History Main / StableTimeloop

21st Aug '16 12:28:59 PM spydre
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There are two basic types of time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (Sorry [[Theatre/OedipusTheKing Oedipus]]. And [[Film/TheTerminator John Connor]]) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox"[[note]]from the classic RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].

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There are two basic types of time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (Sorry [[Theatre/OedipusTheKing Oedipus]]. And [[Film/TheTerminator John Connor]]) Connor]].) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox"[[note]]from the classic RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].
21st Aug '16 12:28:04 PM spydre
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There are two basic types of time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (sorry [[Theatre/OedipusTheKing Oedipus]]) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox"[[note]]from the classic RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].

to:

There are two basic types of time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (sorry (Sorry [[Theatre/OedipusTheKing Oedipus]]) Oedipus]]. And [[Film/TheTerminator John Connor]]) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox"[[note]]from the classic RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].
20th Aug '16 12:57:45 PM spydre
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There are two basic types of time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (sorry {{Oedipus}}) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox"[[note]]from the classic RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].

to:

There are two basic types of time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (sorry {{Oedipus}}) [[Theatre/OedipusTheKing Oedipus]]) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox"[[note]]from the classic RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].
20th Aug '16 12:56:24 PM spydre
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Also known as a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]].

Through AppliedPhlebotinum, FunctionalMagic, or some other means, our heroes [[TimeTravel travel back to the past]]. In the past, they wind up being responsible for the very events that underpin their own "present." This creates a chicken-and-egg scenario, in which the looping sequence of events has no clear beginning. The result of breaking the zeroth law of TimeTravel: do not cause the event you went back to prevent.

to:

Also known as a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]].


Through AppliedPhlebotinum, FunctionalMagic, or some other means, our heroes [[TimeTravel travel back to the past]]. In the past, they wind up being responsible for the very events that underpin their own "present." This creates a chicken-and-egg scenario, in which the looping sequence of events has no clear beginning. The result of breaking the zeroth law of TimeTravel: do not cause the event you went back to prevent.
prevent.



This is sometimes referred to as a "time loop" paradox, particularly when a character, object, or piece of information was never originally created, but exists solely because of its own existence. Also known as a "bootstrap paradox," from the classic Heinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''. It's also called a "TemporalParadox" or "ontological paradox". The classic hypothetical example is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].

to:

This is sometimes referred to as a "time loop" paradox, particularly when a character, object, or piece There are two basic types of information was never originally created, but exists solely because of its own existence. Also known as a time loop: a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox predestination paradox]], in which events in the future ultimately trigger events in the past (sorry {{Oedipus}}) and the even more mind-squirming "bootstrap paradox," from paradox"[[note]]from the classic Heinlein RobertHeinlein short story, ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''. It's also ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps''[[/note]] (also called a "TemporalParadox" the ontological paradox), in which the time loop allows for the existence of information or "ontological paradox". objects that have no origin. The classic hypothetical example bootstrap paradox is to jump into the future, steal some wondrous gadget, come back to the original time, grab the patent on that gadget and start mass-producing them immediately. Eventually, they become so ubiquitous or so common that you, ten, twenty years younger, show up and steal one. The simplest version is the one where the time machine itself is the product of the stable time loop -- the character sees a version of himself pop into existence with a time machine, hand it to him, and press the button, only to be whisked into the past where he hands it to his past self and presses the button[[note]]This exact example is also an Object Paradox, wherein the time machine has no past and no future outside the loop, no origin, and somehow never decays or suffers wear and tear[[/note]].
3rd Aug '16 2:38:19 AM GoogMastr
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->''"The Destiny Trap: you can't change history if you're part of it."''
-->-- '''The Eleventh Doctor''', ''Series/DoctorWho'', "The Time of the Doctor"

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->''"The Destiny Trap: you can't change ->''"Warp: One cannot damage history, because history if you're part cannot be changed. [Holds up Clock of it.Eternity] I went back in time to steal this because history said it disappeared. And history said it disappeared because I went back to steal it. Past, present, future. It's all written in stone, my dear."''
-->-- '''The Eleventh Doctor''', ''Series/DoctorWho'', "The Time of the Doctor"
'''Warp''', ''Series/TeenTitans'', "How Long Is Forever"
10th Jul '16 1:02:44 AM Meneth
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Added DiffLines:

** Finally, there's [[spoiler: the prophecies. Dumbledore listened to ''all'' of them, and then set the events in motion that would lead to Harry's birth.]]
3rd Jul '16 7:09:35 PM TaylorHyuuga
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** In VisualNovel/ZeroTimeDilemma, [[spoiler:this is half of Zero's goal. He needs to create one so that he and his twin sister are bornunder specific circumstances to make them both [=ESPers=]]]

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** In VisualNovel/ZeroTimeDilemma, [[spoiler:this is half of Zero's goal. He needs to create one so that he and his twin sister are bornunder born under specific circumstances to make them both [=ESPers=]]]
3rd Jul '16 7:09:09 PM TaylorHyuuga
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Added DiffLines:

** In VisualNovel/ZeroTimeDilemma, [[spoiler:this is half of Zero's goal. He needs to create one so that he and his twin sister are bornunder specific circumstances to make them both [=ESPers=]]]
19th Jun '16 8:54:26 PM Powerlord
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** Its sequel, ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward,'' seems to be setting this up as well. [[spoiler: There are at least two. The first occurs in the path where the old woman does not die -- upon nearing the end of the path to Phi's ending, Sigma and Phi go back in time and save her, thereby setting up the timeline in which she lives. The second one is the cycle Sigma and Phi are going though, as explained by the diagram in the true ending route. However, the characters are actively trying to ''break'' the stable time loop, [[MindScrew which is why they set it up in the first place.]]]]

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** Its sequel, ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward,'' seems to be setting this up as well. [[spoiler: There are at least two. The first occurs in the path where the old woman does not die -- upon nearing the end of the path to Phi's ending, Sigma and Phi go back in time and save her, thereby setting up the timeline in which she lives. The second one is the cycle Sigma and Phi are going though, as explained by the diagram in the true ending route. However, the characters are actively trying to ''break'' the stable time loop, [[MindScrew which is why they set it up in the first place.]]]]place]], which continues on into the third game]], ''VisualNovel/ZeroTimeDilemma''.
16th May '16 4:54:31 PM IAmNotAFunguy
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* In the MegaMan Games episode of ''WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd'' the Nerd decides to go back in time to see past versions of himself. He goes back to 2007 and sees himself just having reviewed "Independence Day" on Playstation, and tells him to review some crappy games based on ''WesternAnimation/TheSImpsons''. He goes back to 2006 and sees himself in his review of "A Nightmare on Elm Street" as "The Angry Nintendo Nerd" and convinces him to change his name to "The Angry Video Game Nerd". Finally he goes to 2004 and tells the version of himself that just finished ranting on "Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde" to keep working on reviewing games he thinks are of poor quality.

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* In the MegaMan Games episode of ''WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd'' the Nerd decides to go back in time to see past versions of himself. He goes back to 2007 and sees himself just having reviewed "Independence Day" on Playstation, and tells him to review some crappy games based on ''WesternAnimation/TheSImpsons''.''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''. He goes back to 2006 and sees himself in his review of "A Nightmare on Elm Street" as "The Angry Nintendo Nerd" and convinces him to change his name to "The Angry Video Game Nerd". Finally he goes to 2004 and tells the version of himself that just finished ranting on "Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde" to keep working on reviewing games he thinks are of poor quality.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.StableTimeloop