History Main / SmallTaxonomyPools

16th Dec '17 2:22:04 PM BrendanRizzo
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** [[PantheraAwesome Cats]]. Since the domestic cat is a species (''Felis catus''), all breeds count. Then we have tigers, lions, pumas, panthers, leopards (or jaguars, [[YouFailBiologyForever which will often be mistaken for the other and vice versa]]), and cheetahs. The medium-sized cats like the ocelot, lynx and serval are virtually never used. You will never, EVER see a kod-kod or fishing cat. If it's set in prehistory, the only felines are saber-toothed cats, specifically ''Smilodon fatalis'', which is only one of many saber-toothed cats. Among domestic cats, black and white cats and tabbies seem to be favored in film or in animation. Black cats are specifically seen in anything related to Halloween. "Torties" and solid gray/blue cats are more rare. Siamese or white Persians appear when the cat is intended to be glamorous and/or [[RightHandCat a villain's]]. Also see CatStereotype.

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** [[PantheraAwesome Cats]]. Since the domestic cat is a species (''Felis catus''), silvestris''), all breeds count. Then we have tigers, lions, pumas, panthers, leopards (or jaguars, [[YouFailBiologyForever which will often be mistaken for the other and vice versa]]), and cheetahs. The medium-sized cats like the ocelot, lynx and serval are virtually never used. You will never, EVER see a kod-kod or fishing cat. If it's set in prehistory, the only felines are saber-toothed cats, specifically ''Smilodon fatalis'', which is only one of many saber-toothed cats. Among domestic cats, black and white cats and tabbies seem to be favored in film or in animation. Black cats are specifically seen in anything related to Halloween. "Torties" and solid gray/blue cats are more rare. Siamese or white Persians appear when the cat is intended to be glamorous and/or [[RightHandCat a villain's]]. Also see CatStereotype.



* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle, sheep, and pigs) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. Non-domesticated suids will always be warthogs or wild boars, with others like bush pigs and babirusa never being shown. Appearances of peccaries, the pigs' closest cousins, can be counted on one hand. [[EverythingsBetterWithLlamas Llamas]] are quite popular too, usually in works set in the Andes mountains, and alpacas are gaining popularity for their gentle, fluffy appearance, particularly in Japan. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because [[TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs herbivores are harmless]] and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]] (''Pakicetus'' and ''Basilosaurus'' were traditionally the most common in educational works, but the former has slowly been replaced by the more completely known ''Ambulocetus''). Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries. The popular image of the African savanna is so tied to the one in Southern and Eastern Africa (i.e. the one in former British colonies) that it may come as a shock to learn that zebras and wildebeest don't exist at all in the remaining stretch of savanna from Senegal to Ethiopia (i.e. the one in former French colonies). Similar-sized artiodactyls that do exist there, like eland, hartebeest and roan antelopes are much more obscure.

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* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle, sheep, and pigs) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. Non-domesticated suids will always be warthogs or wild boars, with others like bush pigs and babirusa never being shown. Appearances of peccaries, the pigs' closest cousins, can be counted on one hand. [[EverythingsBetterWithLlamas Llamas]] are quite popular too, usually in works set in the Andes mountains, and alpacas are gaining popularity for their gentle, fluffy appearance, particularly in Japan. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because [[TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs [[JustForFun/TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs herbivores are harmless]] and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]] (''Pakicetus'' and ''Basilosaurus'' were traditionally the most common in educational works, but the former has slowly been replaced by the more completely known ''Ambulocetus''). Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries. The popular image of the African savanna is so tied to the one in Southern and Eastern Africa (i.e. the one in former British colonies) that it may come as a shock to learn that zebras and wildebeest don't exist at all in the remaining stretch of savanna from Senegal to Ethiopia (i.e. the one in former French colonies). Similar-sized artiodactyls that do exist there, like eland, hartebeest and roan antelopes are much more obscure.
16th Dec '17 2:14:35 PM BrendanRizzo
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* Any extinct mammal that's not a woolly mammoth or sabre-toothed "tiger" that show up are simply generic shrew-like creatures (orders Docodonta, Triconodonta, Multituberculata, Symmetrodonta and Eupantotheria) that get eaten or crushed by dinosaurs, and that's only if they're lucky. They may also be shown as survivors of the K-Pg extinction.

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* Any extinct mammal that's not a woolly mammoth or sabre-toothed "tiger" that show up are simply generic shrew-like creatures (orders Docodonta, Triconodonta, Multituberculata, Symmetrodonta and Eupantotheria) that get eaten or crushed by dinosaurs, and that's only if they're lucky. They may also be shown as survivors of the K-Pg extinction.
Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction. Except in the [[NoExportForYou Japan-only]] predecessor to ''VideoGame/EVOSearchForEden'', they are never distinguished by name. Ever.



* Elephants (order Proboscidea) are nearly always African in cartoons, because big ears are funny. They're nearly always Asian in movies or on TV, because they're the only ones you can actually have on set. Outside the Discovery Channel, all extinct proboscideans are mammoths or mastodons and all mammoths are woolly. ''Deinotherium'' and ''Platybelodon'' are the only other extinct proboscideans prevalent in works about extinct Cenozoic mammals, and even then that's pushing it.
* Good luck finding non-elephant afrotheres in pop culture. ''Maybe'' an aardvark (order Tubulidentata) or sirenian (order Sirenia) if you're lucky. Hyraxes (order Hyracoidea), golden moles, tenrecs (order Afrosoricida or Tenrecoidea) and elephant shrews (order Macroscelidea) are nowhere to be seen. Never mind all the extinct afrothere groups…

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* Elephants (order Proboscidea) are nearly always African in cartoons, because big ears are funny. They're nearly always Asian in movies or on TV, because they're the only ones you can actually have on set. Outside the Discovery Channel, all extinct proboscideans are mammoths or mastodons and all mammoths are woolly. ''Deinotherium'' and ''Platybelodon'' are the only other extinct proboscideans prevalent in works about extinct Cenozoic mammals, and even then that's pushing it.
it. Expect elephants (and only elephants) to be called “pachyderms” even though this has been obsolete for a century, and contained more than just elephants.
* Good luck finding non-elephant afrotheres in pop culture. ''Maybe'' an aardvark (order Tubulidentata) or sirenian manatee (order Sirenia) if you're lucky. Hyraxes (order Hyracoidea), golden moles, tenrecs (order Afrosoricida or Tenrecoidea) and elephant shrews (order Macroscelidea) are nowhere to be seen. Never mind all the extinct afrothere groups…



* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle, sheep, and pigs) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. Non-domesticated suids will always be warthogs or wild boars, with others like bush pigs and babirusa never being shown. Appearances of peccaries, the pigs' closest cousins, can be counted on one hand. [[EverythingsBetterWithLlamas Llamas]] are quite popular too, usually in works set in the Andes mountains, and alpacas are gaining popularity for their gentle, fluffy appearance, particularly in Japan. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because herbivores are harmless and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]] (''Pakicetus'' and ''Basilosaurus'' were traditionally the most common in educational works, but the former has slowly been replaced by the more completely known ''Ambulocetus''). Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries. The popular image of the African savanna is so tied to the one in Southern and Eastern Africa (i.e. the one in former British colonies) that it may come as a shock to learn that zebras and wildebeest don't exist at all in the remaining stretch of savanna from Senegal to Ethiopia (i.e. the one in former French colonies). Similar-sized artiodactyls that do exist there, like eland, hartebeest and roan antelopes are much more obscure.

to:

* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle, sheep, and pigs) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. Non-domesticated suids will always be warthogs or wild boars, with others like bush pigs and babirusa never being shown. Appearances of peccaries, the pigs' closest cousins, can be counted on one hand. [[EverythingsBetterWithLlamas Llamas]] are quite popular too, usually in works set in the Andes mountains, and alpacas are gaining popularity for their gentle, fluffy appearance, particularly in Japan. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because [[TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs herbivores are harmless harmless]] and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]] (''Pakicetus'' and ''Basilosaurus'' were traditionally the most common in educational works, but the former has slowly been replaced by the more completely known ''Ambulocetus''). Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries. The popular image of the African savanna is so tied to the one in Southern and Eastern Africa (i.e. the one in former British colonies) that it may come as a shock to learn that zebras and wildebeest don't exist at all in the remaining stretch of savanna from Senegal to Ethiopia (i.e. the one in former French colonies). Similar-sized artiodactyls that do exist there, like eland, hartebeest and roan antelopes are much more obscure.
16th Dec '17 12:30:40 PM BrendanRizzo
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** ''E. coli'' is particularly prone to this: the dangerous pathogenic strain [=O157:H7=] is the only strain anyone has heard of, but in reality the vast majority of strains are non-pathogenic and the vast majority of pathogenic strains relatively innocuous. The relatively innocuous kind is living inside you ''right now.''

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** ''E. coli'' (properly known as ''Escherichia coli'') is particularly prone to this: the dangerous pathogenic strain [=O157:H7=] is the only strain anyone has heard of, but in reality the vast majority of strains are non-pathogenic and the vast majority of pathogenic strains relatively innocuous. The relatively innocuous kind is living inside you ''right now.''
15th Dec '17 5:07:44 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Seahorses (order Gasterosteiformes) often act like actual horses in animation. You'll never see a sea dragon, pipefish, trumpetfish or stickleback, though.

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* Seahorses (order Gasterosteiformes) often act like actual horses in animation. You'll never see a sea dragon, pipefish, sea moth, trumpetfish or stickleback, though.
9th Dec '17 6:31:24 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Wasps and hornets (order Hymenoptera) are usually called "yellow jackets", build nests like paper wasps, and act like hornets. Bees are honeybees or bumblebees, and have hives resembling those of hornets or paper wasps.

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* Wasps and hornets (order Hymenoptera) are usually called "yellow jackets", build nests like paper wasps, and act like hornets. Bees are honeybees or bumblebees, and have hives resembling those of hornets or paper wasps. Ants are common but almost never identified as a specific species.
8th Dec '17 1:00:25 PM schoi30
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* Horses (by far the best-known members of the order Perissodactyla) in fiction come in four types: draft horse (usually a Clydesdale), race horse (almost always a Thoroughbred despite many other breeds being used for racing as well), wild horse (mustang), and Generic Critter-You-Sit-On (all others). Mules appear much more often than donkeys, despite needing the latter to create the former. Zebras are treated as one species and will usually be plains zebras, often wrongly depicted as the size of modern domestic horses. Rhinos, often also treated as one species and almost always African black or hook-lipped rhinos, appear as charging brutes or musclebound thugs in media. Woolly rhinos are prevalent in works about extinct mammals, though the giant hornless rhino ''Paraceratherium'' may show up as well due to its reputation as one of the largest land mammals. Brontotheres, rhino-like but more closely related to horses, are also quite popular in the subject of prehistoric mammals. Tapirs, particularly the black-and-white Malayan tapir, tend to appear in Japanese media due to their resemblance to the mythical [[DreamStealer Baku]]. Chalicotheres (closely related to rhinos and tapirs) are occasionally mentioned in educational works.

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* Horses (by far the best-known members of the order Perissodactyla) in fiction come in four types: draft horse (usually a Clydesdale), race horse (almost always a Thoroughbred despite many other breeds being used for racing as well), wild horse (mustang), and Generic Critter-You-Sit-On (all others). Mules appear much more often than donkeys, despite needing the latter to create the former. Zebras are treated as one species and will usually be plains zebras, often wrongly depicted as the size of modern domestic horses. Rhinos, often also treated as one species and almost always African black rhinos (if not, they'll be white rhinos or hook-lipped rhinos, Indian rhinos), appear as charging brutes or musclebound thugs in media. Woolly rhinos are prevalent in works about extinct mammals, though the giant hornless rhino ''Paraceratherium'' may show up as well due to its reputation as one of the largest land mammals. Brontotheres, rhino-like but more closely related to horses, are also quite popular in the subject of prehistoric mammals. Tapirs, particularly the black-and-white Malayan tapir, tend to appear in Japanese media due to their resemblance to the mythical [[DreamStealer Baku]]. Chalicotheres (closely related to rhinos and tapirs) are occasionally mentioned in educational works.
8th Dec '17 5:43:58 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* The most common annelids in fiction are earthworms and leeches.

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* The most common annelids in fiction are earthworms and leeches.
leeches (class Clitellata).
5th Dec '17 5:28:43 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle, sheep, and pigs) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. Non-domesticated suids will always be warthogs or wild boars, with others like bush pigs and babirusa never being shown. Appearances of peccaries, the pigs' closest cousins, can be counted on one hand. [[EverythingsBetterWithLlamas Llamas]] are quite popular too, usually in works set in the Andes mountains, and alpacas are gaining popularity for their gentle, fluffy appearance, particularly in Japan. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because herbivores are harmless and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]] (''Pakicetus'' and ''Basilosaurus'' were traditionally the most common in educational works, but the former has slowly been replaced by the more completely known ''Ambulocetus''). Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries.
** The popular image of the African savanna is so tied to the one in Southern and Eastern Africa (i.e. the one in former British colonies), that it may come as a shock to learn that zebras and wildebeest don't exist at all in the remaining stretch of savanna from Senegal to Ethiopia (i.e. the one in former French colonies). Similar sized artiodactyls that do exist there, like eland, hartebeest and roan antelopes are much more obscure.

to:

* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle, sheep, and pigs) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. Non-domesticated suids will always be warthogs or wild boars, with others like bush pigs and babirusa never being shown. Appearances of peccaries, the pigs' closest cousins, can be counted on one hand. [[EverythingsBetterWithLlamas Llamas]] are quite popular too, usually in works set in the Andes mountains, and alpacas are gaining popularity for their gentle, fluffy appearance, particularly in Japan. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because herbivores are harmless and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]] (''Pakicetus'' and ''Basilosaurus'' were traditionally the most common in educational works, but the former has slowly been replaced by the more completely known ''Ambulocetus''). Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries.
**
tributaries. The popular image of the African savanna is so tied to the one in Southern and Eastern Africa (i.e. the one in former British colonies), colonies) that it may come as a shock to learn that zebras and wildebeest don't exist at all in the remaining stretch of savanna from Senegal to Ethiopia (i.e. the one in former French colonies). Similar sized Similar-sized artiodactyls that do exist there, like eland, hartebeest and roan antelopes are much more obscure.
5th Dec '17 12:45:55 AM Naram-Sin
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to:

** The popular image of the African savanna is so tied to the one in Southern and Eastern Africa (i.e. the one in former British colonies), that it may come as a shock to learn that zebras and wildebeest don't exist at all in the remaining stretch of savanna from Senegal to Ethiopia (i.e. the one in former French colonies). Similar sized artiodactyls that do exist there, like eland, hartebeest and roan antelopes are much more obscure.
22nd Nov '17 5:04:19 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Corals (class Anthozoa) and sea anemones (order Actiniaria) may be seen, but exactly what type they are isn't often specified. However, if brain coral is shown, it will probably referred to as such.

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* Corals and sea anemones (class Anthozoa) and sea anemones (order Actiniaria) may be seen, but exactly what type they are isn't often specified. However, if brain coral is shown, it will probably referred to as such.



* You probably won't find pseudoscorpions (order Pseudoscorpiones), whip scorpions (order Thelyphonida), mites (order Acari), tickspiders (order Ricinulei), sun spiders (order Solifigae), or anything other than spiders, scorpions and ''maybe'' [[TheTick ticks]] featured in fiction. You probably won't even get an acknowledgement that "arachnid" is anything other than a fancy synonym for "eight-legged thing".

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* You probably won't find pseudoscorpions (order Pseudoscorpiones), whip scorpions (order Thelyphonida), mites (order Acari), tickspiders (order Ricinulei), sun spiders (order Solifigae), Solifugae), or anything other than spiders, scorpions and ''maybe'' [[TheTick ticks]] featured in fiction. You probably won't even get an acknowledgement that "arachnid" is anything other than a fancy synonym for "eight-legged thing".
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SmallTaxonomyPools