History Main / SmallTaxonomyPools

30th Mar '18 3:18:11 PM schoi30
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** Hadrosaurs are usually represented by ''Parasaurolophus'' or ''Edmontosaurus''/''Anatosaurus'' (whatever name it's referred to as), and neither is likely to be named (''Corythosaurus'' and ''Lambeosaurus'' used to be somewhat common, and ''Maiasaura'' will occasionally appear in modern works). Non-hadrosaur ornithopods are pretty much only represented by ''Iguanodon'' (you might see ''Hypsilophodon'', ''Camptosaurus'', ''Dryosaurus'', and ''Ouranosaurus'' if you're ''really'' lucky).

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** Hadrosaurs are usually represented by ''Parasaurolophus'' or ''Edmontosaurus''/''Anatosaurus'' (whatever name it's referred to as), and neither is likely to be named (''Corythosaurus'' and ''Lambeosaurus'' used to be somewhat common, and ''Maiasaura'' will occasionally appear in modern works). Non-hadrosaur ornithopods are pretty much only represented by ''Iguanodon'' (you might see ''Hypsilophodon'', ''Camptosaurus'', ''Dryosaurus'', ''Hypsilophodon'', and ''Ouranosaurus'' if you're ''really'' lucky).
30th Mar '18 3:14:38 PM schoi30
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** Hadrosaurs are usually represented by ''Parasaurolophus'' or ''Edmontosaurus''/''Anatosaurus'' (whatever name it's referred to as), and neither is likely to be named (''Corythosaurus'' used to be somewhat common, and ''Maiasaura'' will occasionally appear in modern works). Non-hadrosaur ornithopods are pretty much only represented by ''Iguanodon'' (''Hypsilophodon'', ''Camptosaurus'', or ''Dryosaurus'' if you're ''really'' lucky).

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** Hadrosaurs are usually represented by ''Parasaurolophus'' or ''Edmontosaurus''/''Anatosaurus'' (whatever name it's referred to as), and neither is likely to be named (''Corythosaurus'' and ''Lambeosaurus'' used to be somewhat common, and ''Maiasaura'' will occasionally appear in modern works). Non-hadrosaur ornithopods are pretty much only represented by ''Iguanodon'' (''Hypsilophodon'', (you might see ''Hypsilophodon'', ''Camptosaurus'', or ''Dryosaurus'' ''Dryosaurus'', and ''Ouranosaurus'' if you're ''really'' lucky).
30th Mar '18 3:12:27 PM schoi30
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** Birdlike theropods are mostly represented by dromaeosaurs (namely ''Deinonychus'' or ''Velociraptor'', though ''Utahraptor'' and ''Microraptor'' show up occasionally), ''Archaeopteryx'', and ornithomimids (''Ornithomimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', or ''Gallimimus'', with ''Dromiceiomimus'' [possibly synonymous with ''Ornithomimus''] occasionally appearing in older works). ''Oviraptor'' and ''Troodon'' if you're lucky (''Stenonychosaurus'' used to appear in older works). ''Therizinosaurus'' is getting popular due to its WolverineClaws as well being a theropod that's herbivorous as opposed to carnivorous, though it's still not quite common in media.

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** Birdlike theropods are mostly represented by dromaeosaurs (namely ''Deinonychus'' or ''Velociraptor'', though ''Utahraptor'' ''Dromaeosaurus'', ''Utahraptor'', and ''Microraptor'' show up occasionally), ''Archaeopteryx'', and ornithomimids (''Ornithomimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', or ''Gallimimus'', with ''Dromiceiomimus'' [possibly synonymous with ''Ornithomimus''] occasionally appearing in older works). ''Oviraptor'' and ''Troodon'' if you're lucky (''Stenonychosaurus'' used to appear in older works). ''Therizinosaurus'' is getting popular due to its WolverineClaws as well being a theropod that's herbivorous as opposed to carnivorous, though it's still not quite common in media.



** Hadrosaurs are usually represented by ''Parasaurolophus'' or ''Edmontosaurus''/''Anatosaurus'' (whatever name it's referred to as), and neither is likely to be named (''Corythosaurus'' used to be somewhat common, and ''Maiasaura'' will occasionally appear in modern works). Non-hadrosaur ornithopods are pretty much only represented by ''Iguanodon'' (or, if you're ''really'' lucky, ''Hypsilophodon''). ''Camptosaurus'' and ''Dryosaurus'' tend to show up in educational works.

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** Hadrosaurs are usually represented by ''Parasaurolophus'' or ''Edmontosaurus''/''Anatosaurus'' (whatever name it's referred to as), and neither is likely to be named (''Corythosaurus'' used to be somewhat common, and ''Maiasaura'' will occasionally appear in modern works). Non-hadrosaur ornithopods are pretty much only represented by ''Iguanodon'' (or, (''Hypsilophodon'', ''Camptosaurus'', or ''Dryosaurus'' if you're ''really'' lucky, ''Hypsilophodon''). ''Camptosaurus'' and ''Dryosaurus'' tend to show up in educational works.
lucky).
30th Mar '18 3:09:32 PM schoi30
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** Sauropods are represented by ''Brontosaurus'', ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', and ''Brachiosaurus''. ''Camarasaurus'', ''Saltasaurus'', ''Mamenchisaurus'', ''Argentinosaurus'', and ''Supersaurus'' if you're lucky.

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** Sauropods are represented by ''Brontosaurus'', ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', and ''Brachiosaurus''. ''Camarasaurus'', ''Saltasaurus'', ''Amargasaurus'', ''Barosaurus'', ''Mamenchisaurus'', ''Argentinosaurus'', and ''Supersaurus'' if you're lucky.
30th Mar '18 1:50:51 PM Spinosegnosaurus77
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!!!Jawless fish (classes Myxini and Hyperoartia or class Agnatha):
* Lampreys and hagfishes, occasionally mentioned for their "ick" value, are always lumped under the generic designation of "fish", even though they're less closely related to the two extant fish classes than ''you'' are (although lampreys, unlike hagfish, are at least true vertebrates).

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!!!Jawless fish (classes Myxini and Hyperoartia or (obsolete class Agnatha):
* Lampreys (order Petromyzontiformes) and hagfishes, hagfishes (order Myxiniformes), occasionally mentioned for their "ick" value, are always lumped under the generic designation of "fish", even though they're less closely related to the two extant fish classes than ''you'' are (although lampreys, unlike hagfish, are at least true vertebrates).



Best known examples being rays (superorder Batoidea) and sharks (superorder Selachimorpha).
* Sharks are almost always either great whites or hammerheads. Maybe you'll get a tiger shark or mako shark, but that's about it. {{Megalodon}} may appear occasionally if the work is set in the Mesozoic (despite having only appeared 28 million years ago).
* Rays very, very rarely appear. Don't expect more diversity than a manta or stingray.

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Best known examples being rays (superorder Batoidea) and sharks (superorder Selachimorpha).
* Sharks (orders Heterodontiformes, Lamniformes, Hexanchiformes and Squaliformes) are almost always either great whites or hammerheads. Maybe you'll get a tiger shark or mako shark, but that's about it. {{Megalodon}} may appear occasionally if the work is set in the Mesozoic (despite having only appeared 28 million years ago).
* Rays (order Rajiformes) very, very rarely appear. Don't expect more diversity than a manta or stingray.
* Ratfish (order Chimaeriformes)? What’s that?



* Paleozoic reptiles (obsolete order Cotylosauria) do not exist. At all.

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* Paleozoic reptiles (obsolete order Cotylosauria) (orders Captorhinida, Mesosauria and Araeoscelidia) do not exist. At all.
18th Mar '18 3:47:27 PM nombretomado
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* You probably won't find horseshoe crabs (class Merostomata), sea spiders (class Pycnogonida), pseudoscorpions (order Pseudoscorpiones), whip scorpions (order Thelyphonida), mites (order Acari), tickspiders (order Ricinulei), sun spiders (order Solifugae), or anything other than spiders, scorpions and ''maybe'' [[TheTick ticks]] featured in fiction. You probably won't even get an acknowledgement that "arachnid" is anything other than a fancy synonym for "eight-legged thing".

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* You probably won't find horseshoe crabs (class Merostomata), sea spiders (class Pycnogonida), pseudoscorpions (order Pseudoscorpiones), whip scorpions (order Thelyphonida), mites (order Acari), tickspiders (order Ricinulei), sun spiders (order Solifugae), or anything other than spiders, scorpions and ''maybe'' [[TheTick [[ComicBook/TheTick ticks]] featured in fiction. You probably won't even get an acknowledgement that "arachnid" is anything other than a fancy synonym for "eight-legged thing".
12th Mar '18 8:22:47 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Good luck finding a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caecilian caecilian]] (order Gymnophiona or Apoda).

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* Good luck finding a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caecilian caecilian]] (order Gymnophiona or Apoda).Gymnophiona).



* Salamanders (order Caudata or Urodela) and newts are less common than frogs, but when they do appear, they're given any color and pattern.

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* Salamanders (order Caudata or Urodela) and newts (order Caudata) are less common than frogs, but when they do appear, they're given any color and pattern.
12th Mar '18 8:20:13 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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!!!Chelicerates (subphylum Chelicerata):
* Arachnids ''are not'' insects; this is such a common mistake that a character pointing out "You know that spiders are arachnids, and not insects, right?" is almost its own trope.
* Spiders (order Araneae) are usually tarantulas or black widows. The former is most common because they're really large for spiders (which makes them more intimidating to look at), but are also relatively docile for spiders, making them easier to work with (some species do have a painful bite though, and some fling hairs that can cause severe irritation to the skin). Black widows have a nasty bite and a very distinctive appearance. Any spider that isn't one of the two "dangerous" varieties is "generic harmless" and is probably either a garden spider or a harvestman (aka daddy longlegs), the latter of which isn't really a spider.
* It should be noted that while the harvestman (order Opiliones) is not a spider, the cellar spider which is also called the daddy longlegs is a true spider. Confusion over the name leads to people claiming the cellar spider is not a true spider (especially in regions where they exist but harvestmen do not).
* The emperor scorpion is the only scorpion (order Scorpiones) you'll see in fiction, with very few exceptions. That particular species hits the perfect sweet spot of being huge and impressive looking, mildly poisonous, and very docile.
* You probably won't find horseshoe crabs (class Merostomata), sea spiders (class Pycnogonida), pseudoscorpions (order Pseudoscorpiones), whip scorpions (order Thelyphonida), mites (order Acari), tickspiders (order Ricinulei), sun spiders (order Solifugae), or anything other than spiders, scorpions and ''maybe'' [[TheTick ticks]] featured in fiction. You probably won't even get an acknowledgement that "arachnid" is anything other than a fancy synonym for "eight-legged thing".



!!!Arachnids (subphylum Chelicerata, class Arachnida):
* Arachnids ''are not'' insects; this is such a common mistake that a character pointing out "You know that spiders are arachnids, and not insects, right?" is almost its own trope.
* Spiders (order Araneae) are usually tarantulas or black widows. The former is most common because they're really large for spiders (which makes them more intimidating to look at), but are also relatively docile for spiders, making them easier to work with (some species do have a painful bite though, and some fling hairs that can cause severe irritation to the skin). Black widows have a nasty bite and a very distinctive appearance. Any spider that isn't one of the two "dangerous" varieties is "generic harmless" and is probably either a garden spider or a harvestman (aka daddy longlegs), the latter of which isn't really a spider.
* It should be noted that while the harvestman (order Opiliones) is not a spider, the cellar spider which is also called the daddy longlegs is a true spider. Confusion over the name leads to people claiming the cellar spider is not a true spider (especially in regions where they exist but harvestmen do not).
* The emperor scorpion is the only scorpion (order Scorpiones) you'll see in fiction, with very few exceptions. That particular species hits the perfect sweet spot of being huge and impressive looking, mildly poisonous, and very docile.
* You probably won't find pseudoscorpions (order Pseudoscorpiones), whip scorpions (order Thelyphonida), mites (order Acari), tickspiders (order Ricinulei), sun spiders (order Solifugae), or anything other than spiders, scorpions and ''maybe'' [[TheTick ticks]] featured in fiction. You probably won't even get an acknowledgement that "arachnid" is anything other than a fancy synonym for "eight-legged thing".



* Barnacles (infraclass Cirripedia) are crustaceans as well, but they're usually only shown as "that stuff that covers rocks, ships and whales". Or as [[WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants being so ugly]] [[Literature/TheUglyBarnacle that everyone died]].

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* Barnacles (infraclass Cirripedia) (class Maxillopoda) are crustaceans as well, but they're usually only shown as "that stuff that covers rocks, ships and whales". Or as [[WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants being so ugly]] [[Literature/TheUglyBarnacle that everyone died]].



What most people think of when they hear the word "fish" - and oftentimes, if a fish is represented in media it will be a generic, very nondescript creature resembling members of this class. Specific varieties of ray-finned fishes common in fiction include:

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What most people think of when they hear the word "fish" - and oftentimes, if a fish is represented in media it will be a generic, very nondescript creature resembling members of this class. Specific varieties of ray-finned bony fishes common in fiction include:



* Basal tetrapods (obsolete order Ichthyostegalia) are common in educational works but otherwise rare.

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* Basal tetrapods (obsolete order Ichthyostegalia) Ichthyostegalia; not true amphibians but traditionally placed in this class for convenience) are common in educational works but otherwise rare.
12th Mar '18 8:11:39 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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!!Echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata):
* Sea urchins (class Echinoidea) are fairly uncommon. You might see some of the flashy black-or-purple spiky-ball variety sea urchin, but no attention will be paid to them.
* Despite there being a large number of sea cucumbers (class Holothuroidea) available to choose from, they remain incredibly unpopular, appearing only to produce the occasional gag (being literal cucumbers on ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'' or [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything spewing sticky white goo on a girl]]).
* Sea stars (or starfish; class Asteroidea) are one of the most underrepresented animals out there. The only type of sea star that ever appears is the generic five-armed pink-or-tan "Patrick Star" kind. In reality, there are thousands of types of sea stars of various colors, sizes, and arm counts. Some have as many as eleven arms, and can be found in practically any color (though grey and tan are pretty common).
* The crinoids, or sea lilies (class Crinoidea), are totally unheard of, except for ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''[='=]s Cradily.



!!Echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata):
* Sea urchins (class Echinoidea) are fairly uncommon. You might see some of the flashy black-or-purple spiky-ball variety sea urchin, but no attention will be paid to them.
* Despite there being a large number of sea cucumbers (class Holothuroidea) available to choose from, they remain incredibly unpopular, appearing only to produce the occasional gag (being literal cucumbers on ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'' or [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything spewing sticky white goo on a girl]]).
* Sea stars (or starfish; class Asteroidea) are one of the most underrepresented animals out there. The only type of sea star that ever appears is the generic five-armed pink-or-tan "Patrick Star" kind. In reality, there are thousands of types of sea stars of various colors, sizes, and arm counts. Some have as many as eleven arms, and can be found in practically any color (though grey and tan are pretty common).
* The crinoids, or sea lilies (class Crinoidea), are totally unheard of, except for ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''[='=]s Cradily.



!!!Jawless fish (classes Myxini and Hyperoartia):

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!!!Jawless fish (classes Myxini and Hyperoartia):Hyperoartia or class Agnatha):



* Labyrinthodonts get an occasional nod in LostWorld adventure-fiction, but that's about it.

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* Labyrinthodonts Basal tetrapods (obsolete order Ichthyostegalia) are common in educational works but otherwise rare.
* Temnospondyls (order Temnospondyli)
get an occasional nod in LostWorld adventure-fiction, but that's about it.
7th Mar '18 6:16:57 PM schoi30
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* Primates (order Primates) have a wide variety, even counting humans ([[MostWritersAreHuman since we show up by default]]). We have gorillas, orangutans, chimpanzees, baboons, and a few monkey species. No bonobos, though - except in one Creator/{{Humon}} comic. No gibbons either, even though they make up the majority of extant ape species. If someone has a pet monkey, it will almost always be a capuchin. This particularly stands out in fiction set in Africa or the Middle East, since capuchins (like all monkeys with prehensile tails) are New World monkeys - that is, only native to the Americas. Don't expect to see lemurs much, and if one shows up it will usually be a ring-tailed lemur (although you have a slim chance of seeing an aye-aye, especially in educational works). Extinct non-human primates are represented by ''Gigantopithecus'', closely related to the orangutan. Most primates except for humans and lemurs will be referred to as monkeys. Expect ape, monkey, and chimp to be used interchangeably even within the same sentence.

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* Primates (order Primates) have a wide variety, even counting humans ([[MostWritersAreHuman since we show up by default]]). We have gorillas, orangutans, chimpanzees, baboons, and a few monkey species. No bonobos, though - except in one Creator/{{Humon}} comic. No gibbons either, even though they make up the majority of extant ape species. If someone has a pet monkey, it will almost always be a capuchin. This particularly stands out in fiction set in Africa or the Middle East, since capuchins (like all monkeys with prehensile tails) are New World monkeys - that is, only native to the Americas. Don't expect to see lemurs much, and if one shows up it will usually be a ring-tailed lemur (although you have a slim chance of seeing an aye-aye, especially in educational works). Extinct non-human primates are represented by ''Gigantopithecus'', closely related to the orangutan. Most primates except for humans and lemurs will be referred to as monkeys.monkeys (which can be an acceptable term for any simian considering modern classification, though that would ironically mean humans are monkeys too). Expect ape, monkey, and chimp to be used interchangeably even within the same sentence.
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