History Main / SpellMyNameWithABlank

2nd Aug '16 9:36:05 AM JamesAustin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Barchester Towers'' from ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfBarsetshire'' has a scene where the government has just fallen. It names both the defeated Prime Minister, and the incoming one, as the Earl of _____. In the audiobook version, they are the Creator/EarlRussell and UsefulNotes/TheEarlOfDerby, respectively.

to:

* ''Barchester Towers'' from ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfBarsetshire'' has a scene where the government has just fallen. It names both the defeated Prime Minister, and the incoming one, as the Earl of _____. In the audiobook version, they are the Creator/EarlRussell UsefulNotes/EarlRussell and UsefulNotes/TheEarlOfDerby, respectively.
22nd Jul '16 3:13:02 PM theguywithanaccount
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder: Comics ]]

to:

[[folder: Comics C_____ ]]



[[folder: Fan Fiction ]]

to:

[[folder: Fan Fiction F__ F______ ]]



[[folder: Film ]]

to:

[[folder: Film F___ ]]



[[folder: Literature]]

to:

[[folder: Literature]]
L_________]]



[[folder: Live Action TV ]]

to:

[[folder: Live Action L___ A_____ TV ]]



[[folder: Tabletop Games ]]

to:

[[folder: Tabletop Games T_______ G____ ]]



[[folder: Video Games ]]

to:

[[folder: Video Games V____ G____ ]]



[[folder: Web Original ]]

to:

[[folder: Web Original W__ O_______ ]]



[[folder: Real Life ]]

to:

[[folder: Real Life R___ L___ ]]
23rd Jun '16 8:29:04 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The only time the nameless hero of ''TheTimeMachine'' is addressed by name, this trope is used.

to:

* The only time the nameless hero of ''TheTimeMachine'' ''Literature/TheTimeMachine'' is addressed by name, this trope is used.
8th Jun '16 4:00:27 PM Hodor2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Creator/JosephConrad novel ''Under Western Eyes'' has its plot set in motion by the assassination by BombThrowingAnarchists of a Czarist official, de P_____. It's noted in the Penguin Classics edition that the official is a CompositeCharacter of an actual person who was assassinated who had a P name and another who ''wasn't assassinated'' but who the anti-Czarist Conrad probably hoped would be.

to:

* The Creator/JosephConrad novel ''Under Western Eyes'' has its plot set in motion by the assassination by BombThrowingAnarchists of a Czarist official, de P_____. It's noted in the Penguin Classics edition that the official is a CompositeCharacter of an actual person who was assassinated who had a P The name and another who ''wasn't assassinated'' but who incident alludes to the anti-Czarist Conrad probably hoped would be.assassination of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vyacheslav_von_Plehve Vyacheslav von Plehve]].


Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/BarryLyndon'', which pastiches 18th century novels, there are the typical elisions of regiments and the like, and in the Naxos audio book, these are signaled by an amused clearing-of-the-throat. The example that stands out is a longish digression titled "The Tragical History of the Princess of X---", wherein Barry tells about his sojourn in the Duchy of X---, as well as additional information he learned years later from one of the witnesses. X--- is a {{Ruritania}}-style place implied to be one of the German states and the incident described involves a TragicRomance between a nobleman and the wife of the Hereditary Prince and the Prince's ensuing murder of the lover and persecution of his wife. The reason for the cover-up of the location is presumably because the inserted story is based on events from several decades before the novel is set, wherein the future George I of Britain ordered the murder of his wife Sophia Dorothea's supposed lover, Philip von Königsmarck, and then imprisoned her for the remainder of her life.
16th Apr '16 8:02:50 AM Arcorann
Is there an issue? Send a Message


September 3rd 18

to:

September 3rd 18
[[YearX 18]]



* Played with in the early ''Franchise/JamesBond'' movies. We don't get t osee M's full name right away, as it's been redacted to "M*** M***". It's revealed much later, after which it's not a secret anymore.

to:

* Played with in the early ''Franchise/JamesBond'' movies. We don't get t osee to see M's full name right away, as it's been redacted to "M*** M***". It's revealed much later, after which it's not a secret anymore.
25th Mar '16 6:16:13 PM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''AStudyInEmerald'' does this with the narrator's name and service record, giving his regiment as the __th and his initials as [[spoiler: S______ M_____.]]

to:

* ''AStudyInEmerald'' ''Literature/AStudyInEmerald'' does this with the narrator's name and service record, giving his regiment as the __th and his initials as [[spoiler: S______ M_____.]]
19th Feb '16 8:59:31 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' used this from time to time, but with dates instead of places. For example, in Robert Walton's letters to his sister, the date is given as "Dec. 11th, 17[=--=]".



** ''Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde'' takes place in 18--.



* ''Literature/TreasureIsland'': James Hawkins takes up his pen in the year of grace 17-- to recount his brush with pirates.



* Creator/KimNewman's "Richard Jeperson" stories (part of the Literature/DiogenesClub series) are all mostly set in the 1970s, but are fairly ambiguous as to the precise setting (although careful reading can give a few clues as to roughly when each one is set), and every time a specific year is mentioned it is presented to the reader as 197-.



* In the third ''[[Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy]]'' book ''Literature/LifeTheUniverseAndEverything'', when Arthur and Ford return from prehistoric Earth to the present day the year is given in the text as "198-".
1st Feb '16 4:48:41 PM hamza678
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Typically in ''EchoBazaar'', individuals are called the Adjective Noun - the Repentant Forger, for example, or the Cultured Attaché, and so on. However, in letters names usually take this form. Then there's the University's Department of ______. The blank's not pronounced, just replaced with a knowing nod, possibly with a raised eyebrow.


to:

* Typically in ''EchoBazaar'', ''VideoGame/FallenLondon'', individuals are called the Adjective Noun - the Repentant Forger, for example, or the Cultured Attaché, and so on. However, in letters names usually take this form. Then there's the University's Department of ______. The blank's not pronounced, just replaced with a knowing nod, possibly with a raised eyebrow.

12th Jan '16 6:12:04 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In RuneScape, there is a book on the history of the Moon Clan which mentions a man named V- - - - - - and an object named the Stone of J- -. V- - - - - -'s real name is said in the "While Guthix Sleeps" quest and varies from player to player, but the object is always the Stone of J[[spoiler:as]].

to:

* In RuneScape, ''VideoGame/RuneScape'', there is a book on the history of the Moon Clan which mentions a man named V- - - - - - and an object named the Stone of J- -. V- - - - - -'s real name is said in the "While Guthix Sleeps" quest and varies from player to player, but the object is always the Stone of J[[spoiler:as]].
24th Dec '15 4:52:06 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


While it is no longer the current fashion in these tell-all times, in the 18th century and the early part of the 19th, it was practically ''de rigueur'' to refer to certain personages and locations merely by a single letter, or in some cases, a mere blank. This, no doubt, found its origin in the newspapers of the period, wishing to avoid suits at law when repeating gossip about public figures, from [[UsefulNotes/BritishPoliticalSystem politicians]] to [[BlueBlood aristocrats]] and possibly even members of the [[BritishRoyalFamily R____ F____]]. The form was adopted by writers of novels, when [[FictionalCounterpart obliquely referring to same]] or to entirely fictional characters, or even to fictional [[NoCommunitiesWereHarmed cities and counties]]. Often, stories that were [[RippedFromTheHeadlines based upon actual events]] would use a blank to avoid referring to real people. With that in mind, you will better understand when I tell you about what [[AliceAndBob Mr. A____ said to the Countess of B____]] in the gardens of _____ House when the Earl was not listening.

to:

While it is no longer the current fashion in these tell-all times, in the 18th century and the early part of the 19th, it was practically ''de rigueur'' to refer to certain personages and locations merely by a single letter, or in some cases, a mere blank. This, no doubt, found its origin in the newspapers of the period, wishing to avoid suits at law when repeating gossip about public figures, from [[UsefulNotes/BritishPoliticalSystem politicians]] to [[BlueBlood aristocrats]] and possibly even members of the [[BritishRoyalFamily [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishRoyalFamily R____ F____]]. The form was adopted by writers of novels, when [[FictionalCounterpart obliquely referring to same]] or to entirely fictional characters, or even to fictional [[NoCommunitiesWereHarmed cities and counties]]. Often, stories that were [[RippedFromTheHeadlines based upon actual events]] would use a blank to avoid referring to real people. With that in mind, you will better understand when I tell you about what [[AliceAndBob Mr. A____ said to the Countess of B____]] in the gardens of _____ House when the Earl was not listening.
This list shows the last 10 events of 94. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SpellMyNameWithABlank