History Main / SmallTaxonomyPools

7th Feb '16 5:18:43 PM geekgecko
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* No one species is commonly shown. It's probably because of ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'' that many are even aware sponges are living creatures. We hope.
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* No one species is commonly shown. It's probably because of ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'' that many are even aware sponges are living creatures. We hope. hope. Expect to never see a freshwater sponge. Ever.

* Subclass Coleoidea ** Octopuses/Octopi (Order Octopoda) are the most used members of this class, but they are almost always the "generic octopus"(Suborder Cirrina) with a big mantle and no fins. The absolutely adorable finned octopuses (Suborder Cirrina) have no representation other than Pearl from WesternAnimation/FindingNemo. Squids (Order Teuthida) are represented by the [[GiantSquid giant squid]], with the odd appearance by a generic smaller squid. Cuttlefish (order Sepiida) are common in documentaries, but nonexistent in other works. The vampire squid (Order Vampyromorphida) is often used as an example of "creepy deep-sea animal", but is never shown in fiction (other than partially inspiring Malamar from Video Game/Pokemon and appearing hybridized with an AnglerFish in Pi's hallucination in the film adaption of Literature/LifeOfPi). Ram's Horn Squid (Order Spirulida) are never shown, though this is not surprising as very little is known about them due to them living extremely deep underwater. Bobtail Squid (Order Sepiida) are also never shown, even though at least some of them live in shallow water. The ammonite often appears as a generic fossil, but the nautilus is almost never shown.
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* Subclass **Subclass Coleoidea ** Octopuses/Octopi (Order Octopoda) are the most used members of this class, but they are almost always the "generic octopus"(Suborder Cirrina) with a big mantle and no fins. The absolutely adorable finned octopuses (Suborder Cirrina) have no representation other than Pearl from WesternAnimation/FindingNemo. Squids (Order Teuthida) are represented by the [[GiantSquid giant squid]], with the odd appearance by a generic smaller squid. Cuttlefish (order Sepiida) are common in documentaries, but nonexistent in other works. The vampire squid (Order Vampyromorphida) is often used as an example of "creepy deep-sea animal", but is never shown in fiction (other than partially inspiring Malamar from Video Game/Pokemon Franchise/{{Pokemon}} and appearing hybridized with an AnglerFish [[AlluringAnglerfish Anglerfish]] in Pi's hallucination in the film adaption of Literature/LifeOfPi). Ram's Horn Squid (Order Spirulida) are never shown, though this is not surprising as very little is known about them due to them living extremely deep underwater. Bobtail Squid (Order Sepiida) are also never shown, even though at least some of them live in shallow water. **Subclass Ammonoidea ** The ammonite often appears as a generic fossil, but it is almost always has a typical spiral-shelled shape. The cone shaped ammonoids such as Baculites, or the extremely weird looking ones such as [[https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/d3/4c/77/d34c77c245a2c7f8f0be8d2b322fc44c.jpg Oxybeloceras]] are never shown. ** Subclass Nautiloidea ** Note that nautiloids are in fact the oldest cephalopod order (they include many of the first cephalopods and have lived since the late Cambrian), despite their representation. **While they look very much like relics of days gone by with their spiral shells, the nautilus is and Allonautilus (the only surviving members of this subclass) are almost never shown.shown. The extinct species of nautiloid such as Orthoceras don't get much luck either.
7th Feb '16 5:04:25 PM geekgecko
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* Cephalopods: A generic octopus, or giant squid, with the odd appearance by a generic smaller squid. The ammonite often appears as a generic fossil, but the nautilus is almost never shown.
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* Cephalopods: A generic octopus, or Cephalopods (Class Cephalopoda): * Subclass Coleoidea ** Octopuses/Octopi (Order Octopoda) are the most used members of this class, but they are almost always the "generic octopus"(Suborder Cirrina) with a big mantle and no fins. The absolutely adorable finned octopuses (Suborder Cirrina) have no representation other than Pearl from WesternAnimation/FindingNemo. Squids (Order Teuthida) are represented by the [[GiantSquid giant squid, squid]], with the odd appearance by a generic smaller squid. Cuttlefish (order Sepiida) are common in documentaries, but nonexistent in other works. The vampire squid (Order Vampyromorphida) is often used as an example of "creepy deep-sea animal", but is never shown in fiction (other than partially inspiring Malamar from Video Game/Pokemon and appearing hybridized with an AnglerFish in Pi's hallucination in the film adaption of Literature/LifeOfPi). Ram's Horn Squid (Order Spirulida) are never shown, though this is not surprising as very little is known about them due to them living extremely deep underwater. Bobtail Squid (Order Sepiida) are also never shown, even though at least some of them live in shallow water. The ammonite often appears as a generic fossil, but the nautilus is almost never shown.
27th Jan '16 4:23:42 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Outside documentaries, you will never ever see someone refer to a non-mammalian synapsid (formerly United as the orders Pelycosauria and Therapsida, but now scattered across various unranked clades; not true reptiles, but placed here for convenience), regardless as to how [[RuleOfCool cool]] they might be. Until recently the single exception to this was ''Dimetrodon'', though it is frequently shown [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology coexisting with dinosaurs and even labeled as dinosaur itself]]. Another exception is starting to be made for gorgonopsians, though ''Series/{{Primeval}}'' is the primary work using them.
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* Outside documentaries, you will never ever see someone refer to a non-mammalian synapsid (formerly United united as the orders Pelycosauria and Therapsida, but now scattered across various unranked clades; not true reptiles, but placed here for convenience), regardless as to how [[RuleOfCool cool]] they might be. Until recently the single exception to this was ''Dimetrodon'', though it is frequently shown [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology coexisting with dinosaurs and even labeled as dinosaur itself]]. Another exception is starting to be made for gorgonopsians, though ''Series/{{Primeval}}'' is the primary work using them.
27th Jan '16 4:22:56 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* If it's a turtle (order Testudines), prepare to see either a cute pond turtle, a sea turtle, or a tortoise. Snappers may show up on occasion. ** They're also likely to be called [[YouFailBiologyForever amphibians]].
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* If it's a turtle (order Testudines), prepare to see either a cute pond turtle, a sea turtle, or a tortoise. Snappers may show up on occasion. ** occasion. They're also likely to be called [[YouFailBiologyForever amphibians]].

* Outside documentaries, you will never ever see someone refer to a non-mammalian synapsid (formerly United as the orders Pelycosauria and Therapsida, but now scattered across various unranked clades; not true reptiles, but placed here for convenience), regardless as to how [[RuleofCool cool]] they might be. Until recently the single exception to this was ''Dimetrodon'', though it is frequently shown [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology coexisting with dinosaurs and even labeled as dinosaur itself]]. Another exception is starting to be made for gorgonopsians, though ''Series/{{Primeval}}'' is the primary work using them. * There were several other extinct groups of reptiles, but most of them were probably never depicted in fiction. Good luck finding a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhynchosaur rhynchosaur]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choristodera choristoderan]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drepanosaur drepanosaur]], or a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procolophonid procolophonid]], among many others.
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* Outside documentaries, you will never ever see someone refer to a non-mammalian synapsid (formerly United as the orders Pelycosauria and Therapsida, but now scattered across various unranked clades; not true reptiles, but placed here for convenience), regardless as to how [[RuleofCool [[RuleOfCool cool]] they might be. Until recently the single exception to this was ''Dimetrodon'', though it is frequently shown [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology coexisting with dinosaurs and even labeled as dinosaur itself]]. Another exception is starting to be made for gorgonopsians, though ''Series/{{Primeval}}'' is the primary work using them. * There were several other extinct groups of reptiles, but most of them were probably never depicted in fiction. Good luck finding a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhynchosaur rhynchosaur]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choristodera choristoderan]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drepanosaur drepanosaur]], or a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procolophonid org/wiki/Procolophonidae procolophonid]], among many others.

* Xenarthrans (order Xenarthra) may occasionally be shown in the form of generic armadillos, three-toed sloths, or giant anteaters. Ground sloths and glyptodonts are popular if the subject matter involves prehistoric mammals. Tamanduas (lesser anteaters), silky anteaters, and two-toed sloths are very rarely shown.
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* Xenarthrans (order Xenarthra) (usually considered a single order Xenarthra or Edentata, but sometimes split into the orders Cingulata & Pilosa) may occasionally be shown in the form of generic armadillos, three-toed sloths, or giant anteaters. Ground sloths and glyptodonts are popular if the subject matter involves prehistoric mammals. Tamanduas (lesser anteaters), silky anteaters, and two-toed sloths are very rarely shown.
18th Jan '16 1:00:06 PM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Mold -- Although anyone who's seen food go rotten knows there are several kinds of mold (depending on the color of the rot), no species is known by name. Even ''Penicillium chrysogenum'' is just known by the antibiotic based from it, "Penicillin". ** Slime molds and water molds are polyphyletic and consist of several supergroups, none of which fit in the fungi kingdom. * Yeast -- Also, no species is known by name. It's just commonly known as one of two things: ** A fermentation agent, although there are still several different kinds of species for that. ** Whatever species causes yeast infection, which are the species of the genus ''Candida''. * Truffle -- Again, just the group known, not any species. And they are only mentioned when someone is making some kind of fancy meal, or getting ingredients for one. ** Cooking shows will differentiate between black and white truffles. The fact that there is more than one type of black truffle (black Périgord truffle being the good one), or even just more than two types of truffles never gets mentioned. White truffles are rarer than the Périgords and tend to carry a sort of elitist appeal to them... even more than the elitism that plain old Périgords have. Most people can't tell the difference and restaurants have been known to dose the milder white truffles with Périgord oil so the diners taste the distinctive truffle flavor. Scams abound with lesser quality black truffles also being dosed in the same manner and sold for obscene prices. * Mushrooms ** Edible ones might be mentioned by name, such as morels or shiitake. Poisonous ones are invariably called "toadstools" or just "poisonous mushroom" even though there are an awful lot of mycotoxin-containing species. (If one is mentioned, it will probably be the destroying angel simply because it has the most BadAss name ever. Not coincidentally it's one of the most toxic and most easily misidentified mushrooms in the wild.) *** In ''Literature/DresdenFiles'' book "Grave Peril" Jim Butcher [[ShownTheirWork gets it exactly right]] with his description of how eating a destroying angel will kill you. He even gets the antidote spot-on. ** Kind of justified. Some are ''ridiculously'' hard to identify without specialized equipment and even mycologists are known to argue about which are which. ** This is also very culturally dependent. East European and Asian cuisine uses a lot more mushrooms than Western or American, so people from the former areas are likely to be able to identify a much longer list of edible species and (if they're the type to go mushroom hunting themselves) to be able to recognize poisonous ones. However this can backfire horribly if they move if they move to western countries as several very poisonous varieties native to western countries strongly resemble edible fungi from their original locales.
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* Mold -- Although anyone who's seen food go rotten knows there are several kinds of mold (depending on the color of the rot), no species is known by name. Even ''Penicillium chrysogenum'' is just known by the antibiotic based from it, "Penicillin". ** "Penicillin". Slime molds and water molds are polyphyletic and consist of several supergroups, none of which fit in the fungi kingdom. * Yeast -- Also, no species is known by name. It's just commonly known as one of two things: ** things: A fermentation agent, although there are still several different kinds of species for that. ** Whatever that, and as whatever species causes yeast infection, which are the species of the genus ''Candida''. * Truffle -- Again, just the group known, not any species. And they are only mentioned when someone is making some kind of fancy meal, or getting ingredients for one. ** one. Cooking shows will differentiate between black and white truffles. The fact that there is more than one type of black truffle (black Périgord truffle being the good one), or even just more than two types of truffles never gets mentioned. White truffles are rarer than the Périgords and tend to carry a sort of elitist appeal to them... even more than the elitism that plain old Périgords have. Most people can't tell the difference and restaurants have been known to dose the milder white truffles with Périgord oil so the diners taste the distinctive truffle flavor. Scams abound with lesser quality black truffles also being dosed in the same manner and sold for obscene prices. * Mushrooms ** Edible ones mushrooms might be mentioned by name, such as morels or shiitake. Poisonous ones are invariably called "toadstools" or just "poisonous mushroom" even though there are an awful lot of mycotoxin-containing species. (If one is mentioned, it will probably be the destroying angel simply because it has the most BadAss name ever. Not coincidentally it's one of the most toxic and most easily misidentified mushrooms in the wild.) *** ) In ''Literature/DresdenFiles'' book "Grave Peril" Jim Butcher [[ShownTheirWork gets it exactly right]] with his description of how eating a destroying angel will kill you. He even gets the antidote spot-on. ** Kind spot-on, which is kind of justified. Some are ''ridiculously'' hard to identify without specialized equipment and even mycologists are known to argue about which are which. ** which. This is also very culturally dependent. East European and Asian cuisine uses a lot more mushrooms than Western or American, so people from the former areas are likely to be able to identify a much longer list of edible species and (if they're the type to go mushroom hunting themselves) to be able to recognize poisonous ones. However this can backfire horribly if they move if they move to western countries as several very poisonous varieties native to western countries strongly resemble edible fungi from their original locales.

** Snakes in fiction come in five main styles: cobras, rattlesnakes, constrictors (boas, pythons, and anacondas being the most popular), and "generic deadly" (almost always in fact a false corn snake, which look appropriately poisonous) are the first four. The fifth type of snake is "generic harmless", usually a green garden snake. *** Somewhat averted in Australian fiction, if only due to the sheer number of venomous snakes available. *** The cobra species you'll most commonly see is ''Naja naja'', the Indian cobra. That's because it's the "snake-charmer" cobra. The king cobra (''Ophiophagus hannah'') is larger, but because of its size its hood looks disproportionately smaller, thus making it less "evil" in appearance.
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** Snakes in fiction come in five main styles: cobras, rattlesnakes, constrictors (boas, pythons, and anacondas being the most popular), and "generic deadly" (almost always in fact a false corn snake, which look appropriately poisonous) are the first four. The fifth type of snake is "generic harmless", usually a green garden snake. *** snake. Somewhat averted in Australian fiction, if only due to the sheer number of venomous snakes available. *** available. The cobra species you'll most commonly see is ''Naja naja'', the Indian cobra. That's because it's the "snake-charmer" cobra. The king cobra (''Ophiophagus hannah'') is larger, but because of its size its hood looks disproportionately smaller, thus making it less "evil" in appearance.

* When people think of crocodilians (order Crocodylia), they're most likely going to picture your standard American alligator, estuarine crocodile (also known as the saltwater crocodile), or Nile crocodile. Rarely will you see a gharial or a caiman in non-documentary media. ** The group containing crocodilians and their prehistoric relatives, Crocodylomorpha, [[http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/2012/09/02/the-crocopocalypse-is-upon-us/ was historically very diverse]], with its members ranging from marine taxa with limbs and tails turned into fins, to freshwater forms, to terrestrial and possibly ''warm-blooded'' crocs such as sphenosuchians and notosuchians of various size and diet (the latter ranged from carnivores to omnivores and possibly even herbivores). Yet in fiction prehistoric crocodylomorphs are always just oversized versions of living crocodilians, and pretty much the only specific prehistoric crocodylomorph you can expect to see is ''Deinosuchus''. It's possible to find a ''Sarcosuchus'' or some other large species in a documentary or two.
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* When people think of crocodilians (order Crocodylia), they're most likely going to picture your standard American alligator, estuarine crocodile (also known as the saltwater crocodile), or Nile crocodile. Rarely will you see a gharial or a caiman in non-documentary media. ** media. The group containing crocodilians and their prehistoric relatives, Crocodylomorpha, [[http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/2012/09/02/the-crocopocalypse-is-upon-us/ was historically very diverse]], with its members ranging from marine taxa with limbs and tails turned into fins, to freshwater forms, to terrestrial and possibly ''warm-blooded'' crocs such as sphenosuchians and notosuchians of various size and diet (the latter ranged from carnivores to omnivores and possibly even herbivores). Yet in fiction prehistoric crocodylomorphs are always just oversized versions of living crocodilians, and pretty much the only specific prehistoric crocodylomorph you can expect to see is ''Deinosuchus''. It's possible to find a ''Sarcosuchus'' or some other large species in a documentary or two.

* Rodents (order Rodentia) are usually known for mice, rats, squirrels and chipmunks. Less used, but still relatively familiar are beavers and porcupines as wild animals, and hamsters, gerbils and guinea pigs as pets. The low ranking is especially odd as the rodents are the largest of the major mammal groups, with 40% of mammal species in it. ** Almost all rodents seem to be confused or mixed together to form some sort of new creature. Mice and rats are commonly confused, especially wild ones and pests (which are ALWAYS diseased and filthy in fictionland. Even some pet ones are depicted this way). Usually you see a character screeching and screaming or going "YUCK" and calling what is usually a mouse a rat. You also have the people who [[YouFailBiologyForever call every rodent a rat]] --unless casting requires the opposite, as when the unambiguous rat in ''Because of Winn-Dixie'' is repeatedly described as a "mouse". Unfortunately this is TruthInTelevision for many. ** Similarly, guinea pigs are constantly confused with hamsters, even though they hardly look alike (Google either and you will eventually see hamsters in the guinea pig search, and guinea pigs in the hamster search). They are usually depicted with running wheels and salt licks and seeds, when all three of these are extremely unhealthy and even dangerous for guinea pigs. They are also often drawn the size and shape of hamsters, and only called guinea pigs for plot reasons (such as they are being experimented on, or the creators thought "guinea pig" sounded cooler/more mature/wanted to avoid being connected to Anime/{{Hamtaro}}). ** Don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capybara capybaras]] in fiction, even though they are the largest rodents alive and are very closely related to guinea pigs. ** The chinchilla rates an occasional mention, either as somebody's coat or somebody's faddish pet. ** It's also not uncommon for chinchillas to be dismissed as a type of rabbit or a type of giant mouse, if they are shown at all, but actually they aren't closely related to either.
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* Rodents (order Rodentia) are usually known for mice, rats, squirrels and chipmunks. Less used, but still relatively familiar are beavers and porcupines as wild animals, and hamsters, gerbils and guinea pigs as pets. The low ranking is especially odd as the rodents are the largest of the major mammal groups, with 40% of mammal species in it. ** it. Almost all rodents seem to be confused or mixed together to form some sort of new creature. Mice and rats are commonly confused, especially wild ones and pests (which are ALWAYS diseased and filthy in fictionland. Even some pet ones are depicted this way). Usually you see a character screeching and screaming or going "YUCK" and calling what is usually a mouse a rat. You also have the people who [[YouFailBiologyForever call every rodent a rat]] --unless casting requires the opposite, as when the unambiguous rat in ''Because of Winn-Dixie'' is repeatedly described as a "mouse". Unfortunately this is TruthInTelevision for many. ** many. Similarly, guinea pigs are constantly confused with hamsters, even though they hardly look alike (Google either and you will eventually see hamsters in the guinea pig search, and guinea pigs in the hamster search). They are usually depicted with running wheels and salt licks and seeds, when all three of these are extremely unhealthy and even dangerous for guinea pigs. They are also often drawn the size and shape of hamsters, and only called guinea pigs for plot reasons (such as they are being experimented on, or the creators thought "guinea pig" sounded cooler/more mature/wanted to avoid being connected to Anime/{{Hamtaro}}). ** ''Anime/{{Hamtaro}}''). Don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capybara capybaras]] in fiction, even though they are the largest rodents alive and are very closely related to guinea pigs. ** pigs. The chinchilla rates an occasional mention, either as somebody's coat or somebody's faddish pet. ** pet. It's also not uncommon for chinchillas to be dismissed as a type of rabbit or a type of giant mouse, if they are shown at all, but actually they aren't closely related to either.

* Primates (order Primates) have a wide variety, even counting humans ([[MostWritersAreHuman since we show up by default]]). We have gorillas, orangutans, chimpanzees, baboons, and a few monkey species. No bonobos, though - except in one Humon comic. ** If someone has a pet monkey, it will almost always be a capuchin. This particularly stands out in fiction set in Africa or the Middle East, since capuchins (like all monkeys with prehensile tails) are New World monkeys - that is, only native to the Americas. ** Most primates except for humans and lemurs will be referred to as monkeys. Expect ape, monkey, and chimp to be used interchangeably even within the same sentence.
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* Primates (order Primates) have a wide variety, even counting humans ([[MostWritersAreHuman since we show up by default]]). We have gorillas, orangutans, chimpanzees, baboons, and a few monkey species. No bonobos, though - except in one Humon comic. ** comic. If someone has a pet monkey, it will almost always be a capuchin. This particularly stands out in fiction set in Africa or the Middle East, since capuchins (like all monkeys with prehensile tails) are New World monkeys - that is, only native to the Americas. ** Americas. Most primates except for humans and lemurs will be referred to as monkeys. Expect ape, monkey, and chimp to be used interchangeably even within the same sentence.

* The mammals pertaining to the now obsolete order Insectivora tend to be represented by the mole, the shrew and the hedgehog. Moles tend to look always like the European mole (except for the {{Redwall}} animated series where they were star-nosed moles, [[MisplacedWildlife which are not native to England and therefore aren't native to Mossflower either]]). ** And the other members of the Insectivora who got booted out? They never appear either. Sorry, tenrecs, elephant shrews and golden moles. ** Speaking of the hedgehog, Google "baby porcupine" and see what comes up. That's right, hedgehogs, despite the fact they are completely different species. Apparently if it's rodent-like and has spines it's a porcupine. If it's small it's just a baby porcupine.
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* The mammals pertaining to the now obsolete order Insectivora tend to be represented by the mole, the shrew and the hedgehog. Moles tend to look always like the European mole (except for the {{Redwall}} animated series where they were star-nosed moles, [[MisplacedWildlife which are not native to England and therefore aren't native to Mossflower either]]). ** either]]). And the other members of the Insectivora who got booted out? They never appear either. Sorry, tenrecs, elephant shrews and golden moles. ** moles. Speaking of the hedgehog, Google "baby porcupine" and see what comes up. That's right, hedgehogs, despite the fact they are completely different species. Apparently if it's rodent-like and has spines it's a porcupine. If it's small it's just a baby porcupine.
16th Jan '16 2:01:40 AM Anddrix
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* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because [[ViewersAreMorons herbivores are harmless]] and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]]. Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries.
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* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because [[ViewersAreMorons herbivores are harmless]] harmless and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]]. Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries.
15th Jan '16 9:07:32 AM TrollMan
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* Better off than the mantis shrimp, who despite being the living spineless incarnation of BadAss, almost never appears in books or other works of fiction. When it does, it is always in aquarium books demanding that one [[BurnTheWitch kill it on sight,]] with the notable exception of ''[[Literature/Fragment]]'', where several of Henders Isle's nightmarish inhabitants are distant relatives of mantis shrimp (in fact, at one point the characters theorize that this is looking at it backwards: that mantis shrimp originated on Henders Isle.)
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* Better off than the mantis shrimp, who despite being the living spineless incarnation of BadAss, almost never appears in books or other works of fiction. When it does, it is always in aquarium books demanding that one [[BurnTheWitch kill it on sight,]] with the notable exception of ''[[Literature/Fragment]]'', ''{{Literature/Fragment}}'', where several of Henders Isle's nightmarish inhabitants are distant relatives of mantis shrimp (in fact, at one point the characters theorize that this is looking at it backwards: that mantis shrimp originated on Henders Isle.)
15th Jan '16 9:07:00 AM TrollMan
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* Better off than the mantis shrimp, who despite being the living spineless incarnation of BadAss, almost never appears in books or other works of fiction. When it does, it is always in aquarium books demanding that one [[BurnTheWitch kill it on sight,]] with the notable exception of ''Fragment'', where several of Henders Isle's nightmarish inhabitants are distant relatives of mantis shrimp (in fact, at one point the characters theorize that this is looking at it backwards: that mantis shrimp originated on Henders Isle.)
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* Better off than the mantis shrimp, who despite being the living spineless incarnation of BadAss, almost never appears in books or other works of fiction. When it does, it is always in aquarium books demanding that one [[BurnTheWitch kill it on sight,]] with the notable exception of ''Fragment'', ''[[Literature/Fragment]]'', where several of Henders Isle's nightmarish inhabitants are distant relatives of mantis shrimp (in fact, at one point the characters theorize that this is looking at it backwards: that mantis shrimp originated on Henders Isle.)

** ''Film/JurassicWorld'' has the only notable appearance of a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosasaur mosasaur]] in fiction.
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** ''Film/JurassicWorld'' has the only notable appearance of a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosasaur mosasaur]] in fiction.fiction (although they are common in paleo-documentaries).
10th Jan '16 11:28:11 AM nombretomado
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* Despite there being a large number of sea cucumbers available to choose from, they remain incredibly unpopular, appearing only to produce the occasional gag (being eaten as food on ''SpongebobSquarepants'' or [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything spewing sticky white goo on a girl]]).
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* Despite there being a large number of sea cucumbers available to choose from, they remain incredibly unpopular, appearing only to produce the occasional gag (being eaten as food on ''SpongebobSquarepants'' ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'' or [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything spewing sticky white goo on a girl]]).
9th Jan '16 5:32:26 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* The order Squamata is prevalent in fiction.
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* The order Squamata is prevalent common in fiction.

* The order Carnivora frequently appears in fiction.
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* The order Carnivora frequently appears is prevalent in fiction.
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