History Main / SocietyMarchesOn

11th May '16 7:28:15 PM DaNuke
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* Averting this is specifically one of the reasons why ''Literature/AClockworkOrange'' uses an entire new brand of slang created from scratch coupled with an alien, otherworldly future with very different values (to begin with: bars that instead of booze serve milk laced with narcotics) -- if Anthony Burgess's rendition of 1962's TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture were based on what was actually going on in 1962, the book and its film would have aged pretty poorly.
28th Apr '16 7:01:09 PM Fireblood
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** Also from the version of 2003 found in ''TheMartianChronicles'' is the story "Way in the Middle of the Air." It focuses on a Southern town's... um, black people (although not in those words and who still speak like they just walked off the set of ''GoneWithTheWind'') having pooled their resources and bought rockets in secret to escape the racist American south. In describing the region, a (white) character notes that the poll tax is gone and "More and more states passin' anti-lynchin' bills." Once again, this is ''2003.'' [[note]] The poll tax was outlawed in 1964; and while no anti-lynching bills were passed, they would have become obsolete once lynching became so disreputable that only the lowest criminals were willing to participate in it. [[/note]]
** Another Mars-based story, "The Other Foot" claims that not only is segregation in America going to continue well into the future, but will eventually become so extreme that Black people will eventually colonize Mars entirely on their own. It's actually quite FairForItsDay considering it was probably written in the 1940's and the all-Black colony ends up in a very good position to retaliate against their former oppressors (and they almost go through with it, too) yet ultimately both sides are able to reconcile their differences and live together in peace. However, it is a bit ironic when you consider that a lot of the major Civil Rights movements started happening in the 1950's and 1960's, not too long after it was written.

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** Also from the version of 2003 found in ''TheMartianChronicles'' is the story "Way in the Middle of the Air." It focuses on a Southern town's... um, black people (although not in those words and who still speak like they just walked off the set of ''GoneWithTheWind'') having pooled their resources and bought rockets in secret to escape the racist American south. In describing the region, a (white) character notes that the poll tax is gone and "More and more states passin' anti-lynchin' bills." Once again, this is ''2003.'' [[note]] The poll tax was outlawed in 1964; and while no anti-lynching bills were passed, they would have become obsolete once lynching became so disreputable that only the lowest criminals were willing to participate in it. it, and anyone who did prosecuted for murder rather than praised.[[/note]]
** Another Mars-based story, "The Other Foot" claims that not only is segregation in America going to continue well into the future, but will eventually become so extreme that Black black people will eventually colonize Mars entirely on their own. It's actually quite FairForItsDay considering it was probably written in the 1940's and the all-Black all-black colony ends up in a very good position to retaliate against their former oppressors (and they almost go through with it, too) yet ultimately both sides are able to reconcile their differences and live together in peace. However, it is a bit ironic when you consider that a lot of the major Civil Rights movements started happening in the 1950's and 1960's, not too long 1950's, just after it was written.



* Published in 1959, ''Literature/AlasBabylon'' portrays breastfeeding and home canning as relics which have all but disappeared prior to the nuclear strike depicted in the book, but which must be reluctantly revived in the conditions prevailing afterward. Both practices have made a strong comeback since the 1950s.

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** Some have suggested that "grinding corn" was actually one euphemism for...[[IsThatWhatTheyreCallingItNow something else]]. If true, this is actually progressive, saying a lesbian would get to heaven.
* Published in 1959, ''Literature/AlasBabylon'' portrays breastfeeding and home canning as relics which have all but disappeared prior to the nuclear strike depicted in the book, but which must be reluctantly revived in the conditions prevailing afterward. Both practices have made a strong comeback since the 1950s.1950's.



* In the book ''I Kissed Dating Goodbye'', Joshua Harris recommends that men and women be "friends first" before beginning to date. Back when he wrote that book in the late 90s, most couples met in real life and through platonic situations where it was highly likely that they would be friends first anyway. However, with internet dating sites being so popular nowadays and so many couples meeting through them, being friends first is not always an option.
* The ''Literature/VenusPrime'' series, published in the early aughts but written in the 80s (and based on older Creator/ArthurCClarke short stories) have several examples:
** In the first book, one of the suspects in the ''Star Queen'' sabotage, Sondra Sylvester, has a big secret that she doesn't want anyone to find out... she's living with another woman. While this might have been scandalous in the 80s, it's not so controversial nowadays.

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* In the book ''I Kissed Dating Goodbye'', Joshua Harris recommends that men and women be "friends first" before beginning to date. Back when he wrote that book in the late 90s, 90's, most couples met in real life and through platonic situations where it was highly likely that they would be friends first anyway. However, with internet dating sites being so popular nowadays and so many couples meeting through them, being friends first is not always an option.
* The ''Literature/VenusPrime'' series, published in the early aughts but written in the 80s 80's (and based on older Creator/ArthurCClarke short stories) have several examples:
** In the first book, one of the suspects in the ''Star Queen'' sabotage, Sondra Sylvester, has a big secret that she doesn't want anyone to find out... she's living with another woman. While this might have been scandalous in the 80s, 80's, it's not so controversial nowadays.



** This is particularly bad in Literature/SpeakerForTheDead and it's sequel, Xenocide, where a lot of the plot points are being derived from Card's assumption that Brazilian society (the basis for the location of the book) would remain basically as conservative and catholic as it was when he traveled there for his missionary mission.

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** This is particularly bad in Literature/SpeakerForTheDead and it's sequel, Xenocide, where a lot of the plot points are being derived from Card's assumption that Brazilian society (the basis for the location of the book) would remain basically as conservative and catholic Catholic as it was when he traveled there for his missionary mission.
15th Apr '16 1:04:48 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** Alex Bartoli decides to fake a pregnancy, via blackmailing a doctor to provide a sonogram to lead her husband, Peter Fairchild, on and get married. The episode was produced at a time long before pregnancy tests became incredibly cheap and could be administered at home, as well as DNA tests. If such items were available, [[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot Alex's deception would have been uncovered in 20 minutes or less]].

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** Alex Bartoli decides to fake a pregnancy, via blackmailing a doctor to provide a sonogram to lead her husband, Peter Fairchild, on and get married. The episode was produced at a time long before pregnancy tests became incredibly cheap and could be administered at home, as well as DNA tests. If such items were available, [[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot Alex's deception would have been uncovered in 20 minutes or less]].less.
11th Apr '16 9:29:13 AM Hanz
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* Played for laughs in the first ''Film/AustinPowers'' film, where the [[FishOutOfTemporalWater recently-defrosted]] Dr. Evil's proposed evil schemes (making a hole in the ozone layer and destroying Prince Charles and Lady Diana's marriage) are things that have already happened by the time of the film (1997). Frustrated, he decides to just fall back on the classic "Hijack nuclear weapons and hold the world for hostage" plan.
8th Apr '16 1:43:05 PM Savini24
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31st Mar '16 1:31:27 PM de.barros12345@gmail.com
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* ''Creator/OrsonScottCard has this very blatantly in his Ender series, possibly due to AuthorAppeal. Written in the 80's, the multi-planetary society of the last three books is extremely religious considering 3,000 years have passed since modern day. Planets are weirdly segregated by nationality, despite those having long lost any real meaning, and they have "licenses" for official religions, even those based on modern secular societies. The protagonists and their companions regularly venture into theology, which is mostly no longer true for a society only 30 years after the books.
** This is particularly bad in Literature/SpeakerForTheDead and it's sequel, Xenocide, where a lot of the plot points are being derived from Card's assumption that Brazilian society (the basis for the location of the book) would remain basically as conservative and catholic as it was when he traveled there for his missionary mission.
16th Mar '16 2:18:41 AM mlsmithca
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* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' has several parts where social mores have not dated so well. One example is the alien from Betelgeuse who tries to pretend he's human, and English, by adopting what he thought was a very common name - [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Prefect Ford Prefect]]. While it still sort-of works (after all, the joke is he DidNotDoTheResearch), the joke is slightly spoiled by the fact that hardly anyone except a few classic car enthusiasts has ever actually heard of a Ford Prefect, but no modern update has yet renamed him "Ford Fiesta" or something. (This was a problem when the book was first published in the United States as well, because Ford never set up a North American assembly line and only a handful were imported.)

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* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' has several parts where social mores have not dated so well. One example is the alien from Betelgeuse who tries to pretend he's human, and English, by adopting what he thought was a very common name - [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Prefect Ford Prefect]]. While it still sort-of works (after all, the joke is he DidNotDoTheResearch), sort of works, the joke is slightly spoiled by the fact that hardly anyone except a few classic car enthusiasts has ever actually heard of a Ford Prefect, but no modern update has yet renamed him "Ford Fiesta" or something. (This was a problem when the book was first published in the United States as well, because Ford never set up a North American assembly line and only a handful were imported.)
14th Mar '16 10:55:56 AM Jake
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* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' has several parts where social mores have not dated so well. One example is the alien from Betelgeuse who tries to pretend he's human, and English, by adopting what he thought was a very common name - [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Prefect Ford Prefect]]. While probably funny back when the first radio serial was released, the fact that he's named after a car that hasn't been around for nearly half a century completely ruins the joke, and to date ''no'' adaptation has changed the name to something like "Ford Focus" or "Ford Fiesta". Another possible example is the claim that humans are "ape-descended life forms" that "are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea". This was back when digital watches were fairly new but not totally ubiquitous, but reading it now, can you think of ''anybody'' in a developed world that is still that impressed with digital watches?

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* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' has several parts where social mores have not dated so well. One example is the alien from Betelgeuse who tries to pretend he's human, and English, by adopting what he thought was a very common name - [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Prefect Ford Prefect]]. While probably funny back when it still sort-of works (after all, the first radio serial was released, joke is he DidNotDoTheResearch), the joke is slightly spoiled by the fact that he's named after hardly anyone except a few classic car that hasn't been around for nearly half a century completely ruins the joke, and to date ''no'' adaptation enthusiasts has changed the name to something like ever actually heard of a Ford Prefect, but no modern update has yet renamed him "Ford Focus" Fiesta" or "Ford Fiesta". something. (This was a problem when the book was first published in the United States as well, because Ford never set up a North American assembly line and only a handful were imported.)
**
Another possible example is the claim that humans are "ape-descended life forms" that "are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea". This was back when digital watches were fairly new but not totally ubiquitous, but reading it now, can you think of ''anybody'' in a developed world that is still that impressed with digital watches?



** The Quandary Phase of [[Radio/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy the radio series]] (based on ''Literature/SoLongAndThanksForAllTheFish'') alters it to "novelty cellphone ringtones". This sets up a similar alteration later, where Ford hands cellphones with novelty ringtones out to a crowd. In the book, it was Sony Walkmen.
** Also, in [[Film/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy the movie]], Ford was referred to only by first name, preserving the joke.

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** The Quandary Phase of [[Radio/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy the radio series]] (based on ''Literature/SoLongAndThanksForAllTheFish'') alters it to "novelty cellphone ringtones". This sets up a similar alteration later, where Ford hands cellphones with novelty ringtones out to a crowd. In the book, it was crowd instead of Sony Walkmen.
Walkmen. And now ''that's'' dated as well; how many people in 2016 still think novelty cellphone ringtones are a pretty neat idea?
** Also, in [[Film/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy The movie]] dodged the movie]], issue; Ford was referred to only by his first name, preserving the joke.name.
17th Feb '16 7:52:59 AM erforce
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* ''Film/TheWarriors'' (1979), based on a book from the mid-1960s, is supposed to take place "sometime in the future" (as the opening of Walter Hill's "director's cut" makes clear), but even leaving aside the film's TotallyRadical fashions, hairstyles, and slang, there are a number of other elements that now strike us as Zeerusty. Most prominent is Cyrus's claim that a citywide gang could control everything and even thwart the NYPD...when, just a few years after this film's release, the LAPD began to employ military technology in their fight against street gangs. There's also the failure of any character to suspect that a woman sitting alone on a park bench very late at night might be a plainclothes police officer [[note]] which is especially stupid of them because they are themselves examples of dangerous gang members in a park, and one of them is [[SociopathicHero a potential if not actual rapist]] [[/note]].

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* ''Film/TheWarriors'' (1979), based on a book from the mid-1960s, is supposed to take place "sometime in the future" (as the opening of Walter Hill's Creator/WalterHill's "director's cut" makes clear), but even leaving aside the film's TotallyRadical fashions, hairstyles, and slang, there are a number of other elements that now strike us as Zeerusty. Most prominent is Cyrus's claim that a citywide gang could control everything and even thwart the NYPD...when, just a few years after this film's release, the LAPD began to employ military technology in their fight against street gangs. There's also the failure of any character to suspect that a woman sitting alone on a park bench very late at night might be a plainclothes police officer [[note]] which is especially stupid of them because they are themselves examples of dangerous gang members in a park, and one of them is [[SociopathicHero a potential if not actual rapist]] [[/note]].
7th Feb '16 4:35:38 PM nombretomado
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* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' episode "Rest in Pieces" had an important plot point being that no one ever dies in a cartoon. On the other hand, death has been a recurring and frequent topic in anime even at that time, but this was also before anime really took off in the west. In any case, by the turn of the millennium, Slappy Squirrel's statement about the nonexistence of death in cartoons feels more like a quaint throwback to the GoldenAgeOfAnimation than any accurate statement about cartoons.

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* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' episode "Rest in Pieces" had an important plot point being that no one ever dies in a cartoon. On the other hand, death has been a recurring and frequent topic in anime even at that time, but this was also before anime really took off in the west. In any case, by the turn of the millennium, Slappy Squirrel's statement about the nonexistence of death in cartoons feels more like a quaint throwback to the GoldenAgeOfAnimation UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation than any accurate statement about cartoons.
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