History Main / SoCalization

20th Sep '16 3:42:09 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* The episode "Exit Wounds" of ''CriminalMinds'' has the BAU assisting a small town sheriff department in Alaska. In reality, there are no sheriff departments in Alaska and their duties are fulfilled by the Alaska State Troopers.

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* The episode "Exit Wounds" of ''CriminalMinds'' has the BAU assisting a small town sheriff department in Alaska. In reality, there are no sheriff departments in Alaska and their duties are fulfilled by the Alaska State Troopers.
20th Sep '16 3:27:42 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** The stickiness of the term JuniorHigh. This is, of course, partly because MostWritersAreAdults - but it's partly because the L.A. school district didn't reconfigure and rebrand them to middle schools until the mid-90s, some 20 years after most of the rest of the country.

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** * The stickiness of the term JuniorHigh. This is, of course, partly because MostWritersAreAdults - but it's partly because the L.A. school district didn't reconfigure and rebrand them to middle schools until the mid-90s, some 20 years after most of the rest of the country.



* Comicbook/SwampThing supposedly lives in a "County". Unfortunately, it is also set in Louisiana, which has parishes, but not counties.[[note]]The purpose of parishes is to allow people who live in Louisiana to correct people who refer to counties. There's no legal difference.[[/note]]
20th Sep '16 3:23:07 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** And the numbering is another issue. Interstates are numbered low in the west and high in the east. This is why the major north-south interstate on the west coast is 5, while the one on the east coast is 95. The reverse is true for U.S highways; the major U.S highweay in Los Angeles is 101, while the original north-south route on the east coast (built before I-95) is U.S. Route 1.
20th Sep '16 3:22:24 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** This one's a double whammy, because most of what's not filmed in California is filmed in New York--where the age of consent is still 17
29th May '16 12:55:02 AM spiritsunami
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** This one's a double whammy, because most of what's not filmed in California is filmed in New York--where the age of consent is still 17
28th May '16 10:38:49 PM 10-13-2
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* People of Latin American descent in other states are as likely as not - and sometimes ''more'' likely - to be from the Caribbean or even South America as they are to be from Mexico or Central America. But expect tacos, burritos, pinatas, ''Dia de los Muertos'', etc., no matter where you are (goes hand in hand with LatinoIsBrown).
28th May '16 10:25:52 PM Toadofsteel
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* While California is far from the only state to use the term "District Attorney" for their prosecutors, many states and the Federal government use different terms. Despite this, no matter where a work is set, a prosecutor is going to be called the District Attorney. You'll rarely hear US Attorney (the federal title), Commonwealth's Attorney, County Attorney, State's Attorney, or any of the other titles. It doesn't help that ''Series/LawAndOrder'', the one major police/courtroom franchise that is actually filmed in the jurisdiction it depicts, is set in a state where each county's prosecution is led by a District Attorney (though they correctly depict that the ''Assistant'' District Attorneys are the ones often in the courtroom prosecuting.)

to:

* While California is far from the only state to use the term "District Attorney" for their prosecutors, many states and the Federal government use different terms. Despite this, no matter where a work is set, a prosecutor is going to be called the District Attorney. You'll rarely hear US Attorney (the federal title), Commonwealth's Attorney, County Attorney, State's Attorney, or any of the other titles. It doesn't help that ''Series/LawAndOrder'', the one major police/courtroom franchise that is actually filmed in the jurisdiction it depicts, is also set in a state where each county's prosecution is led by a District Attorney (though they correctly depict that the ''Assistant'' District Attorneys are the ones often in the courtroom prosecuting.)
28th May '16 10:25:04 PM Toadofsteel
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* While California is far from the only state to use the term "District Attorney" for their prosecutors, many states and the Federal government use different terms. Despite this, no matter where a work is set, a prosecutor is going to be called the District Attorney. You'll rarely hear US Attorney (the federal title), Commonwealth's Attorney, County Attorney, State's Attorney, or any of the other titles. It doesn't help that ''Series/LawAndOrder'', the one major police/courtroom franchise that is actually filmed in the jurisdiction it depicts, is set in a state where each county's prosecution is led by a District Attorney (though they correctly depict that the ''Assistant'' DAs are the ones often in the courtroom prosecuting.)

to:

* While California is far from the only state to use the term "District Attorney" for their prosecutors, many states and the Federal government use different terms. Despite this, no matter where a work is set, a prosecutor is going to be called the District Attorney. You'll rarely hear US Attorney (the federal title), Commonwealth's Attorney, County Attorney, State's Attorney, or any of the other titles. It doesn't help that ''Series/LawAndOrder'', the one major police/courtroom franchise that is actually filmed in the jurisdiction it depicts, is set in a state where each county's prosecution is led by a District Attorney (though they correctly depict that the ''Assistant'' DAs District Attorneys are the ones often in the courtroom prosecuting.)
28th May '16 10:24:33 PM Toadofsteel
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* While California is far from the only state to use the term "District Attorney" for their prosecutors, many states and the Federal government use different terms. Despite this, no matter where a work is set, a prosecutor is going to be called the District Attorney. You'll rarely hear US Attorney (the federal title), Commonwealth's Attorney, County Attorney, State's Attorney, or any of the other titles.

to:

* While California is far from the only state to use the term "District Attorney" for their prosecutors, many states and the Federal government use different terms. Despite this, no matter where a work is set, a prosecutor is going to be called the District Attorney. You'll rarely hear US Attorney (the federal title), Commonwealth's Attorney, County Attorney, State's Attorney, or any of the other titles. It doesn't help that ''Series/LawAndOrder'', the one major police/courtroom franchise that is actually filmed in the jurisdiction it depicts, is set in a state where each county's prosecution is led by a District Attorney (though they correctly depict that the ''Assistant'' DAs are the ones often in the courtroom prosecuting.)
16th May '16 10:13:58 AM kinney
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Added DiffLines:

* It's fairly rare in South Korean media to see stories set outside of Seoul or Kyeonggi-do. This is perhaps [[JustifiedTrope justified]] considering nearly half of the entire country's population lives in the Seoul metropolitan area.
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