History Main / SmallTaxonomyPools

5th Jun '16 9:05:07 AM Hvedekorn
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* Storks (order Ciconiiformes) only ever appear in reference to [[DeliveryStork delivering babies]]. Herons fare slightly better as background birds in wilderness settings.

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* Storks (order Ciconiiformes) only ever appear in reference to [[DeliveryStork delivering babies]]. Herons fare slightly better as background birds in wilderness settings. Don't ever expect to see an ibis or spoonbill, even though scarlet ibises are actually very common and popular in real-life zoos for their bright colors.
1st May '16 3:14:26 AM schoi30
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* Pterosaurs (order Pterosauria) will always be either ''Pteranodon'', ''Rhamphorhynchus'', or a completely fictional blend of the two. Always. If not, it will be an [[PteroSoarer eagle-like]] ''Quetzalcoatlus''. ''Pterodactylus'' and ''Dimorphodon'' are common in educational works, although the latter recently made its way into ''Film/Jurassic World''. They are often erroneously called "flying dinosaurs".

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* Pterosaurs (order Pterosauria) will always be either ''Pteranodon'', ''Rhamphorhynchus'', or a completely fictional blend of the two. Always. If not, it will be an [[PteroSoarer eagle-like]] ''Quetzalcoatlus''. ''Pterodactylus'' and ''Dimorphodon'' are common may show in educational works, although the latter recently made its way into ''Film/Jurassic World''.''Film/JurassicWorld''. They are often erroneously called "flying dinosaurs".
1st May '16 3:13:39 AM schoi30
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* Pterosaurs (order Pterosauria) will always be either ''Pteranodon'', ''Rhamphorhynchus'', or a completely fictional blend of the two. Always. If not, it will be an [[PteroSoarer eagle-like]] ''Quetzalcoatlus''. They are often erroneously called "flying dinosaurs".

to:

* Pterosaurs (order Pterosauria) will always be either ''Pteranodon'', ''Rhamphorhynchus'', or a completely fictional blend of the two. Always. If not, it will be an [[PteroSoarer eagle-like]] ''Quetzalcoatlus''. ''Pterodactylus'' and ''Dimorphodon'' are common in educational works, although the latter recently made its way into ''Film/Jurassic World''. They are often erroneously called "flying dinosaurs".
30th Mar '16 5:33:12 AM HTD
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* Mold -- Although anyone who's seen food go rotten knows there are several kinds of mold (depending on the color of the rot), no species is known by name. Even ''Penicillium chrysogenum'' is just known by the antibiotic based from it, "Penicillin". Slime molds and water molds are polyphyletic and consist of several supergroups, none of which fit in the fungi kingdom.

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* Mold -- Although anyone who's seen food go rotten knows there are several kinds of mold (depending on the color of the rot), no species is known by name. Even ''Penicillium chrysogenum'' is just known by the antibiotic based from it, "Penicillin".penicillin. Slime molds and water molds are polyphyletic and consist of several supergroups, none of which fit in the fungi kingdom.



* The conifers are an entire phylum of plant species, yet all fiction seems to mention are "pines" and "firs" (both of which are genera themselves). "Redwoods" (a casual name, not a formal taxonomic designation) and "blue spruce" (a single species) run a distant third and fourth, and there's very rarely a distinction made between Coastal Redwood and Giant Sequoia.

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* The conifers are an entire phylum of plant species, yet all fiction seems to mention are "pines" and "firs" (both of which are genera themselves). "Redwoods" (a casual name, not a formal taxonomic designation) and "blue spruce" (a single species) run a distant third and fourth, and there's very rarely a distinction made between Coastal Redwood coastal redwood and Giant Sequoia.giant sequoia.



* Carnivorous plants are never represented as anything but [[ManEatingPlant pure fantasy with giant man-eating snapping jaws and writhing vines]]. There are probably close to 1000 different species of insectivorous plants around the world with New World and Asian pitcher plants, sundew, bladderworts, butterworts and others, many of which are perfectly "weird" and photogenic without any fabrication at all. The Venus Flytrap gets extra props for Charles Darwin calling it "the most wonderful plant in the world."

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* Carnivorous plants are never represented as anything but [[ManEatingPlant pure fantasy with giant man-eating snapping jaws and writhing vines]]. There are probably close to 1000 different species of insectivorous plants around the world with New World and Asian pitcher plants, sundew, bladderworts, butterworts and others, many of which are perfectly "weird" and photogenic without any fabrication at all. The Venus Flytrap flytrap gets extra props for Charles Darwin calling it "the most wonderful plant in the world."



** Starmie from Pokemon has at least ten arms, leaving aside that there's a large faceted gemstone where its anus should be and nothing where its mouth belongs, not to mention the PsychicPowers.



* Mosquitos aren't considered flies in fiction.

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* Mosquitos Mosquitoes aren't considered flies in fiction.



* A SlayingMantis will always be ''Mantis religiosa'', the "common" praying mantis, and not any of the hundreds of other mantid species.
* Even though everyone calls arthropods "bugs", the Hemiptera "true bugs" are largely ignored, unless you see a cicada that's ''not'' being treated as a locust. You'll never see a stink bug or an assassin bug, even though some of the latter (like Wheel Bugs) make decent rivals to mantids in terms of cool and frightening appearance.
** Cicadas in particular are very familiar to the Japanese and show up very frequently in anime, considered an iconic symbol of summer there. Outside of Japan they're rare in fiction.
* Fleas, mosquitos, and lice are treated as one thing each, when all are made up of a wide variety of species evolved specifically to infest a particular sort of animal, or even particular parts of animals (human head lice and human pubic lice are two different species). The only occasional exception might be if an example is named as a carrier of a specific disease, such as the oriental rat flea for bubonic plague.

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* A SlayingMantis will always be ''Mantis religiosa'', the "common" praying mantis, and not any of the hundreds of other mantid mantis species.
* Even though everyone calls arthropods "bugs", the Hemiptera "true bugs" (true bugs) are largely ignored, unless you see a cicada that's ''not'' being treated as a locust. You'll never see a stink bug or an assassin bug, even though some of the latter (like Wheel Bugs) make decent rivals to mantids in terms of cool and frightening appearance.
**
Cicadas in particular are very familiar to the Japanese and show up very frequently in anime, considered an iconic symbol of summer there. Outside there, but outside of Japan they're rare in fiction.
fiction. And you'll never see a stink bug or an assassin bug, even though some of the latter (like wheel bugs) make decent rivals to mantises in terms of cool and frightening appearance.
* Fleas, mosquitos, mosquitoes, and lice are treated as one thing each, when all are made up of a wide variety of species evolved specifically to infest a particular sort of animal, or even particular parts of animals (human head lice and human pubic lice are two different species). The only occasional exception might be if an example is named as a carrier of a specific disease, such as the oriental rat flea for bubonic plague.



* The most common members of this subphylum are centipedes and millipedes. These are often referenced in media, but are often [[AttackOfTheFiftyFootWhatever much larger]] than they should be. They are never painted in a positive light, and are often referred to (mistakenly) as insects, or just dismissed as "bugs." As if centipedes and millipedes didn't get it bad enough, other classes (Pauropoda, Symphyla) within Myriapoda will NEVER be mentioned.

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* The most common members of this subphylum are centipedes and millipedes. These are often referenced in media, but are often [[AttackOfTheFiftyFootWhatever much larger]] than they should be. They are never painted in a positive light, and are often referred to (mistakenly) as insects, or just dismissed as "bugs." "bugs". As if centipedes and millipedes didn't get it bad enough, other classes (Pauropoda, Symphyla) within Myriapoda will NEVER be mentioned.



* Cephalopods (Class Cephalopoda):
** Subclass Coleoidea
** Octopuses/Octopi (Order Octopoda) are the most used members of this class, but they are almost always the "generic octopus"(Suborder Cirrina) with a big mantle and no fins. The absolutely adorable finned octopuses (Suborder Cirrina) have no representation other than Pearl from WesternAnimation/FindingNemo. Squids (Order Teuthida) are represented by the [[GiantSquid giant squid]], with the odd appearance by a generic smaller squid. Cuttlefish (order Sepiida) are common in documentaries, but nonexistent in other works. The vampire squid (Order Vampyromorphida) is often used as an example of "creepy deep-sea animal", but is never shown in fiction (other than partially inspiring Malamar from Franchise/{{Pokemon}} and appearing hybridized with an [[AlluringAnglerfish Anglerfish]] in Pi's hallucination in the film adaption of Literature/LifeOfPi). Ram's Horn Squid (Order Spirulida) are never shown, though this is not surprising as very little is known about them due to them living extremely deep underwater. Bobtail Squid (Order Sepiida) are also never shown, even though at least some of them live in shallow water.
** Subclass Ammonoidea
** The ammonite often appears as a generic fossil, but it is almost always has a typical spiral-shelled shape. The cone shaped ammonoids such as Baculites, or the extremely weird looking ones such as [[https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/d3/4c/77/d34c77c245a2c7f8f0be8d2b322fc44c.jpg Oxybeloceras]] are never shown.
** Subclass Nautiloidea
** Note that nautiloids are in fact the oldest cephalopod order (they include many of the first cephalopods and have lived since the late Cambrian), despite their representation.
** While they look very much like relics of days gone by with their spiral shells, the nautilus and Allonautilus (the only surviving members of this subclass) are almost never shown. The extinct species of nautiloid such as Orthoceras don't get much luck either.

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* Cephalopods (Class (class Cephalopoda):
** Subclass Coleoidea
** Octopuses/Octopi (Order
Coleoidea: Octopuses (order Octopoda) are the most used members of this class, but they are almost always the "generic octopus"(Suborder Cirrina) octopus" with a big mantle and no fins. The absolutely adorable finned octopuses (Suborder (suborder Cirrina) have no representation other than Pearl from WesternAnimation/FindingNemo. Squids (Order (order Teuthida) are represented by the [[GiantSquid giant squid]], with the odd appearance by a generic smaller squid. Cuttlefish (order Sepiida) are common in documentaries, but nonexistent in other works. The vampire squid (Order (order Vampyromorphida) is often used as an example of "creepy deep-sea animal", but is never shown in fiction (other than partially inspiring Malamar from Franchise/{{Pokemon}} and appearing hybridized with an [[AlluringAnglerfish Anglerfish]] in Pi's hallucination in the film adaption of Literature/LifeOfPi). Ram's Horn Squid (Order squid (order Spirulida) are never shown, though this is not surprising as very little is known about them due to them living extremely deep underwater. Bobtail Squid (Order squid (order Sepiida) are also never shown, even though at least some of them live in shallow water.
** Subclass Ammonoidea
**
Ammonoidea: The ammonite often appears as a generic fossil, but it is almost always has a typical spiral-shelled shape. The cone shaped ammonoids such as Baculites, or the extremely weird looking ones such as [[https://s-media-cache-ak0.''[[https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/d3/4c/77/d34c77c245a2c7f8f0be8d2b322fc44c.jpg Oxybeloceras]] Oxybeloceras]]'' are never shown.
** Subclass Nautiloidea
** Note that nautiloids are in fact the oldest cephalopod order (they include many of the first cephalopods and have lived since the late Cambrian), despite their representation.
**
Nautiloidea: While they look very much like relics of days gone by with their spiral shells, the nautilus ''Nautilus'' and Allonautilus ''Allonautilus'' (the only surviving members of this subclass) are almost never shown. The extinct species of nautiloid such as Orthoceras ''Orthoceras'' don't get much luck either.



* Best known examples being rays (superorder Batoidea) and sharks (superorder Selachimorpha).
** Sharks are almost always either great whites or hammerheads. Maybe you'll get a tiger shark or mako shark, but that's about it. {{Megalodon}} may appear occasionally if the work is set in the Mesozoic (despite having only appeared 28 million years ago).
** Rays very, very rarely appear. Don't expect more diversity than a manta or stingray.

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* Best known examples being rays (superorder Batoidea) and sharks (superorder Selachimorpha).
** * Sharks are almost always either great whites or hammerheads. Maybe you'll get a tiger shark or mako shark, but that's about it. {{Megalodon}} may appear occasionally if the work is set in the Mesozoic (despite having only appeared 28 million years ago).
** * Rays very, very rarely appear. Don't expect more diversity than a manta or stingray.



* What most people think of when they hear the word "fish" - and oftentimes, if a fish is represented in media it will be a generic, very nondescript creature resembling members of this class. Specific varieties of ray-finned fishes common in fiction include:
** Eels (order Anguilliformes), which come in two flavors: [[PsychoElectricEel electric]] (which are actually more related to goldfish and catfish, and are not true eels), and 'other'. Expect 'other' eels to be called "moray eels" even if they are something else (often a rock eel or wolf eel, for ease of handling).
** Goldfish, and sometimes carp and koi (order Cypriniformes) are common.
** [[PiranhaProblem Piranhas]] (order Characiformes), always exaggeratedly vicious, of course - and sometimes shown living in the sea!
** Catfish (order Siluriformes) are well-known but only semi-common in fiction.
** Trout and salmon (order Salmoniformes), typically the go-to freshwater fish in fiction and usually what you see when characters are fishing.
** Seahorses (order Syngnathiformes) often act like actual horses in animation. You'll never see a sea dragon or a pipefish, though.
** [[AlluringAnglerfish Anglerfish]] (order Lophiiformes) aren't rare.
** [[PufferFish Puffer fish and blowfish]] (order Tetraodontiformes) appear often, but triggerfish and ocean sunfish have no such luck.
** 40% of all bony fish are members of the order Perciformes, which includes many familiar varieties. Tropical reef fishes are always members of this order, and usually angelfish and butterflyfish are shown (clownfish and regal tangs are recently popular thanks to ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo''. Bass are always associated with sports fishing. Tuna are more commonly shown in their canned forms, but living ones are a semi-common choice for marine fish that aren't small and colorful. Swordfish/marlins and barracudas are also occasionally seen.

to:

* What most people think of when they hear the word "fish" - and oftentimes, if a fish is represented in media it will be a generic, very nondescript creature resembling members of this class. Specific varieties of ray-finned fishes common in fiction include:
** * Eels (order Anguilliformes), which come in two flavors: [[PsychoElectricEel electric]] (which are actually more related to goldfish and catfish, and are not true eels), and 'other'. Expect 'other' eels to be called "moray eels" even if they are something else (often a rock eel or wolf eel, for ease of handling).
** * Goldfish, and sometimes carp and koi (order Cypriniformes) are common.
** * [[PiranhaProblem Piranhas]] (order Characiformes), always exaggeratedly vicious, of course - and sometimes shown living in the sea!
** * Catfish (order Siluriformes) are well-known but only semi-common in fiction.
** * Trout and salmon (order Salmoniformes), typically the go-to freshwater fish in fiction and usually what you see when characters are fishing.
** * Seahorses (order Syngnathiformes) often act like actual horses in animation. You'll never see a sea dragon or a pipefish, though.
** * [[AlluringAnglerfish Anglerfish]] (order Lophiiformes) aren't rare.
** * [[PufferFish Puffer fish and blowfish]] (order Tetraodontiformes) appear often, but triggerfish and ocean sunfish have no such luck.
** * 40% of all bony fish are members of the order Perciformes, which includes many familiar varieties. Tropical reef fishes are always members of this order, and usually angelfish and butterflyfish are shown (clownfish and regal tangs are recently popular thanks to ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo''. Bass are always associated with sports fishing. Tuna are more commonly shown in their canned forms, but living ones are a semi-common choice for marine fish that aren't small and colorful. Swordfish/marlins and barracudas are also occasionally seen.



* Outside documentaries, you will never ever see someone refer to a non-mammalian synapsid (formerly united as the orders Pelycosauria and Therapsida, but now scattered across various unranked clades; not true reptiles, but placed here for convenience), regardless as to how [[RuleOfCool cool]] they might be. Until recently the single exception to this was ''Dimetrodon'', though it is frequently shown [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology coexisting with dinosaurs and even labeled as dinosaur itself]]. Another exception is starting to be made for gorgonopsians, though ''Series/{{Primeval}}'' is the primary work using them.

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* Outside documentaries, you will never ever see someone refer to a non-mammalian synapsid (formerly united as the orders Pelycosauria and Therapsida, but now scattered across various unranked clades; not true reptiles, but placed here for convenience), regardless as to how [[RuleOfCool cool]] they might be. Until recently the The single exception to this was has been ''Dimetrodon'', though it is frequently shown [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology coexisting with dinosaurs and even labeled as dinosaur itself]]. Another exception is starting to be made for gorgonopsians, though ''Series/{{Primeval}}'' is the primary work using them.



* The mammals pertaining to the now obsolete order Insectivora tend to be represented by the mole, the shrew and the hedgehog. Moles tend to look always like the European mole (except for the {{Redwall}} animated series where they were star-nosed moles, [[MisplacedWildlife which are not native to England and therefore aren't native to Mossflower either]]). And the other members of the Insectivora who got booted out? They never appear either. Sorry, tenrecs, elephant shrews and golden moles. Speaking of the hedgehog, Google "baby porcupine" and see what comes up. That's right, hedgehogs, despite the fact they are completely different species. Apparently if it's rodent-like and has spines it's a porcupine. If it's small it's just a baby porcupine.

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* The mammals pertaining to the now obsolete order Insectivora tend to be represented by the mole, the shrew and the hedgehog. Moles tend to look always like the European mole (except for the {{Redwall}} animated series where they were star-nosed moles, [[MisplacedWildlife which are not native to England and therefore aren't native to Mossflower either]]). And the other members of the Insectivora who got booted out? They never appear either. Sorry, tenrecs, elephant shrews and golden moles. Speaking of the hedgehog, Google "baby porcupine" and see what comes up. That's right, hedgehogs, despite the fact they are completely different species. Apparently if it's rodent-like and has spines it's a porcupine. If it's small it's just a baby porcupine.
15th Mar '16 5:46:48 AM ading
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** Regarding smaller carnivorans, among the most familiar seem to be raccoons and skunks. Members of the Mustelidae family aren't seen so often in fiction, but there are a few commonly-used stock species. Smaller varieties will be ferrets when something cute and playful is called for, or weasels if a sinister creature is in order. Next in line are ever-popular otters, followed by less-often-seen badgers, and the occasional wolverine ([[WolverinePublicity far less common]] than the [[Franchise/XMen X-Man]] bearing their name). Expect most of these to be chattering like raccoons as well. [[YouFailBiologyForever Ferrets are lumped with rodents]], sometimes. Which is OlderThanFeudalism, apparently. The Latin name for such creatures, ''Mustelidae'', roughly translates to "mice as long as spears." Mongooses are essentially known in fiction solely for their cobra-killing reputation, [[YouFailBiologyForever and are sometimes even called weasels]]. Good luck finding any civet or genet in fiction. Thanks to ''Disney/TheLionKing'' and Animal Planet, meerkats have surpassed other mongoose species in popularity. Now, you seldom see ''regular'' mongooses, either. Chances are the only time you'll see a mink or a stoat in fiction is [[PrettyInMink as a coat]].

to:

** Regarding smaller carnivorans, among the most familiar seem to be raccoons and skunks. Members of the Mustelidae family aren't seen so often in fiction, but there are a few commonly-used stock species. Smaller varieties will be ferrets when something cute and playful is called for, or weasels if a sinister creature is in order. Next in line are ever-popular otters, followed by less-often-seen badgers, badgers (with the honey badger having seen a recent rise in popularity due to its MemeticBadass status, and the occasional wolverine ([[WolverinePublicity far less common]] than the [[Franchise/XMen X-Man]] bearing their name). Expect most of these to be chattering like raccoons as well. [[YouFailBiologyForever Ferrets are sometimes lumped with rodents]], sometimes. Which rodents]] (which is OlderThanFeudalism, apparently. OlderThanFeudalism; The Latin name for such creatures, ''Mustelidae'', roughly translates to "mice as long as spears." spears"). Mongooses are essentially known in fiction solely for their cobra-killing reputation, [[YouFailBiologyForever and are sometimes even called weasels]]. Good luck finding any civet or genet in fiction. Thanks to ''Disney/TheLionKing'' and Animal Planet, meerkats have surpassed other mongoose species in popularity. Now, you seldom see ''regular'' mongooses, either. Chances are the only time you'll see a mink or a stoat in fiction is [[PrettyInMink as a coat]].
8th Mar '16 5:21:44 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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** The only ankylosaur is ''Ankylosaurus'', although older works will sometimes use ''Euoplocephalus'' instead (the anatomy of ''Ankylosaurus'' itself was poorly known until 2004). Nodosaurs and polacanthids are practically unheard of (though ''Polacanthus'' may show in older works).

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** The only ankylosaur is ''Ankylosaurus'', although older works will sometimes use ''Euoplocephalus'' instead (the anatomy of ''Ankylosaurus'' itself was poorly known until 2004). Nodosaurs and polacanthids are practically unheard of (though ''Polacanthus'' may show in older works).
7th Mar '16 8:35:35 PM schoi30
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** The only ankylosaur is ''Ankylosaurus'', although older works will sometimes use ''Euoplocephalus'' instead (the anatomy of ''Ankylosaurus'' itself was poorly known until 2004). Nodosaurs are practically unheard of (though ''Polacanthus'' may show in older works).

to:

** The only ankylosaur is ''Ankylosaurus'', although older works will sometimes use ''Euoplocephalus'' instead (the anatomy of ''Ankylosaurus'' itself was poorly known until 2004). Nodosaurs and polacanthids are practically unheard of (though ''Polacanthus'' may show in older works).
5th Mar '16 5:06:42 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Tanystropheus'' (order Protorosauria) occasionally appears in documentaries as "that Triassic reptile with a ridiculously long neck".
1st Mar '16 11:05:31 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Plants that produce edible things are far more well known by what they produce then the plants themselves. For example, an apple tree and an orange tree will be depicted as exactly the same aside from what fruit is growing on them. Even then, expect to find [[FantasticFruitsAndVegetables made up ones]] alongside more familiar fruit.

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* Plants that produce edible things are far more well known by what they produce then than the plants themselves. For example, an apple tree and an orange tree will be depicted as exactly the same aside from what fruit is growing on them. Even then, expect to find [[FantasticFruitsAndVegetables made up made-up ones]] alongside more familiar fruit.
1st Mar '16 11:03:43 AM PDL
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* Plants that produce edible things are far more well known by what they produce then the plants themselves. Even then, expect to find [[FantasticFruitsAndVegetables made up ones]] alongside more familiar fruit.

to:

* Plants that produce edible things are far more well known by what they produce then the plants themselves. For example, an apple tree and an orange tree will be depicted as exactly the same aside from what fruit is growing on them. Even then, expect to find [[FantasticFruitsAndVegetables made up ones]] alongside more familiar fruit.
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