History Main / SomeDexterityRequired

27th May '17 3:38:55 PM nombretomado
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* Players of ''ViewtifulJoe: Double Trouble'' can run into problems when the game demands you use both touch screen and buttons within a short time frame.

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* Players of ''ViewtifulJoe: Double Trouble'' ''VideoGame/ViewtifulJoeDoubleTrouble'' can run into problems when the game demands you use both touch screen and buttons within a short time frame.
24th May '17 1:44:07 AM HyperEmerson
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* In ''Overcooked!'', you must control a minimum of two characters at once to collect ingredients, chop and cook them and then take the finished plates to the clients. Even if you have friends helping you, everyone must focus, manage the limited tools and space and cooperate as much as possible to even get over the minimum score. Several levels also add odd gimmicks and hazards to contend with on top of that.
10th May '17 8:04:08 AM Darkmoonfire
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* While it's technically not dexterity so much as timing, the shield in ''Ferazel's Wand'' can be extremely irritating. In order to block you must duck, then press the arrow key opposite the direction you're facing. Ducking takes about a second, and if you press the opposing arrow while you're in the process of ducking you will turn around as you duck. Attempting to turn around after having finished ducking will simply make you shield in the opposite direction from the one you intended to, so unless you waited to finish ducking and risked that throwing knife reaching you, you must stand up again, turn towards the knife again, and attempt to duck again, almost guaranteeing it will reach you before you can block it. Good thing you can usually jump out of the way.

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* While it's technically not dexterity so much as timing, the shield in ''Ferazel's Wand'' ''VideoGame/FerazelsWand'' can be extremely irritating. In order to block you must duck, then press the arrow key opposite the direction you're facing. Ducking takes about a second, and if you press the opposing arrow while you're in the process of ducking you will turn around as you duck. Attempting to turn around after having finished ducking will simply make you shield in the opposite direction from the one you intended to, so unless you waited to finish ducking and risked that throwing knife reaching you, you must stand up again, turn towards the knife again, and attempt to duck again, almost guaranteeing it will reach you before you can block it. Good thing you can usually jump out of the way.
7th May '17 5:28:48 PM nombretomado
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* The original ''{{Starcraft}}'' and its expansion have an artificially elevated skill cap due to the large Action Per Minute requirements of certain basic functions (such as queuing mutiple build orders on more than one building). Bad pathfinding also means that players have to babysit units on the opposite side of the map ''while managing their economy back home''. While the sequel streamlined many of these mechanics, there are now specific micromanagement-heavy new ones that can turn a defeat into a victory (or vice versa if used badly).

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* The original ''{{Starcraft}}'' ''VideoGame/StarCraftI'' and its expansion have an artificially elevated skill cap due to the large Action Per Minute requirements of certain basic functions (such as queuing mutiple build orders on more than one building). Bad pathfinding also means that players have to babysit units on the opposite side of the map ''while managing their economy back home''. While the sequel streamlined many of these mechanics, there are now specific micromanagement-heavy new ones that can turn a defeat into a victory (or vice versa if used badly).
26th Mar '17 2:51:03 PM nombretomado
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* ''Doodle Hex'', despite being a "casual" game, should not be attempted by anyone with high blood pressure. It suffers from "{{Okami}} Syndrome", regularly mistaking one rune for another (generally the most useless one it can get away with), and the fact that your opponents [[TheAIIsACheatingBastard never mess up, and somehow seem to be able to repower much more quickly than you can]] means that you have to be ''fast.'' Which means either you have on-the-money dexterity (and even ''that'' is no guarantee) or you spend a lot of time swearing at your DS.

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* ''Doodle Hex'', despite being a "casual" game, should not be attempted by anyone with high blood pressure. It suffers from "{{Okami}} "VideoGame/{{Okami}} Syndrome", regularly mistaking one rune for another (generally the most useless one it can get away with), and the fact that your opponents [[TheAIIsACheatingBastard never mess up, and somehow seem to be able to repower much more quickly than you can]] means that you have to be ''fast.'' Which means either you have on-the-money dexterity (and even ''that'' is no guarantee) or you spend a lot of time swearing at your DS.
25th Mar '17 1:43:51 PM nombretomado
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* ''MetroidPrimeHunters'' on the [[NintendoDS DS]] uses the D-pad for moving, the touch screen for aiming, the ABXY buttons for jumping, shooting, etc. and the shoulder buttons for secondary weapons like missiles. For those who have never played on a DS, these buttons are not conveniently arranged to be used in a manner anything like this. [[note]]Bear in mind that all the levels include challenging timed dashes, and if you want the secondary effects of your secondary weapon (eg. homing missiles) then you'll have to hold the shoulder buttons down to charge them.[[/note]]

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* ''MetroidPrimeHunters'' on the [[NintendoDS [[UsefulNotes/NintendoDS DS]] uses the D-pad for moving, the touch screen for aiming, the ABXY buttons for jumping, shooting, etc. and the shoulder buttons for secondary weapons like missiles. For those who have never played on a DS, these buttons are not conveniently arranged to be used in a manner anything like this. [[note]]Bear in mind that all the levels include challenging timed dashes, and if you want the secondary effects of your secondary weapon (eg. homing missiles) then you'll have to hold the shoulder buttons down to charge them.[[/note]]
15th Mar '17 11:51:38 PM X2X
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* 10 hit combos in ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}''. Timing is essential to pull off these combos, often having to press the button for the next attack before the current one is finished. And many of the characters have combos that involve pressing LP + RK or RP + LK (that's Square + Circle and Triangle + X on a Playstation Controller). This can be made easier, however, by programming the shoulder buttons to correspond to the aforementioned button combinations. [[DifficultButAwesome And if you manage to pull one off, half the opponent's health goes down the gutter]].
* As shown in the trope image, the ''Videogame/AloneInTheDark2008'' remake. The game allows for players to switch between first and third person and use a variety of improvised weapons, set items on fire to permanently kill enemies, and mix items together in the inventory to make things like fire bullets, an improvised flamethrower, or a bomb that you shoot out of the air. Problem is, the inventory tends to be extremely finicky (requiring you to use a thumbstick to scroll through Carnby's jacket pouches and stop the stick precisely at the right spot to get what you want), and virtually every button had a specific use that may or may not change depending on what you're doing at the time; even putting away your flashlight and gun can be a pain for newcomers. Melee combat tried to be flexible by allowing for several different swings and precise movements of held objects for pushing items or holding them against a flame, but Carnby moves like a tank and doesn't swing much faster than he turns. And the inventory screen ''doesn't pause the game'', meaning that rapidly building a bomb or fire bullets that will actually kill an enemy or grabbing a healing spray or bandages to avoid death involves fighting the imprecise and complex interface while you try and avoid getting smacked in the face.

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** How do you do Jax's multi-hit throw in VideoGame/MortalKombat4? Throw, then (hold) RN+BL+HK > HP+LP+LK > HP+BL+LK > HP+LP+HK+LK, of course.
* 10 hit 10-hit combos in ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}''. Timing is essential to pull off these combos, often having to press the button for the next attack before the current one is finished. And many of the characters have combos that involve pressing LP + RK or RP + LK (that's Square + Circle and Triangle + X on a Playstation Controller).[=PlayStation=] controller). This can be made easier, however, by programming the shoulder buttons to correspond to the aforementioned button combinations. [[DifficultButAwesome And if you manage to pull one off, half the opponent's health goes down the gutter]].
gutter.]]
* As shown in the trope image, the ''Videogame/AloneInTheDark2008'' ''VideoGame/AloneInTheDark2008'' remake. The game allows for players to switch between first and third person and use a variety of improvised weapons, set items on fire to permanently kill enemies, and mix items together in the inventory to make things like fire bullets, an improvised flamethrower, or a bomb that you shoot out of the air. Problem is, the inventory tends to be extremely finicky (requiring you to use a thumbstick to scroll through Carnby's jacket pouches and stop the stick precisely at the right spot to get what you want), and virtually every button had a specific use that may or may not change depending on what you're doing at the time; even putting away your flashlight and gun can be a pain for newcomers. Melee combat tried to be flexible by allowing for several different swings and precise movements of held objects for pushing items or holding them against a flame, but Carnby moves like a tank and doesn't swing much faster than he turns. And the inventory screen ''doesn't pause the game'', meaning that rapidly building a bomb or fire bullets that will actually kill an enemy or grabbing a healing spray or bandages to avoid death involves fighting the imprecise and complex interface while you try and avoid getting smacked in the face.



* ''TraumaCenter'' in all its incarnations takes a bit of getting used to, especially if you're aiming for a high score. Stitching a wound neatly but slowly will generally get you fewer points than drawing a quick, random zigzag that would leave a heck of a scar if any doctor did it in real life. It also occasionally suffers from the "not enough room on the screen" variant, where the item you could have sworn you placed directly on the tray somehow misses it, or you injure a patient while trying to fill a syringe from the bottle that appears on the screen, damaging your score.

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* ''TraumaCenter'' ''VideoGame/TraumaCenter'' in all its incarnations takes a bit of getting used to, especially if you're aiming for a high score. Stitching a wound neatly but slowly will generally get you fewer points than drawing a quick, random zigzag that would leave a heck of a scar if any doctor did it in real life. It also occasionally suffers from the "not enough room on the screen" variant, where the item you could have sworn you placed directly on the tray somehow misses it, or you injure a patient while trying to fill a syringe from the bottle that appears on the screen, damaging your score.



** The first DS game has an {{egregious}} example in the magnification tool, which requires the player to draw a circle around the area they want to magnify. Having this go wrong even a few times during the first operation in which it crops up means a game over, never mind frustratedly scribbling what you think is a perfect circle maybe eight or nine times before the game zooms in on the wrong area.

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** The first DS game has an {{egregious}} JustForFun/{{egregious}} example in the magnification tool, which requires the player to draw a circle around the area they want to magnify. Having this go wrong even a few times during the first operation in which it crops up means a game over, never mind frustratedly scribbling what you think is a perfect circle maybe eight or nine times before the game zooms in on the wrong area.



* {{SNK}} is the mother and father of all impossible FightingGame motions. Back in the days of ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' and ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters '94'', characters always had impossible controller motions for their [[LimitBreak Super Moves]] - the crowned king of which is Geese Howard's Raging Storm, executed as follows: Down-Back, Half-Circle Back, Down-Forward + Punch. They call it [[FanNickname The Pretzel]] for a reason. In addition, super moves are activated by hitting ''two'' attack buttons, which is reasonable in an arcade but ludicrous at home. As of later KOF installments, SNK has gotten much better at this (by KOF '96, most characters have less insane motions for their attacks), but it lapses sometimes - try using Duck King in KOF XI. (Geese Howard's Raging Storm has ''never'' changed its motion, primarily due to nostalgia.)
** Adding to this is the modern method of performing his Deadly Rave DM. Especially when it can only be used once per round in ''VideoGame/SVCChaosSNKVsCapcom''. The input needed to pull off the move in that game is the following: Roll the stick from forward to downward to back, bring it forward and hit buttons B, C, and D at the same time, wait for Geese to start performing the move, then timing each of the following button presses just as Geese does each attack in the sequence: A, A, B, B, C, C, D, D, and then roll the stick from down to backward and hit C and D at the same time to get a big blast of energy. And no, you can't just mash the "A, A, B, B..." part, because performing it too slowly ''or'' too quickly will ruin the move. Oh, and if you screw up at any point after the first B + C + D attack (assuming you don't get attacked or fail to pull off the move in the first place), the move does extremely little damage. Even if you only fail the "QCB + C + D" part at the end. And in the case of ''[=SVC=] Chaos'', if you begin executing this move and fail it, even if it's because your opponent attacked you and ended the move prematurely, you ''don't get to use it for the rest of the round.'' At least other ''King of Fighters'' and ''Fatal Fury'' games are nice enough to let you use the move infinitely while a certain meter lasts, or at least grant you the ability to refill said meter. Some even have an easier variation of the move. It's still hard even without requiring a QCB + simultaneous button press at the end, though. If there's anything worthwhile about the move, however, it's that it does extremely high damage if pulled off correctly. Then again, a good number of other characters have moves of roughly equivalent power while not requiring such insane input. Or at least a better damage-to-move-difficulty ratio. This wasn't a problem in it first appearence in ''VideoGame/ArtOfFighting 2'' or KOF 98 Ultimate Match, where it's an automatic ranbu-type DM.
** Not as ludicrous as the Deadly Rave, but more complex than the Raging Storm, is Lawrence Blood's super move - Down-Forward, Half Circle Forward, Down-Back, Forward + Buttons. He's not as well known as Geese so his super usually gets overlooked in these discussions.
** ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown 2'' has its share of difficult motions, most of them being for the [[SuperDeformed "Super Deformed Transformation"]] and certain secret special moves that only a few characters have. Of all those motions, Haohmaru's Ten'ha Fuujin Zan deserves special mention, being: Down-forward, half circle forward, back, down, down-back plus medium slash and weak kick buttons together.
** Parodied in a ''ComicStrip/FoxTrot'' strip. Jason, upon starting to play a new fighting game he just bought, discovers that there is a complex button series needed to throw a basic punch. ...And a fold-out chart showing you how to kick.

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* {{SNK}} Creator/{{SNK}} is the mother and father of all impossible FightingGame motions. Back in the days of ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' and ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters '94'', characters always had impossible controller motions for their [[LimitBreak Super Moves]] - the crowned king of which is Geese Howard's Raging Storm, executed as follows: Down-Back, Half-Circle Back, Down-Forward + Punch. They call it [[FanNickname The Pretzel]] for a reason. In addition, super moves are activated by hitting ''two'' attack buttons, which is reasonable in an arcade but ludicrous at home. As of later KOF ''KOF'' installments, SNK has gotten much better at this (by KOF '96, ''KOF '96'', most characters have less insane motions for their attacks), but it lapses sometimes - -- try using Duck King in KOF XI.''KOF XI''. (Geese Howard's Raging Storm has ''never'' changed its motion, primarily due to nostalgia.)
** Adding to this is the modern method of performing his Deadly Rave DM. Especially when it can only be used once per round in ''VideoGame/SVCChaosSNKVsCapcom''.''VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSVCChaos''. The input needed to pull off the move in that game is the following: Roll the stick from forward to downward to back, bring it forward and hit buttons B, C, and D at the same time, wait for Geese to start performing the move, then timing each of the following button presses just as Geese does each attack in the sequence: A, A, B, B, C, C, D, D, and then roll the stick from down to backward and hit C and D at the same time to get a big blast of energy. And no, you can't just mash the "A, A, B, B..." part, because performing it too slowly ''or'' too quickly will ruin the move. Oh, and if you screw up at any point after the first B + C + D attack (assuming you don't get attacked or fail to pull off the move in the first place), the move does extremely little damage. Even if you only fail the "QCB + C + D" part at the end. And in the case of ''[=SVC=] ''SVC Chaos'', if you begin executing this move and fail it, even if it's because your opponent attacked you and ended the move prematurely, you ''don't get to use it for the rest of the round.'' At least other ''King of Fighters'' and ''Fatal Fury'' games are nice enough to let you use the move infinitely while a certain meter lasts, or at least grant you the ability to refill said meter. Some even have an easier variation of the move. It's still hard even without requiring a QCB + simultaneous button press at the end, though. If there's anything worthwhile about the move, however, it's that it does extremely high damage if pulled off correctly. Then again, a good number of other characters have moves of roughly equivalent power while not requiring such insane input. Or at least a better damage-to-move-difficulty ratio. This wasn't a problem in it first appearence appearance in ''VideoGame/ArtOfFighting 2'' or KOF 98 ''KOF '98 Ultimate Match, Match'', where it's an automatic ranbu-type Ranbu-type DM.
** Not as ludicrous as the Deadly Rave, but more complex than the Raging Storm, is Lawrence Blood's super move - move: Down-Forward, Half Circle Half-Circle Forward, Down-Back, Forward + Buttons. He's not as well known as Geese so his super usually gets overlooked in these discussions.
** ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown 2'' has its share of difficult motions, most of them being for the [[SuperDeformed "Super Deformed Transformation"]] and certain secret special moves that only a few characters have. Of all those motions, Haohmaru's Ten'ha Fuujin Zan deserves special mention, being: Down-forward, half circle half-circle forward, back, down, down-back plus medium slash and weak kick buttons together.
** Parodied in a ''ComicStrip/FoxTrot'' strip. Jason, upon starting to play a new fighting game he just bought, discovers that there is a complex button series needed to throw a basic punch. ... And a fold-out chart showing you how to kick.



* ''VideoGame/StreetFighter'' and other fighting games have an issue with [[MightyGlacier grappler]] characters. Namely, the biggest problem is what's called a "720" motion. Basically, you have to perform two full circles of the joystick in about a second to pull off the move, faster to do it without jumping. Zangief is the main culprit here, but the reason no one complains about it with Zangief is because it's [[DifficultButAwesome completely worth the difficulty]] to finish off a full health opponent in three or four moves, and if you're playing on the defensive, the fact that less than master players telegraph their strategies by hopping around all the time puts them at a tactical disadvantage. Of course, in games that are picky about the diagonals, if you don't have a + arcade stick and are stuck with the keyboard (especially without macros), you ''will'' cry trying to pull a move like this off. Some games are pickier than others, ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' being to the point where simply pulling off a half circle forward is near-impossible without a macro.

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* ''VideoGame/StreetFighter'' ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' and other fighting games have an issue with [[MightyGlacier grappler]] characters. Namely, the biggest problem is what's called a "720" motion. Basically, you have to perform two full circles of the joystick in about a second to pull off the move, faster to do it without jumping. Zangief is the main culprit here, but the reason no one complains about it with Zangief is because it's [[DifficultButAwesome completely worth the difficulty]] to finish off a full health opponent in three or four moves, and if you're playing on the defensive, the fact that less than master players telegraph their strategies by hopping around all the time puts them at a tactical disadvantage. Of course, in games that are picky about the diagonals, if you don't have a + arcade stick and are stuck with the keyboard (especially without macros), you ''will'' cry trying to pull a move like this off. Some games are pickier than others, ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' being to the point where simply pulling off a half circle half-circle forward is near-impossible without a macro.



* How do you do Jax's multihit throw in MortalKombat 4? Throw,then(hold)RN+BL+HK > HP+LP+LK > HP+BL+LK > HP+LP+HK+LK of course.
30th Jan '17 10:07:03 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''GunZ: The Duel'' has programming gaps that allow players to do move cancels unintended by the developers, introducing a whole new complex metagame, with the simpler moves like "slashshot" requiring 6 keypresses in less than a second[[note]]jump, dash, slash, switch to gun, shoot, switch back to sword, and land.[[/note]]. Then you've got moves with about 20 keypresses in them, most of which need to be precisely timed, a d-style move that require you to dash and lunge[[note]]extended lunge, tap one of the basic movement keys (cursor keys and wasd usually) then tap the same key along with your lunge key.[[/note]]at the exact same time, and some others that need to be timed precisely against the lag between you and your opponent. Even just getting a hit in when your opponent is doing this qualifies as you'll be shooting at someone who's bouncing all over the place changing directions and blocking half the time. Most inexperienced players just spam their guns hoping to get at least some hits in. Needless to say, this rarely works.

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* ''GunZ: The Duel'' ''VideoGame/GunZTheDuel'' has programming gaps that allow players to do move cancels unintended by the developers, introducing a whole new complex metagame, with the simpler moves like "slashshot" requiring 6 keypresses in less than a second[[note]]jump, dash, slash, switch to gun, shoot, switch back to sword, and land.[[/note]]. Then you've got moves with about 20 keypresses in them, most of which need to be precisely timed, a d-style move that require you to dash and lunge[[note]]extended lunge, tap one of the basic movement keys (cursor keys and wasd usually) then tap the same key along with your lunge key.[[/note]]at the exact same time, and some others that need to be timed precisely against the lag between you and your opponent. Even just getting a hit in when your opponent is doing this qualifies as you'll be shooting at someone who's bouncing all over the place changing directions and blocking half the time. Most inexperienced players just spam their guns hoping to get at least some hits in. Needless to say, this rarely works.
17th Jan '17 7:27:43 AM Saber15
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* ''Videogame/MechWarrior'' traditionally featured bizarre all-over-the-keyboard controls thanks to the huge suite of controls and the expectation that players would be using a joystick and throttle anyways. In ''Mechwarrior 2'', for example, leg controls were on one side of the keyboard, and directional JumpJetPack controls were on the complete opposite side. The controls have [[ThePennyfarthingEffect gradually been consolidated]] and moved to more reasonable places, but some oddities remain in the newer titles.
11th Jan '17 6:13:46 AM Dravencour
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* ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry 4''. EVERYTHING is a combination of several button taps and leaning the stick in a sequence of directions that makes more sense in a 2D fighting game than in a 3D game where even facing the right target is tough. Two of Nero's attacks require pressing back and forward ''quickly'' on the left stick in order to use while locked on, and the tougher one has to be done in the air). The four fighting styles Dante uses are assigned to four different directions on the famously inaccurate Xbox direction pad, a fifth style requires pressing the same direction twice, two buttons cycle through 8 different kinds of ranged and melee weaponry, one ranged weapon requires multiple spins of the direction stick to change attack type.. the list goes on and on. Surprisingly, all the complexity is really rewarding when it works. Also, the freaking trigger pressing on Nero's sword to power it up on EVERY SINGLE ATTACK SWING is not. That. Easy.

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* ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry 4''. EVERYTHING is a combination of several button taps and leaning the stick in a sequence of directions that makes more sense in a 2D fighting game than in a 3D game where even facing the right target is tough. Two of Nero's attacks require pressing back and forward ''quickly'' on the left stick in order to use while locked on, and the tougher one has to be done in the air). air. The four fighting styles Dante uses are assigned to four different directions on the famously inaccurate Xbox direction pad, a fifth style requires pressing the same direction twice, two buttons cycle through 8 different kinds of ranged and melee weaponry, one ranged weapon requires multiple spins of the direction stick to change attack type.. type...the list goes on and on. Surprisingly, all the complexity is really rewarding when it works. Also, the freaking trigger pressing on Nero's sword to power it up on EVERY SINGLE ATTACK SWING is not. That. Easy.
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