History Main / SpaceIsCold

12th Apr '16 1:08:54 PM ewap
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** In fact, as this troper has seen with her own eyes, the water in vacuum (or at least, severely reduced pressure) does simultaneously boil and freeze. Boiling takes energy (phase-change energy), and it is enough to freeze the rest of the water (we have made a really nice popsicle in a big vacuum chamber, sorry, no foto).

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** In fact, as this troper has seen with her own eyes, the water in vacuum (or at least, severely reduced pressure) does simultaneously boil and freeze. Boiling takes energy (phase-change energy), and it is enough to freeze the rest of the water (we have made a really nice popsicle icicle in a big vacuum chamber, sorry, no foto).
12th Apr '16 1:02:18 PM ewap
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**In fact, as this troper has seen with her own eyes, the water in vacuum (or at least, severely reduced pressure) does simultaneously boil and freeze. Boiling takes energy (phase-change energy), and it is enough to freeze the rest of the water (we have made a really nice popsicle in a big vacuum chamber, sorry, no foto).
22nd Feb '16 2:59:28 AM timotaka
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* ''Film/{{Sunshine}}'' also carried this trope to an extreme; when performing a dangerous jump across space from one spaceship to another, crew members wrapped themselves in the ship's insulation. All were shivering and one had developed frostbite from the time in space (which appeared to be thirty seconds, at most). There was also a guy whose [[LiterallyShatteredLives body shattered]] when he struck a part of the ship. Made even sillier since they don't follow their own Movie Physics: The crew states that space is -272 degrees Celsius, just above absolute zero. If space really was that cold and it had enough particles to freeze a bare person so quickly, a few sheets of insulation aren't going to protect you from instantaneously turning into a block of ice when they blow the airlock. Keep in mind the actual temperature of space could easily be 3 kelvins, or -270 degrees Celsius.

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* ''Film/{{Sunshine}}'' also carried this trope to an extreme; when performing a dangerous jump across space from one spaceship to another, crew members wrapped themselves in the ship's insulation. All were shivering and one had developed frostbite from the time in space (which appeared to be thirty seconds, at most). There was also a guy whose [[LiterallyShatteredLives body shattered]] when he struck a part of the ship. Made even sillier since they don't follow their own Movie Physics: The crew states that space is -272 degrees Celsius, just above absolute zero. If space really was that cold and it had enough particles to freeze a bare person so quickly, a few sheets of insulation aren't going to protect you from instantaneously turning into a block of ice when they blow the airlock. Keep in mind the actual temperature of space could easily be 3 kelvins, or -270 degrees Celsius. Furthermore, as the ship had been heading straight towards the sun for a good while, they should have been burning, not freezing.
22nd Jan '16 8:36:42 AM Cuddles
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* Averting this is a major point in ''Literature/TheMoteInGodsEye'' and its sequel. Spaceships radiate heat using their [[DeflectorShields shields]]. When under fire, the shield generators generate heat faster than it can be radiated. Shields in this universe are essentially impenetrable, so space battles only end when one ship accumulates too much heat and vaporises itself. In the sequel, the Moties have developed a way of increasing the radius of their shields as they heat up, giving them a larger surface area to radiate heat and allowing them to last much longer in combat that human ships. Unfortunately for them, the only wormhole out of their system ends in the atmosphere of a star (which they don't know about), so their expanding shields end up absorbing heat much faster and destroying them rather than allowing them to fight their way out.


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** This is actually a problem for all infrared imaging. Since an infrared camera itself has a temperature and radiates infrared, any signal from an object the same temperature or cooler than it will be swamped by its own radiation. This makes it important to prevent infrared cameras getting too hot, since you won't be able to see body heat if the camera is at body temperature. Telescopes have more of a problem because they're usually looking at very long wavelengths and need to be very cold to avoid producing those wavelengths themselves. This also explains why heat-sensing organs can be found in cold-blooded creatures like snakes, but not in any warm-blooded animals - a snake can see a mouse in infrared, but a mouse wouldn't be able to see the snake.
20th Dec '15 6:33:37 PM eroock
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->''Ah, Kirk, my old friend, do you know the old Klingon proverb that tells us revenge is a dish that is best served cold? It is very cold... in space.''

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->''Ah, ->''"Ah, Kirk, my old friend, do you know the old Klingon proverb that tells us revenge is a dish that is best served cold? It is very cold... in space.''"''
15th Nov '15 5:04:36 AM onyhow
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** In ''VideoGame/EliteDangerous'' one factor you must keep an eye on is the heat level of your ship. Normally, it doesn't rise above about 30% of the safe maximum and if it goes above that waiting is usually enough to cool it back down, but, if you want to use StealthInSpace, you have to cut off all heat emissions, and store all your heat in silent running mode or turn off all your systems including engines and life support. Also, doing things lie firing your weapons and flying too close to a star increases your heat levels, and if your ship gets too hot, it stars taking damage.

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** * In ''VideoGame/EliteDangerous'' one factor you must keep an eye on is the heat level of your ship. Normally, it doesn't rise above about 30% of the safe maximum and if it goes above that waiting is usually enough to cool it back down, but, if you want to use StealthInSpace, you have to cut off all heat emissions, and store all your heat in silent running mode or turn off all your systems including engines and life support. Also, doing things lie firing your weapons and flying too close to a star increases your heat levels, and if your ship gets too hot, it stars taking damage.
14th Nov '15 5:30:02 PM nombretomado
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** Of course, this was also present in [[{{Robotech}} the English version of the series]]; the ''Robotech'' novelization of the scene drew attention to the fact it didn't make sense, and credited the enigmatic shapings of Protoculture with causing the unusual effect.

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** Of course, this was also present in [[{{Robotech}} [[{{Anime/Robotech}} the English version of the series]]; the ''Robotech'' novelization of the scene drew attention to the fact it didn't make sense, and credited the enigmatic shapings of Protoculture with causing the unusual effect.
14th Nov '15 2:00:44 AM Vir
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The first reason is that temperature and heat are physical properties of matter. Space is the exact opposite of matter. Space is the absence of all matter Asking "what is the temperature of space?" is like asking a bald person what their hair color is.[[note]]Technically, space is not completely empty; [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstellar_medium the interstellar medium can actually reach a density of about one million molecules per cubic centimeter, and even in its least dense areas it still has about 100 ions per cubic meter]], and you can find the temperature of the few atoms present. The Local Interstellar Cloud we're in has an average temperature of around 6000K, comparable to the surface of the sun, but since there are so few atoms (about 0.3 per cubic centimeter), it doesn't really matter. And a bald person may still have body hair.[[/note]] This means you cannot touch space because there is nothing to touch in the first place. This in turn means heat loss by convection or conduction cannot happen in space. (Touching the surface of your spacecraft, however, can be a whole different story). This is how a thermos works, by the way; there is a near-vacuum surrounding the storage space, preventing heat from passing through.

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The first reason is that temperature and heat are physical properties of matter. Space is the exact opposite of matter. Space is the absence of all matter matter. Asking "what is the temperature of space?" is like asking a bald person what their hair color is.[[note]]Technically, space is not completely empty; [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstellar_medium the interstellar medium can actually reach a density of about one million molecules per cubic centimeter, and even in its least dense areas it still has about 100 ions per cubic meter]], and you can find the temperature of the few atoms present. The Local Interstellar Cloud we're in has an average temperature of around 6000K, comparable to the surface of the sun, but since there are so few atoms (about 0.3 per cubic centimeter), it doesn't really matter. And a bald person may still have body hair.[[/note]] This means you cannot touch space because there is nothing to touch in the first place. This in turn means heat loss by convection or conduction cannot happen in space. (Touching the surface of your spacecraft, however, can be a whole different story). This is how a thermos works, by the way; there is a near-vacuum surrounding the storage space, preventing heat from passing through.
8th Oct '15 7:33:36 PM nombretomado
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* In an issue of MarvelStarWars, the ''Millennium Falcon'' is trying to escape from Darth Vader in his personal fighter, and having trouble. So they make a tight turn around a large ship to temporarily block his view, and jettison the water supply of the ''Falcon'', which instantly freezes into several large blocks of ice, and Vader crashes into them when he comes around the "corner" at high speed. In reality, the water would ''boil'' due to the lack of pressure, and dissipate into a harmless gas cloud.

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* In an issue of MarvelStarWars, ComicBook/MarvelStarWars, the ''Millennium Falcon'' is trying to escape from Darth Vader in his personal fighter, and having trouble. So they make a tight turn around a large ship to temporarily block his view, and jettison the water supply of the ''Falcon'', which instantly freezes into several large blocks of ice, and Vader crashes into them when he comes around the "corner" at high speed. In reality, the water would ''boil'' due to the lack of pressure, and dissipate into a harmless gas cloud.
6th Oct '15 5:44:01 AM hullflyer
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* In an issue of MarvelStarWars, the ''Millennium Falcon'' is trying to escape from Darth Vader in his personal fighter, and having trouble. So they make a tight turn around a large ship to temporarily block his view, and jettison the water supply of the ''Falcon'', which instantly freezes into several large blocks of ice, and Vader crashes into them when he comes around the "corner" at high speed. In reality, the water would ''boil'' due to the lack of pressure, and dissipate into a harmless gas cloud.
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