History Main / SmallTaxonomyPools

16th Feb '17 12:00:51 PM MrMediaGuy2
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* Aside from cranes and the extinct terror birds, the loosely-defined order Gruiformes is essentially nonexistent in fiction (things like rails, mesites and kagu being just as elusive in fiction as in real life).

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* Aside from cranes and the extinct terror birds, the loosely-defined order Gruiformes is essentially nonexistent in fiction (things like rails, mesites and kagu being just as elusive in fiction as in real life). The most baffling case would have to be seriemas, as you'd think being the only surviving relatives of the famous [[FeatheredFiend terror birds]] would give them at least a bit of media attention.
26th Jan '17 11:11:29 AM ElSquibbonator
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* The kookaburra (order Coraciiformes) is known for precisely two things: that one children's rhyme and [[its cry JunglesSoundLikeKookaburras]], which is, without exception, [[MisplacedWildlife attributed to a monkey]]. ''Disney/TheLionKing'' has the only other notable appearance of a coraciiform in fiction (in this case, a hornbill).

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* The kookaburra (order Coraciiformes) is known for precisely two things: that one children's rhyme and [[its cry JunglesSoundLikeKookaburras]], [[JunglesSoundLikeKookaburras its cry]], which is, without exception, [[MisplacedWildlife attributed to a monkey]]. ''Disney/TheLionKing'' has the only other notable appearance of a coraciiform in fiction (in this case, a hornbill).
26th Jan '17 11:10:26 AM ElSquibbonator
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* Carnivorous plants are never represented as anything but [[ManEatingPlant pure fantasy with giant man-eating snapping jaws and writhing vines]]. There are probably close to 1000 different species of insectivorous plants around the world with New World and Asian pitcher plants, sundew, bladderworts, butterworts and others, many of which are perfectly "weird" and photogenic without any fabrication at all. The Venus flytrap gets extra props for Charles Darwin calling it "the most wonderful plant in the world."

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* Carnivorous plants are never rarely represented as anything but [[ManEatingPlant pure fantasy with giant man-eating snapping jaws and writhing vines]]. There are probably close to 1000 different species of insectivorous plants around the world with New World and Asian pitcher plants, sundew, bladderworts, butterworts and others, many of which are perfectly "weird" and photogenic without any fabrication at all. The Venus flytrap gets extra props for Charles Darwin calling it "the most wonderful plant in the world."



* Mosquitoes aren't considered flies in fiction.

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* Mosquitoes aren't considered thought of as flies in fiction.



* There are lobsters and crabs. Crabs are almost always one of hermit crabs, blue crabs, or Alaskan king crabs. Lobsters only come in one variety in fiction, and to make matters worse, especially in animation, they're bright red. (Live lobsters are brownish-green; they only turn red when they're cooked.) Shrimps are also often colored either pink or orange in advertising, even if they're supposedly alive.

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* There are lobsters and crabs.lobsters, crabs,and shrimp. Crabs are almost always one of hermit crabs, blue crabs, or Alaskan king crabs. Lobsters only come in one variety in fiction, and to make matters worse, especially in animation, they're bright red. (Live lobsters are brownish-green; they only turn red when they're cooked.) Shrimps are also often colored either pink or orange in advertising, even if they're supposedly alive.



* 40% of all bony fish are members of the order Perciformes, which includes many familiar varieties. Tropical reef fishes are always members of this order, and usually angelfish and butterflyfish are shown (clownfish and regal tangs are recently popular thanks to ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo''. Bass are always associated with sports fishing. Tuna are more commonly shown in their canned forms, but living ones are a semi-common choice for marine fish that aren't small and colorful. Swordfish/marlins and barracudas are also occasionally seen.

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* 40% of all bony fish are members of the order Perciformes, which includes many familiar varieties. Tropical reef fishes are always members of this order, and usually angelfish and butterflyfish are shown (clownfish and regal tangs are recently popular thanks to ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo''. Bass are always associated with sports sport fishing. Tuna are more commonly shown in their canned forms, but living ones are a semi-common choice for marine fish that aren't small and colorful. Swordfish/marlins and barracudas are also occasionally seen.



* The best known example is the West Indian Ocean coelacanth (''Latimeria chalumnae'', order Coelacanthiformes).

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* The best known example is the West Indian Ocean coelacanth (''Latimeria chalumnae'', order Coelacanthiformes).
Coelacanthiformes). However, it rarely shows up in fiction.



** The most common lizards you'll see on TV/movies are iguanas, chameleons, geckos, the occasional frilled lizard (if it's set in Australia), and the Komodo dragon. Gila monsters show up occasionally. Note that if an iguana does show up, it will almost always be a palette-swapped chameleon or Gila monster, sporting a prehensile tongue, color changing abilities and a taste for bugs and small animals. Herbivorous real world iguanas display none of these traits.

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** The most common lizards you'll see on TV/movies are iguanas, chameleons, geckos, the occasional frilled lizard (if it's set in Australia), and the Komodo dragon. Gila monsters show up occasionally. Note that if an iguana does show up, it will almost always be a palette-swapped chameleon or Gila monster, sporting a prehensile projectile tongue, color changing abilities and a taste for bugs and small animals. Herbivorous real world iguanas display none of these traits.



** Large theropods are usually ''T. rex'', ''Allosaurus'', ''Spinosaurus'', or sometimes ''Dilophosaurus'' (rarely ''Ceratosaurus'', ''Megalosaurus'', ''Albertosaurus'', ''Giganotosaurus'', ''Baryonyx'', or ''Carnotaurus'' will appear).

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** Large theropods are usually ''T. rex'', ''Allosaurus'', ''Spinosaurus'', or sometimes ''Dilophosaurus'' (rarely (occasionally, ''Ceratosaurus'', ''Megalosaurus'', ''Albertosaurus'', ''Giganotosaurus'', ''Baryonyx'', or ''Carnotaurus'' will appear).



** There are two ceratopsids: ''Triceratops'' and ''Styracosaurus'' (although older works will sometimes use ''Centrosaurus''), while more basal ceratopsians are rarely heard of (except for ''Protoceratops'' and ''Psittacosaurus'', and only in edutainment works).

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** There are two ceratopsids: ''Triceratops'' and ''Styracosaurus'' (although older works will sometimes use ''Centrosaurus''), while more ''Centrosaurus''). Rarely, ''Torosaurus''and''Pachyrhinosaurus''may show up. More basal ceratopsians are rarely heard of (except for ''Protoceratops'' (''Protoceratops'' and ''Psittacosaurus'', and only in edutainment works).works).



** Hadrosaurs are usually represented by ''Parasaurolophus'' or ''Edmontosaurus'' (whatever name it's referred to as), and neither is likely to be named (''Corythosaurus'' used to be somewhat common, and ''Maiasaura'' will occasionally appear in modern works). Non-hadrosaur ornithopods are pretty much only represented by ''Iguanodon'' (or, if you're ''really'' lucky, ''Hypsilophodon'').

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** Hadrosaurs are usually represented by ''Parasaurolophus'' or ''Edmontosaurus'' ''Edmontosaurus''/''Anatosaurus'' (whatever name it's referred to as), and neither is likely to be named (''Corythosaurus'' used to be somewhat common, and ''Maiasaura'' will occasionally appear in modern works). Non-hadrosaur ornithopods are pretty much only represented by ''Iguanodon'' (or, if you're ''really'' lucky, ''Hypsilophodon'').



* Birds are the only living dinosaurs. As such, if there is anything close to a representative of this it will be ''Archaeopteryx'', and even that's doubtful (educational works might throw in ''Hesperornis'', ''Ichthyornis'' and/or ''Confuciusornis'', but don't hold your breath). Few extinct birds are ever used - not even the rather awesome elephant bird, the formidable pseudotoothed birds or the incredibly diverse opposite birds. The exception to this is the dodo which is practically a symbol for 'extinction', and has a reputation for being too dumb to live. Occasionally also the terror birds.
* You will never see a hoatzin in fiction. Nor will you see a sunbittern, chachalaca or other such birds (most people probably don't even know there are such things as a go-away-bird or a puffbird).

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* Birds are the only living dinosaurs. As such, if there is anything close to a representative of this it will be ''Archaeopteryx'', and even that's doubtful (educational works might throw in ''Hesperornis'', ''Ichthyornis'' and/or ''Confuciusornis'', but don't hold your breath). Few extinct birds are ever used - not even the rather awesome elephant bird, the formidable pseudotoothed birds or the incredibly diverse opposite birds. The exception to this is the dodo which is practically a symbol for 'extinction', and has a reputation for being too dumb to live.TooDumbToLive. Occasionally also the terror birds.
* You will never see a hoatzin in fiction. Nor will you see a sunbittern, chachalaca or other such birds (most people probably don't even know there are such things as a go-away-bird or a puffbird).



* Thanks to ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'', the roadrunner is the only cuckoo (order Cuculiformes) that often appears in fiction.
* Parrots (order Psittaciformes) will always be brightly-coloured, mostly red or commonly green, and will be able to talk fluently. Cockatoos, large white parrots with moveable head crests, are rare; black cockatoos, including the highly intimidating but gentle Palm Cockatoo, aren't seen. There will be no concept of a parrot shorter than your arm unless it's a budgie/budgerigar (UK) or parakeet (US), which will always be yellow and green. And there will never be a mention of the heavy and rare kakapo, nor of the fearless and destructive kea and kaka - all three being New Zealand birds and dark greenish brown. The kakapo is becoming a bit more popular in internet works, but its almost always because [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9T1vfsHYiKY it's shagging you]]. Specifically, the most commonly shown big parrots are Amazons and Macaws, and even then, it's usually Yellow-Headed Amazons, Blue & Gold Macaws, or Scarlet Macaws. The small Hahns and Noble Macaws don't appear at all. When Cockatoos do show up, they're usually the huge white Umbrella or distinctive Sulfur Crested - forget the smaller Goffins, Bare-eyed, Rose, and Major Mitchells varieties. African Grays hold some popularity since [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alex_(parrot) Alex]] and are primarily Congos. Any sufficiently tropical location may have Lorikeets, either Green-Napped or Rainbow. 'Parakeet' actually refers to any bird with long tail feathers, which includes Macaws and a huge variety of other parrot species that even don't blip the radar. Such as Sun Conures and Cockatiels, despite their huge popularity in the pet trade. That's not even mentioning the many hundreds of types of short-tailed parrots. Anyone ever seen a Caique, Hawk Headed Parrot, or a Pionus?

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* Thanks to ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'', the roadrunner is the only cuckoo (order Cuculiformes) that often appears in fiction.
fiction (other than cuckoo clocks, that is).
* Parrots (order Psittaciformes) will always be brightly-coloured, mostly either red or commonly green, and will be able to talk fluently. Cockatoos, large white parrots with moveable head crests, are rare; black cockatoos, including the highly intimidating but gentle Palm Cockatoo, aren't seen. There will be no concept of a parrot shorter than your arm unless it's a budgie/budgerigar (UK) or parakeet (US), which will always be yellow and green. And there will never be a mention of the heavy and rare kakapo, nor of the fearless and destructive kea and kaka - all three being New Zealand birds and dark greenish brown. The kakapo is becoming a bit more popular in internet works, but its almost always because [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9T1vfsHYiKY it's shagging you]]. Specifically, the most commonly shown big parrots are Amazons and Macaws, and even then, it's usually Yellow-Headed Amazons, Blue & Gold Macaws, or Scarlet Macaws. The small Hahns and Noble Macaws don't appear at all. When Cockatoos do show up, they're usually the huge white Umbrella or distinctive Sulfur Crested - forget the smaller Goffins, Bare-eyed, Rose, and Major Mitchells varieties. African Grays hold some popularity since [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alex_(parrot) Alex]] and are primarily Congos. Any sufficiently tropical location may have Lorikeets, either Green-Napped or Rainbow. 'Parakeet' actually refers to any bird parrot with long tail feathers, which technically includes Macaws and a huge variety of other parrot species that even don't blip the radar. Such as Sun Conures and Cockatiels, despite their huge popularity in the pet trade. That's not even mentioning the many hundreds of types of short-tailed parrots. Anyone ever seen a Caique, Hawk Headed Parrot, or a Pionus?



* The kookaburra (order Coraciiformes) is known for precisely two things: that one children's rhyme and its cry, which is, without exception, [[MisplacedWildlife attributed to a monkey]]. ''Disney/TheLionKing'' has the only other notable appearance of a coraciiform in fiction (in this case, a hornbill).

to:

* The kookaburra (order Coraciiformes) is known for precisely two things: that one children's rhyme and its cry, [[its cry JunglesSoundLikeKookaburras]], which is, without exception, [[MisplacedWildlife attributed to a monkey]]. ''Disney/TheLionKing'' has the only other notable appearance of a coraciiform in fiction (in this case, a hornbill).



* Marsupials arguably have more diversity in their hundreds of species than any other variety of mammal, yet the amount of species used in fiction could be counted on a few fingers. Kangaroos and koalas (order Diprotodontia) are obviously the most popular, and instantly come to mind at the word "marsupial".

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* Marsupials arguably have more diversity in their hundreds of species than any other variety group of mammal, mammals, yet the amount of species used in fiction could be counted on a few fingers. Kangaroos and koalas (order Diprotodontia) are obviously the most popular, and instantly come to mind at the word "marsupial".



** When we think of bears, we think of the grizzly, the black bear, the polar bear, and the giant panda (which, by the way, was found to genetically actually be a bear[[note]]In case you are wondering, it was long believed giant pandas were actually a kind of raccoon, due to their relation to the red panda. It turns out bears and raccoons had a common ancestor, just that pandas are closer to them.[[/note]]). Spectacled bears, despite being the only surviving cousins of the badass short-faced bear, never appear. Speaking of which, short-faced bears and cave bears are common if the work is set in the Ice Age, and both are often confused with each other (despite the short-faced bear having longer legs and being carnivorous, as opposed to the more herbivorous and grizzly-like cave bear).

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** When we think of bears, we think of the grizzly, the black bear, the polar bear, and the giant panda (which, by the way, was found to genetically actually be a bear[[note]]In case you are wondering, it was long believed giant pandas were actually a kind of raccoon, due to their relation similarity to the red panda. It turns out bears and raccoons had a common ancestor, just that pandas are closer to them.[[/note]]). Spectacled bears, despite being the only surviving cousins of the badass short-faced bear, almost never appear.appear (the only possible example is Paddington Bear, who came from "Darkest Peru", where the spectacled bear is native). Speaking of which, short-faced bears and cave bears are common if the work is set in the Ice Age, and both are often confused with each other (despite the short-faced bear having longer legs and being carnivorous, as opposed to the more herbivorous and grizzly-like cave bear).



* Horses (order Perissodactyla) in fiction come in four types: draft horse (usually a Clydesdale), race horse (almost always a Thoroughbred despite many other breeds being used for racing as well), wild horse (mustang), and Generic Critter-You-Sit-On (all others). Mules appear much more often than donkeys, despite needing the latter to create the former. Zebras are treated as one species and will usually be plains zebras, often wrongly depicted as the size of modern domestic horses. Rhinos, often also treated as one species and almost always African black or hook-lipped rhinos, appear as charging brutes or (rarely) musclebound thugs in media. Woolly rhinos are prevalent in works about extinct mammals, though the giant hornless rhino ''Paraceratherium'' may show up as well due to its reputation as one of the largest land mammals. Brontotheres, rhino-like but more closely related to horses, are also quite popular in the subject of prehistoric mammals. Tapir? What's that? Chalicotheres (closely related to rhinos and tapirs) are occasionally mentioned in educational works.
* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because herbivores are harmless and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]]. Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries.

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* Horses Odd-toed Ungulates (order Perissodactyla) in fiction come in four types: draft horse (usually a Clydesdale), race horse (almost always a Thoroughbred despite many other breeds being used for racing as well), wild horse (mustang), and Generic Critter-You-Sit-On (all others). Mules appear much more often than donkeys, despite needing the latter to create the former. Zebras are treated as one species and will usually be plains zebras, often wrongly depicted as the size of modern domestic horses. Rhinos, often also treated as one species and almost always African black or hook-lipped rhinos, appear as charging brutes or (rarely) musclebound thugs in media. Woolly rhinos are prevalent in works about extinct mammals, though the giant hornless rhino ''Paraceratherium'' may show up as well due to its reputation as one of the largest land mammals. Brontotheres, rhino-like but more closely related to horses, are also quite popular in the subject of prehistoric mammals. Tapir? What's that? Chalicotheres (closely related to rhinos and tapirs) are occasionally mentioned in educational works.
* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle) cattle, sheep, and pigs) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because herbivores are harmless and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]]. Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries.
16th Jan '17 5:22:55 PM schoi30
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** Birdlike theropods are mostly represented by dromaeosaurs (usually ''Deinonychus'' and ''Velociraptor'', though ''Utahraptor'' and ''Microraptor'' show up occasionally), ''Archaeopteryx'', and ornithomimids (''Ornithomimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', or ''Gallimimus''). ''Oviraptor'' and ''Troodon'' if you're lucky. ''Therizinosaurus'' is getting popular due to its WolverineClaws as well being a theropod that's herbivorous as opposed to carnivorous, though it's still not quite common in media.

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** Birdlike theropods are mostly represented by dromaeosaurs (usually (namely ''Deinonychus'' and or ''Velociraptor'', though ''Utahraptor'' and ''Microraptor'' show up occasionally), ''Archaeopteryx'', and ornithomimids (''Ornithomimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', or ''Gallimimus''). ''Oviraptor'' and ''Troodon'' if you're lucky. ''Therizinosaurus'' is getting popular due to its WolverineClaws as well being a theropod that's herbivorous as opposed to carnivorous, though it's still not quite common in media.
16th Jan '17 5:21:15 PM schoi30
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** Birdlike theropods are mostly represented by dromaeosaurs (usually ''Deinonychus'' or ''Velociraptor'', though ''Utahraptor'', or ''Microraptor'' show up occasionally), ''Archaeopteryx'', and ornithomimids (''Ornithomimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', or ''Gallimimus''). ''Oviraptor'' and ''Troodon'' if you're lucky. ''Therizinosaurus'' is getting popular due to its WolverineClaws as well being a theropod that's herbivorous as opposed to carnivorous, though it's still not quite common in media.

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** Birdlike theropods are mostly represented by dromaeosaurs (usually ''Deinonychus'' or and ''Velociraptor'', though ''Utahraptor'', or ''Utahraptor'' and ''Microraptor'' show up occasionally), ''Archaeopteryx'', and ornithomimids (''Ornithomimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', or ''Gallimimus''). ''Oviraptor'' and ''Troodon'' if you're lucky. ''Therizinosaurus'' is getting popular due to its WolverineClaws as well being a theropod that's herbivorous as opposed to carnivorous, though it's still not quite common in media.
16th Jan '17 5:20:43 PM schoi30
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** Birdlike theropods are mostly represented by dromaeosaurs (''Deinonychus'', ''Velociraptor'', ''Utahraptor'', or ''Microraptor''), ''Archaeopteryx'', and ornithomimids (''Ornithomimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', or ''Gallimimus''). ''Oviraptor'' and ''Troodon'' if you're lucky. ''Therizinosaurus'' is getting popular due to its WolverineClaws as well being a theropod that's herbivorous as opposed to carnivorous, though it's still not quite common in media.

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** Birdlike theropods are mostly represented by dromaeosaurs (''Deinonychus'', (usually ''Deinonychus'' or ''Velociraptor'', though ''Utahraptor'', or ''Microraptor''), ''Microraptor'' show up occasionally), ''Archaeopteryx'', and ornithomimids (''Ornithomimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', or ''Gallimimus''). ''Oviraptor'' and ''Troodon'' if you're lucky. ''Therizinosaurus'' is getting popular due to its WolverineClaws as well being a theropod that's herbivorous as opposed to carnivorous, though it's still not quite common in media.
16th Jan '17 5:19:34 PM schoi30
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** Birdlike theropods are mostly represented by dromaeosaurs (''Deinonychus'', ''Velociraptor'', or ''Utahraptor''), ''Archaeopteryx'', and ornithomimids (''Ornithomimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', or ''Gallimimus''). ''Oviraptor'' and ''Troodon'' if you're lucky. ''Therizinosaurus'' is getting popular due to its WolverineClaws as well being a theropod that's herbivorous as opposed to carnivorous, though it's still not quite common in media.

to:

** Birdlike theropods are mostly represented by dromaeosaurs (''Deinonychus'', ''Velociraptor'', ''Utahraptor'', or ''Utahraptor''), ''Microraptor''), ''Archaeopteryx'', and ornithomimids (''Ornithomimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', or ''Gallimimus''). ''Oviraptor'' and ''Troodon'' if you're lucky. ''Therizinosaurus'' is getting popular due to its WolverineClaws as well being a theropod that's herbivorous as opposed to carnivorous, though it's still not quite common in media.
15th Jan '17 2:55:33 PM DustSnitch
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* Better off than the mantis shrimp, who despite being the living spineless incarnation of BadAss, almost never appears in books or other works of fiction. When it does, it is always in aquarium books demanding that one [[BurnTheWitch kill it on sight,]] with the notable exception of ''{{Literature/Fragment}}'', where several of Henders Isle's nightmarish inhabitants are distant relatives of mantis shrimp (in fact, at one point the characters theorize that this is looking at it backwards: that mantis shrimp originated on Henders Isle.)

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* Better off than the mantis shrimp, who despite being the living spineless incarnation of BadAss, badass, almost never appears in books or other works of fiction. When it does, it is always in aquarium books demanding that one [[BurnTheWitch kill it on sight,]] with the notable exception of ''{{Literature/Fragment}}'', where several of Henders Isle's nightmarish inhabitants are distant relatives of mantis shrimp (in fact, at one point the characters theorize that this is looking at it backwards: that mantis shrimp originated on Henders Isle.)



** When we think of bears, we think of the grizzly, the black bear, the polar bear, and the giant panda (which, by the way, was found to genetically actually be a bear[[note]]In case you are wondering, it was long believed giant pandas were actually a kind of raccoon, due to their relation to the red panda. It turns out bears and raccoons had a common ancestor, just that pandas are closer to them.[[/note]]). Spectacled bears, despite being the only surviving cousins of the BadAss short-faced bear, never appear. Speaking of which, short-faced bears and cave bears are common if the work is set in the Ice Age, and both are often confused with each other (despite the short-faced bear having longer legs and being carnivorous, as opposed to the more herbivorous and grizzly-like cave bear).

to:

** When we think of bears, we think of the grizzly, the black bear, the polar bear, and the giant panda (which, by the way, was found to genetically actually be a bear[[note]]In case you are wondering, it was long believed giant pandas were actually a kind of raccoon, due to their relation to the red panda. It turns out bears and raccoons had a common ancestor, just that pandas are closer to them.[[/note]]). Spectacled bears, despite being the only surviving cousins of the BadAss badass short-faced bear, never appear. Speaking of which, short-faced bears and cave bears are common if the work is set in the Ice Age, and both are often confused with each other (despite the short-faced bear having longer legs and being carnivorous, as opposed to the more herbivorous and grizzly-like cave bear).
14th Jan '17 6:25:46 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because herbivores are harmless and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]]. Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries.

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* In fiction, artiodactyls (order Artiodactyla) will be livestock (usually cattle) on farms, deer in temperate climates, antelope (usually gazelle or wildebeest) and hippopotami in the tropics, camels in the desert, or caribou in the arctic. Period pieces might add bison (called buffalo, natch) to the American West. For works set in the North Woods of North America you may see moose. Works set in the Ice Age will often feature ''Megaloceros'' or "Irish elk" (actually a fallow deer as opposed to a true elk). Educational works will sometimes mention entelodonts.entelodonts, but anthracotheres, oreodonts and protoceratids are rare even there. No further description or species distinctions are given or expected, because herbivores are harmless and therefore boring. Of the two extant species of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giraffidae giraffids]], the giraffe is all but guaranteed to appear when an African savanna is involved. Meanwhile, you can probably count on one hand the number of fictional works in which you've seen an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okapi okapi]]. Prehistoric documentaries never contain their many extinct relatives, which are actually much more similar to the okapi than the giraffe. Of the cetaceans (formerly given their own order Cetacea, but now regarded as part of Artiodactyla), we have the bottlenose dolphin for dolphins (thanks to ''{{Series/Flipper}}'') and for whales we have the orca/killer whale (even though it's actually a dolphin), humpback, sperm (used to be the most common depicted whale likely because its oil made it the most valuable to whalers, so this is an association that dropped due to ValuesDissonance), and blue, pretty much in that order. A character pointing out that killer whales aren't whales is a trope in itself. Nevermind that toothed cetaceans (sperm whales, killer whales, bottlenose dolphins) are all more closely related to each other than baleen cetaceans (humpback whales, blue whales), making the "whale/dolphin/porpoise" distinction rather meaningless. Beaked whales are NEVER shown. Not ''ever'', though considering how elusive and poorly-known they are, that's not surprising. Unless you're watching a documentary, don't expect to see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_cetaceans the whales' land-based ancestors]]. Don't expect to see too many freshwater dolphins either, like the pink dolphins of the Amazon River and its tributaries.
8th Dec '16 7:13:24 AM Morgenthaler
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* Edible mushrooms might be mentioned by name, such as morels or shiitake. Poisonous ones are invariably called "toadstools" or just "poisonous mushroom" even though there are an awful lot of mycotoxin-containing species. (If one is mentioned, it will probably be the destroying angel simply because it has the most BadAss name ever. Not coincidentally it's one of the most toxic and most easily misidentified mushrooms in the wild.) In ''Literature/DresdenFiles'' book "Grave Peril" Jim Butcher [[ShownTheirWork gets it exactly right]] with his description of how eating a destroying angel will kill you. He even gets the antidote spot-on, which is kind of justified. Some are ''ridiculously'' hard to identify without specialized equipment and even mycologists are known to argue about which are which. This is also very culturally dependent. East European and Asian cuisine uses a lot more mushrooms than Western or American, so people from the former areas are likely to be able to identify a much longer list of edible species and (if they're the type to go mushroom hunting themselves) to be able to recognize poisonous ones. However this can backfire horribly if they move if they move to western countries as several very poisonous varieties native to western countries strongly resemble edible fungi from their original locales.

to:

* Edible mushrooms might be mentioned by name, such as morels or shiitake. Poisonous ones are invariably called "toadstools" or just "poisonous mushroom" even though there are an awful lot of mycotoxin-containing species. (If one is mentioned, it will probably be the destroying angel simply because it has the most BadAss badass name ever. Not coincidentally it's one of the most toxic and most easily misidentified mushrooms in the wild.) In ''Literature/DresdenFiles'' book "Grave Peril" Jim Butcher [[ShownTheirWork gets it exactly right]] with his description of how eating a destroying angel will kill you. He even gets the antidote spot-on, which is kind of justified. Some are ''ridiculously'' hard to identify without specialized equipment and even mycologists are known to argue about which are which. This is also very culturally dependent. East European and Asian cuisine uses a lot more mushrooms than Western or American, so people from the former areas are likely to be able to identify a much longer list of edible species and (if they're the type to go mushroom hunting themselves) to be able to recognize poisonous ones. However this can backfire horribly if they move if they move to western countries as several very poisonous varieties native to western countries strongly resemble edible fungi from their original locales.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SmallTaxonomyPools