History Main / SquarePegRoundTrope

24th Jul '16 6:33:20 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* NoFinalBossForYou is about video games that have a FinalBoss, but for some reason you can't access it. It's sometimes misused with games that don't have a final boss at all. Additionally, it and TrueFinalBoss tend to be confused with each other; TrueFinalBoss means "you don't have to beat this boss to beat the game, but it's there if you meet conditions above just beating the game."

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* NoFinalBossForYou is about video games that have a FinalBoss, but for some reason you can't access it. It's sometimes misused with games that don't have a final boss at all. Additionally, it and TrueFinalBoss tend to be confused with each other; TrueFinalBoss means "you don't have to beat this boss to beat the game, but it's there if you meet conditions above just beating the game.game", whereas NoFinalBossForYou means "you ''have'' to beat this boss for the standard ending, but you goofed at some point so you're not getting to fight it."
22nd Jul '16 9:50:24 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* FauxActionGirl refers to characters famed as [[Action Girl Action Girls]] in-universe, but in practice the "Action" part is just an InformedAttribute. It's quickly becoming "Any female character who so much as loses one fight, or ever gets captured." (even if they curb-stomp everyone the rest of the time)

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* FauxActionGirl refers to characters famed as [[Action Girl Action Girls]] {{Action Girl}}s in-universe, but in practice the "Action" part is just an InformedAttribute. It's quickly becoming "Any female character who so much as loses one fight, or ever gets captured." (even if they curb-stomp everyone the rest of the time)
22nd Jul '16 1:07:09 AM Gravityman
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* RuleOfThree is one that gets thrown around in PotHoles similarly to RecycledInSpace and PrecisionFStrike seemingly just to lampshade how the troper wrote what they wrote. It's meant to be about three being a very common number for things to happen in, especially if written as such. On the site, however, it's usually just potholed whenever anything happens three times, or worse, when somebody writes a joke themselves in three times and then potholes the third one to it. Of course, the worst is when somebody potholes to it for the third instance in a chain ''of more than three'', meaning it isn't really an example anyway.

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* RuleOfThree is one that gets thrown around in PotHoles similarly to RecycledInSpace and PrecisionFStrike seemingly just to lampshade how the troper wrote what they wrote. It's meant Its intention is to be about show that three being a very is an extremely common number for things writers to happen in, especially if written use in many different ways, such as such.with repetition, where it is a good number to stop at in order to establish repetition without letting it go stale. On the site, however, it's usually just potholed whenever anything happens three times, or worse, when somebody writes a joke themselves in three times and then potholes the third one to it. Of course, the worst is when somebody potholes to it for the third instance in a chain ''of more than three'', meaning it isn't really an example anyway.
21st Jul '16 9:56:31 PM SeekerSS
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Sometimes an EntryPimp forgets that TropesAreNotBad/[[TropesAreNotGood Good]] and tries to shove an example from their favorite show into a trope where it doesn't fit. It may not be the fault of the contributor because the description of the trope left the emphasis on part B while part A is the important part. Or maybe the name of the trope was [[WordSaladTitle confusing.]] Or perhaps the original definition of [[MissingSupertrope the trope was something so specific or esoteric that new examples tend to be something related to, but not quite, the trope's original intent]]. But often it is because the contributor did not understand the standard and direction the trope was describing. This of course may result in a [[TropeDecay trope suffering]] {{Flanderization}}.

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Sometimes an EntryPimp forgets that TropesAreNotBad/[[TropesAreNotGood Good]] and tries to shove an example from their favorite hated/favorite show into a trope where it doesn't fit. It may not be the fault of the contributor because the description of the trope left the emphasis on part B while part A is the important part. Or maybe the name of the trope was [[WordSaladTitle confusing.]] Or perhaps the original definition of [[MissingSupertrope the trope was something so specific or esoteric that new examples tend to be something related to, but not quite, the trope's original intent]]. But often it is because the contributor did not understand the standard and direction the trope was describing. This of course may result in a [[TropeDecay trope suffering]] {{Flanderization}}.
21st Jul '16 8:12:52 PM Josef5678
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* An InnocuouslyImportantEpisode is an episode that subtly sets events in motion that lead to a big payoff later in a way that the audience won't realize the importance of the episode until late in the series. But it's often used to describe light-hearted episodes that surprisingly ends with a big reveal or a major events even when said reveal and event has no relation with the rest of the episode. Other times it just gets used as "this episode received a CallBack or ContinuityNod later on", even if it doesn't really make the episode any more important in the grand scheme of things.

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* An InnocuouslyImportantEpisode is an episode that subtly sets events in motion that lead to a big payoff later in a way that the audience won't realize the importance of the episode until late in the series. But it's often used to describe light-hearted episodes that surprisingly ends end with a big reveal or a major events event, even when said reveal and event has no relation with the rest of the episode. Other times it just gets used as "this episode received a CallBack or ContinuityNod later on", even if it doesn't really make the episode any more important in the grand scheme of things.
21st Jul '16 3:25:30 PM Kayube
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* An InnocuouslyImportantEpisode is an episode that subtly sets events in motion that lead to a big payoff later in a way that the audience won't realize the importance of the episode until late in the series. But it's often used to describe light-hearted episodes that surprisingly ends with a big reveal or a major events even when said reveal and event has no relation with the rest of the episode.

to:

* An InnocuouslyImportantEpisode is an episode that subtly sets events in motion that lead to a big payoff later in a way that the audience won't realize the importance of the episode until late in the series. But it's often used to describe light-hearted episodes that surprisingly ends with a big reveal or a major events even when said reveal and event has no relation with the rest of the episode. Other times it just gets used as "this episode received a CallBack or ContinuityNod later on", even if it doesn't really make the episode any more important in the grand scheme of things.
21st Jul '16 6:56:12 AM Josef5678
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* FanonDiscontinuity is supposed to refer to cases when a sequel or episode just screws up our mental image of the plot, so the fandom collectively decides to ignore its existence. Of course, in {{Pot Hole}}s, it is used as another TakeThat against anything you don't particularly like, including entire verses. It also requires the work to be (officially) set in the canon, meaning AlternateContinuity work can't qualify.

to:

* FanonDiscontinuity is supposed to refer to cases when a sequel or episode just screws up our mental image of the plot, so the fandom collectively decides to ignore its existence. Of course, in {{Pot Hole}}s, it is used as another TakeThat against anything you don't particularly like, including entire verses. It also requires the work to be (officially) set in the canon, meaning AlternateContinuity work works can't qualify.
20th Jul '16 7:03:44 PM PacificGreen
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Added DiffLines:

* NeverSayDie is when the words "die", "kill", "death", or other forms of those words are replaced with euphemisms ("destroy" being one of the most common examples) in a kid-friendly work because of the fear that children might not understand death, or that the idea of death might be too "heavy" for kids. However, not every aversion of those words constitutes an example; for instance, there are a lot of examples listed where the replacement words for death are merely used for dramatic effect (for example, "never made it out alive"). When determining whether an example counts, one should consider if the words used are a direct replacement for "die" or "kill", if the sentence would sound more natural if "die" or "kill" was actually used in its place, and if the replacement is being made for any other reason other than that it might be too intense for children (e.g. for dramatic effect, or for specificity).
20th Jul '16 4:28:55 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* FanonDiscontinuity is supposed to refer to cases when a sequel or episode just screws up our mental image of the plot, so the fandom collectively decides to ignore its existence. Of course, in {{Pot Hole}}s, it is used as another TakeThat against anything you don't particularly like, including entire verses.

to:

* FanonDiscontinuity is supposed to refer to cases when a sequel or episode just screws up our mental image of the plot, so the fandom collectively decides to ignore its existence. Of course, in {{Pot Hole}}s, it is used as another TakeThat against anything you don't particularly like, including entire verses. It also requires the work to be (officially) set in the canon, meaning AlternateContinuity work can't qualify.



* FauxActionGirl refers to characters famed as [[ActionGirl Action Girls]] in-universe, but in practice the "Action" part is just an InformedAttribute. It's quickly becoming "Any female character who so much as loses one fight, or ever gets captured." (even if they curb-stomp everyone the rest of the time)

to:

* FauxActionGirl refers to characters famed as [[ActionGirl [[Action Girl Action Girls]] in-universe, but in practice the "Action" part is just an InformedAttribute. It's quickly becoming "Any female character who so much as loses one fight, or ever gets captured." (even if they curb-stomp everyone the rest of the time)
20th Jul '16 6:06:11 AM Morgenthaler
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* PragmaticVillainy is meant for an instance when a character refuses to indulge in an evil act not because [[EvenEvilHasStandards it's too evil]], but because said character knows it's not really to their benefit (wasted resources, PR nightmare, likely to get themselves harmed in the process, not actually possible, etc). It does not necessarily refer to villains who are pragmatic overall (that's closer to NoNonsenseNemesis or occasionally DangerouslyGenreSavvy), nor is it necessarily referring to villains who [[CombatPragmatist fight dirty.]]

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* PragmaticVillainy is meant for an instance when a character refuses to indulge in an evil act not because [[EvenEvilHasStandards it's too evil]], but because said character knows it's not really to their benefit (wasted resources, PR nightmare, likely to get themselves harmed in the process, not actually possible, etc). It does not necessarily refer to villains who are pragmatic overall (that's closer to NoNonsenseNemesis or occasionally DangerouslyGenreSavvy), NoNonsenseNemesis), nor is it necessarily referring to villains who [[CombatPragmatist fight dirty.]]
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