History Main / SpitefulAI

5th Jan '17 6:16:01 PM DanaO
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*** Worse still, computer-controlled allies never do damage to enemies, which of course isn't much help. This also carries over to the rest of the VideoGame/{{LEGO Adaptation Game}}s.

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*** Worse still, computer-controlled allies never do damage to enemies, which of course isn't much help. This also carries over to the rest of the VideoGame/{{LEGO Adaptation Game}}s. Some of the later games attempt to script events so that allies can more or less ''hold'' enemies and appear useful.



* In SpaceEmpires IV if you get too large, all the other races in the galaxy will all suddenly break off relations with you, make peace with each other, and put together a massive military alliance that declares war on you. Even races that had "brotherly" affection for you and have been in a partnership for centuries, even pitiable races that are thousands of years less advanced and have been your vassal state for most of their existence, they all will spontaneously join in the free-for-all and attack you.

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* In SpaceEmpires IV if you get too large, all the other races in the galaxy will all suddenly break off relations with you, make peace with each other, and put together a massive military alliance that declares war on you. Even races that had "brotherly" affection for you and have been in a partnership for centuries, even pitiable races that are thousands of years less advanced and have been your vassal state for most of their existence, they all will spontaneously join in the free-for-all and attack you. (They ''will'' do this against another AI empire, but with a much harder-to-meet criteria of "too large"; also, the definition's weighed in a way that human playstyles tend to more rapidly fill. Also, this part of the stock AI is optional and may be absent or different for the plethora of [[GameMod third-party species]].)
3rd Jan '17 8:23:09 PM Gingerkitteh
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Not to be confused with AIIsACrapshoot, although a lot of ''those'' can be pretty spiteful, too. Related to WeWinBecauseYouDidNot.


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Not to be confused with AIIsACrapshoot, although a lot of ''those'' can be pretty spiteful, too. Related to WeWinBecauseYouDidNot.

WeWinBecauseYouDidnt.

3rd Jan '17 7:46:13 PM Gingerkitteh
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** The spite continues in the latest generation, ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', with the "Minior" creatures: There are seven different colors / variants, but they all have an identical outer shell. You can only know which color the one you're battling is by reducing it to under half health. All of them have the ''[[ActionBomb Self-Destruct]]'' move, which they will use at random, often on their first turn. The only way to prevent it working and catch all seven variants reliably is to battle them using a Pokémon with the "Damp" ability (Golduck, Parasect), which prevents Explosion and Self-Destruct from working when used.

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** The spite continues in the latest generation, ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', with the "Minior" creatures: There are seven different colors / variants, but they all have an identical outer shell. You can only know which color the one you're battling is by reducing it to under half health. All of them have the ''[[ActionBomb Self-Destruct]]'' move, which they will use at random, often on their first turn. The only way to prevent it working and catch all seven variants reliably is to battle them using a Pokémon with the "Damp" ability (Golduck, Parasect), which prevents Explosion and Self-Destruct from working when used.used by anybody (friend or foe) while the Damp Pokémon on the field.
3rd Jan '17 7:44:11 PM Gingerkitteh
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** The spite continues in the latest generation, ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', with the "Minior" creatures: There are seven different colors / variants, but they all have an identical outer shell. You can only know which color the one you're battling is by reducing it to under half health. All of them have the ''[[ActionBomb Self-Destruct]]'' move, which they will use at random, often on their first turn. The only way to prevent it working and catch all seven variants reliably is to battle them using a Pokémon with the "Damp" ability (such as some Golduck), which prevents Explosion and Self-Destruct from working when used.

to:

** The spite continues in the latest generation, ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', with the "Minior" creatures: There are seven different colors / variants, but they all have an identical outer shell. You can only know which color the one you're battling is by reducing it to under half health. All of them have the ''[[ActionBomb Self-Destruct]]'' move, which they will use at random, often on their first turn. The only way to prevent it working and catch all seven variants reliably is to battle them using a Pokémon with the "Damp" ability (such as some Golduck), (Golduck, Parasect), which prevents Explosion and Self-Destruct from working when used.
3rd Jan '17 7:42:53 PM Gingerkitteh
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** The AI drivers in some games, ''8'' for instance, have been known to intentionally run wipe themselves out on your back-held item just to make sure you can't use it. Especially if it's a red shell, which would be great for catching the racer ahead of you, or the Bob-omb, which would blow up and take you out with it.

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** The AI drivers in some games, ''8'' for instance, have been known to intentionally run into and wipe themselves out on your back-held item just to make sure you can't use it. Especially if it's a red shell, which would be great for catching the racer ahead of you, or the Bob-omb, which would blow up and take you out with it.
3rd Jan '17 6:21:13 PM Gingerkitteh
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Added DiffLines:

** The spite continues in the latest generation, ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', with the "Minior" creatures: There are seven different colors / variants, but they all have an identical outer shell. You can only know which color the one you're battling is by reducing it to under half health. All of them have the ''[[ActionBomb Self-Destruct]]'' move, which they will use at random, often on their first turn. The only way to prevent it working and catch all seven variants reliably is to battle them using a Pokémon with the "Damp" ability (such as some Golduck), which prevents Explosion and Self-Destruct from working when used.
3rd Dec '16 6:57:33 AM elemt
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* In ''VideoGame/MasterOfOrion'', especially MOO1, any A.I faction you are at war with won't hesitate to deliberately vote for your opponent in the Galactic Council election just to spite you, which if he is elected causes him to win the game, making the AI faction lose the game themselves as a result of their vote. Note that there is no allied victory in MOO, it's evey man for himself. The only rational thing to do for the A.I faction in such a situation is to abstain, which ensures that nobody is elected and therefore prevents the player from winning just as much, but the AI hates you so much that they're willing to deliberately lose the game just to make the player lose as well.

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* In ''VideoGame/MasterOfOrion'', especially MOO1, any A.I faction you are at war with won't hesitate to deliberately vote for your opponent in the Galactic Council election just to spite you, which if he is elected causes him to win the game, making the AI faction lose the game themselves as a result of their vote. Note that there is no allied victory in MOO, it's evey every man for himself. The only rational thing to do for the A.I faction in such a situation is to abstain, which ensures that nobody is elected and therefore prevents the player from winning just as much, but the AI hates you so much that they're willing to deliberately lose the game just to make the player lose as well.well.
* In ''Videogame/LordsOfMagic'' enemies will always prioritize killing your mage over anything else, even though the mage likely expended all of their mana at the very beginning and will have no further effect on the battle (besides the enemies ignoring all the real dangers to chase them down). They do this if they're a band of marauders loyal to no one, fighting to defend their capital city, or any other circumstance that should make them prioritize winning the current battle over denying you use of the mage in future battles against someone else.
22nd Oct '16 6:24:32 AM thatother1dude
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** In one quest you have a single character supporting a bunch of moogles in a fight. This is a teammate who will constantly try to use the haste spell until it works. The problem with this is it's a tinkerer, meaning that he will keep using red gear (grants one team's entire party haste, determined by what amounts to a coin flip but the RNG seems to favor the enemy team) and, if failing, keeping the other team sped up getting in too many attacks that the player can do nothing at all against it. The thing is, unless you can haste your entire party, he will do this unless rendered unable to, such as by debuff, and the second one member has slown down he will start up again. However, aside from that he actually acts rather smartly in combat, meaning that if you can stop him from casting he will start fighting.

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** In one quest you have a single character supporting a bunch of moogles in a fight. This is a teammate who will constantly try to use the haste spell until it works. The problem with this is it's a tinkerer, meaning that he will keep using red gear (grants Red Gear (randomly grants one team's entire party haste, determined by what amounts to a coin flip but the RNG seems to favor the enemy team) haste) and, if failing, keeping the other team sped up getting in too many attacks that the player can do nothing at all against it. The thing is, unless you can haste your entire party, he will do this unless rendered unable to, such as by debuff, and the second one member has slown down he will start up again. However, aside from that he actually acts rather smartly in combat, meaning that if you can stop him from casting he will start fighting.
22nd Oct '16 6:17:16 AM thatother1dude
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* In the ''{{Pokemon}}'' games, wild [[{{Mons}} Pokémon]] such as Geodude and Voltorb will often blow up on you for no good reason. Why would wild animals [[NonLethalKO knock themselves unconscious]] [[SenselessSacrifice just to damage you?]] How bizarre. At least Electrodes' explosions run on their lackluster Attack stat, making them less powerful than they could have been (although their high speed means it's hard to kill them before they attack you and possibly blow up on you). The same cannot be said of Gravelers, the evolved form of Geodude. Their Attack stat is respectable, which means Selfdestruct hurts a '''lot'''. Even worse, the damn things often have the Sturdy ability, [[LastChanceHitPoint which allows them to survive an otherwise fatal hit]] - there is nothing more annoying than landing what should have been a OneHitKO on a Graveler, but seeing it hang on by a sliver of health and blast the Pokémon you were trying to level up to smithereens. And of course, in some caves the damn things are '''[[GoddamnedBats everywhere]]'''.
** [[TruthInTelevision Bees do this in real life, but with deadlier consequences for themselves.]]
** Interestingly, Literature/{{Discworld}} might hold the explanation for moves like Explosion and Self Destruct. To sum up, dragons in this series breathe fire not by being intensely magical, but by having more in common with a badly run chemical factory than your average lizard, and thus are prone to exploding at the slightest provocation. This, posit the books, is actually quite beneficial on a species level (not, obviously, on an individual level); if you taste like a faceful of violent explosive death, predators drop you from the menu ''really fast''.
*** Or for a real world example, look at poisonous creatures, such as monarch butterflies. Their toxins only kick in after the monarch has been eaten, meaning it doesn't do that particular butterfly any good - but the predator learns to not eat the monarch's siblings.
*** The problem here is that poisonous creatures like the monarch are colorful and easy to see like how bees are black and yellow as a big warning to predators. Geodude and Voltorb are rocks and a large pokeball, so CAMOUFLAGED creatures. Rather than using their own safety to protect their group and scare away predators, they tempt you closer just to blow up in your face. Geodude might have the excuse that you startle or step on them in some way thinking they're just a rock, but Voltorb look like itemboxes! Most trainers already don't want to fight Voltorb to go with the above examples but are TRICKED into fighting them. And you don't even need to battle Electrodes--their Pokedex entries say they'll explode mainly because they find it [[ItAmusedMe amusing]] (in the anime, exploded Electrodes do often have a gigantic grin on their face and lack the "KO'd" crossed-out eyes).
*** While that's a fair complaint for Geodude, Voltorb/Electrode looking like Pokeballs/Item Boxes probably isn't an example of evolutionary camoflage (unless Pokeball tech has been around for literally millions of years in that universe). If they evolved, the red/white colouring probably did indeed come about as a warning for other creatures; Pokeballs are made to look like them, not the other way around. The alternative is that those creatures are some sort of science-experiment-gone-wrong offshoot of Pokeballs (surprisingly possible in the Pokemon universe), but that would mean both their colouring and behaviour no longer need to make much evolutionary sense either: they didn't evolve.

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* In the ''{{Pokemon}}'' games, wild ''{{Pokemon}}'':
** Wild
[[{{Mons}} Pokémon]] such as Geodude and Voltorb will often blow up on you for no good reason. Why would wild animals [[NonLethalKO knock themselves unconscious]] [[SenselessSacrifice just to damage you?]] How bizarre. At least Electrodes' explosions run on their lackluster Attack stat, making them less powerful than they could have been (although their high speed means it's hard to kill them before they attack you and possibly blow up on you). The same cannot be said of Gravelers, the evolved form of Geodude. Their Attack stat is respectable, which means Selfdestruct hurts a '''lot'''. Even worse, the damn things often have the Sturdy ability, [[LastChanceHitPoint which allows them to survive an otherwise fatal hit]] - there is nothing more annoying than landing what should have been a OneHitKO on a Graveler, but seeing it hang on by a sliver of health and blast the Pokémon you were trying to level up to smithereens. And of course, in some caves the damn things are '''[[GoddamnedBats everywhere]]'''.
** [[TruthInTelevision Bees do this in real life, but with deadlier consequences for themselves.]]
** Interestingly, Literature/{{Discworld}} might hold the explanation for moves like Explosion and Self Destruct. To sum up, dragons in this series breathe fire not by being intensely magical, but by having more in common with a badly run chemical factory than your average lizard, and thus are prone to exploding at the slightest provocation. This, posit the books, is actually quite beneficial on a species level (not, obviously, on an individual level); if you taste like a faceful of violent explosive death, predators drop you from the menu ''really fast''.
*** Or for a real world example, look at poisonous creatures, such as monarch butterflies. Their toxins only kick in after the monarch has been eaten, meaning it doesn't do that particular butterfly any good - but the predator learns to not eat the monarch's siblings.
*** The problem here is that poisonous creatures like the monarch are colorful and easy to see like how bees are black and yellow as a big warning to predators. Geodude and Voltorb are rocks and a large pokeball, so CAMOUFLAGED creatures. Rather than using their own safety to protect their group and scare away predators, they tempt you closer just to blow up in your face. Geodude might have the excuse that you startle or step on them in some way thinking they're just a rock, but Voltorb look like itemboxes! Most trainers already don't want to fight Voltorb to go with the above examples but are TRICKED into fighting them. And you don't even need to battle Electrodes--their Pokedex entries say they'll explode mainly because they find it [[ItAmusedMe amusing]] (in the anime, exploded Electrodes do often have a gigantic grin on their face and lack the "KO'd" crossed-out eyes).
*** While that's a fair complaint for Geodude, Voltorb/Electrode looking like Pokeballs/Item Boxes probably isn't an example of evolutionary camoflage (unless Pokeball tech has been around for literally millions of years in that universe). If they evolved, the red/white colouring probably did indeed come about as a warning for other creatures; Pokeballs are made to look like them, not the other way around. The alternative is that those creatures are some sort of science-experiment-gone-wrong offshoot of Pokeballs (surprisingly possible in the Pokemon universe), but that would mean both their colouring and behaviour no longer need to make much evolutionary sense either: they didn't evolve.
16th Oct '16 11:11:50 AM nombretomado
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* This rarely happens in ''FinalFantasyTactics'', but given that you don't get EXP for killing blows, it's less of an inconvenience. Now, when your ''allies'' do it...
** In ''FinalFantasyTacticsA2'', there are quite a few escort missions, and while in some the allies will actively flee your foes, some insist on diving right into the action, exposing themselves to certain doom as the enemies will usually target them when able. The Paladin's Cover ability can solve this problem, though.
*** Also in Tactics A2, in one quest you have a single character supporting a bunch of moogles in a fight. This is a teammate who will constantly try to use the haste spell until it works. The problem with this is it's a tinkerer, meaning that he will keep using red gear (grants one team's entire party haste, determined by what amounts to a coin flip but the RNG seems to favor the enemy team) and, if failing, keeping the other team sped up getting in too many attacks that the player can do nothing at all against it. The thing is, unless you can haste your entire party, he will do this unless rendered unable to, such as by debuff, and the second one member has slown down he will start up again. However, aside from that he actually acts rather smartly in combat, meaning that if you can stop him from casting he will start fighting.
*** By the way, the rest of the above fight is GuideDangIt, not this trope, but no matter what you've done for those moogles, that tinkerer will always insist on speeding up the enemies.

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* This rarely happens in ''FinalFantasyTactics'', ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'', but given that you don't get EXP for killing blows, it's less of an inconvenience. Now, when your ''allies'' do it...
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsA2'':
** In ''FinalFantasyTacticsA2'', there There are quite a few escort missions, and while in some the allies will actively flee your foes, some insist on diving right into the action, exposing themselves to certain doom as the enemies will usually target them when able. The Paladin's Cover ability can solve this problem, though.
*** Also in Tactics A2, in ** In one quest you have a single character supporting a bunch of moogles in a fight. This is a teammate who will constantly try to use the haste spell until it works. The problem with this is it's a tinkerer, meaning that he will keep using red gear (grants one team's entire party haste, determined by what amounts to a coin flip but the RNG seems to favor the enemy team) and, if failing, keeping the other team sped up getting in too many attacks that the player can do nothing at all against it. The thing is, unless you can haste your entire party, he will do this unless rendered unable to, such as by debuff, and the second one member has slown down he will start up again. However, aside from that he actually acts rather smartly in combat, meaning that if you can stop him from casting he will start fighting.
*** By the way, the rest of the above fight is GuideDangIt, not this trope, but no matter what you've done for those moogles, that tinkerer will always insist on speeding up the enemies.
fighting.
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