History Main / ShowdownAtHighNoon

19th Nov '17 1:38:23 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* The endings of the western spoofs ''Film/SupportYourLocalSheriff'' and ''Film/SupportYourLocalGunfighter'' are both extended parodies of this trope. The first film also has the eponymous sheriff dealing with a series of hired guns who all confront him in this fashion: "Why do these jaspers always hit town at mealtime?"

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* The endings of the western spoofs ''Film/SupportYourLocalSheriff'' and ''Film/SupportYourLocalGunfighter'' ''Support Your Local Gunfighter'' are both extended parodies of this trope. The first film also has the eponymous sheriff dealing with a series of hired guns who all confront him in this fashion: "Why do these jaspers always hit town at mealtime?"
14th Oct '17 8:44:52 PM Zaptech
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* In ''Videogame/{{Destiny}}'', the final showdown between [[FallenHero Dredgen Yor]] and [[TheGunslinger Shin Malphur]] is one of these. It begins with the former monologuing to the latter about how [[WorthyOpponent he's always hoped it would come to this]], after he'd killed the latter's mentor and adoptive father Jaren Ward, and let Shin take Jaren's gun, the Last Word. Malphur, on the other hand, [[TranquilFury lets his anger and pain build up within him]] to [[{{Mana}} empower his Light]], until it suddenly explodes out into a [[KillItWithFire revolver formed of pure Solar Light]], and shoots Dredgen Yor [[KilledMidSentence dead mid-sentence.]] When Malphur checks Yor's corpse, he finds that [[DeathSeeker Yor had never even tried to draw his weapon]].
10th Sep '17 2:30:04 PM nombretomado
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The SwordCounterpart to this trope is the SingleStrokeBattle.

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The SwordCounterpart JustForFun/SwordCounterpart to this trope is the SingleStrokeBattle.
8th Sep '17 10:44:19 AM Crewx
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The Time: The instant the clock strikes high noon.

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The Time: The instant the clock strikes high noon.
noon.[[note]]The sun is highest in the sky at high noon, meaning the sun isn't in either person's eyes, thus the playing field is equal.[[/note]]
3rd Sep '17 4:57:22 PM Shieldage
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One of two things happens.

'''Version A'''

TheHero (or AntiHero with NoNameGiven and a BadassLongcoat) and the BigBad stand back to back in the street. They step forward ten paces, the spurs on their heels clinking with every step. At the tenth step, they turn. The shoot out begins.

'''Version B'''

TheHero (or AntiHero etc.) and the BigBad stand at opposite ends of the street, hands hovering over their holsters. The camera cuts between their faces, their twitching fingers, the faces of the frightened crowd, and of [[BetweenMyLegs the combatants framed by the opponent's legs]]. Long seconds pass. On a cue known only to the gunfighters, hands slap leather and shots ring out.

The outcome is never certain, and any number of Westerns, even in the pre-PostModern days of the Fifties, [[PlayingWithATrope played with this trope]] without subverting it. In Version A, will someone cheat? Will the combatants draw at ten paces, or turn it into Version B? In either version, will one get the drop on the other, but not fire? Will both draw, and reach a MexicanStandoff? Will one intentionally miss, [[BlastingItOutOfTheirHands shoot the gun out of the other's hand]], or simply gun him down? Or will [[FramedForHeroism some third party]] change the dynamic completely?

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One of two things happens.

'''Version A'''

TheHero (or AntiHero with NoNameGiven and a BadassLongcoat) and the BigBad stand back to back in the street. They step forward ten paces, the spurs on their heels clinking with every step. At the tenth step, they turn. The shoot out begins.

'''Version B'''

TheHero (or AntiHero etc.)
and the BigBad stand at opposite ends of the street, hands hovering over their holsters. The camera cuts between their faces, their twitching fingers, the faces of the frightened crowd, and of [[BetweenMyLegs the combatants framed by the opponent's legs]]. Long seconds pass. On a cue known only to the gunfighters, hands slap leather and shots ring out.

The outcome is never certain, and any number of Westerns, even in the pre-PostModern days of the Fifties, [[PlayingWithATrope played with this trope]] without subverting it. In Version A, will Will someone cheat? Will the combatants draw at ten paces, or turn it into Version B? In either version, will one get the drop on the other, but not fire? Will both draw, and reach a MexicanStandoff? Will one intentionally miss, [[BlastingItOutOfTheirHands shoot the gun out of the other's hand]], or simply gun him down? Or will [[FramedForHeroism some third party]] change the dynamic completely?



Examples for the major classic variation, where TheHero (or AntiHero etc.) and the BigBad stand back to back in the street. They step forward ten paces, the spurs on their heels clinking with every step. At the tenth step, they turn. The shoot out begins... Should mosey on over to TenPacesAndTurn.



** ''The Tenderfoot'' has one at the climax, but the titular tenderfoot, an ImperturbablePom, uses the ten-steps-and-turn-method, which completely destabilizes the villain, [[spoiler:even moreso when his shot appears to go wild. On seeing the Englishman yet to fire, the villain begs for mercy, after which the Englishman reveals he'd been hit in the arm, and the pain was simply unbearable.]]

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** ''The Tenderfoot'' has sets up one at the climax, but the titular tenderfoot, an ImperturbablePom, uses calls out the ten-steps-and-turn-method, trope and insists on the [[TenPacesAndTurn ten-steps-and-turn-method]] instead, which completely destabilizes the villain, a veteran of the quick-draw form, [[spoiler:even moreso when his shot appears to go wild. On seeing the Englishman yet to fire, the villain begs for mercy, after which the Englishman reveals he'd been hit in the arm, and the pain was simply unbearable.]]



** One duel has one guy yelling out words that rhyme with "Draw!" to check the other guy's hearing.
** One duel has the loser claim he was certain the turnaround was supposed to be after ''eleven'' steps.



* Played with in Sam Peckinpah's ''Film/PatGarrettAndBillyTheKid''. Billy, finding one of his friends had been badged by Garrett, ends up doing the TenPacesAndTurn version. Once his opponent starts counting off steps, Billy simply turns and waits, gun drawn for his opponent to turn. [[RashEquilibrium Of course, Elam's character didn't exactly wait until ten to turn around]].



* The final confrontation between Jack Keenan and Frank Butler in ''Series/WildBoys'' is a Type 2.

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* The final confrontation between Jack Keenan and Frank Butler in ''Series/WildBoys'' is a Type 2.''Series/WildBoys''.



* In ''{{Series/The Adventures of Superboy}}'' episode "Threesome, Part 2," Superboy has one of these with Luthor, Metallo, & Odessa Vexman on a deserted street in Smallville. The scene comes complete with a Western-style musical score. This one is most like version B.

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* In ''{{Series/The Adventures of Superboy}}'' episode "Threesome, Part 2," Superboy has one of these with Luthor, Metallo, & Odessa Vexman on a deserted street in Smallville. The scene comes complete with a Western-style musical score. This one is most like version B.



* The ancient UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum western-themed adventure ''The Wild Bunch'' used version B if you decided you wanted to kill the bad guys, rather than just bring them in to the sheriff (killing them was more rewarding). The trick was that you had to let the bad guy move first, so that's it's self-defence to shoot him rather than just plain old murder.

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* The ancient UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum western-themed adventure ''The Wild Bunch'' used version B let you stage this if you decided you wanted to kill the bad guys, rather than just bring them in to the sheriff (killing them was more rewarding). The trick was that you had to let the bad guy move first, so that's it's self-defence to shoot him rather than just plain old murder.



* ''VideoGame/LiveALive'' has one of the A variety in its Wild West chapter. The protagonist and his nemesis each take five steps (on account of the small viewing area), draw and shoot... at two different outlaws hiding on the sidelines.



* There's one in a cutscene of ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'', of all places. Episode "Wasteland", mission "A Fistful of Gorn" starts with your contact on Nimbus III, an old Romulan named Law, challenging a Gorn pirate who's gunning for your head and attempting to fill the power vacuum you created in the previous mission. He leaves you [[DeadManWriting a death note]] and they square off in a version B. BattleDiscretionShot as they fire. [[spoiler:Next scene has Law walk up to you and give a nonchalant shrug, then note that he looks a little stupid for giving you a death note and then surviving.]]

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* There's one in a cutscene of ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'', of all places. Episode "Wasteland", mission "A Fistful of Gorn" starts with your contact on Nimbus III, an old Romulan named Law, challenging a Gorn pirate who's gunning for your head and attempting to fill the power vacuum you created in the previous mission. He leaves you [[DeadManWriting a death note]] and they square off in for a version B.classic quick-draw. BattleDiscretionShot as they fire. [[spoiler:Next scene has Law walk up to you and give a nonchalant shrug, then note that he looks a little stupid for giving you a death note and then surviving.]]



* Spoofed in the ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' cartoon "WesternAnimation/DripAlongDaffy": Daffy and Nasty Canasta do version A, but before a single shot is fired, Porky defeats Canasta with a wind-up toy soldier... with a ridiculously powerful musket. The crowd already has Porky up on their shoulders when Daffy, still walking towards the showdown, realizes what happened.



* Spoofed in the ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' cartoon "WesternAnimation/DripAlongDaffy": Daffy and Nasty Canasta stalk towards each other along an excessively long street, but before a single shot is fired, Porky defeats Canasta with a wind-up toy soldier... with a ridiculously powerful musket. The crowd already has Porky up on their shoulders when Daffy, still walking towards the showdown, realizes what happened.



* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' featured Homer slapping people everywhere he went challenging them to duels to avoid having to pay for things. Unfortunately when he challenges an old fashioned Texas cowboy to a duel, the man naturally accepted. At the end of the episode they finally duel with the customary ten steps when the Texan is distracted by a pie Marge cooked. Homer, in a move that was idiotic even for him, reminded the man that the duel was not over. The Texan apologized for his rudeness and promptly shot Homer in the shoulder.



* Ironically, in matter of historical fact gun duels have been more common among upper-class "gentlemen" who put great value on personal honor, rather than the lower-class characters who dominate Westerns. Perhaps the most famous example of such a duel is the 1804 duel in which American Vice President Aaron Burr killed Treasury Secretary UsefulNotes/AlexanderHamilton. The difference here is that dueling pistols were not at all accurate nor meant to be accurate -- the point of the duel was to prove you cared enough about the grievance to risk your life. That Aaron Burr actually ''hit'' and ''killed'' Hamilton was a freak occurrence.
** According to the book ''Founding Brothers'', the two witnesses they had brought along agreed in writing that Hamilton fired first and missed, then Burr fired two or three seconds later, fatally wounding Hamilton. Whether Hamilton missed deliberately or Burr intended to miss but hit by accident is a matter for speculation.
** Also, the showdowns happened at high noon (yes, they really did) so that neither participant would have more of the sun in their eyes than the other, and it'd be a fair draw.
** In an episode covering duelling, the documentary series "Tales of the Gun" indicated that high quality duelling pistols were in fact made to be extremely accurate (or at least as accurate as unrifled flintlocks and percussion cap pistols could be).
*** The important thing about dueling pistols was not that they were inaccurate on purpose, but that they were always from the same dueling set, and were ''never'' zeroed (meaning fired from before to determine where exactly bullets are going relative to the visible sight line). To zero a dueling pistol, as was said, would be murder. The pairs were provided by one of the nobles (these were generally very finely made and expensive), and loaded by a third party (dueling aides). Actual, pre-sighted military handguns (such as army Tula pistols in case of Russian officers) were used only in extreme circumstances.
** The "honor" component changed the playing field somewhat from how western "quick draw" shootouts are usually depicted. Andrew Jackson once fought a duel in which he deliberately allowed his opponent to fire ''first'', so that if he missed, he would be compelled by honor to remain still and allow Jackson (taking more time to aim properly) to return fire. Jackson was hit in the chest, but non-fatally, and his return shot killed his opponent. This was considered a dirty trick, though.
*** Generally, duelists could purposefully raise or lower the chances of hitting, depending on their intentions, the gravity of the insult, personal beliefs and other factors. "Rules of engagement" varied from long distance, about 20 yards (very low chance of injury); to fire-at-will while closing (a gamble between getting the first shot and missing, or waiting and shooting from the "barrier" at 10 yards); to the extreme, suicidal "handhold" duel with participants holding the same handkerchief with off-hands. Another rule said that a duelist must fire when the barrier is reached; that after mutual misses, additional shots should be taken; and also that an intentional miss is honorable only after weathering a miss (or even a hit) from the opponent. The choice of aiming point was also a matter of intentions: non-lethal wounds were common - although not guaranteed, because of the inherent inaccuracy of dueling sets. At certain points (before the duel, after mutual shots) the parties could, through their aides, reach a peaceful resolution - a duel's main goal was to resolve a conflict in an honorable manner.

to:

* Ironically, in matter of historical fact gun duels have been more common among upper-class "gentlemen" who put great value on personal honor, rather than the lower-class characters who dominate Westerns. Perhaps the most famous example of such a duel is the 1804 duel in which American Vice President Aaron Burr killed Treasury Secretary UsefulNotes/AlexanderHamilton. The difference here is that dueling pistols Showdowns were not at all accurate nor meant to be accurate -- the point of the duel was to prove you cared enough about the grievance to risk your life. That Aaron Burr actually ''hit'' and ''killed'' Hamilton was a freak occurrence.
** According to the book ''Founding Brothers'', the two witnesses they had brought along agreed in writing that Hamilton fired first and missed, then Burr fired two or three seconds later, fatally wounding Hamilton. Whether Hamilton missed deliberately or Burr intended to miss but hit by accident is a matter
scheduled for speculation.
** Also, the showdowns happened at
high noon (yes, they many really did) were) so that neither participant would have more of the sun in their eyes than the other, and it'd be a fair draw.
** In an episode covering duelling, the documentary series "Tales of the Gun" indicated that high quality duelling pistols were in fact made to be extremely accurate (or at least as accurate as unrifled flintlocks and percussion cap pistols could be).
*** The important thing about dueling pistols was not that they were inaccurate on purpose, but that they were always from the same dueling set, and were ''never'' zeroed (meaning fired from before to determine where exactly bullets are going relative to the visible sight line). To zero a dueling pistol, as was said, would be murder. The pairs were provided by one of the nobles (these were generally very finely made and expensive), and loaded by a third party (dueling aides). Actual, pre-sighted military handguns (such as army Tula pistols in case of Russian officers) were used only in extreme circumstances.
** The "honor" component changed the playing field somewhat from how western "quick draw" shootouts are usually depicted. Andrew Jackson once fought a duel in which he deliberately allowed his opponent to fire ''first'', so that if he missed, he would be compelled by honor to remain still and allow Jackson (taking more time to aim properly) to return fire. Jackson was hit in the chest, but non-fatally, and his return shot killed his opponent. This was considered a dirty trick, though.
*** Generally, duelists could purposefully raise or lower the chances of hitting, depending on their intentions, the gravity of the insult, personal beliefs and other factors. "Rules of engagement" varied from long distance, about 20 yards (very low chance of injury); to fire-at-will while closing (a gamble between getting the first shot and missing, or waiting and shooting from the "barrier" at 10 yards); to the extreme, suicidal "handhold" duel with participants holding the same handkerchief with off-hands. Another rule said that a duelist must fire when the barrier is reached; that after mutual misses, additional shots should be taken; and also that an intentional miss is honorable only after weathering a miss (or even a hit) from the opponent. The choice of aiming point was also a matter of intentions: non-lethal wounds were common - although not guaranteed, because of the inherent inaccuracy of dueling sets. At certain points (before the duel, after mutual shots) the parties could, through their aides, reach a peaceful resolution - a duel's main goal was to resolve a conflict in an honorable manner.
draw.
9th Aug '17 11:27:53 AM GunarmDyne
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* B-ko and Gail face off in one in ''Anime/ProjectAko Uncivil War'' with her utilizing a gun while he uses his magic.
6th Aug '17 6:13:40 PM Andyroid
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* In ''Discworld/ReaperMan'', Death's climactic duel with his replacement borrows from both ''Film/HighNoon'' and ''Film/ForAFewDollarsMore''. It even takes place at midnight, though Death sneers at this ham-handed attempt at drama.

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* In ''Discworld/ReaperMan'', Death's climactic duel with his replacement borrows from both ''Film/HighNoon'' and ''Film/ForAFewDollarsMore''. It even ''Film/ForAFewDollarsMore'', though it takes place [[WhenTheClockStrikesTwelve at midnight, though midnight]] rather than noon, and Death [[LampshadeHanging sneers at this ham-handed attempt at drama."drama"]].
29th Jun '17 8:21:38 PM Someoneman
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** ''Film/TheGoodTheBadAndTheUgly'' has a three-way showdown. In a cemetery. With [[CrowningMusicOfAwesome incredible music.]] It also provides a StandardSnippet for these sorts of scenes.

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** ''Film/TheGoodTheBadAndTheUgly'' has a three-way showdown. In a cemetery. With [[CrowningMusicOfAwesome incredible music.]] It also provides a StandardSnippet for these sorts of scenes.



* [[CrowningMusicOfAwesome The Megaman remix-band]] TheMegas make the battle between Megaman and Quickman sound like an embodiment of this trope. It's all built up with Quickman as the "sheriff"; with lines such as "Quick on the draw, in this town I am the law. Is what they say true? Does death wear blue? Can he fall?" The conclusion comes with "My circuits slow. I'm not scared anymore. Reach for my weapon and in turn you're reaching for yours. My circuits slow. What they said is a lie. The shots are heard and the bullets scream death as they fly", essentially also making this an example of a SingleStrokeBattle. In the end, the winner is [[spoiler: Megaman. But what did you expect? He's the hero.]]

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* [[CrowningMusicOfAwesome The Megaman remix-band]] TheMegas ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' remix-band Music/TheMegas make the battle between Megaman and Quickman sound like an embodiment of this trope. It's all built up with Quickman as the "sheriff"; with lines such as "Quick on the draw, in this town I am the law. Is what they say true? Does death wear blue? Can he fall?" The conclusion comes with "My circuits slow. I'm not scared anymore. Reach for my weapon and in turn you're reaching for yours. My circuits slow. What they said is a lie. The shots are heard and the bullets scream death as they fly", essentially also making this an example of a SingleStrokeBattle. In the end, the winner is [[spoiler: Megaman. But what did you expect? He's the hero.]]
19th Apr '17 11:31:54 PM Geoduck
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* The endings of the western spoofs ''Film/SupportYourLocalSheriff'' and ''Film/SupportYourLocalGunfighter'' are both extended parodies of this trope.

to:

* The endings of the western spoofs ''Film/SupportYourLocalSheriff'' and ''Film/SupportYourLocalGunfighter'' are both extended parodies of this trope. The first film also has the eponymous sheriff dealing with a series of hired guns who all confront him in this fashion: "Why do these jaspers always hit town at mealtime?"
11th Apr '17 11:42:30 AM Chabal2
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* ''ComicBook/LuckyLuke'' naturally had a few variations on the theme.
** One gag has multiple pairs of people waiting in line for their shootouts. That is, lined up behind each other. On all four branches of a crossroads.
** ''The Tenderfoot'' has one at the climax, but the titular tenderfoot, an ImperturbablePom, uses the ten-steps-and-turn-method, which completely destabilizes the villain, [[spoiler:even moreso when his shot appears to go wild. On seeing the Englishman yet to fire, the villain begs for mercy, after which the Englishman reveals he'd been hit in the arm, and the pain was simply unbearable.]]
** One story had an IJustWannaBeBadass guy ask Luke for help impressing his fiancee by winning a gunfight. Unfortunately, his aim is so bad Luke has to duck despite standing behind him. In the end he challenges Luke, [[spoiler:both men are replaced by his LoveInterest / a saloon girl respectively]], he kills a criminal completely by accident, and this reputation is enough to keep desperadoes out of town ever after.
* ''ComicBook/TheFarSide'':
** One strip mentions that before its replacement by its sharper cousin, duels in the West involved fighting with Bowie... spoons.
** One duel has one guy yelling out words that rhyme with "Draw!" to check the other guy's hearing.
** One duel has the loser claim he was certain the turnaround was supposed to be after ''eleven'' steps.
* ''{{ComicBook/Hitman}}'' has Tommy go up against a telepathic gunslinger who can and will outdraw anyone due to reading their minds. The BigBad mockingly asks how Tommy's going to beat that, Nat obligingly provides the answer: [[spoiler:have your buddy blow his head off while he's not looking]].
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