History Main / SmallTaxonomyPools

18th Sep '17 12:09:15 PM schoi30
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** Sauropods are represented by ''Brontosaurus'', ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', and ''Brachiosaurus''. ''Camarasaurus'', ''Saltasaurus'', ''Argentinosaurus'', and ''Supersaurus'' if you're lucky.

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** Sauropods are represented by ''Brontosaurus'', ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', and ''Brachiosaurus''. ''Camarasaurus'', ''Saltasaurus'', ''Mamenchisaurus'', ''Barosaurus'', ''Argentinosaurus'', and ''Supersaurus'' if you're lucky.
18th Sep '17 12:05:45 PM schoi30
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** Sauropods are represented by ''Brontosaurus'', ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', and ''Brachiosaurus''. ''Argentinosaurus'' if you're lucky.

to:

** Sauropods are represented by ''Brontosaurus'', ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', and ''Brachiosaurus''. ''Argentinosaurus'' ''Camarasaurus'', ''Saltasaurus'', ''Argentinosaurus'', and ''Supersaurus'' if you're lucky.
17th Sep '17 9:57:56 PM schoi30
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* Horses (by far the best-known members of the order Perissodactyla) in fiction come in four types: draft horse (usually a Clydesdale), race horse (almost always a Thoroughbred despite many other breeds being used for racing as well), wild horse (mustang), and Generic Critter-You-Sit-On (all others). Mules appear much more often than donkeys, despite needing the latter to create the former. Zebras are treated as one species and will usually be plains zebras, often wrongly depicted as the size of modern domestic horses. Rhinos, often also treated as one species and almost always African black or hook-lipped rhinos, appear as charging brutes or musclebound thugs in media. Woolly rhinos are prevalent in works about extinct mammals, though the giant hornless rhino ''Paraceratherium'' may show up as well due to its reputation as one of the largest land mammals. Brontotheres, rhino-like but more closely related to horses, are also quite popular in the subject of prehistoric mammals. Tapirs are usually unheard of, though they tend to appear in Japanese media due to their resemblance to the mythical [[DreamStealer Baku]]. Chalicotheres (closely related to rhinos and tapirs) are occasionally mentioned in educational works.

to:

* Horses (by far the best-known members of the order Perissodactyla) in fiction come in four types: draft horse (usually a Clydesdale), race horse (almost always a Thoroughbred despite many other breeds being used for racing as well), wild horse (mustang), and Generic Critter-You-Sit-On (all others). Mules appear much more often than donkeys, despite needing the latter to create the former. Zebras are treated as one species and will usually be plains zebras, often wrongly depicted as the size of modern domestic horses. Rhinos, often also treated as one species and almost always African black or hook-lipped rhinos, appear as charging brutes or musclebound thugs in media. Woolly rhinos are prevalent in works about extinct mammals, though the giant hornless rhino ''Paraceratherium'' may show up as well due to its reputation as one of the largest land mammals. Brontotheres, rhino-like but more closely related to horses, are also quite popular in the subject of prehistoric mammals. Tapirs are usually unheard of, though they Tapirs, particularly the black-and-white Malayan tapir, tend to appear in Japanese media due to their resemblance to the mythical [[DreamStealer Baku]]. Chalicotheres (closely related to rhinos and tapirs) are occasionally mentioned in educational works.
4th Sep '17 9:46:58 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Eels (order Anguilliformes) come in two flavors: [[PsychoElectricEel electric]] (which are actually more related to goldfish and catfish, and are not true eels), and 'other'. Expect 'other' eels to be called "moray eels" even if they are something else (often a rock eel or wolf eel, which are also not true eels, for ease of handling). Besides anglers, gulpers are probably the most common deep-sea fish which isn't saying much.

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* Eels [[SlipperyAsAnEel Eels]] (order Anguilliformes) come in two flavors: [[PsychoElectricEel electric]] (which are actually more related to goldfish and catfish, and are not true eels), and 'other'. Expect 'other' eels to be called "moray eels" even if they are something else (often a rock eel or wolf eel, which are also not true eels, for ease of handling). Besides anglers, gulpers are probably the most common deep-sea fish which isn't saying much.
2nd Sep '17 6:37:09 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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When it comes to Linnaean taxonomy, few of us outside of the related fields know how many species it covers (for the record, taxonomists estimate there have been hundreds of millions of species of life forms on this planet up to now). The number of species we are familiar with makes up less than 1% of even the known species.

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When it comes to Linnaean taxonomy, few of us outside of the related fields know how many species it covers (for the record, taxonomists estimate there have been hundreds of millions of species of life forms on this planet up to now).now, about 8.7 million of which are alive today). The number of species we are familiar with makes up less than 1% of even the known species.
1st Sep '17 6:39:51 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Eels (order Anguilliformes) come in two flavors: [[PsychoElectricEel electric]] (which are actually more related to goldfish and catfish, and are not true eels), and 'other'. Expect 'other' eels to be called "moray eels" even if they are something else (often a rock eel or wolf eel, which are also not true eels, for ease of handling).

to:

* Eels (order Anguilliformes) come in two flavors: [[PsychoElectricEel electric]] (which are actually more related to goldfish and catfish, and are not true eels), and 'other'. Expect 'other' eels to be called "moray eels" even if they are something else (often a rock eel or wolf eel, which are also not true eels, for ease of handling). Besides anglers, gulpers are probably the most common deep-sea fish which isn't saying much.



* Trout and salmon (order Salmoniformes), typically the go-to freshwater fish in fiction and usually what you see when characters are fishing.
* Seahorses (order Gasterosteiformes) often act like actual horses in animation. You'll never see a sea dragon, pipefish or stickleback, though.



* Trout and salmon (order Salmoniformes) are typically the go-to freshwater fish in fiction and usually what you see when characters are fishing.
* Seahorses (order Gasterosteiformes) often act like actual horses in animation. You'll never see a sea dragon, pipefish or stickleback, though.



* 40% of all bony fish (that's over 11,000 species more than any tetrapod class) are members of the order Perciformes, which includes many familiar varieties. Tropical reef fishes are always members of this order, and usually angelfish and butterflyfish are shown (clownfish and regal tangs are recently popular thanks to ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo''). Bass are always associated with sport fishing. Tuna are more commonly shown in their canned forms, but living ones are a semi-common choice for marine fish that aren't small and colorful. Swordfish/marlins and barracudas are also occasionally seen. Mudskippers are quite common in educational works but rare elsewhere. Groupers and mahi-mahis are more common as food than as animals.

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* 40% of all bony fish (that's over 11,000 species more than any tetrapod class) are members of the order Perciformes, which includes many familiar varieties. Tropical reef fishes are always members of this order, and usually angelfish and butterflyfish (and, more rarely, parrotfish) are shown (clownfish and regal tangs are recently popular thanks to ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo''). Bass are always associated with sport fishing. Tuna are more commonly shown in their canned forms, but living ones are a semi-common choice for marine fish that aren't small and colorful. Swordfish/marlins Billfish and barracudas are also occasionally seen. Mudskippers are quite common in educational works but rare elsewhere. Groupers and mahi-mahis are more common as food than as animals.
1st Sep '17 6:19:55 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* 40% of all bony fish (that's over 11,000 species more than any tetrapod class) are members of the order Perciformes, which includes many familiar varieties. Tropical reef fishes are always members of this order, and usually angelfish and butterflyfish are shown (clownfish and regal tangs are recently popular thanks to ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo''). Bass are always associated with sport fishing. Tuna are more commonly shown in their canned forms, but living ones are a semi-common choice for marine fish that aren't small and colorful. Swordfish/marlins and barracudas are also occasionally seen. Mudskippers are quite common in educational works but rare elsewhere.

to:

* 40% of all bony fish (that's over 11,000 species more than any tetrapod class) are members of the order Perciformes, which includes many familiar varieties. Tropical reef fishes are always members of this order, and usually angelfish and butterflyfish are shown (clownfish and regal tangs are recently popular thanks to ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo''). Bass are always associated with sport fishing. Tuna are more commonly shown in their canned forms, but living ones are a semi-common choice for marine fish that aren't small and colorful. Swordfish/marlins and barracudas are also occasionally seen. Mudskippers are quite common in educational works but rare elsewhere. Groupers and mahi-mahis are more common as food than as animals.
31st Aug '17 3:12:00 PM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Eels (order Anguilliformes), which come in two flavors: [[PsychoElectricEel electric]] (which are actually more related to goldfish and catfish, and are not true eels), and 'other'. Expect 'other' eels to be called "moray eels" even if they are something else (often a rock eel or wolf eel, for ease of handling).

to:

* Eels (order Anguilliformes), which Anguilliformes) come in two flavors: [[PsychoElectricEel electric]] (which are actually more related to goldfish and catfish, and are not true eels), and 'other'. Expect 'other' eels to be called "moray eels" even if they are something else (often a rock eel or wolf eel, which are also not true eels, for ease of handling).
30th Aug '17 6:29:13 PM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Odd-toed Ungulates (order Perissodactyla) in fiction come in four types: draft horse (usually a Clydesdale), race horse (almost always a Thoroughbred despite many other breeds being used for racing as well), wild horse (mustang), and Generic Critter-You-Sit-On (all others). Mules appear much more often than donkeys, despite needing the latter to create the former. Zebras are treated as one species and will usually be plains zebras, often wrongly depicted as the size of modern domestic horses. Rhinos, often also treated as one species and almost always African black or hook-lipped rhinos, appear as charging brutes or musclebound thugs in media. Woolly rhinos are prevalent in works about extinct mammals, though the giant hornless rhino ''Paraceratherium'' may show up as well due to its reputation as one of the largest land mammals. Brontotheres, rhino-like but more closely related to horses, are also quite popular in the subject of prehistoric mammals. Tapirs are usually unheard of, though they tend to appear in Japanese media due to their resemblance to the mythical [[DreamStealer Baku]]. Chalicotheres (closely related to rhinos and tapirs) are occasionally mentioned in educational works.
* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle, sheep, and pigs) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. [[EverythingsBetterWithLlamas Llamas]] are quite popular too, usually in works set in the Andes mountains, and alpacas are gaining popularity for their gentle, fluffy appearance, particularly in Japan. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because herbivores are harmless and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]] (''Pakicetus'' and ''Basilosaurus'' were traditionally the most common in educational works, but the former has slowly been replaced by the better-known ''Ambulocetus''). Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries.

to:

* Odd-toed Ungulates (order Horses (by far the best-known members of the order Perissodactyla) in fiction come in four types: draft horse (usually a Clydesdale), race horse (almost always a Thoroughbred despite many other breeds being used for racing as well), wild horse (mustang), and Generic Critter-You-Sit-On (all others). Mules appear much more often than donkeys, despite needing the latter to create the former. Zebras are treated as one species and will usually be plains zebras, often wrongly depicted as the size of modern domestic horses. Rhinos, often also treated as one species and almost always African black or hook-lipped rhinos, appear as charging brutes or musclebound thugs in media. Woolly rhinos are prevalent in works about extinct mammals, though the giant hornless rhino ''Paraceratherium'' may show up as well due to its reputation as one of the largest land mammals. Brontotheres, rhino-like but more closely related to horses, are also quite popular in the subject of prehistoric mammals. Tapirs are usually unheard of, though they tend to appear in Japanese media due to their resemblance to the mythical [[DreamStealer Baku]]. Chalicotheres (closely related to rhinos and tapirs) are occasionally mentioned in educational works.
* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle, sheep, and pigs) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. [[EverythingsBetterWithLlamas Llamas]] are quite popular too, usually in works set in the Andes mountains, and alpacas are gaining popularity for their gentle, fluffy appearance, particularly in Japan. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because herbivores are harmless and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]] (''Pakicetus'' and ''Basilosaurus'' were traditionally the most common in educational works, but the former has slowly been replaced by the better-known more completely known ''Ambulocetus''). Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries.
30th Aug '17 6:27:24 PM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle, sheep, and pigs) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. [[EverythingsBetterWithLlamas Llamas]] are quite popular too, usually in works set in the Andes mountains, and alpacas are gaining popularity for their gentle, fluffy appearance, particularly in Japan. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because herbivores are harmless and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]]. Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries.

to:

* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle, sheep, and pigs) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. [[EverythingsBetterWithLlamas Llamas]] are quite popular too, usually in works set in the Andes mountains, and alpacas are gaining popularity for their gentle, fluffy appearance, particularly in Japan. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because herbivores are harmless and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]].ancestors]] (''Pakicetus'' and ''Basilosaurus'' were traditionally the most common in educational works, but the former has slowly been replaced by the better-known ''Ambulocetus''). Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries.
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