History Main / SpiceRackPanacea

20th Nov '17 11:35:59 PM DastardlyDemolition
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* As stated on AllNaturalSnakeOil, raw and wholly organic bitter almonds as well as apricot and peach pits (that is the seed within the stone) contain Amygdalin, the chemical used to get the "almond smell", which breaks down in the body. The chemical itself has a nitrile group that decomposes into cyanide. Amygdalin and it's synthetic cousin laetrile have been pushed as "vitamin B17" and has been made claim that it "selectively targets cancer cells" (yes, this is true and no, they don't explain how) and that The FDA is conspiring with "Big Pharma" to withhold information of the "natural cures" for some sinister reason and not because these are so bad that the bags that sell them explicitly state "don't eat more than six a day" (see [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/ConspiracyTheories/HToN Health]]).

to:

* ** As stated on AllNaturalSnakeOil, raw and wholly organic bitter almonds as well as apricot and peach pits (that is the seed within the stone) contain Amygdalin, the chemical used to get the "almond smell", which breaks down in the body. The chemical itself has a nitrile group that decomposes into cyanide. Amygdalin and it's synthetic cousin laetrile have been pushed as "vitamin B17" and has been made claim that it "selectively targets cancer cells" (yes, this is true and no, they don't explain how) and that The FDA is conspiring with "Big Pharma" to withhold information of the "natural cures" for some sinister reason and not because these are so bad that the bags that sell them explicitly state "don't eat more than six a day" (see [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/ConspiracyTheories/HToN Health]]).
20th Nov '17 11:33:26 PM DastardlyDemolition
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* As stated on AllNaturalSnakeOil, raw and wholly organic bitter almonds as well as apricot and peach pits (that is the seed within the stone) contain Amygdalin, the chemical used to get the "almond smell", which breaks down in the body. The chemical itself has a nitrile group that decomposes into cyanide. Amygdalin and it's synthetic cousin laetrile have been pushed as "vitamin B17" and has been made claim that it "selectively targets cancer cells" (yes, this is true and no, they don't explain how) and that The FDA is conspiring with "Big Pharma" to withhold information of the "natural cures" for some sinister reason and not because these are so bad that the bags that sell them explicitly state "don't eat more than six a day" (see [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/ConspiracyTheories/HToN Health]]).
24th Oct '17 6:12:19 PM Malady
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[AC: In Fiction]]

to:

[[AC: [[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:
In Fiction]]Fiction ]]



[[AC: Real Life]]

to:

[[AC: [[/folder]]

[[folder:
Real Life]]Life ]]




to:

[[/folder]]
18th Sep '17 9:53:49 AM ChaoticNovelist
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In the U.S., a recent law has forced advertisements of such herbal remedies, which are not run through the Food and Drug Administration, to say as much at the end of their ads. Thus, you'll [[RattlingOffLegal hear]] or [[UnreadableDisclaimer see]] [[OurLawyersAdvisedThisTrope the following]]: "These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, prevent, treat, or cure any disease." Which basically translates into "[[BlatantLies We just lied through our teeth]]" if the whole point of the ad was to imply that the remedy ''did'' "diagnose, prevent, treat, or cure" a specific disease. The above disclaimer has been derisively dubbed by the medical community as "The Quack Miranda Warning".

to:

In the U.S., a recent law has forced advertisements of such herbal remedies, which are not run through the Food and Drug Administration, to say as much at the end of their ads. Thus, you'll [[RattlingOffLegal hear]] or [[UnreadableDisclaimer see]] [[OurLawyersAdvisedThisTrope the following]]: "These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, prevent, treat, or cure any disease." Which basically translates into "[[BlatantLies We just lied through our teeth]]" if the whole point of the ad was to imply that the remedy ''did'' "diagnose, prevent, treat, or cure" a specific disease. The above disclaimer has been derisively dubbed by the medical community as "The Quack Miranda Warning".



** Nanny Ogg and Granny Weatherwax make use of this tendency almost to excess, with the former providing it as a reason why her [[GargleBlaster scumble]] is a healthy tonic ("It's made from apples. Well, mainly apples."), and the latter explaining to certain folks that some of her medicines contain rare herbal ingredients, like akwa and sukrose. It helps that, on the Disc, when a witch hands you a bottle and says that it will cure your ailments, you'd better darned well believe that it'll cure your ailments.

to:

** Nanny Ogg and Granny Weatherwax make use of this tendency almost to excess, often, with the former providing it as a reason why her [[GargleBlaster scumble]] is a healthy tonic ("It's made from apples. Well, mainly apples."), and the latter explaining to certain folks that some of her medicines contain rare herbal ingredients, like akwa and sukrose. It helps that, on the Disc, when a witch hands you a bottle and says that it will cure your ailments, you'd better darned well believe that it'll cure your ailments.



* Not yet a trope, but it seems that every month or two someone tests some herbal treatment, and discovers that the manufacturer is slipping in ground up Viagra or blood pressure medicine or some other prescription medicine appropriate to the condition. Not that they're mentioning that little fact on the label, opening people to surprise drug interactions and overdoses.
** The consumer's lucky if it is Viagra or blood pressure medicine. Many herbal medicines contain drugs that were banned in the West years ago after they were discovered to be unsafe. Others contain veterinary drugs that aren't safe for human use - one example contained an antibiotic used to treat horses which in humans could be lethal.

to:

* Not yet a trope, but it It seems that every month or two someone tests some herbal treatment, and discovers that the manufacturer is slipping in ground up ground-up Viagra or blood pressure medicine or some other prescription medicine appropriate to the condition. Not that they're mentioning that little fact on the label, opening people to surprise drug interactions and overdoses.
** The
overdoses, and this is if the consumer's lucky if it is Viagra or blood pressure medicine.''lucky''. Many herbal medicines contain drugs that were banned in the West years ago after they were discovered to be unsafe. Others contain veterinary drugs that aren't safe for human use - one example contained an antibiotic used to treat horses which in humans could be lethal.



* During the SARS outbreak, internet chain letters claimed things such as Vitamin C, Belladonna, and Colloidal Silver would cure it. Vitamin C is fairly tame, but Belladonna is a poisonous plant and Colloidal Silver will ''permanently turn your skin blue.''
** Must be noted that colloidal silver ''has'' demonstrated antimicrobial properties in laboratory testing. Silver itself is antimicrobial and sufficiently small or properly arranged silver particles have increased effect, which is why they are used in coatings. ''Ingested'' silver hasn't been sufficiently tested to determine if it has the same properties in the body but toxicity has no known harmful side effects aside from the blue (actually closer to grey) pigmentation.
*** Except for potential kidney failure, and actual antibiotics doing much better in antimicrobial department. Actually taking colloidal silver is pretty much like drinking bleach because it kills germs.
* Come to think of it, someone really did try selling [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_Mineral_Supplement medicinal bleach]] a couple of years ago. Even now, there are those who claim it cures everything from cancer to autism.

to:

* During the SARS outbreak, internet chain letters claimed things such as Vitamin C, Belladonna, and Colloidal Silver would cure it. Vitamin C is fairly tame, but Belladonna is a poisonous plant and Colloidal Silver will ''permanently turn your skin blue.''
** Must be noted that
'' [[note]] colloidal silver ''has'' demonstrated antimicrobial properties in laboratory testing. Silver itself is antimicrobial and sufficiently small or properly arranged silver particles have increased effect, which is why they are used in coatings. ''Ingested'' silver hasn't been sufficiently tested to determine if testing but it has the same properties in the body but toxicity has no known harmful side effects aside from the blue (actually closer to grey) pigmentation.
*** Except for
potential to cause kidney failure, and actual antibiotics doing do much better in antimicrobial department. Actually taking colloidal silver is pretty much like drinking bleach because it kills germs.
germs. [[/note]]
* Come to think of it, someone really did try Someone tried selling [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_Mineral_Supplement medicinal bleach]] a couple of years ago. Even now, there are those who claim it cures everything from cancer to autism.
24th Aug '17 5:47:06 AM Schismatism
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

** Nanny Ogg and Granny Weatherwax make use of this tendency almost to excess, with the former providing it as a reason why her [[GargleBlaster scumble]] is a healthy tonic ("It's made from apples. Well, mainly apples."), and the latter explaining to certain folks that some of her medicines contain rare herbal ingredients, like akwa and sukrose. It helps that, on the Disc, when a witch hands you a bottle and says that it will cure your ailments, you'd better darned well believe that it'll cure your ailments.
10th May '17 5:20:14 AM CynicalBastardo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Come to think of it, someone really did try selling [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_Mineral_Supplement medicinal bleach]] a couple of years ago.

to:

* Come to think of it, someone really did try selling [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_Mineral_Supplement medicinal bleach]] a couple of years ago. Even now, there are those who claim it cures everything from cancer to autism.
20th Apr '17 10:28:45 AM CosmicFerret
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* An episode of ''LawAndOrder'' deals with a doctor selling one of these as a breast cancer cure, with the result that one of her patients dies from complications of the disease.

to:

* An episode of ''LawAndOrder'' ''Series/LawAndOrder'' deals with a doctor selling one of these as a breast cancer cure, with the result that one of her patients dies from complications of the disease.
20th Jan '17 3:18:50 PM Jeduthun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Equally important, there are often no warnings of potentially harmful side-effects, or interactions with prescription drugs, foods, or even other herbal pills; even when there really ought to be.

to:

Equally important, there are often no warnings of potentially harmful side-effects, or interactions with prescription drugs, foods, or even other herbal pills; even when there really ought to be. \n It's wise to remember that NatureIsNotNice and is [[EverythingTryingToKillYou full of things that are trying to kill us]].



See also AllNaturalSnakeOil. For something that actually works, see {{Panacea}}. Compare and contrast SideEffectsInclude.

to:

See also AllNaturalSnakeOil. For something that actually works, see {{Panacea}}. Compare and contrast SideEffectsInclude. Also consider the PlaceboEffect, which means that even useless remedies can produce genuine results since YourMindMakesItReal.
27th Nov '16 12:44:20 PM JET73L
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'': King Verence of Lancre and Queen Magrat, for all their savvy and intelligence (Magrat is a ''herbalist''), think that medicine containing "herbs" is better, something enterprising merchants like [[HonestJohnsDealership C.M.O.T. Dibbler]] (and his Ramtops equivalent Lobsang Diblah) are all too eager to cash in on, by shoving whatever random plants they find into bottles of shampoo and calling it a day.

to:

* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'': King Verence of Lancre and Queen Magrat, for all their savvy and intelligence (Magrat is a ''herbalist''), think that medicine containing "herbs" is better, something enterprising merchants like [[HonestJohnsDealership C.M.O.T. Dibbler]] (and his Ramtops equivalent [[TheShangriLa Lobsang Diblah) Diblah]]) are all too eager to cash in on, by shoving whatever random plants they find into bottles of shampoo and calling it a day.
27th Nov '16 12:43:18 PM JET73L
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'': King Verence of Lancre and Queen Magrat, for all their savvy and intelligence (Magrat is a ''herbalist''), think that medicine containing "herbs" is better, something enterprising merchants like [HonestJohnsDealership C.M.O.T. Dibbler] (and his Ramtops equivalent Lobsang Diblah) are all too eager to cash in on, by shoving whatever random plants they find into bottles of shampoo and calling it a day.

to:

* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'': King Verence of Lancre and Queen Magrat, for all their savvy and intelligence (Magrat is a ''herbalist''), think that medicine containing "herbs" is better, something enterprising merchants like [HonestJohnsDealership [[HonestJohnsDealership C.M.O.T. Dibbler] Dibbler]] (and his Ramtops equivalent Lobsang Diblah) are all too eager to cash in on, by shoving whatever random plants they find into bottles of shampoo and calling it a day.
This list shows the last 10 events of 33. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SpiceRackPanacea