History Main / SoCalization

4th Sep '17 1:30:48 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** To be fair, "soda" was already popular in most of America.
29th Aug '17 9:46:44 PM TargetOnMyBack
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** In the past, TV and radio presenters were required to speak using received pronunciation (ie., the extremely posh accent heard in older broadcasts), and even when that was relaxed a bit they still had to use a "proper" English accent. It's only in the last couple of decades that presenters have been free to speak normally in the their natural accent. This can give the impression that, prior to the '90s, only close relations of the Queen were allowed to read the news, while now, even if there tends to be a focus on a few large cities, you at least get some impression that people from the rest of the country actually exist.

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** In the past, TV and radio presenters were required to speak using received pronunciation (ie., the extremely posh accent heard in older broadcasts), and even when that was relaxed a bit they still had to use a "proper" English accent. It's only in the last couple of decades that presenters have been free to speak normally in the their natural accent. This can give the impression that, prior to the '90s, only close relations of the Queen were allowed to read the news, while now, even if there tends to be a focus on a few large cities, you at least get some impression that people from the rest of the country actually exist.
23rd Aug '17 9:03:14 AM Cuddles
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Added DiffLines:

** In the past, TV and radio presenters were required to speak using received pronunciation (ie., the extremely posh accent heard in older broadcasts), and even when that was relaxed a bit they still had to use a "proper" English accent. It's only in the last couple of decades that presenters have been free to speak normally in the their natural accent. This can give the impression that, prior to the '90s, only close relations of the Queen were allowed to read the news, while now, even if there tends to be a focus on a few large cities, you at least get some impression that people from the rest of the country actually exist.
29th Jul '17 12:12:32 PM jz78817
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* The state government office that deals with motor vehicle registration, driver's licenses, and personal identification is invariably called the Department of Motor Vehicles, or "the DMV." Most states have this department, but only 18 call it the DMV. The other 32 might change the name slightly, such as Arizona's Motor Vehicle Department (MVD), Massachusetts' Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV or "the Registry") or Ohio's Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV). Others have a name completely different like the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation ([=PennDOT=]). Still others give this task to government offices not normally associated with vehicles or ID. For example, Illinois handles these tasks via local offices of the Secretary of State. Nonetheless, "the DMV" has become shorthand for this office all across the country.

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* The state government office that deals with motor vehicle registration, driver's licenses, and personal identification is invariably called the Department of Motor Vehicles, or "the DMV." Most states have this department, but only 18 call it the DMV. The other 32 might change the name slightly, such as Arizona's Motor Vehicle Department (MVD), Massachusetts' Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV or "the Registry") or Ohio's Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV). Others have a name completely different like the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation ([=PennDOT=]). Still others give this task to government offices not normally associated with vehicles or ID. For example, Illinois handles and Michigan handle these tasks via local offices of the Secretary of State. Nonetheless, "the DMV" has become shorthand for this office all across the country.
29th Jul '17 10:04:39 AM crazysamaritan
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* California cops have [[YouHave48Hours 48 hours]] to charge a suspect with a crime before they have to release him. The standard under federal law is actually 72 hours, but You Have 72 Hours isn't a trope.

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* California cops have [[YouHave48Hours [[RaceAgainstTheClock 48 hours]] to charge a suspect with a crime before they have to release him. The standard under federal law is actually 72 hours, but You Have 72 Hours isn't a trope.
28th Jul '17 10:12:25 AM jz78817
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*** In 2010, ABC offered ''Detroit 1-8-7'', a show with a title referencing the California penal code (murder) in a city not in California. In the Michigan legal code, 187 is a long-repealed section on assisting prison breakouts.

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*** In 2010, ABC offered ''Detroit 1-8-7'', a show with a title referencing the California penal code (murder) in a city not in California. In the Michigan legal code, 187 is a long-repealed section on assisting prison breakouts. 750.316 is the actual Michigan penal code for murder.
24th May '17 10:03:48 PM Naram-Sin
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** It's noteworthy that Latinos in American media became [[LatinoIsBrown noticeably darker]] and began to be treated as a distinct race in the 1980s, precisely when Los Angeles replaced New York City as the hip place to be.

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** It's noteworthy that Latinos in American media became [[LatinoIsBrown noticeably darker]] and began to be treated as a distinct race in the 1980s, precisely when Los Angeles replaced New York City as the hip place to be.
be (NYC's Latin American community has historically been dominated by white Cubans and Puerto Ricans).
21st Apr '17 11:56:15 AM drwhom
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*** This one seems to have percolated into real life. COLORADO white supremacist prison gang The 211 Crew is a reference to the out-of-state penal code. They also practice "187s." The Colorado Revised Statutes use a different numbering format from the California codes; for example, the Colorado laws on homicide are codified at §§ 18-3-101 through 18-3-107.

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*** This one seems to have percolated into real life. COLORADO white supremacist prison gang The 211 Crew is a reference to the out-of-state penal code. They also practice "187s." The Colorado Revised Statutes use a different numbering format from the California codes; for example, codes; the Colorado laws on homicide are codified at §§ 18-3-101 through 18-3-107.18-3-107; while those on robbery are codified at §§ 18-4-301 through 18-4-305.
21st Apr '17 11:52:44 AM drwhom
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*** This one seems to have percolated into real life. COLORADO white supremacist prison gang The 211 Crew is a reference to the out-of-state penal code. They also practice "187s." For reference, Colorado criminal law is by title, not by section. So no number in the state could even be that high.

to:

*** This one seems to have percolated into real life. COLORADO white supremacist prison gang The 211 Crew is a reference to the out-of-state penal code. They also practice "187s." For reference, The Colorado criminal law is by title, not by section. So no number in Revised Statutes use a different numbering format from the state could even be that high.California codes; for example, the Colorado laws on homicide are codified at §§ 18-3-101 through 18-3-107.
3rd Apr '17 7:44:15 PM themisterfree
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* In-N-Out Burger This fast food chain has the ''vast'' majority of its stores in California, with a scant handful in surrounding states. But they are sometimes mentioned in shows that take place elsewhere. Other franchises, such as Sonic and Jack-in-the-Box, are also commonly seen on T.V. despite the fact that they aren't prevalent in some areas. Conversely, chains that are common in other parts of the U.S., such as Hardee's (see below) and White Castle, are almost never seen or mentioned, even in stories set where they are ubiquitous.
* California-specific namings of stores with different names across the country: Ralph's (supermarket chain owned by Kroger), Checkers (known in some places as Rally's), and Carl's Jr. (known as Hardee's in some places, mostly the South and Midwest).

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* In-N-Out Burger This fast food chain has the ''vast'' majority of its stores in California, with a scant handful in surrounding states. But they are sometimes mentioned in shows that take place elsewhere. Other franchises, such as Sonic and Jack-in-the-Box, Jack In The Box, are also commonly seen on T.V. TV despite the fact that they aren't prevalent in some areas. Conversely, chains that are common in other parts of the U.S., such as Hardee's (see below) and White Castle, are almost never seen or mentioned, even in stories set where they are ubiquitous.
ubiquitous. (Roy Rogers would've qualified for this too back in the 70s and 80s, but they've since been far reduced in scope and locations, as a result of Hardee's (who bought them from Marriott- yes, the hotel chain) [[ExecutiveMeddling attempting to use them as a plan for expansion]], only to [[EpicFail fail so hard]] they [[DownerEnding ended up closing most of them]].)
* California-specific namings of stores with different names across the country: Ralph's (supermarket chain owned by Kroger), Kroger- which doesn't operate in some areas of the country), Checkers (known in some places as Rally's), Rally's; they were originally separate chains, but merged), and Carl's Jr. (known as Hardee's in some places, mostly the South and Midwest).Midwest; also a merger of two separate chains).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SoCalization