History Main / SpiritualAntithesis

22nd May '17 7:24:51 PM PaulA
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** The film adaptation of ''Starship Troopers'' also did this. See "Film" above.
20th May '17 1:56:56 AM GentlemensDame883
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* Creator/MakotoShinkai's last two works have strong contrasts with his two previous works.

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* Some of Creator/MakotoShinkai's last two works have strong contrasts with his two previous works.each other:


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** ''Anime/YourName'' in turn affirms the views of ''Voices'' and ''Place'' while rejecting those of ''Centimeters'' and ''Children'' - even when the universe itself seems bent on separating people and making them forget each other, love will eventually prevail and no barrier is insurmountable - not distance, [[spoiler:not time, and not even death.]]
13th May '17 12:29:49 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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** The second is the {{mockumentary}} ''Film/CSATheConfederateStatesOfAmerica'', which probably wasn't intentional. Both ''CSA'' and ''[=DoD=]'' depict worlds in which the values of the DeepSouth's planter aristocrats took over the United States, the nation subjugating Latin America under an apartheid-like system while keeping black people enslaved well into the 20th century, all while a less-powerful nation in the northern half of North America fiercely opposes everything it stands for. The difference is in tone. ''CSA'' [[SlidingScaleOfAlternateHistoryPlausibility plays fast and loose with plausibility]] and is largely PlayedForLaughs as a BlackComedy satire of American race relations, the film's Confederacy ultimately portrayed as NotSoDifferent from our world's America. ''Decades of Darkness'', meanwhile, strives for plausibility, and is very much ''not'' played for laughs -- by the end, it's becoming an increasingly oppressive dystopia even for its white citizens (to say nothing of the brutalization of its non-white underclass), growing so unrecognizable from our world's United States that readers have taken to calling it "the *US", with a conspicuous asterisk.

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** The second is the {{mockumentary}} ''Film/CSATheConfederateStatesOfAmerica'', which probably wasn't intentional. Both ''CSA'' and ''[=DoD=]'' depict worlds in which the values of the DeepSouth's planter aristocrats took over the United States, the nation subjugating Latin America under an apartheid-like system while keeping black people enslaved well into the 20th century, all while a less-powerful nation in the northern half of North America (UsefulNotes/{{Canada}} in ''CSA'', an alliance of Canada and [[HollywoodNewEngland New England]] in ''[=DoD=]'') fiercely opposes everything it stands for. The difference is in tone. ''CSA'' [[SlidingScaleOfAlternateHistoryPlausibility plays fast and loose with plausibility]] and is largely PlayedForLaughs as a BlackComedy satire of American race relations, the film's Confederacy ultimately portrayed as NotSoDifferent from our world's America. ''Decades of Darkness'', meanwhile, strives for plausibility, and is very much ''not'' played for laughs -- by the end, it's becoming an increasingly oppressive dystopia even for its white citizens (to say nothing of the brutalization of its non-white underclass), growing oppressive, {{dystopia}}n society is so unrecognizable from our world's United States that readers have taken to calling it "the *US", with a conspicuous asterisk.
13th May '17 12:21:24 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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** The second is the {{mockumentary}} ''Film/CSATheConfederateStatesOfAmerica'', which probably wasn't intentional. ''CSA'' depicted a world in which [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar the Confederacy]] and its values took over America, and was largely PlayedForLaughs as a satire of American race relations, the film's Confederacy ultimately portrayed as NotSoDifferent from our world's America. ''Decades of Darkness'', meanwhile, depicts an America that was dominated early on by the planter aristocrats of the DeepSouth (the people who formed the Confederacy in our world) after a much earlier Civil War that sees the most stridently anti-slavery parts of the country [[DividedStatesOfAmerica break off]]. It is very much ''not'' played for laughs -- by the end, it's becoming an increasingly oppressive dystopia even for its white citizens, growing so unrecognizable from our world's United States that readers have taken to calling it "the *US", with a conspicuous asterisk.

to:

** The second is the {{mockumentary}} ''Film/CSATheConfederateStatesOfAmerica'', which probably wasn't intentional. Both ''CSA'' depicted a world and ''[=DoD=]'' depict worlds in which [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar the Confederacy]] and its values of the DeepSouth's planter aristocrats took over America, the United States, the nation subjugating Latin America under an apartheid-like system while keeping black people enslaved well into the 20th century, all while a less-powerful nation in the northern half of North America fiercely opposes everything it stands for. The difference is in tone. ''CSA'' [[SlidingScaleOfAlternateHistoryPlausibility plays fast and was loose with plausibility]] and is largely PlayedForLaughs as a BlackComedy satire of American race relations, the film's Confederacy ultimately portrayed as NotSoDifferent from our world's America. ''Decades of Darkness'', meanwhile, depicts an America that was dominated early on by the planter aristocrats of the DeepSouth (the people who formed the Confederacy in our world) after a much earlier Civil War that sees the most stridently anti-slavery parts of the country [[DividedStatesOfAmerica break off]]. It strives for plausibility, and is very much ''not'' played for laughs -- by the end, it's becoming an increasingly oppressive dystopia even for its white citizens, citizens (to say nothing of the brutalization of its non-white underclass), growing so unrecognizable from our world's United States that readers have taken to calling it "the *US", with a conspicuous asterisk.
13th May '17 12:12:05 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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** The second is the {{mockumentary}} ''Film/CSAConfederateStatesOfAmerica'', which probably wasn't intentional. ''CSA'' depicted a world in which [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar the Confederacy]] and its values took over America, and was largely PlayedForLaughs as a satire of American race relations, the film's Confederacy ultimately portrayed as NotSoDifferent from our world's America. ''Decades of Darkness'', meanwhile, depicts an America that was dominated early on by the planter aristocrats of the DeepSouth (the people who formed the Confederacy in our world) after a much earlier Civil War that sees the most stridently anti-slavery parts of the country [[DividedStatesOfAmerica break off]]. It is very much ''not'' played for laughs -- by the end, it's becoming an increasingly oppressive dystopia even for its white citizens, growing so unrecognizable from our world's United States that readers have taken to calling it "the *US", with a conspicuous asterisk.

to:

** The second is the {{mockumentary}} ''Film/CSAConfederateStatesOfAmerica'', ''Film/CSATheConfederateStatesOfAmerica'', which probably wasn't intentional. ''CSA'' depicted a world in which [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar the Confederacy]] and its values took over America, and was largely PlayedForLaughs as a satire of American race relations, the film's Confederacy ultimately portrayed as NotSoDifferent from our world's America. ''Decades of Darkness'', meanwhile, depicts an America that was dominated early on by the planter aristocrats of the DeepSouth (the people who formed the Confederacy in our world) after a much earlier Civil War that sees the most stridently anti-slavery parts of the country [[DividedStatesOfAmerica break off]]. It is very much ''not'' played for laughs -- by the end, it's becoming an increasingly oppressive dystopia even for its white citizens, growing so unrecognizable from our world's United States that readers have taken to calling it "the *US", with a conspicuous asterisk.
13th May '17 12:11:26 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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[[folder:Web Original]]
* ''Literature/DecadesOfDarkness'', a story featured on Website/AlternateHistoryDotCom, can read as this to two separate AlternateHistory works.
** The first is Creator/SMStirling's Literature/TheDraka series, which was intentional on the writer's part. He found the series, which revolves around an [[AmoralAfrikaner evil South African slaver empire]] that [[TheBadGuyWins takes over the world]], to be wildly implausible from an allohistorical standpoint, so he wrote ''Decades of Darkness'' as basically "the Draka, but done right".
** The second is the {{mockumentary}} ''Film/CSAConfederateStatesOfAmerica'', which probably wasn't intentional. ''CSA'' depicted a world in which [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar the Confederacy]] and its values took over America, and was largely PlayedForLaughs as a satire of American race relations, the film's Confederacy ultimately portrayed as NotSoDifferent from our world's America. ''Decades of Darkness'', meanwhile, depicts an America that was dominated early on by the planter aristocrats of the DeepSouth (the people who formed the Confederacy in our world) after a much earlier Civil War that sees the most stridently anti-slavery parts of the country [[DividedStatesOfAmerica break off]]. It is very much ''not'' played for laughs -- by the end, it's becoming an increasingly oppressive dystopia even for its white citizens, growing so unrecognizable from our world's United States that readers have taken to calling it "the *US", with a conspicuous asterisk.
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11th May '17 4:41:48 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* Series/{{Veep}} is basically the photo-negative of Series/ParksAndRecreation. The shows share the basic premise of female leads surrounded by misfits trying to cope with the behind-the-scenes antics of government, but that's where the similarities end. The latter focused of the actions of a determined, idealistic public servant whose co-workers quickly became inseparable TrueCompanions, tackling every obstacle with [[TakeAThirdOption Third Options]] or someone (usually Leslie) falling on their sword ForHappiness. Conversely, the former centered around a group of unrepentant narcissists - ranging from amoral sycophants to total [[TheSociopath Sociopaths]] - who can and will say or do just about anything to keep their jobs one more day. While Parks and Rec poked fun at the bureaucracies of politics, it always showed the heroes achieving ''some'' amount of success through hard-work, creative thinking, and a little bit of luck; Veep's comedy was far more mean-spirited, with its "heroes" taking two steps back for every foot forward, with the little accomplishments usually coming from someone being thrown under the bus. Incidentally, Selina Meyer had black hair, whereas, Leslie Knope is a blond.

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* Series/{{Veep}} ''Series/{{Veep}}'' is basically the photo-negative of Series/ParksAndRecreation. ''Series/ParksAndRecreation''. The shows share the basic premise of being comedies about female leads surrounded by misfits trying to cope with the behind-the-scenes antics of government, but that's where the similarities end. The latter focused of the actions of a determined, idealistic public servant whose co-workers quickly became inseparable TrueCompanions, tackling every obstacle with [[TakeAThirdOption Third Options]] or someone (usually Leslie) falling on their sword ForHappiness. Conversely, the former centered around a group of unrepentant narcissists - narcissists, ranging from amoral sycophants to total [[TheSociopath Sociopaths]] - sociopaths]], who can and will say or do just about anything to keep their jobs one more day. While Parks ''Parks and Rec Rec'' poked fun at the bureaucracies of politics, it always showed the heroes achieving ''some'' amount of success through hard-work, hard work, creative thinking, and a little bit of luck; Veep's luck. ''Veep''[='=]s comedy was far more mean-spirited, with its "heroes" taking two steps back for every foot forward, with the little accomplishments usually coming from someone being thrown under the bus. Incidentally, Selina Meyer had black hair, whereas, whereas Leslie Knope is a blond.blonde.



* Sean O'Neal of the Website/AVClub [[http://www.avclub.com/article/1996-fox-news-and-daily-show-made-politics-spectat-240530 discussed this]] with regards to the Creator/FoxNewsChannel and ''Series/TheDailyShow'', a pair of TV news 'alternatives' that were both launched in 1996. Fox News saw itself as a corrective to perceived bias in the American news media, its audience was dominated by the baby boomers, and its commentary ran on righteous indignation and moral outrage. ''Daily Show'' host Creator/JonStewart, meanwhile, always insisted that he was a comedian rather than a journalist, but regardless, the show came to be seen, especially by the millennials and Gen-Xers who made up most of its audience, as a corrective to the "gut feelings over facts" nature of modern journalism that, during the show's height in the '00s, its viewers saw exemplified in Fox News. Furthermore, while Fox News was a decidedly conservative-leaning outlet, ''The Daily Show'' was just as stridently liberal-leaning.\\
However, O'Neal concludes that, despite these differences, the two were ultimately [[NotSoDifferent two sides of the same coin]] in how they contributed to a blurring of the line between news and entertainment and to a general cynicism of the media and politics, Fox News by getting middle-aged and older people to see liberal journalists and politicians as untrustworthy, and ''The Daily Show'' by getting younger people to see ''all'' journalists and politicians as buffoons. He held up the debate between Stewart and Fox News pundit [[Series/TheOReillyFactor Bill O'Reilly]] in 2012 as the pinnacle of this, with the debate ultimately being as much a {{spectacle}} as it was a serious discussion -- which was [[http://entertainment.time.com/2012/10/07/the-stewart-oreilly-debate-an-inside-view-of-a-seriously-hilarious-rumble/ precisely what Stewart and O'Reilly intended.]]

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* Sean O'Neal of the Website/AVClub [[http://www.avclub.com/article/1996-fox-news-and-daily-show-made-politics-spectat-240530 discussed this]] with regards to the Creator/FoxNewsChannel and ''Series/TheDailyShow'', a pair of TV news 'alternatives' that were both launched in 1996. Fox News saw itself as a corrective to perceived bias in the American news media, its audience was dominated by the baby boomers, and its commentary ran on righteous indignation and moral outrage. ''Daily Show'' host Creator/JonStewart, meanwhile, always insisted that he was a comedian rather than a journalist, but regardless, the show came to be seen, especially by the millennials and Gen-Xers who made up most of its audience, as a corrective to the "gut feelings over facts" nature of modern journalism that, during the show's height in the '00s, its viewers saw exemplified in Fox News. Furthermore, while Fox News was a decidedly conservative-leaning outlet, ''The Daily Show'' was just as stridently liberal-leaning.\\
\\\
However, O'Neal concludes that, despite these differences, the two shows were ultimately [[NotSoDifferent two sides of the same coin]] in how they contributed to a blurring of the line between news and entertainment and to a general cynicism of the media and politics, Fox News by getting middle-aged and older people to see liberal journalists and politicians as untrustworthy, and ''The Daily Show'' by getting younger people to see ''all'' journalists and politicians as buffoons. He held up the debate between Stewart and Fox News pundit [[Series/TheOReillyFactor Bill O'Reilly]] in 2012 as the pinnacle of this, with the debate ultimately being as much a {{spectacle}} as it was a serious discussion -- which was [[http://entertainment.time.com/2012/10/07/the-stewart-oreilly-debate-an-inside-view-of-a-seriously-hilarious-rumble/ precisely what Stewart and O'Reilly intended.]]


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* Jacky St. James felt that the novel ''Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey'' portrayed [[RomanticizedAbuse an abusive relationship as a realistic depiction]] of UsefulNotes/{{BDSM}}. As a result, she co-created the Creator/{{Showtime}} erotic series ''Submission'' to serve as a rebuke to it and show a more honest and faithful look at the BDSM lifestyle.
9th May '17 7:18:42 AM Raygunguy
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* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}''is this to ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' as they both feature society which is constantly under threat from beings that feed on human emotions(the Grimm on RWBY and Chaos in Warhammer 40000). However, RWBY argues that even in that situation, where totalitarianism could be justified, The society can remain free.

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* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}''is ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'' is this to ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' as they both feature society which is constantly under threat from beings that feed on human emotions(the emotions (the Grimm on RWBY in ''RWBY'' and Chaos in Warhammer 40000).''Warhammer 40000''). However, RWBY argues that even in that situation, where totalitarianism could be justified, The society can remain free.
7th May '17 9:40:56 AM nombretomado
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* ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'' is this to ''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated''. ''Animated'' draws more asthetically from [[WesternAnimation/TheTransformers the G1 cartoon]], and is a bright {{Animesque}} GenreThrowback to {{Saturday Morning Cartoon}}s. ''Prime'' draws more astheticaly from the Franchise/TransformersFilmSeries, and is lot more grim and serious. ''Animated'' deconstructs the series background by showing the GrayAndGrayMorality that started the Autobot / Decepticon war, while ''Prime'' deconstructs the characters themselves to show what made them who they are. ''Animated'' notably echews the more "religious" aspects of the Franchise/{{Transformers}} mythos (Primus, Unicron, the Thirteen) so as not to clutter the show, whereas ''Prime'' deeply explores these concepts as it goes on.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'' is this to ''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated''. ''Animated'' draws more asthetically from [[WesternAnimation/TheTransformers the G1 cartoon]], and is a bright {{Animesque}} GenreThrowback to {{Saturday Morning Cartoon}}s. ''Prime'' draws more astheticaly asthetically from the Franchise/TransformersFilmSeries, Film/TransformersFilmSeries, and is lot more grim and serious. ''Animated'' deconstructs the series background by showing the GrayAndGrayMorality that started the Autobot / Decepticon war, while ''Prime'' deconstructs the characters themselves to show what made them who they are. ''Animated'' notably echews the more "religious" aspects of the Franchise/{{Transformers}} mythos (Primus, Unicron, the Thirteen) so as not to clutter the show, whereas ''Prime'' deeply explores these concepts as it goes on.
2nd May '17 9:16:07 AM Prinzenick
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* The animators of ''WesternAnimation/TheTwistedTalesOfFelixTheCat''intended the show to be the polar opposite of the [[WesternAnimation/JoeOrioloFelixTheCat Joe Oriolo's]] WesternAnimation/FelixTheCat cartoons due to their hatred of that series and love of the original Creator/OttoMessmer [[WesternAnimation/FelixTheCatClassic Felix cartoons]]. Don Oriolo, Joe's son, [[ExecutiveMeddling forced elements from that show like the Magic Bag of Tricks into the first season]], and [[DefiedTrope put a stop to this altogether]] with the second seasons retool making things more in line with the Joe Oriolo version.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SpiritualAntithesis