History Main / SmallTaxonomyPools

23rd Aug '16 6:26:35 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Any extinct mammal that's not a woolly mammoth or sabre-toothed "tiger" that show up are simply generic shrew-like creatures that get eaten or crushed by dinosaurs, and that's only if they're lucky. They may also be shown as survivors of the K-Pg extinction.

[[AC:Monotremes (subclass Prototheria or Yinotheria, order Monotremata)]]
* The platypus is the only monotreme showing up in fiction. The hedgehog-like echidnas are rarely (if ever) heard of, ''even'' in documentaries. An exception is made for fiction in which Australia is the main location. Or in the [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgeHog Sonic]] fandom.

[[AC:Marsupials (seven orders of the infraclass Metatheria)]]
* Marsupials arguably have more diversity in their hundreds of species than any other variety of mammal, yet the amount of species used in fiction could be counted on a few fingers. Kangaroos and koalas are obviously the most popular, and instantly come to mind at the word "marsupial". Opossums (which will probably be referred to as possums, actually a name for a different animal altogether; although possums are still tree-dwelling omnivorous marsupials) are familiar due to being so common in the United States.
* You will ''never'' see a quoll in fiction, even a story set in Australia.
* There is only one [[Franchise/CrashBandicoot Bandicoot]].
* The only American marsupial ever portrayed in fiction is the Virginia opossum - there are apparently close to 100 opossum species ranging from the semi-aquatic yapok to primate-like woolly opossums to mouse opossums with no pouches. Aside from the true opossums there are two other orders of marsupials in the Americas: the shrew opossums and the Monito del Monte, the latter bizarrely grouped with the Australian marsupials despite its locale...
* Rarely you might see a thylacine. Although this is rare and it is usually referred to as a Tasmanian tiger or wolf. Can't forget the Tasmanian devil - although, [[AluminumChristmasTrees thanks to Bugs Bunny cartoons]], [[EskimosArentReal most non-Australians apparently believe it isn't real]]. Of course, those cartoons ''do'' inaccurately portray it as bipedal, able to spin in a circle really fast, and capable of muttering semi-intelligible gibberish.

[[AC:Placentals (infraclass Eutheria)]]

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* Any extinct mammal that's not a woolly mammoth or sabre-toothed "tiger" that show up are simply generic shrew-like creatures (orders Docodonta, Triconodonta, Multituberculata, Symmetrodonta and Eupantotheria) that get eaten or crushed by dinosaurs, and that's only if they're lucky. They may also be shown as survivors of the K-Pg extinction.

[[AC:Monotremes (subclass Prototheria or Yinotheria, order Monotremata)]]
Yinotheria]]
* The platypus (order Monotremata) is the only monotreme showing up in fiction. The hedgehog-like echidnas are rarely (if ever) heard of, ''even'' in documentaries. An exception is made for fiction in which Australia is the main location. Or in the [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgeHog Sonic]] fandom.

[[AC:Marsupials (seven orders of the (subclass Theria, infraclass Metatheria)]]
* Marsupials arguably have more diversity in their hundreds of species than any other variety of mammal, yet the amount of species used in fiction could be counted on a few fingers. Kangaroos and koalas (order Diprotodontia) are obviously the most popular, and instantly come to mind at the word "marsupial". Opossums (which will probably be referred to as possums, actually a name for a different animal altogether; although possums are still tree-dwelling omnivorous marsupials) are familiar due to being so common in the United States.
* You will ''never'' see a quoll in fiction, even a story set in Australia.
"marsupial".
* There is only one [[Franchise/CrashBandicoot Bandicoot]].
bandicoot]] (order Peramelemorphia).
* The only American marsupial ever portrayed in fiction is the Virginia opossum (order Didelphimorphia) - there are apparently close to 100 opossum species ranging from the semi-aquatic yapok to primate-like woolly opossums to mouse opossums with no pouches. Aside from the true opossums there are two other orders of marsupials in the Americas: the shrew opossums (order Paucituberculata) and the Monito del Monte, Monte (order Microbiotheria), the latter bizarrely grouped with the Australian marsupials despite its locale...
locale…
* You will ''never'' see a quoll (order Dasyuromorphia) in fiction, not even in a story set in Australia. Rarely you might see a thylacine. Although this is rare and it is usually referred to as a Tasmanian tiger or wolf. Can't forget the Tasmanian devil - although, [[AluminumChristmasTrees thanks to Bugs Bunny cartoons]], [[EskimosArentReal most non-Australians apparently believe it isn't real]]. Of course, those cartoons ''do'' inaccurately portray it as bipedal, able to spin in a circle really fast, and capable of muttering semi-intelligible gibberish.

[[AC:Placentals (infraclass (subclass Theria, infraclass Eutheria)]]
22nd Aug '16 8:43:07 PM Lymantria
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* The crinoids, or sea lilies, are totally unheard of, except for ''VideoGame/Pokemon''[='=]s Cradily.

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* The crinoids, or sea lilies, are totally unheard of, except for ''VideoGame/Pokemon''[='=]s ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''[='=]s Cradily.
10th Aug '16 8:37:37 PM schoi30
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* Horses (order Perissodactyla) in fiction come in four types: draft horse (usually a Clydesdale), race horse (almost always a Thoroughbred despite many other breeds being used for racing as well), wild horse (mustang), and Generic Critter-You-Sit-On (all others). Mules appear much more often than donkeys, despite needing the latter to create the former. Zebras are treated as one species and will usually be plains zebras, often wrongly depicted as the size of modern domestic horses. Rhinos, often also treated as one species and almost always African black or hook-lipped rhinos, appear as charging brutes or (rarely) musclebound thugs in media. Woolly rhinos are quite prevalent in works about extinct mammals, though the giant hornless rhino ''Paraceratherium'' may show up as well due to its reputation as one of the largest land mammals. Brontotheres, rhino-like but more closely related to horses, are also quite popular in the subject of prehistoric mammals. Tapir? What's that?

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* Horses (order Perissodactyla) in fiction come in four types: draft horse (usually a Clydesdale), race horse (almost always a Thoroughbred despite many other breeds being used for racing as well), wild horse (mustang), and Generic Critter-You-Sit-On (all others). Mules appear much more often than donkeys, despite needing the latter to create the former. Zebras are treated as one species and will usually be plains zebras, often wrongly depicted as the size of modern domestic horses. Rhinos, often also treated as one species and almost always African black or hook-lipped rhinos, appear as charging brutes or (rarely) musclebound thugs in media. Woolly rhinos are quite prevalent in works about extinct mammals, though the giant hornless rhino ''Paraceratherium'' may show up as well due to its reputation as one of the largest land mammals. Brontotheres, rhino-like but more closely related to horses, are also quite popular in the subject of prehistoric mammals. Tapir? What's that?
10th Aug '16 8:36:28 PM schoi30
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* Horses (order Perissodactyla) in fiction come in four types: draft horse (usually a Clydesdale), race horse (almost always a Thoroughbred despite many other breeds being used for racing as well), wild horse (mustang), and Generic Critter-You-Sit-On (all others). Mules appear much more often than donkeys, despite needing the latter to create the former. Zebras are treated as one species and will usually be plains zebras, often wrongly depicted as the size of modern domestic horses. Rhinos, often also treated as one species and almost always African black or hook-lipped rhinos, appear as charging brutes or (rarely) musclebound thugs in media. Woolly rhinos are quite prevalent in works about extinct mammals, though the giant hornless rhino ''Paraceratherium'' may show up as well due to its reputation as one of the largest land mammals. Tapir? What's that?

to:

* Horses (order Perissodactyla) in fiction come in four types: draft horse (usually a Clydesdale), race horse (almost always a Thoroughbred despite many other breeds being used for racing as well), wild horse (mustang), and Generic Critter-You-Sit-On (all others). Mules appear much more often than donkeys, despite needing the latter to create the former. Zebras are treated as one species and will usually be plains zebras, often wrongly depicted as the size of modern domestic horses. Rhinos, often also treated as one species and almost always African black or hook-lipped rhinos, appear as charging brutes or (rarely) musclebound thugs in media. Woolly rhinos are quite prevalent in works about extinct mammals, though the giant hornless rhino ''Paraceratherium'' may show up as well due to its reputation as one of the largest land mammals. Brontotheres, rhino-like but more closely related to horses, are also quite popular in the subject of prehistoric mammals. Tapir? What's that?
10th Aug '16 8:29:53 PM schoi30
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** The only ankylosaur is ''Ankylosaurus'', although older works will sometimes use ''Euoplocephalus'' instead (the anatomy of ''Ankylosaurus'' itself was poorly known until 2004). Nodosaurs are practically unheard of (though ''Hylaeosaurus'' and ''Polacanthus'' may show in older works).

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** The only ankylosaur is ''Ankylosaurus'', although older works will sometimes use ''Euoplocephalus'' instead (the anatomy of ''Ankylosaurus'' itself was poorly known until 2004). Nodosaurs are practically unheard of (though ''Hylaeosaurus'' and ''Polacanthus'' may show in older works).
24th Jul '16 4:45:12 PM schoi30
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** Large theropods are usually ''T. rex'', ''Allosaurus'', ''Spinosaurus'', or sometimes ''Dilophosaurus'' (rarely ''Ceratosaurus'', ''Megalosaurus'', ''Giganotosaurus'', ''Baryonyx'', or ''Carnotaurus'' will appear).

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** Large theropods are usually ''T. rex'', ''Allosaurus'', ''Spinosaurus'', or sometimes ''Dilophosaurus'' (rarely ''Ceratosaurus'', ''Megalosaurus'', ''Albertosaurus'', ''Giganotosaurus'', ''Baryonyx'', or ''Carnotaurus'' will appear).



** The only ankylosaur is ''Ankylosaurus'', although older works will sometimes use ''Euoplocephalus'' instead (the anatomy of ''Ankylosaurus'' itself was poorly known until 2004). Nodosaurs are practically unheard of (though ''Hylaeosaurus'' and ''Polacanthus'' may show in older works, while modern works would often use ''Edmontonia'').

to:

** The only ankylosaur is ''Ankylosaurus'', although older works will sometimes use ''Euoplocephalus'' instead (the anatomy of ''Ankylosaurus'' itself was poorly known until 2004). Nodosaurs are practically unheard of (though ''Hylaeosaurus'' and ''Polacanthus'' may show in older works, while modern works would often use ''Edmontonia'').works).
24th Jul '16 4:41:57 PM schoi30
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** Birdlike theropods are mostly represented by dromaeosaurs (''Deinonychus'', ''Velociraptor'', or ''Utahraptor''), ''Archaeopteryx'', and ornithomimids (''Ornithomimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', or ''Gallimimus''). ''Oviraptor'' and ''Troodon'' if you're lucky.
** Non-birdlike small theropods are pretty much unheard of. ''Coelophysis'' & ''Compsognathus'', if you're lucky (you might see ''Ornitholestes'' in an older work, but don't hold your breath).
** Sauropods are represented by ''Brontosaurus'', ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', and ''Brachiosaurus''.

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** Birdlike theropods are mostly represented by dromaeosaurs (''Deinonychus'', ''Velociraptor'', or ''Utahraptor''), ''Archaeopteryx'', and ornithomimids (''Ornithomimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', or ''Gallimimus''). ''Oviraptor'' and ''Troodon'' if you're lucky. \n ''Therizinosaurus'' is getting popular due to its WolverineClaws as well being a theropod that's herbivorous as opposed to carnivorous, though it's still not quite common in media.
** Non-birdlike small theropods are pretty much unheard of. ''Coelophysis'' & and ''Compsognathus'', if you're lucky (you might see ''Ornitholestes'' in an older work, but don't hold your breath).
** Sauropods are represented by ''Brontosaurus'', ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', and ''Brachiosaurus''. ''Argentinosaurus'' if you're lucky.



** There are two ceratopsids: ''Triceratops'' and ''Styracosaurus'' (although older works will sometimes use ''Centrosaurus''), while more basal ceratopsians are rarely heard of (except for ''Protoceratops'' & ''Psittacosaurus'', and only in edutainment works).

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** There are two ceratopsids: ''Triceratops'' and ''Styracosaurus'' (although older works will sometimes use ''Centrosaurus''), while more basal ceratopsians are rarely heard of (except for ''Protoceratops'' & and ''Psittacosaurus'', and only in edutainment works).
24th Jul '16 4:35:46 PM schoi30
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* Elephants (order Proboscidea) are nearly always African in cartoons, because big ears are funny. They're nearly always Asian in movies or on TV, because they're the only ones you can actually have on set. Outside the Discovery Channel, all extinct proboscideans are mammoths or mastodons and all mammoths are woolly. ''Deinotherium'' and ''Platybelodon'' are the only other extinct proboscideans prevalent in works about extinct Cenozoic mammals and even then that's pushing it.

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* Elephants (order Proboscidea) are nearly always African in cartoons, because big ears are funny. They're nearly always Asian in movies or on TV, because they're the only ones you can actually have on set. Outside the Discovery Channel, all extinct proboscideans are mammoths or mastodons and all mammoths are woolly. ''Deinotherium'' and ''Platybelodon'' are the only other extinct proboscideans prevalent in works about extinct Cenozoic mammals mammals, and even then that's pushing it.
24th Jul '16 4:34:06 PM schoi30
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* Elephants (order Proboscidea) are nearly always African in cartoons, because big ears are funny. They're nearly always Asian in movies or on TV, because they're the only ones you can actually have on set. Outside the Discovery Channel, all extinct proboscideans are mammoths or mastodons and all mammoths are woolly.

to:

* Elephants (order Proboscidea) are nearly always African in cartoons, because big ears are funny. They're nearly always Asian in movies or on TV, because they're the only ones you can actually have on set. Outside the Discovery Channel, all extinct proboscideans are mammoths or mastodons and all mammoths are woolly. ''Deinotherium'' and ''Platybelodon'' are the only other extinct proboscideans prevalent in works about extinct Cenozoic mammals and even then that's pushing it.



** When we think of bears, we think of the grizzly, the black bear, the polar bear, and the giant panda (which, by the way, was found to genetically actually be a bear[[note]]In case you are wondering, it was long believed giant pandas were actually a kind of raccoon, due to their relation to the red panda. It turns out bears and raccoons had a common ancestor, just that pandas are closer to them.[[/note]]). Spectacled bears, despite being the only surviving cousins of the BadAss short-faced bear, never appear. Cave bears are common if the work is set in the Ice Age.

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** When we think of bears, we think of the grizzly, the black bear, the polar bear, and the giant panda (which, by the way, was found to genetically actually be a bear[[note]]In case you are wondering, it was long believed giant pandas were actually a kind of raccoon, due to their relation to the red panda. It turns out bears and raccoons had a common ancestor, just that pandas are closer to them.[[/note]]). Spectacled bears, despite being the only surviving cousins of the BadAss short-faced bear, never appear. Cave Speaking of which, short-faced bears and cave bears are common if the work is set in the Ice Age.Age, and both are often confused with each other (despite the short-faced bear having longer legs and being carnivorous, as opposed to the more herbivorous and grizzly-like cave bear).
24th Jul '16 4:28:17 PM schoi30
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** Large theropods are usually ''T. rex'', ''Allosaurus'', or ''Spinosaurus'' (rarely ''Dilophosaurus'', ''Ceratosaurus'', ''Megalosaurus'', ''Giganotosaurus'', ''Baryonyx'', or ''Carnotaurus'' will appear).

to:

** Large theropods are usually ''T. rex'', ''Allosaurus'', ''Spinosaurus'', or ''Spinosaurus'' sometimes ''Dilophosaurus'' (rarely ''Dilophosaurus'', ''Ceratosaurus'', ''Megalosaurus'', ''Giganotosaurus'', ''Baryonyx'', or ''Carnotaurus'' will appear).



** The only ankylosaur is ''Ankylosaurus'', although older works will sometimes use ''Euoplocephalus'' instead (the anatomy of ''Ankylosaurus'' itself was poorly known until 2004). Nodosaurs are practically unheard of (though ''Polacanthus'' may show in older works).

to:

** The only ankylosaur is ''Ankylosaurus'', although older works will sometimes use ''Euoplocephalus'' instead (the anatomy of ''Ankylosaurus'' itself was poorly known until 2004). Nodosaurs are practically unheard of (though ''Hylaeosaurus'' and ''Polacanthus'' may show in older works).works, while modern works would often use ''Edmontonia'').
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SmallTaxonomyPools