History Main / SingleStrokeBattle

13th Jun '16 10:15:51 AM Kakai
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''Film/WarCraft2016'', [[spoiler:the climatic fight between Lothar and Blackhand]] goes this way, with the former sliding low and striking under the latter's guard. He adds a second strike, but that's mostly a finishing touch - his opponent would've bled out of the first cut anyway.
5th Jun '16 6:35:42 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Note: it is also incredibly common to have [[DelayedCausality a beat go by]], one character (99% of the time the hero) falls to one knee as if he has been hit, and then have the other character fall over dead. In RealLife, UsefulNotes/{{kendo}} kata #7 ends this way. Another common subversion involves revealing ''both'' combatants to have been injured (or killed).

to:

Note: it It is also incredibly common to have [[DelayedCausality a beat go by]], one character (99% of the time the hero) falls to one knee as if he has been hit, and then have the other character fall over dead. In RealLife, UsefulNotes/{{kendo}} kata #7 ends this way. Another common subversion involves revealing ''both'' combatants to have been injured (or killed).
29th May '16 7:32:57 PM PixelKnight
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Swordplay equivalent to ShowdownAtHighNoon. One use of the FlashStep. Probably implies a OneHitKill. If the battle is one sided and the winner uses a flash step, then there is a good chance that the loser will perform a SnapToTheSide before realizing that they've just been cut in two. For battles that end with one strike, see CurbStompBattle

to:

Swordplay equivalent to SwordCounterpart of ShowdownAtHighNoon. One use of the FlashStep. Probably implies a OneHitKill. If the battle is one sided and the winner uses a flash step, then there is a good chance that the loser will perform a SnapToTheSide before realizing that they've just been cut in two. For battles that end with one strike, see CurbStompBattle
28th May '16 7:42:53 AM TheOneWhoTropes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Setsuna in ''MahouSenseiNegima'' suggested she and Negi do this to finish their match in the TournamentArc seeing as they only had 15 seconds left in the match.

to:

* Setsuna in ''MahouSenseiNegima'' ''Manga/MahouSenseiNegima'' suggested she and Negi do this to finish their match in the TournamentArc seeing as they only had 15 seconds left in the match.
25th May '16 2:20:13 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


While you should aim to make your strike decisive, you should also immediately face your opponent again and get ready to defend against an afterblow, because you cannot assume that they were instantly incapacitated by your first strike without first observing how they react. The part of the fictional samurai duel where the winner slowly rises from a crouch, sheathes his sword, and walks away while having his back turned to his opponent the whole time is making him that much cooler than real life by implying he is so skilled that he doesn't even ''need'' to look in order to know that he felled his opponent with 100% certainty.

to:

While you should aim to make your strike decisive, you should also immediately face your opponent again and get ready to defend against an afterblow, because you cannot assume that they were instantly incapacitated by your first strike without first observing how they react. The part of the fictional samurai duel where the winner slowly rises from a crouch, sheathes his sword, and walks away while having his back turned to his opponent the whole time is making him that much cooler than real life by implying he is so skilled that he doesn't even ''need'' to look in order to know that he felled his opponent with 100% certainty.
certainty. This is especially true when the winner tells the loser YouAreAlreadyDead and walks away with their guard down, because they have predicted the exact second when the loser will collapse or burst into blood, often just as they're about to strike in retaliation.
25th May '16 2:16:28 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


While you should aim to make your strike decisive, you should also immediately turn to face your opponent and get ready to defend against an afterblow, because you cannot assume that they were instantly incapacitated by your first strike without first observing how they react. The part of the fictional samurai duel where the winner slowly rises from a crouch, sheathes his sword, and walks away while having his back turned to his opponent the whole time is making him that much cooler than real life by implying he is so skilled that he doesn't even ''need'' to look in order to know that he felled his opponent with 100% certainty.

to:

While you should aim to make your strike decisive, you should also immediately turn to face your opponent again and get ready to defend against an afterblow, because you cannot assume that they were instantly incapacitated by your first strike without first observing how they react. The part of the fictional samurai duel where the winner slowly rises from a crouch, sheathes his sword, and walks away while having his back turned to his opponent the whole time is making him that much cooler than real life by implying he is so skilled that he doesn't even ''need'' to look in order to know that he felled his opponent with 100% certainty.
25th May '16 2:15:20 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Contains some TruthInTelevision, even if embellished. Real sword fights often take only a few seconds or even a fraction of a second, with one solid hit generally being enough to take a man out of the fight (contrast this with {{Flynning}}). On the other hand a single stroke battle is only one of many outcomes, since the initial clash will often be indecisive due to a successful void (dodge) or parry, and the reaction of any particular person to a given wound type is highly unpredictable. Historical examples show that some individuals collapsed or died instantly upon receiving relatively superficial wounds, while others managed to keep attacking for several minutes before collapsing while having a blade buried deep in their torso, and some of the latter even survived afterwards! While you should aim to make your strike decisive, you should also immediately turn to face your opponent and get ready to defend against an afterblow, because you cannot assume that they were instantly incapacitated by your first strike without first observing how they react. The part of the fictional samurai duel where the winner slowly rises from a crouch, sheathes his sword, and walks away while having his back turned to his opponent the whole time is making him that much cooler than real life by implying he is so skilled that he doesn't even ''need'' to look in order to know that he felled his opponent with 100% certainty.

to:

Contains some TruthInTelevision, even if embellished. Real sword fights often take only a few seconds or even a fraction of a second, with one solid hit generally being enough to take a man out of the fight (contrast this with {{Flynning}}). On the other hand a single stroke battle is only one of many outcomes, since the initial clash will often be indecisive due to a successful void (dodge) or parry, and the reaction of any particular person to a given wound type is highly unpredictable. Historical examples show that some individuals collapsed or died instantly upon receiving relatively superficial wounds, while others managed to keep attacking for several minutes before collapsing while having a blade buried deep in their torso, and some of the latter even survived afterwards! afterwards!

While you should aim to make your strike decisive, you should also immediately turn to face your opponent and get ready to defend against an afterblow, because you cannot assume that they were instantly incapacitated by your first strike without first observing how they react. The part of the fictional samurai duel where the winner slowly rises from a crouch, sheathes his sword, and walks away while having his back turned to his opponent the whole time is making him that much cooler than real life by implying he is so skilled that he doesn't even ''need'' to look in order to know that he felled his opponent with 100% certainty.
25th May '16 2:14:51 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Contains some TruthInTelevision, even if embellished. Real sword fights often take only a few seconds or even a fraction of a second, with one solid hit generally being enough to take a man out of the fight (contrast this with {{Flynning}}). On the other hand a single stroke battle is only one of many outcomes, since the initial clash will often be indecisive due to a successful void (dodge) or parry, and the reaction of any particular person to a given wound type is highly unpredictable. Historical examples show that some individuals collapsed or died instantly upon receiving relatively superficial wounds, while others managed to keep attacking for several minutes before collapsing while having a blade buried deep in their torso, and some of the latter even survived afterwards! While you should aim to make your strike decisive, you should also immediately get ready to defend against an afterblow, because you cannot assume that your opponent was instantly incapacitated by your first strike without first observing how they react. The part of the fictional samurai duel where the winner slowly rises from a crouch, sheathes his sword, and walks away while having his back turned to his opponent the whole time is making him that much cooler than real life by implying that he is ''so'' skilled that he ''knows'' he felled his opponent with 100% certainty.

to:

Contains some TruthInTelevision, even if embellished. Real sword fights often take only a few seconds or even a fraction of a second, with one solid hit generally being enough to take a man out of the fight (contrast this with {{Flynning}}). On the other hand a single stroke battle is only one of many outcomes, since the initial clash will often be indecisive due to a successful void (dodge) or parry, and the reaction of any particular person to a given wound type is highly unpredictable. Historical examples show that some individuals collapsed or died instantly upon receiving relatively superficial wounds, while others managed to keep attacking for several minutes before collapsing while having a blade buried deep in their torso, and some of the latter even survived afterwards! While you should aim to make your strike decisive, you should also immediately turn to face your opponent and get ready to defend against an afterblow, because you cannot assume that your opponent was they were instantly incapacitated by your first strike without first observing how they react. The part of the fictional samurai duel where the winner slowly rises from a crouch, sheathes his sword, and walks away while having his back turned to his opponent the whole time is making him that much cooler than real life by implying that he is ''so'' so skilled that he ''knows'' doesn't even ''need'' to look in order to know that he felled his opponent with 100% certainty.
25th May '16 2:08:54 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Contains some TruthInTelevision, even if embellished. Real sword fights often take only a few seconds or even a fraction of a second, with one solid hit generally being enough to take a man out of the fight (contrast this with {{Flynning}}). On the other hand a single stroke battle is only one of many outcomes, since the initial clash will often be indecisive due to a successful void (dodge) or parry, and the reaction of any particular person to a given wound type is highly unpredictable. Historical examples show that some individuals collapsed or died instantly upon receiving relatively superficial wounds, while others managed to keep attacking for several minutes before collapsing while having a blade buried deep in their torso, and some of the latter even survived afterwards! While you should aim to make your strike decisive, you should also immediately get ready to defend against an afterblow, because you cannot assume that your opponent was instantly incapacitated by your first strike. The part of the fictional samurai duel where the winner slowly rises from a crouch, sheathes his sword, and walks away while having his back turned to his opponent the whole time is making him that much cooler than real life by implying that he is ''so'' skilled that he ''knows'' he felled his opponent with 100% certainty.

to:

Contains some TruthInTelevision, even if embellished. Real sword fights often take only a few seconds or even a fraction of a second, with one solid hit generally being enough to take a man out of the fight (contrast this with {{Flynning}}). On the other hand a single stroke battle is only one of many outcomes, since the initial clash will often be indecisive due to a successful void (dodge) or parry, and the reaction of any particular person to a given wound type is highly unpredictable. Historical examples show that some individuals collapsed or died instantly upon receiving relatively superficial wounds, while others managed to keep attacking for several minutes before collapsing while having a blade buried deep in their torso, and some of the latter even survived afterwards! While you should aim to make your strike decisive, you should also immediately get ready to defend against an afterblow, because you cannot assume that your opponent was instantly incapacitated by your first strike.strike without first observing how they react. The part of the fictional samurai duel where the winner slowly rises from a crouch, sheathes his sword, and walks away while having his back turned to his opponent the whole time is making him that much cooler than real life by implying that he is ''so'' skilled that he ''knows'' he felled his opponent with 100% certainty.
25th May '16 2:06:33 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Contains some TruthInTelevision, even if embellished. Real sword fights often take only a few seconds or even a fraction of a second, with one solid hit generally being enough to take a man out of the fight (contrast this with {{Flynning}}). On the other hand a single stroke battle is only one of many outcomes, since the initial clash will often be indecisive due to a successful void (dodge) or parry, and the reaction of any particular person to a given wound type is highly unpredictable. Historical examples show that some individuals collapsed or died instantly upon receiving relatively superficial wounds, while others managed to keep attacking for several minutes before collapsing while having a blade buried deep in their torso, and some of the latter even survived afterwards! While you should aim to make your strike decisive, you should also immediately get ready to defend against an afterblow, because you cannot assume that your opponent was instantly incapacitated. The fictional samurai fight where the winner slowly rises from a crouch, sheathes his sword, and walks away with his back turned the whole time implies that he is ''so'' skilled that he ''knows'' he felled his opponent with 100% certainty.

to:

Contains some TruthInTelevision, even if embellished. Real sword fights often take only a few seconds or even a fraction of a second, with one solid hit generally being enough to take a man out of the fight (contrast this with {{Flynning}}). On the other hand a single stroke battle is only one of many outcomes, since the initial clash will often be indecisive due to a successful void (dodge) or parry, and the reaction of any particular person to a given wound type is highly unpredictable. Historical examples show that some individuals collapsed or died instantly upon receiving relatively superficial wounds, while others managed to keep attacking for several minutes before collapsing while having a blade buried deep in their torso, and some of the latter even survived afterwards! While you should aim to make your strike decisive, you should also immediately get ready to defend against an afterblow, because you cannot assume that your opponent was instantly incapacitated. incapacitated by your first strike. The part of the fictional samurai fight duel where the winner slowly rises from a crouch, sheathes his sword, and walks away with while having his back turned to his opponent the whole time implies is making him that much cooler than real life by implying that he is ''so'' skilled that he ''knows'' he felled his opponent with 100% certainty.
This list shows the last 10 events of 105. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SingleStrokeBattle