steal this because history said it disappeared. And history said it disappeared because I went back to steal it. Past, present, future. It's all written in stone, my dear."''

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->''"Warp: One ->''"One cannot damage history, because history cannot be changed. [Holds up Clock of Eternity] I went back in time to steal this because history said it disappeared. And history said it disappeared because I went back to steal it. Past, present, future. It's all written in stone, my dear."''
2nd Dec '16 11:45:19 PM KeithM
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* One online story featured a mafiosi who was killed by a rival family and found himself in the afterlife identical to his city where he was met by a woman who informed him of what was going on and urging him to better himself. He finds he's stuck in a GroundhogDayLoop where each morning everything resets. He spends countless cycles getting his revenge on the men who killed him again and again in different ways, then engaging in casual murder, rape, and other acts to the citizens of the city, all the while his guide telling him that he can be better than he thinks he is even as she's also a victim of his actions again and again, and also tells him she's paying off her own debt. Finally growing despondent at the meaningless of it all and realizing what a monster he really is, he begs her for a way out and is told that the only way he can escape is to pay penance by understanding what his victims felt, and the next time he wakes up he discovers he isn't in his own body, he's in that of his first afterlife victim. He discovers the day keeps repeating, but each loop he's living the life for that day of a person he's previously encountered on a prior loop, and suffers that person's fate at his own hands. After he's finished he's learned to become a far better person, and his guide joyfully informs him that she's finally earned her own reward and departs to Heaven, while he has only one more inhabitant of the city he must be. When next he wakes up he finds himself in the body of his guide, and she goes to meet a mafiosi arriving in the afterlife having been killed by a rival family...
2nd Dec '16 2:58:19 AM KeithM
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* One online story featured a mafiosi who was killed by a rival family and found himself in the afterlife identical to his city where he was met by a woman who informed him of what was going on and urging him to better himself. He finds he's stuck in a GroundhogDayLoop where each morning everything resets. He spends countless cycles getting his revenge on the men who killed him again and again in different ways, then engaging in casual murder, rape, and other acts to the citizens of the city, all the while his guide telling him that he can be better than he thinks he is even as she's also a victim of his actions again and again, and also tells him she's paying off her own debt. Finally growing despondent at the meaningless of it all and realizing what a monster he really is, he begs her for a way out and is told that the only way he can escape is to pay penance by understanding what his victims felt, and the next time he wakes up he discovers he isn't in his own body, he's in that of his first afterlife victim. He discovers the day keeps repeating, but each loop he's living the life for that day of a person he's previously encountered on a prior loop, and suffers that person's fate at his own hands. After he's finished he's learned to become a far better person, and his guide joyfully informs him that she's finally earned her own reward and departs to Heaven, while he has only one more inhabitant of the city he must be. When next he wakes up he finds himself in the body of his guide, and she goes to meet a mafiosi arriving in the afterlife having been killed by a rival family...
30th Oct '16 5:23:14 AM spydre
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This trope is actually OlderThanFeudalism, since, while time travel is a relatively new concept, prophecy (which is basically information time travel) is not, and SelfFulfillingProphecy is the earliest form of stable time loop.
3rd Oct '16 2:11:08 PM Vir
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* In the ''WebVideo/HappyTreeFriends'' TV episode "Blast from the Past", Sniffles makes a time machine out of parts in his storage room [[MundaneUtility to go back to before he accidentally knocked his glass of milk off his table]] and ends up in a loop wherein he accidentally drops the time machine on himself.

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* In the ''WebVideo/HappyTreeFriends'' ''WebAnimation/HappyTreeFriends'' TV episode "Blast from the Past", Sniffles makes a time machine out of parts in his storage room [[MundaneUtility to go back to before he accidentally knocked his glass of milk off his table]] and ends up in a loop wherein he accidentally drops the time machine on himself.
3rd Oct '16 2:10:35 PM Vir
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* In the MegaMan Games episode of ''WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd'' the Nerd decides to go back in time to see past versions of himself. He goes back to 2007 and sees himself just having reviewed "Independence Day" on Playstation, and tells him to review some crappy games based on ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''. He goes back to 2006 and sees himself in his review of "A Nightmare on Elm Street" as "The Angry Nintendo Nerd" and convinces him to change his name to "The Angry Video Game Nerd". Finally he goes to 2004 and tells the version of himself that just finished ranting on "Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde" to keep working on reviewing games he thinks are of poor quality.

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* In the MegaMan Games Franchise/MegaMan games episode of ''WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd'' the Nerd decides to go back in time to see past versions of himself. He goes back to 2007 and sees himself just having reviewed "Independence Day" on Playstation, and tells him to review some crappy games based on ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''. He goes back to 2006 and sees himself in his review of "A Nightmare on Elm Street" as "The Angry Nintendo Nerd" and convinces him to change his name to "The Angry Video Game Nerd". Finally he goes to 2004 and tells the version of himself that just finished ranting on "Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde" to keep working on reviewing games he thinks are of poor quality.
3rd Oct '16 2:10:18 PM Vir
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* In the ''WebVideo/HappyTreeFriends'' TV episode "Blast from the Past", Sniffles makes a time machine out of parts in his storage room [[MundaneUtility to go back to before he accidentally knocked his glass of milk off his table]] and ends up in a loop in wherein he accidentally drops the time machine on himself.

to:

* In the ''WebVideo/HappyTreeFriends'' TV episode "Blast from the Past", Sniffles makes a time machine out of parts in his storage room [[MundaneUtility to go back to before he accidentally knocked his glass of milk off his table]] and ends up in a loop in wherein he accidentally drops the time machine on himself.
21st Aug '16 12:28:59 PM spydre
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There are two basic types of time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (Sorry [[Theatre/OedipusTheKing Oedipus]]. And [[Film/TheTerminator John Connor]]) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox"[[note]]from the classic RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].

to:

There are two basic types of time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (Sorry [[Theatre/OedipusTheKing Oedipus]]. And [[Film/TheTerminator John Connor]]) Connor]].) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox"[[note]]from the classic RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].
21st Aug '16 12:28:04 PM spydre
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There are two basic types of time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (sorry [[Theatre/OedipusTheKing Oedipus]]) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox"[[note]]from the classic RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].

to:

There are two basic types of time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (sorry (Sorry [[Theatre/OedipusTheKing Oedipus]]) Oedipus]]. And [[Film/TheTerminator John Connor]]) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox"[[note]]from the classic RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].
20th Aug '16 12:57:45 PM spydre
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There are two basic types of time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (sorry {{Oedipus}}) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox"[[note]]from the classic RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].

to:

There are two basic types of time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (sorry {{Oedipus}}) [[Theatre/OedipusTheKing Oedipus]]) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox"[[note]]from the classic RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].
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