History Main / SpecialSnowFlakeSyndrome

26th Apr '16 1:10:20 AM Universalist
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CantrII: Like you would not believe. Characters have walked into towns and asked if there was a plague, from all the stuttering, limbs missing, sobbing and wailing. No, just a Tuesday.

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CantrII: *CantrII: Like you would not believe. Characters have walked into towns and asked if there was a plague, from all the stuttering, limbs missing, sobbing and wailing. No, just a Tuesday.
26th Apr '16 1:10:20 AM Universalist
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* CantrII: Like you would not believe. Characters have walked into towns and asked if there was a plague, from all the stuttering, limbs missing, sobbing and wailing. No, just a Tuesday.

to:

* CantrII: *CantrII: Like you would not believe. Characters have walked into towns and asked if there was a plague, from all the stuttering, limbs missing, sobbing and wailing. No, just a Tuesday.
13th Feb '16 11:17:06 PM Driavatus
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CantrII: Like you would not believe. Characters have walked into towns and asked if there was a plague, from all the stuttering, limbs missing, sobbing and wailing. No, just a Tuesday.
17th Jan '16 10:18:24 AM Underachiever
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Some gamemasters will forbid this kind of behavior, rolling their eyes at the guy who absolutely must play a dragon thief, Chaotic Good Drow ranger or an Avariel wereshark Elemental Archon of Fire. Making an interesting character has nothing to do with having an obscure background and grab-bag of powers, and everything to do with how well the character is played. However, some will [[JustForPun roll]] [[OffTheRails with it]], letting people make up stat bonuses for the most ridiculous of races or classes.

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Some gamemasters will forbid this kind of behavior, rolling their eyes at the guy who absolutely must play a dragon thief, Chaotic Good Drow ranger or an Avariel wereshark Elemental Archon of Fire. Making an interesting character has nothing to do with having an obscure background and grab-bag of powers, and everything to do with how well the character is played. [[note]]Of course, FridgeLogic might then suggest that if they indeed have nothing to do with it, all these things aren't automatically a ''hindrance'' to making an interesting character either...[[/note]] However, some will [[JustForPun roll]] [[OffTheRails with it]], letting people make up stat bonuses for the most ridiculous of races or classes.
22nd Oct '15 3:29:56 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* In ''Film/TheGamersDorknessRising'', one player declares he is playing an Elf Monk, despite the fact that the DM said ahead of time that this was a Medieval Western Europe inspired setting and that an Eastern-flavored Monk wouldn't fit, and that it was also a human only campaign. The DM begrudgingly allows the Monk class, but disallows him to play an elf, to the point where the in-game avatar's elf ears get ripped off.

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* In ''Film/TheGamersDorknessRising'', one player declares he is playing an Elf Monk, despite the fact that the DM said ahead of time that this was a Medieval Western Europe inspired setting and that an Eastern-flavored Monk wouldn't fit, and that it was also a human only campaign. The DM begrudgingly allows the Monk class, but disallows him to play an elf, to the point where the in-game avatar's elf ears get ripped off. The DM then [[HypocriticalHumor throws ninjas at them]] as the second combat encounter.
7th Sep '15 8:42:41 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''Film/TheGamers: Dorkness Rising'', one player declares he is playing an Elf Monk, despite the fact that the DM said ahead of time that this was a Medieval Western Europe inspired setting and that an Eastern-flavored Monk wouldn't fit, and that it was also a human only campaign. The DM begrudgingly allows the Monk class, but disallows him to play an elf, to the point where the in-game avatar's elf ears get ripped off.

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* In ''Film/TheGamers: Dorkness Rising'', ''Film/TheGamersDorknessRising'', one player declares he is playing an Elf Monk, despite the fact that the DM said ahead of time that this was a Medieval Western Europe inspired setting and that an Eastern-flavored Monk wouldn't fit, and that it was also a human only campaign. The DM begrudgingly allows the Monk class, but disallows him to play an elf, to the point where the in-game avatar's elf ears get ripped off.
2nd Sep '15 8:14:18 PM zarpaulus
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* The core rulebook of ''TabletopGame/{{Ironclaw}}'' 2nd edition has 49 playable species, not counting "variants" mentioned in some descriptions.
* ''TabletopGame/HcSvntDracones'' has in the core rulebook 24 playable species and nine "morphisms" that can be combined. The first expansion is set to add more, including Cogs (sentient robots) who have their own set of "frames" and "Blips", one-off genetic experiments.
28th Aug '15 9:11:17 PM FordPrefect
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*** The 4th edition of ''D&D'' and "3.75" edition ''TableTopGames/{{Pathfinder}}'', both try to bring that back. 4th edition locks you into a class, a paragon path and an epic destiny. ''Pathfinder'' provides incentives for most characters to remain single classed (filling dead levels, giving you extra hit points or skill points for staying with your original class, payoff abilities, etc) but allows you to multiclass if you want to.

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*** The 4th edition of ''D&D'' and "3.75" edition ''TableTopGames/{{Pathfinder}}'', ''TableTopGames/{{Pathfinder}}'' both try to bring that back. 4th edition locks you into a class, a paragon path and an epic destiny. ''Pathfinder'' provides incentives for most characters to remain single classed (filling dead levels, giving you extra hit points or skill points for staying with your original class, payoff abilities, etc) but allows you to multiclass if you want to.
14th Aug '15 5:07:35 PM zarpaulus
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** One sourcebook introduced Exigents, unique Exalted created by one of the thousands of minor gods in Creation. Most of whom can only spare enough Essence for one, maybe two Exaltations.
26th Jun '15 10:03:51 AM justanid
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Such creativity has its place, however: In a setting like {{Planescape}} (where hundreds of worlds collide) or {{Spelljammer}} (planet-hopping adventure) such characters are no problem, and, indeed, may add to the game.

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Such creativity has its place, however: In a setting like {{Planescape}} ''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}}'' (where hundreds of worlds collide) or {{Spelljammer}} ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' (planet-hopping adventure) such characters are no problem, and, indeed, may add to the game.



* As a general rule, the older any tabletop [=RPG=] that's still supported gets, the easier it becomes to create special snowflakes in it as more races, classes, and equipment are added in every (other) {{Sourcebook}}. This is simply because new and additional {{character customization}} options [[RevenueEnhancingDevices almost always sell]].
* ''[[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons Dungeons & Dragons]]''

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* As a general rule, the older any tabletop [=RPG=] TabletopRPG that's still supported gets, the easier it becomes to create special snowflakes in it as more races, classes, and equipment are added in every (other) {{Sourcebook}}.{{sourcebook}} & {{splat}}book. This is simply because new and additional {{character customization}} options [[RevenueEnhancingDevices almost always sell]].
* ''[[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons Dungeons & Dragons]]''Pretty much any version of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' one might care to name has ''started out'' with a fairly limited number of player character class/race choices and then proceeded to enable this trope more and more over time by selling more material, with almost every new sourcebook offering new ways to customize your character, and that's not even counting stuff from their official articles.



** This trope has become so pervasive that it seems that sometimes the RAREST PC race/class combo is now a straight human single classed (no prestige classes) character.
*** The 4th edition of ''D&D'' and "3.75" edition ''TableTopGames/{{Pathfinder}}'', both try to bring that back. 4th edition locks you into a class, a paragon path and an epic destiny. ''Pathfinder'' provides incentives for most characters to remain single classed (filling dead levels, giving you extra hit points or skill points for staying with your original class, payoff abilities, etc) but allows you to multiclass if you want to.
** Really, 3rd edition had a better mechanic for averting this, a 10% experience point penalty but the mechanic was easy to forget and rarely enforced.
*** The 10% experience point penalty only applied under specific circumstances, and did not apply to the most egregious special snowflake classes (the prestige classes). Multiclassing in general was a bad idea in 3rd edition though; while the mundane classes might benefit from it to avoid "dead" levels, the spellcasters were better off taking only pure class levels and prestige class levels that granted full spellcasting ability. Thus while a fighter/rogue/ranger/monk might sound cheesy, it was less powerful than a straight up full caster character due to LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards.



** In the Old WOD setting, the bane of gamemasters everywhere was any player who wanted to play an ''Abomination'' (a werewolf who survived being turned into a vampire, ending up as a shapeshifting, blood drinking, {{angst}}-filled killing machine with the magic powers of both species), or a ''Skin Dancer'' (a werewolf kinfolk who after ritually killing a bunch of were-creatures then turns himself into such a werecreature), or an awakened mage who is also a fairie changeling ''and'' a dhampir ''and'' a ghoul (a human minion of a vampire who drinks vampire blood and gains limited immortality and vampiric powers from it).
** The fact that a published series of adventures had a character approximately this obnoxious (the infamous Samuel Haight) certainly didn't help. For Werewolf 20th, they dumped all of the crossover stuff Haight had got loaded with and kept him a Skin Dancer -- and already dead, just to be safe. Before that, [[http://mrgone.rocksolidshells.com/pdf/MiscOWOD/SamuelHaight.pdf he really was that obnoxious]].
** In general, in the old World of Darkness the 3rd editions of the ''TabletopGame/WerewolfTheApocalypse'', ''TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade'', ''TabletopGame/MageTheAscension'' gamelines and the 2nd edition of ''TabletopGame/ChangelingTheDreaming'' put a stop to that by outright stating that such creatures were ''extremely''!! rare, or simply by enforcing new rules that a supernatural character becoming an [insert different supernatural creature here] will lead to said character losing the special powers she had before. For example, drinking vampire blood or being turned into a vampire will destroy the awakened avatar of an awakened character (who is thus no longer able to bend reality to his will) and will kill a changeling's Faerie soul forever. Such characters basically end up as mundane humans who then become a ghoul or vampire, respectively. Werewolves who drink vampire blood lose their connection to the spirit world.

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** In the Old WOD ''[=oWoD=]'' setting, the bane of gamemasters everywhere was any player who wanted to play an ''Abomination'' (a werewolf who survived being turned into a vampire, ending up as a shapeshifting, blood drinking, {{angst}}-filled killing machine with the magic powers of both species), or a ''Skin Dancer'' (a werewolf kinfolk who after ritually killing a bunch of were-creatures then turns himself into such a werecreature), or an awakened mage who is also a fairie changeling ''and'' a dhampir ''and'' a ghoul (a human minion of a vampire who drinks vampire blood and gains limited immortality and vampiric powers from it).
** The fact that a published series of adventures had a character approximately this obnoxious (the infamous Samuel Haight) certainly didn't help. For Werewolf 20th, ''Werewolf 20th'', they dumped all of the crossover stuff Haight had got loaded with and kept him a Skin Dancer -- and already dead, just to be safe. Before that, [[http://mrgone.rocksolidshells.com/pdf/MiscOWOD/SamuelHaight.pdf he really was that obnoxious]].
** In general, in the old World ''World of Darkness Darkness'' the 3rd editions of the ''TabletopGame/WerewolfTheApocalypse'', ''TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade'', ''TabletopGame/MageTheAscension'' gamelines and the 2nd edition of ''TabletopGame/ChangelingTheDreaming'' put a stop to that by outright stating that such creatures were ''extremely''!! rare, or simply by enforcing new rules that a supernatural character becoming an [insert different supernatural creature here] will lead to said character losing the special powers she had before. For example, drinking vampire blood or being turned into a vampire will destroy the awakened avatar of an awakened character (who is thus no longer able to bend reality to his will) and will kill a changeling's Faerie soul forever. Such characters basically end up as mundane humans who then become a ghoul or vampire, respectively. Werewolves who drink vampire blood lose their connection to the spirit world.



** The Old WOD's 20th Anniversary Editions have taken a more relaxed approach to this trope, by providing the stats for each of the obscure races from each game, along with the caveat that the storyteller has final say on what is and isn't allowed. Their reasoning is basically, "It isn't what ''we'' would do, but it's your game."
* The TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness flat-out makes hybrids of any kind explicitly impossible, though some creatures can be thematic hybrids. Hilariously, the only real way to become something resembling such a hybrid would make your character a CosmicPlaything; a [[TabletopGame/HunterTheVigil hunter]] turned into a [[TabletopGame/WerewolfTheForsaken werewolf]], who dies and has his corpse made into a [[TabletopGame/PrometheanTheCreated Promethean]], becomes human and gets turned into a [[TabletopGame/VampireTheRequiem vampire]], reaches Golconda and becomes human again, then getting an epiphany and awakening as a [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening Mage]], somehow having the awakened soul put to sleep by being kidnapped to {{Arcadia}} by the True Fae and turned into a [[TabletopGame/ChangelingTheLost Changeling]], getting killed '''''yet again''''' and then coming back as a [[TabletopGame/GeistTheSinEaters Sin Eater]] with a Geist... but, through all that, the character would still only ever be one type of supernatural at a time. And probably very, ''very'' confused. To have this character be a [[TabletopGame/MummyTheCurse mummy]] as well, all of this either needs to happen six thousand years ago, or the luckless corpse becomes the new body of a mummy who's lost their original. Of course, [[AndThenJohnWasAZombie a hunter becoming his prey is something of a cliche by now.]]
* ''{{Exalted}}'' actively encourages this sort of behavior.

to:

** The Old WOD's ''[=oWoD=]'s'' 20th Anniversary Editions have taken a more relaxed approach to this trope, by providing the stats for each of the obscure races from each game, along with the caveat that the storyteller has final say on what is and isn't allowed. Their reasoning is basically, "It isn't what ''we'' would do, but it's your game."
* The TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' flat-out makes hybrids of any kind explicitly impossible, though some creatures can be thematic hybrids. Hilariously, the only real way to become something resembling such a hybrid would make your character a CosmicPlaything; a [[TabletopGame/HunterTheVigil hunter]] turned into a [[TabletopGame/WerewolfTheForsaken werewolf]], who dies and has his corpse made into a [[TabletopGame/PrometheanTheCreated Promethean]], becomes human and gets turned into a [[TabletopGame/VampireTheRequiem vampire]], reaches Golconda and becomes human again, then getting an epiphany and awakening as a [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening Mage]], somehow having the awakened soul put to sleep by being kidnapped to {{Arcadia}} by the True Fae and turned into a [[TabletopGame/ChangelingTheLost Changeling]], getting killed '''''yet again''''' and then coming back as a [[TabletopGame/GeistTheSinEaters Sin Eater]] with a Geist... but, through all that, the character would still only ever be one type of supernatural at a time. And probably very, ''very'' confused. To have this character be a [[TabletopGame/MummyTheCurse mummy]] as well, all of this either needs to happen six thousand years ago, or the luckless corpse becomes the new body of a mummy who's lost their original. Of course, [[AndThenJohnWasAZombie a hunter becoming his prey is something of a cliche by now.]]
* ''{{Exalted}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'' actively encourages this sort of behavior.



* This trope has become so pervasive that it seems that sometimes the RAREST PC race/class combo is now a straight human single classed (no prestige classes) character.
** The latest versions of [=DnD=], 4th edition and TableTopGames/{{Pathfinder}}, both try to bring that back. 4th edition locks you into a class, a paragon path and an epic destiny. Pathfinder provides incentives for most characters to remain single classed (filling dead levels, giving you extra hit points or skill points for staying with your original class, payoff abilities, etc) but allows you to multiclass if you want to. Really, 3rd edition had a better mechanic for averting this, a 10% experience point penalty but the mechanic was easy to forget and rarely enforced.
*** The 10% experience point penalty only applied under specific circumstances, and did not apply to the most egregious special snowflake classes (the prestige classes). Multiclassing in general was a bad idea in 3rd edition though; while the mundane classes might benefit from it to avoid "dead" levels, the spellcasters were better off taking only pure class levels and prestige class levels that granted full spellcasting ability. Thus while a fighter/rogue/ranger/monk might sound cheesy, it was less powerful than a straight up full caster character due to LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards.
** Pretty much any version of D&D one might care to name has ''started out'' with a fairly limited number of player character class/race choices and then proceeded to enable this trope more and more over time by selling more material, with almost every new sourcebook offering new ways to customize your character, and that's not even counting stuff from their official articles.



* Justified (mostly) in [[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}} Warhammer 40,000]]. Games Workshop actively encourages players to make model conversions, because they appreciate creativity and probably because it also [[CrackIsCheaper needs many components to do it well]]. While a custom model can be given the profile for [[{{Expy}} a pre-existing unit]], players often create a profile of their own for the custom model. It's also worth mentioning that these conversions can get to be [[http://coolminiornot.com/244623 rather impressive]] or [[http://www.games-workshop.com/MEDIA_CustomProductCatalog/m2180145_P9Mb2.jpg downright scary]].

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* Justified (mostly) in [[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer ''[[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}} Warhammer 40,000]].40,000]]''. Games Workshop actively encourages players to make model conversions, because they appreciate creativity and probably because it also [[CrackIsCheaper needs many components to do it well]]. While a custom model can be given the profile for [[{{Expy}} a pre-existing unit]], players often create a profile of their own for the custom model. It's also worth mentioning that these conversions can get to be [[http://coolminiornot.com/244623 rather impressive]] or [[http://www.games-workshop.com/MEDIA_CustomProductCatalog/m2180145_P9Mb2.jpg downright scary]].
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