History Main / SpellMyNameWithAThe

16th Nov '16 5:51:03 PM Divra
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16th Nov '16 5:46:35 PM Divra
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* The chief of a Scots clan will usually refer to himself or herself in this way: the chief of Clan [=MacFarlane=], for instance, is "the[= MacFarlane=]". (If a chieftainship descends to someone who doesn't have that clan name as their surname - say, to the child of a woman who married outside the clan - the new chief is expected to change his or her surname to match.)

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* The chief of a Scots clan will usually refer to himself or herself in this way: the chief of Clan [=MacFarlane=], for instance, is "the[= MacFarlane=]".MacFarlane=]" (or, more formally, "the[= MacFarlane=] of[= MacFarlane=]" or "the[= MacFarlane=] of that ilk]). (If a chieftainship descends to someone who doesn't have that clan name as their surname - say, to the child of a woman who married outside the clan - the new chief is expected to change his or her surname to match.)
7th Nov '16 11:38:46 AM Discar
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* ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'': Lopen mentions that his family members often call him ''the'' Lopen, because no one has ever heard of anyone else with that name. In his own narration, he occasionally uses it for himself as well.
2nd Nov '16 1:24:12 AM Tamfang
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** Similarly The Alameda, San Jose, and The Embarcadero, San Francisco, California.



* Holders of UK peerage titles are strictly ''The'' Lord Loveaduck or ''The'' Lady Day, to distinguish them from non-peers who might have those titles; e.g. the younger sons of a Marquis ([[Literature/BridesheadRevisited Lord Sebastian Flyte]]) or the wife of a Knight (Lady Elspeth Flashman.)
** Similarly, but oddly different at the same time, a baroness can refer to herself as The Baroness (name) if she earned her title under her own merit.

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* Holders of UK peerage titles are strictly ''The'' Lord Loveaduck or ''The'' Lady Day, to distinguish them from non-peers who might have those titles; e.g. the younger sons of a Marquis ([[Literature/BridesheadRevisited Lord Sebastian Flyte]]) or the wife of a Knight (Lady Elspeth Flashman.)
Flashman).
** Similarly, but oddly different at Courtesy peerages formally don't get the same time, a baroness can refer to herself as article. The Baroness (name) if she earned her title under her own merit.eldest son of His Grace the Duke of Norfolk is Earl of Surrey -- not ''the'' Earl of Surrey, that's really his dad. The distinction is not scrupulously observed. He'd normally be called ''Lord Surrey'' anyway.



* A street in San Jose, California is officially named "The Alameda".
** The Embarcadero in San Francisco.



* Most people insert "the" in front of ship names, thus we have the ''Enterprise'' or the ''Intrepid''. However at least in the west, a ship name is supposed to be referred to as if it were a person's. Therefore it's actually grammatically correct to ''avert'' this trope (see the ''Firefly'' example above).

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* Most people insert "the" in front of ship names, thus we have the ''Enterprise'' or the ''Intrepid''. However However, at least in the west, a ship name is supposed to be referred to as if it were a person's. Therefore it's actually grammatically correct to ''avert'' this trope (see the ''Firefly'' example above).



* A defunct department store chain in El Paso, TX called "The Popular" invoked this trope. Moreover, Spanish speaking people even referred to it as "El Popular".

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* A "The Popular" was a defunct department store chain in El Paso, TX called "The Popular" invoked this trope. Moreover, Spanish speaking Texas. Spanish-speaking people even referred to it as "El Popular".
2nd Nov '16 1:14:37 AM Tamfang
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* 'Der Führer' or 'The Führer' a.k.a. Adolf Hitler.

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* 'Der Führer' ('the Leader' or 'The Führer' 'the Guide') a.k.a. Adolf Hitler.



** Consequently, any Arabic name that starts with "Al" is automatically this.

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** Consequently, any Arabic name that starts with "Al" is automatically this.this, unless it's the other word ''al'' (as in ''Al Saud'') meaning 'family'.



* There are several countries like this, including [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gambia The Gambia]], the Sudan, the Philippines, the United States, the UK, and just about any country that starts with "The Republic" or similar. Also, many geographic regions are like this too, especially places that used to be ''the (former)''. In some cases, the name doesn't make much sense without the definite article (e.g. the Philippines, the US, the UK, the Czech Republic), while some seem to just have it there (I'm looking at you, Sudan and Gambia...)
** Some countries take a definite article in Arabic. These are not always the same ones that take a definite article in English. Iraq, for example, is literally "The Iraq." This is also the reason (the) Sudan takes the definite article: in Arabic (the language of most Sudanese), it's ''Al-Suudaan'', "The Sudan", with "Sudan" meaning "Land of the Blacks" (since the Sudanese are for the most part Black).
*** And it's not just Arab countries that get this weirdness: Austria is ''Al-Nimsaa'' ("Al" being "the", and "Nimsaa" from ''Niemcy'', a common Slavic name for German-speakers; it probably came from South Slavic via Turkish), and Argentina, which is ''Al-Arjentiin''.
*** The same happens in some Spanish dialects, like Argentinian and Peruvian Spanish: Some countries are named with the Spanish article ''El'' (The) as Argentina (La Argentina), Peru (El Peru), Japan (El Japon), Canada (El Canada), etc. On the other hand, other dialects, like the Mexican one, avoid this like a plague, since it's considered outdated speech. The only exception to this rule is India (La India), albeit it's starting to fall into disuse in some circles.
** And subverting this: despite being ''The'' Ukraine in the popular mind, the country is merely "Ukraine," due to 19th century translations ("Ukrayina" derives from a term for "Borderland"). While the Ukrainian language had no articles, the Ukrainian translators just assumed you were supposed to put one in English. "The" has been falling out of usage as of late, with "Ukraine" gaining popularity.

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* There are several countries like this, including [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gambia The Gambia]], the Sudan, the Philippines, the United States, the UK, and just about any country that starts with "The Republic" or similar. Also, many geographic regions are like this too, especially places that used to be ''the (former)''. In some cases, the name doesn't make much sense without the definite article (e.g. the Philippines, the US, the UK, the Czech Republic), while some seem to just have it there (I'm looking at you, Sudan and Gambia...)
).
** Some countries take a definite article in Arabic. These are not always the same ones that take a definite article in English. Iraq, for example, is literally "The "the Iraq." This is also the reason (the) Sudan takes the definite article: in Arabic (the language of most Sudanese), it's ''Al-Suudaan'', "The ''al-Suudaan'', "the Sudan", with "Sudan" meaning "Land of the Blacks" (since the Sudanese are for the most part Black).
*** And it's not just Arab countries that get this weirdness: Austria is ''Al-Nimsaa'' ("Al" being "the", and "Nimsaa" from ''al-Nimsaa'' (from ''Niemcy'', a common Slavic name for German-speakers; it probably came from South Slavic via Turkish), and Argentina, which is ''Al-Arjentiin''.
''al-Arjentiin''.
*** The same happens in some Spanish dialects, Romance languages, like Argentinian and Peruvian Spanish: Some some countries are named with the Spanish article ''El'' (The) a definite article, such as Argentina (La Argentina), Peru (El Peru), Japan (El Japon), Canada (El Canada), ''la Argentina'', ''el Perú'', ''el Japón'' (Japan), ''el Canada'', etc. On the other hand, other dialects, like the Mexican one, avoid this like a plague, since it's considered outdated speech. The only exception to this rule is India (La India), ''la India'', albeit it's starting to fall into disuse in some circles.
** And subverting this: despite being ''The'' ''the'' Ukraine in the popular mind, the country is merely "Ukraine," mind due to 19th century translations ("Ukrayina" derives from a term for "Borderland")."Borderland"), the country is officially merely "Ukraine". While the Ukrainian language had no articles, the Ukrainian translators just assumed you were supposed to put one in English. "The" has been falling out of usage as of late, with "Ukraine" gaining popularity.



** Old colonial names for different countries often had this, as they were often seen as regions that were expanded into rather than sovereign states: "The Canadas", "The Belgian (or French) Congo", etc. Sometimes, different English-speaking countries will use these names (i.e. Argentina vs. The Argentine). As well, names like "The Americas", "The Koreas", and so forth exist when there's more than one of a country or continent, and they're both/all being referenced at once.

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** Old colonial names for different countries often had this, as they were often seen as regions that were expanded into rather than sovereign states: "The "the Canadas", "The "the Belgian (or French) Congo", etc. Sometimes, different English-speaking countries will use these names (i.e.(e.g. Argentina vs. The the Argentine). As well, names like "The "the Americas", "The "the Koreas", and so forth exist when there's more than one of a country or continent, and they're both/all being referenced at once.



* The painter Doménikos Theotokópoulos was known as ''El Greco'': an archaic Spanish word for "the Greek" (he worked in Spain).

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* The painter Doménikos Theotokópoulos Theotokópoulos, who worked in Spain, was understandably known as ''El Greco'': an archaic Greco'', the Greek (though the modern Spanish word for "the Greek" (he worked in Spain).'Greek' is ''Griego''; ''Greco'' is good Italian).



** Italian is somewhat weird about first names, the article before is considered canon ''only'' for female first names. While the construction is identical (and it is often used informally) it's considered a grammatical error to use it before male names.

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** Italian is somewhat weird about first names, names: the article before is considered canon ''only'' for female first names. While the construction is identical (and it is often used informally) it's considered a grammatical error to use it before male names.



** Bonus Point: Cid is Spanish term for Arabic "Sayid", which means a noble man: a Master. So El Cid means TheMaster.

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** Bonus Point: Cid is Spanish term for ''Cid'' comes from Arabic "Sayid", ''sayid'', which means a noble man: a Master. So El Cid means TheMaster.



* When things that are famous throughout the world are named in untranslated Spanish the Spanish equivalent to "the", "el" for male nouns and "la" for female nouns, is made part of the name for mistake, in that way what shall be "the niño current" is known as "the el niño current" despite being known in Spanish as "La corriente del niño."

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* When things that are famous throughout the world are named in untranslated Spanish Spanish, the Spanish equivalent to "the", "el" for male nouns and "la" for female nouns, article ''el/la'' is made part of the name for mistake, in that way by mistake; thus what shall ought to be "the niño Niño current" is known as "the el niño El Niño current" despite being known in Spanish as "La ''la corriente del niño."Niño''.



* Partisan leaders in the Peninsular War were frequently known by titles beginning "El", such as "El Empecinado" (The Undaunted) and "El Medico" (The Doctor... probably not ''[[Series/DoctorWho that]]'' one).

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* Partisan leaders in the Peninsular War were frequently known by titles beginning "El", such as "El Empecinado" (The Undaunted) and "El Medico" Médico" (The Doctor... probably not ''[[Series/DoctorWho that]]'' one).



* The Dalles, Oregon
** The Woodlands, Texas.

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* The Dalles, Oregon
**
Oregon; The Woodlands, Texas.



** El: masculine singular (Ex: El Cerrito in the UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco Bay Area, El Camino Real throughout UsefulNotes/{{California}}, and El Centro in southeastern California)
** Los: masculine plural (Ex: UsefulNotes/LosAngeles in [=SoCal=] and Los Banos in the San Joaquin Valley)
** La: feminine singular (Ex: La Jolla, a neighborhood in San Diego, CA)
** Las: feminine plural (Ex: UsefulNotes/LasVegas, NV and Las Cruces, NM)
** Similar things occur in other languages too, for instance in French you have "la France", "Le Havre", "Le Mans", "les Halles" and "les Gobelins" (neighborhoods in Paris), "les Pays-Bas" (the Netherlands) and "les Cornouailles" (Cornwall). Not that these articles are treated like normal articles, so "I come from Le Havre" is "Je viens du Havre".
*** Speaking of les Pays-Bas, in Dutch you also find a number of persons and places which feature definite articles, such as "De" (e. g. in the surname De Jong) or "Het" (as in the palace Het Loo), the latter occasionally shortened to "'t". Sometimes the article will be inflected in ways that have fallen from use outside the field of name, e. g. to "Den" as in Den Haag (The Hague) or Den Bosch. Occasionally you even see the article as a genitive, reduced to a little "'s", as in the full names of the last two cities, 's Gravenhage ("the Count's Wood", implying either a hedge or an enclosed land preserve) and 's Hertogenbosch ("the Duke's Forest").

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** El: ''El'': masculine singular (Ex: singular, as in El Cerrito ('the Little Hill') in the UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco Bay Area, El Camino Real ('the Royal Road') throughout UsefulNotes/{{California}}, and El Centro in southeastern California)
California.
** Los: ''Los'': masculine plural (Ex: plural, as in UsefulNotes/LosAngeles ('the Angels', truncated from a long name containing ''de la Reina de los Ángeles'' = of the Queen of the Angels) in [=SoCal=] and Los Banos Baños ('the Baths', after a creek used for bathing) in the San Joaquin Valley)
Valley.
** La: ''La'': feminine singular (Ex: La Jolla, singular, as in ''La Jolla'' (properly ''la Joya'', 'the jewel'), a neighborhood in San Diego, CA)
California.
** Las: ''Las'': feminine plural (Ex: UsefulNotes/LasVegas, NV plural, as in UsefulNotes/LasVegas ('the Plains'), Nevada, and Las Cruces, NM)
Cruces ('the Crosses'), New Mexico.
** Similar things occur in other languages too, for instance in French you have "la France", "Le Havre", "Le Mans", "les Halles" and "les Gobelins" (neighborhoods in Paris), "les Pays-Bas" (the Netherlands) and "les Cornouailles" (Cornwall). Not Note that these articles are treated like normal articles, so "I come from Le Havre" is "Je viens du Havre".
*** Speaking of les Pays-Bas, in Dutch you also find a number of persons and places which feature definite articles, such as "De" (e. g. in the surname De Jong) or "Het" (as in the palace Het Loo), the latter occasionally shortened to "'t". Sometimes the article will be inflected in ways that have fallen from use outside the field of name, e. g. to "Den" as in Den Haag (The Hague) or Den Bosch. Occasionally you even see the article as a genitive, reduced to a little "'s", as in the full names of the last two cities, 's Gravenhage ("the Count's Wood", implying either a hedge or an enclosed land preserve) and 's Hertogenbosch ("the Duke's Forest").
2nd Nov '16 12:39:34 AM Tamfang
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*** This may be borrowed from the style of Scottish/Irish clan chiefs.



* Less often done in the "hero pulps", but often in the paperback original series of the 1960's to 1980's. The Executioner, the Penetrator, the Sharpshooter, the Liquidator, the Destroyer, the Butcher, the [[NounVerber Nazi Hunter]], the Terminator, the Revenger, the Avenger, the Protector, etc., stand as examples. Many retrospectives on the paperback original trend (e.g. Jeff Siegel's The American Detective: An Illustrated History, Sons of Sam Spade, Geherin in American Private Eye, Warren Murphy's article in The Fine Art of Murder, Murder Off the Rack's Matt Helm article) derisively point out how common the agent noun series title turned out.

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* Less often done in the "hero pulps", but often in the paperback original series of the 1960's 1960s to 1980's.1980s. The Executioner, the Penetrator, the Sharpshooter, the Liquidator, the Destroyer, the Butcher, the [[NounVerber Nazi Hunter]], the Terminator, the Revenger, the Avenger, the Protector, etc., stand as examples. Many retrospectives on the paperback original trend (e.g. Jeff Siegel's The American Detective: An Illustrated History, Sons of Sam Spade, Geherin in American Private Eye, Warren Murphy's article in The Fine Art of Murder, Murder Off the Rack's Matt Helm article) derisively point out how common the agent noun series title turned out.


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* In ''Clarges'' aka ''To Live Forever'' by Creator/JackVance, those who reach the top caste (whose perqs include effective immortality) get "The" prefixed to their name; the protagonist, Gavin Waylock, thus becomes The Gavin Waylock.
31st Oct '16 11:12:02 AM gewunomox
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* Before StatusQuo switched from psychedelic rock to three power chords per song, they were The Status Quo.

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* Before StatusQuo Music/StatusQuo switched from psychedelic rock to three power chords per song, they were The Status Quo.
21st Oct '16 1:45:02 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* A pretty bad example is ''Film/AttackOfTheTheEyeCreatures''. The title was originally supposed to be "The Eye Creatures," but it was given the prefix "Attack of the" ''without'' removing the "the" that was already there. TheyJustDidntCare.

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* A pretty bad example is ''Film/AttackOfTheTheEyeCreatures''. The title was originally supposed to be "The Eye Creatures," but it was given the prefix "Attack of the" ''without'' removing the "the" that was already there. TheyJustDidntCare.
20th Oct '16 6:07:51 PM Gitaxias
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* Inverted in ''Literature/TheClericQuintet''. The assassin known as Ghost gets irritated with anyone who calls him "the ghost".
29th Sep '16 11:39:21 AM FoxBluereaver
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** In fact, most of his characters play this trope straight, the prime examples being his two best known works: ''Series/ElChapulinColorado'' and ''Series/ElChavoDelOcho''.



* Creator/{{Chespirito}} named many of his characters like this. In addition to "El Chanfle", we also have [[Series/ElChavoDelOcho El Chavo (literally, "The Boy"), La Chilindrina, La Popis]], El Chompiras, El Peterete, El Botija[[note]]A preexisting character who later became El Peterete's SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute[[/note]] (often called "Boti" for short), and La Chimoltrufia (who later became El Botija's wife), possibly among others.

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* Creator/{{Chespirito}} named many of his characters like this. In addition to "El Chanfle", we also have [[Series/ElChavoDelOcho El Chavo (literally, "The Boy"), La Chilindrina, La Popis]], El Chompiras, El Peterete, El Botija[[note]]A preexisting character who later became El Peterete's SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute[[/note]] (often called "Boti" for short), and La Chimoltrufia (who later became El Botija's wife), possibly wife). There's also [[Series/ElChapulinColorado El Chapulín]] and several members of his RoguesGallery: El Cuajinais, El Tripaseca, el Rascabuches, among others.
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