History Main / ShockingDefeatLegacy

24th Sep '17 12:00:27 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Italy's defeat at Gasr Bu Hadi in 1915 saw the Italians expelled from most of Libya and reduced to a few coastal cities, as now not only the rebels knew they could defeat the Italians in a pitched battle but, due the Italian commander's arrogance, had managed to capture thousands of rifles dozens of machine guns, and even some artillery, all with plentiful ammunition. On the long run it backfired on the entire Libyan population, as when they counterattacked the Italians first shattered the main rebel forces and then defeated the guerilla by ''taking in hostage most of the civilian population'' to isolate the rebels from support (also killing many civilians from starvation due the Italians not caring much of keeping them fed), but said counterattack was so ferocious because the Italians still felt the sting of Gasr Bu Hadi (and actually made a point of luring a rebel force there to annihilate it just to avenge that defeat), and it only came in 1923-one year after BenitoMussolini took over in Italy.

to:

* Italy's defeat at Gasr Bu Hadi in 1915 saw the Italians expelled from most of Libya and reduced to a few coastal cities, as now not only the rebels knew they could defeat the Italians in a pitched battle but, due the Italian commander's arrogance, had managed to capture thousands of rifles dozens of machine guns, and even some artillery, all with plentiful ammunition. On the long run it backfired on the entire Libyan population, as when they counterattacked the Italians first shattered the main rebel forces and then defeated the guerilla by ''taking in hostage most of the civilian population'' to isolate the rebels from support (also killing many civilians from starvation due the Italians not caring much of keeping them fed), but said counterattack was so ferocious because the Italians still felt the sting of Gasr Bu Hadi (and actually made a point of luring a rebel force there to annihilate it just to avenge that defeat), and it only came in 1923-one year after BenitoMussolini UsefulNotes/BenitoMussolini took over in Italy.
17th Sep '17 7:58:37 AM FringeBenefits
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[folder: Fan Works]]
* In the MagicalGirl CrisisCrossover ''FanFic/ShatteredSkies'', [[spoiler:the total massacre of the [[Franchise/LyricalNanoha TSAB's]] [[TheFederation Dimensional]] [[TimePolice Navy]], done singlehandedly by [[PersonOfMassDestruction Unison Reinforce]], lets everyone know that [[LegionOfDoom Dead End]] is not screwing around with the whole [[ApocalypseHow/ClassZ multiversal destruction]] thing, and they've damn well got the firepower to pull it off.]]

[[/folder]]
28th Aug '17 10:26:01 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Perhaps the biggest defeat in soccer history was the 3:2 Germany inflicted upon Hungary in the final of the 1954 FIFA World Cup. Hungary went from one of the dominant soccer powers on earth to an afterthought, virtually overnight.
27th Aug '17 8:46:19 PM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The first and most humiliating one was the Battle of Carrhae, where triumvir Marcus Licinus Crassus (the guy who crushed Spartacus) invaded the Parthian Empire. He had a solidly equipped army and greatly outnumbered the Parthians, yet the latter's cavalry and horse-archers (what the Byzantine Romans would call kataphracts) were too much and Crassus while a good general with some moments was not a genius, and he really needed to be one. The Parthians brutally crushed the Romans despite being outnumbered, Crassus was murdered and depending on which account you believe, molten gold was poured into his mouth or he was beheaded and his head was used as a prop for a Persian production of Creator/{{Euripides}}'s ''Theatre/{{Bacchae}}'' (Crassus was apparently the head of King Pentheus in what we can assume was a rather intensely realistic production).

to:

** The first and most humiliating one was the Battle of Carrhae, where triumvir Marcus Licinus Crassus UsefulNotes/MarcusLiciniusCrassus (the guy who crushed Spartacus) invaded the Parthian Empire. He had a solidly equipped army and greatly outnumbered the Parthians, yet the latter's cavalry and horse-archers (what the Byzantine Romans would call kataphracts) were too much and Crassus while a good general with some moments was not a genius, and he really needed to be one. The Parthians brutally crushed the Romans despite being outnumbered, Crassus was murdered and depending on which account you believe, molten gold was poured into his mouth or he was beheaded and his head was used as a prop for a Persian production of Creator/{{Euripides}}'s ''Theatre/{{Bacchae}}'' (Crassus was apparently the head of King Pentheus in what we can assume was a rather intensely realistic production).
4th Aug '17 4:11:54 PM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In the early imperial era, the most famous was the Battle of Teutoburg Forest on September 9, 9 AD. Three Roman legions were returning to camp when they were attacked by Arminius, a Germanic chieftain who had grown up in Rome. All three legions were wiped out, and eventually the Roman Empire withdrew from Germania. Emperor Augustus, when told of the disaster, as per Suetonius, banged his head against the wall, shouting "Varus! Give me back my legions!" went days without shaving in a HeroicBSOD and years after was known to mutter as a non-sequitir the same line, despite the fact that Varus had died in battle (mercifully since he didn't [[YouHaveFailedMe have to face Augustus]] in person). This defeat is often cited, especially in Romantic German nationalism as the real reason why the Romans never went further into Germania. Of course, the Romans did make excursions and expand there under Marcus Aurelius (a fact which ThePhilosopherKing comemorates in a column showing him personally slaughter Germans) and there are some archaeological findings that suggest the Romans did try again but that defeat did endure in Rome's psyche.[[note]]More recent research, e. g. the finding of the remains of a post 9 A. D. battlefield in the middle of Germania where the Romans conclusively defeated their Germanic foes, indicates that Rome continued to make successful incursions into Germania much longer than was hitherto believed and that the eventual withdrawal from there was, perhaps not directly preconditioned on the battle of the Teutoburg Forest.[[/note]]

to:

** In the early imperial era, the most famous was the Battle of Teutoburg Forest on September 9, 9 AD. Three Roman legions were returning to camp when they were attacked by Arminius, a Germanic chieftain who had grown up in Rome. All three legions were wiped out, and eventually the Roman Empire withdrew from Germania. Emperor Augustus, when told of the disaster, as per Suetonius, banged his head against the wall, shouting "Varus! Give me back my legions!" went days without shaving in a HeroicBSOD and years after was known to mutter as a non-sequitir non-sequitur the same line, despite the fact that Varus had died in battle (mercifully since he didn't [[YouHaveFailedMe have to face Augustus]] in person). This defeat is often cited, especially in Romantic German nationalism as the real reason why the Romans never went further into Germania. Of course, the Romans did make excursions and expand there under Marcus Aurelius (a fact which ThePhilosopherKing comemorates commemorates in a column showing him personally slaughter Germans) Germanic warriors) and there are some archaeological findings that suggest the Romans did try again but that defeat did endure in Rome's psyche.[[note]]More recent research, e. g. the finding of the remains of a post 9 A. D. battlefield in the middle of Germania where the Romans conclusively defeated their Germanic foes, indicates that Rome continued to make successful incursions into Germania much longer than was hitherto believed and that the eventual withdrawal from there was, perhaps not directly preconditioned on the battle of the Teutoburg Forest.[[/note]]
4th Aug '17 1:01:23 PM HeroicJay
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[folder: Webcomics]]
* In ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', the heroes are trying to protect the five Gates from Xykon. After two gates are destroyed (rendering them useless to Xykon, but also weakening reality), the heroes decide that Xykon is likely to target either Girard's Gate or Kraagor's Gate next, since Soon's Gate is in the well-defended Azure City, full of paladins. Thus, they don't even bother preparing for the possibility of Soon's Gate being targeted. So, of course, it is, and Azure City gets overrun, thousands die or are enslaved, and the heroes and their allies spend the next several story arcs split and mostly playing defense.
[[/folder]]
4th Aug '17 12:34:11 PM EDP
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* For Italy's colonial ambitions in East Africa it was Adwa. Before, Ethiopia was considered doomed to fall and become an outright colony after their rebellion at being scammed into becoming a protectorate was suppressed in blood-and then the Italian invasion army was wiped out thanks to a combination of bad Italian leadership, Ethiopian numerical superiority and the Ethiopian best troops being actually ''better armed than the Italians'' through sheer cunning (before trying to take his country's independence back, emperor Menelik had used the credits he had thanks to his treaty with the Italians to buy weapons from Italy and got the latest models, while the Italian force was armed with weapons slated to be phased out soon). Italy would not make another attempt at Ethiopia until 1936, and they were still so shocked they started using chemical weapons the moment it ''looked'' the ailing Ethiopian forces were preparing a comeback.




to:

* Italy's defeat at Gasr Bu Hadi in 1915 saw the Italians expelled from most of Libya and reduced to a few coastal cities, as now not only the rebels knew they could defeat the Italians in a pitched battle but, due the Italian commander's arrogance, had managed to capture thousands of rifles dozens of machine guns, and even some artillery, all with plentiful ammunition. On the long run it backfired on the entire Libyan population, as when they counterattacked the Italians first shattered the main rebel forces and then defeated the guerilla by ''taking in hostage most of the civilian population'' to isolate the rebels from support (also killing many civilians from starvation due the Italians not caring much of keeping them fed), but said counterattack was so ferocious because the Italians still felt the sting of Gasr Bu Hadi (and actually made a point of luring a rebel force there to annihilate it just to avenge that defeat), and it only came in 1923-one year after BenitoMussolini took over in Italy.
4th Aug '17 12:11:39 PM EDP
Is there an issue? Send a Message
4th Aug '17 12:11:17 PM EDP
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In the early imperial era, the most famous was the Battle of Teutoburg Forest on September 9, 9 AD. Three Roman legions were returning to camp when they were attacked by Arminius, a Germanic chieftain who had grown up in Rome. All three legions were wiped out, and eventually the Roman Empire withdrew from Germania. Emperor Augustus, when told of the disaster, as per Suetonius, banged his head against the wall, shouting "Varus! Give me back my legions!" went days without shaving in a HeroicBSOD and years after was known to mutter as a non-sequitir the same line, despite the fact that Varus had died in battle (mercifully since he didn't [[YouHaveFailedMe have to face Augustus]] in person). This defeat is often cited, especially in Romantic German nationalism as the real reason why the Romans never went further into Germania. Of course, the Germans did make excursions and expand there under Marcus Aurelius (a fact which ThePhilosopherKing comemorates in a column showing him personally slaughter Germans) and there are some archaeological findings that suggest the Romans did try again but that defeat did endure in Rome's psyche.[[note]]More recent research, e. g. the finding of the remains of a post 9 A. D. battlefield in the middle of Germania where the Romans conclusively defeated their Germanic foes, indicates that Rome continued to make successful incursions into Germania much longer than was hitherto believed and that the eventual withdrawal from there was, perhaps not directly preconditioned on the battle of the Teutoburg Forest.[[/note]]

to:

** Shortly after the Second Punic War came the destruction of Placentia, in no small part thanks to the Gauls doing so immediately after the Romans had deemed them pacified thanks to the defeats they had suffered late in the war for allying with Hannibal (in fact the Romans had just disbanded most of their northern army when the Gauls attacked). Then the Gauls attacked Placentia's twin city of Cremona to finish them off... [[SubvertedTrope And discovered they had just pissed the Romans off]], with Cremona's defenses holding and the Roman reinforcements wiping the Gaulish army out.
** In the early imperial era, the most famous was the Battle of Teutoburg Forest on September 9, 9 AD. Three Roman legions were returning to camp when they were attacked by Arminius, a Germanic chieftain who had grown up in Rome. All three legions were wiped out, and eventually the Roman Empire withdrew from Germania. Emperor Augustus, when told of the disaster, as per Suetonius, banged his head against the wall, shouting "Varus! Give me back my legions!" went days without shaving in a HeroicBSOD and years after was known to mutter as a non-sequitir the same line, despite the fact that Varus had died in battle (mercifully since he didn't [[YouHaveFailedMe have to face Augustus]] in person). This defeat is often cited, especially in Romantic German nationalism as the real reason why the Romans never went further into Germania. Of course, the Germans Romans did make excursions and expand there under Marcus Aurelius (a fact which ThePhilosopherKing comemorates in a column showing him personally slaughter Germans) and there are some archaeological findings that suggest the Romans did try again but that defeat did endure in Rome's psyche.[[note]]More recent research, e. g. the finding of the remains of a post 9 A. D. battlefield in the middle of Germania where the Romans conclusively defeated their Germanic foes, indicates that Rome continued to make successful incursions into Germania much longer than was hitherto believed and that the eventual withdrawal from there was, perhaps not directly preconditioned on the battle of the Teutoburg Forest.[[/note]]
31st Jul '17 4:35:51 PM Elitegamer010
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** at the start of the Legion expansion there is the battle of Broken Shore, where the united army of both the Alliance and the Horde attempted to assault an island that the [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TheLegionsOfHell Burning Legion]]. has taken over. the battle went well for the Alliance and Horde at first, but at the end they got overwhelmed by demons and were forced to retreat, losing a lot of soldiers and King Varian Wyrnn of the Alliance, and Warchief Vol'jin of the Horde.

to:

** at the start of the Legion expansion there is the battle of Broken Shore, where the united army of both the Alliance and the Horde attempted to assault an island that the [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TheLegionsOfHell Burning Legion]]. Legion]] has taken over. the battle went well for the Alliance and Horde at first, but at the end they got overwhelmed by demons and were forced to retreat, losing a lot of soldiers and King Varian Wyrnn of the Alliance, and Warchief Vol'jin of the Horde.
This list shows the last 10 events of 289. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ShockingDefeatLegacy