History Main / SpareToTheThrone

16th Apr '16 12:26:31 PM totoofze47
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* ''Manga/OnePiece'': As a flashback shows, Sabo's parents adopted Stelly, a noble child of even higher status than him, as Sabo kept running away to see Ace and Luffy, among other "lower-class trash" in their eyes. The parents expected Sabo and Stelly to get along, but since the latter was a dick like the other nobles, and only Sabo was kind, it didn't turn out too well. [[spoiler:Sabo was eventually shot by a World Noble and presumed dead, while Stelly grew up to be the king of Goa Kingdom.]]
9th Apr '16 8:53:55 PM 20person
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* Pops up all over the place in ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' due to a messy and protracted multiway civil war with [[AnyoneCanDie a high casualty rate]]. Before the main story begins, Ned Stark was this to his brother Brandon, and Maester Aemon was offered this but abdicated in favor of his younger brother (who was called "Aegon the Unlikely" for how far down the line of succession they had to go to finally find someone to take the job). Renly and Stannis vie for this after the death of older brother Robert, Stannis playing it slightly more straight (reluctant but insistent) while Renly leaps at the chance. Tommen is this to older brother Joffrey. Daenerys is this to her brother Viserys, and in ''A Dance With Dragons'' it is revealed that [[spoiler: Rhaegar Targaryen's son Aegon is alive after all (if he's genuine), making Daenerys this to ''him'' as well]]. And depending on how things go, either Bran, Rickon, or Jon is likely to become this to Robb. There are probably dozens of other minor examples that don't spring immediately to mind.

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* Pops up all over the place in ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' due to a messy and protracted multiway civil war with [[AnyoneCanDie a high casualty rate]]. Before the main story begins, Ned Stark was this to his brother Brandon, and Maester Aemon was offered this but abdicated in favor of his younger brother (who was called "Aegon the Unlikely" for how far down the line of succession they had to go to finally find someone to take the job).job[[note]]He was the fourth son of a fourth son, and was favoured over his infant (and [[UnfortunateNames unfortunately named]]) nephew Maegor[[/note]]). Renly and Stannis vie for this after the death of older brother Robert, Stannis playing it slightly more straight (reluctant but insistent) while Renly leaps at the chance. Tommen is this to older brother Joffrey. Daenerys is this to her brother Viserys, and in ''A Dance With Dragons'' it is revealed that [[spoiler: Rhaegar Targaryen's son Aegon is alive after all (if he's genuine), making Daenerys this to ''him'' as well]]. And depending on how things go, either Bran, Rickon, or Jon is likely to become this to Robb. There are probably dozens of other minor examples that don't spring immediately to mind.
2nd Apr '16 10:28:11 PM BURGINABC
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* This was [[WhatCouldHaveBeen originally]] planned to play into the story of ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'', with Anna feeling some angst over her role as the "superfluous" sister while the older Elsa is set up to be queen. In the actual movie this is averted -- while Elsa spends much of the movie in exile or arrested, and Anna briefly holds power as regent before she heads off alone to look for Elsa, no one really talks about Anna taking her place as queen, likely because there isn't any chance to figure that out before everything is resolved. [[spoiler:Well, Hans ''does'' consider it. In fact, he banks on this trope when he plans to woo Anna, marry her, kill Elsa, and then be set up as king of Arandelle.]] Strictly speaking, however, this film averts this trope: once their parents die, Elsa is the queen, Anna is the heir, and there is no spare [[spoiler:which is where Hans sees himself fitting in]]. Both Anna and her boyfriend Hans were born in this position (in fact, Hans has seven older siblings, so his chances of inheriting are nil), but while Anna is happy in a supporting role to her sister, Hans has [[EvilAllAlong let it bother him somewhat]].

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* This was [[WhatCouldHaveBeen originally]] planned to play into the story of ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'', with Anna feeling some angst over her role as the "superfluous" sister while the older Elsa is set up to be queen. In the actual movie this is averted -- while Elsa spends much of the movie in exile or arrested, and Anna briefly holds power as regent before she heads off alone to look for Elsa, no one really talks about Anna taking her place as queen, likely because there isn't any chance to figure that out before everything is resolved. [[spoiler:Well, Hans ''does'' consider it. In fact, he banks on this trope when he plans to woo Anna, marry her, kill Elsa, and then be set up as king of Arandelle.]] Strictly speaking, however, this film averts this trope: once their parents die, Elsa is the queen, Anna is the heir, and there is no spare [[spoiler:which is where Hans sees himself fitting in]]. Both Anna and [[spoiler: her boyfriend Hans Hans]] were born in this position (in ([[spoiler:in fact, Hans has seven twelve older siblings, so his chances of inheriting are nil), basically nil]]), but while Anna is happy in a supporting role to her sister, [[spoiler: Hans has [[EvilAllAlong let it bother him somewhat]].somewhat]]]].
29th Feb '16 4:03:14 PM Eievie
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->''"My parents were ... rather traditional. They wanted the heir and the spare, and I was left in the cold."''

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->''"My parents were ... were… rather traditional. They wanted the heir and the spare, and I was left in the cold."''
10th Jan '16 8:45:53 PM zarpaulus
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* Late in the first season of ''Series/{{Galavant}}'' it turns out that Richard was the geeky second son and that his parents wanted his older brother Kingsley to inherit the throne. But Kingsley didn't want to be "given" anything, or so he said, and left to terrorize the countryside for thirty years before coming back to ''take'' Richard's kingdoms from him.
12th Dec '15 10:31:04 PM DragonQuestZ
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* This was [[WhatCouldHaveBeen originally]] planned to play into the story of ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'', with Anna feeling some angst over her role as the "superfluous" sister while the older Elsa is set up to be queen. In the actual movie this is averted -- while Elsa spends much of the movie in exile or arrested, and Anna briefly holds power as regent before she heads off alone to look for Elsa, no one really talks about Anna taking her place as queen, likely because there isn't any chance to figure that out before everything is resolved. [[spoiler:Well, Hans ''does'' consider it. In fact, he banks on this trope when he plans to woo Anna, marry her, kill Elsa, and then be set up as king of Arandelle.]] Strictly speaking, however, this film averts this trope: once their parents die, Elsa is the queen, Anna is the heir, and there is no spare [[spoiler:which is where Hans sees himself fitting in]]. Both Anna and her boyfriend Hans were born in this position (in fact, Hans has seven older siblings, so his chances of inheriting are nil), but while Anna is happy in a supporting role to her sister, Hans has [[{{Understatement}} let it bother him somewhat]].

to:

* This was [[WhatCouldHaveBeen originally]] planned to play into the story of ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'', with Anna feeling some angst over her role as the "superfluous" sister while the older Elsa is set up to be queen. In the actual movie this is averted -- while Elsa spends much of the movie in exile or arrested, and Anna briefly holds power as regent before she heads off alone to look for Elsa, no one really talks about Anna taking her place as queen, likely because there isn't any chance to figure that out before everything is resolved. [[spoiler:Well, Hans ''does'' consider it. In fact, he banks on this trope when he plans to woo Anna, marry her, kill Elsa, and then be set up as king of Arandelle.]] Strictly speaking, however, this film averts this trope: once their parents die, Elsa is the queen, Anna is the heir, and there is no spare [[spoiler:which is where Hans sees himself fitting in]]. Both Anna and her boyfriend Hans were born in this position (in fact, Hans has seven older siblings, so his chances of inheriting are nil), but while Anna is happy in a supporting role to her sister, Hans has [[{{Understatement}} [[EvilAllAlong let it bother him somewhat]].
7th Oct '15 9:30:01 AM RobTan
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*** In the case that the Vice President also dies, then the next in line to the Presidency is the Speaker of the House. Since the Speaker is frequently a member of the opposing party and the President's strongest adversary in Washington, that would be one of the biggest political upsets in history. Fortunately, it hasn't happened yet, the closest America has come is when LBJ was almost shot by a Secret Service agent who mistook him for a trespasser on the White House lawn the night after the Kennedy assassination.
6th Sep '15 3:52:53 AM Morgenthaler
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** In ''The Curse of {{Chalion}}'' itself (the first book of the series), the much younger half brother of the infertile and secretly ill king is brought to court by the king's EvilChancellor to insure the succession. [[spoiler: When the prince dies shortly after the king's condition takes a massive turn for the worse the entire [[DeadlyDecadentCourt court]] instantly redirects it's attention to the prince's marginally older sister.]]

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** In ''The Curse of {{Chalion}}'' Chalion'' itself (the first book of the series), the much younger half brother of the infertile and secretly ill king is brought to court by the king's EvilChancellor to insure the succession. [[spoiler: When the prince dies shortly after the king's condition takes a massive turn for the worse the entire [[DeadlyDecadentCourt court]] instantly redirects it's attention to the prince's marginally older sister.]]
26th Aug '15 9:49:40 AM nombretomado
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* Chagum in ''SeireiNoMoribito'' is the Emperor's second son, and SpareToTheThrone. Unlike most examples he did apparently receive schooling because his older brother suffers from a SoapOperaDisease, and becomes the heir apparent after his brother succumbs to it halfway through the series. In either case, he is remarkably calm (although clearly not-too-pleased) about it.

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* Chagum in ''SeireiNoMoribito'' ''Anime/MoribitoGuardianOfTheSpirit'' is the Emperor's second son, and SpareToTheThrone. Unlike most examples he did apparently receive schooling because his older brother suffers from a SoapOperaDisease, and becomes the heir apparent after his brother succumbs to it halfway through the series. In either case, he is remarkably calm (although clearly not-too-pleased) about it.
22nd Aug '15 4:23:11 PM Macintrasher
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The reasoning for this is simple. Back before modern medicine, child mortality was through the roof even for the ruling elite. Assuming a prince survived past the age of five, they could still catch [[ThePlague a nasty illness]], fall victim to a hunting accident, fall victim to a "{{hunting accident}}," or be slain in an overt coup. On top of this, medieval monarchs were often expected to be [[RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething warr]][[WarriorPrince iors]], so the heir might be slain in battle, or even while [[TrainingAccident training for battle]]. Anything could happen to the oldest child, hence the importance of having a figurative spare tire to keep the kingdom and royal line running. In fact, he could even avoid all of this, succeed to the throne, and then fail to produce any surviving heirs of his own, in which case it would be prudent for his parents to provide him with a brother.

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The reasoning for this is simple. Back before modern medicine, child mortality was through the roof even for the ruling elite. Assuming a prince survived past the age of five, they could still catch [[ThePlague a nasty illness]], fall victim to a hunting accident, fall victim to a "{{hunting accident}}," or be slain in an overt coup. On top of this, medieval monarchs were often expected to be [[RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething warr]][[WarriorPrince iors]], so the heir might be slain in battle, or even while [[TrainingAccident training for battle]]. Anything could happen to the oldest child, hence the importance of having a figurative spare tire to keep the kingdom and royal line running. In fact, he could even avoid all of this, succeed to the throne, and then fail to produce any surviving heirs of his own, in which case it would be prudent for his parents to provide him with a brother.
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