History Main / ShockingDefeatLegacy

9th Dec '16 11:13:13 AM Sulphuristical
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* The Battle of Ksar El Kebir in 1578 was this for the Portuguese Empire. With the empire already becoming stagnant, a massive fortune was then spent in amassing one of the largest and most well equiped land armies in Europe at the time, in an attempt by the young Portuguese king to expand their holdings in North Africa. However, they were met by the Moors and their Ottoman allies, who vastly outnumbered them. The Portuguese army fought valiantly, but was utterly crushed, the king missing or dead, and thousands of noblemen made prisoner. Another vast fortune was spent ransoming them back, and, since the king had disappeared without producing an heir, shortly after the country was taken over by the Spanish in a Personal Union, which lasted for sixty years, during which Portugal further lost a great amount of power, colonies, and influence.

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* The Battle of Ksar El Kebir in 1578 was this for the Portuguese Empire. With the empire already becoming stagnant, a massive fortune was then spent in amassing one of the largest and most well equiped land armies in Europe at the time, in an attempt by the young Portuguese king to expand their holdings in North Africa. However, they were met by the Moors and their Ottoman allies, who vastly outnumbered them. The Portuguese army fought valiantly, but was utterly crushed, the king missing or dead, and thousands of noblemen made prisoner. Another vast fortune was spent ransoming them back, and, since the king had disappeared without producing an heir, shortly after the country was taken over by the Spanish in a Personal Union, which lasted for sixty years, during which Portugal could only watch as they further lost a great amount of power, colonies, and influence.
influence. By the time they got their independence back, the other nations of Europe, with their superior economies and manpower, were well underway in their own discovery and colonisation efforts, and for Portugal there was no going back to their former glory.
9th Dec '16 11:10:01 AM Sulphuristical
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* The Battle of Ksar El Kebir in 1578 was this for the Portuguese Empire. With the empire already becoming stagnant, a massive fortune was then spent in amassing one of the largest and most well equiped land armies in Europe at the time, in an attempt by the young Portuguese king to expand their holdings in North Africa. However, they were met by the Moors and their Ottoman allies, who vastly outnumbered them. The Portuguese army fought valiantly, but was utterly crushed, the king missing or dead, and thousands of noblemen made prisoner. Another vast fortune was spent ransoming them back, and, since the king had disappeared without producing an heir, shortly after the country was taken over by the Spanish in a Personal Union, which lasted for sixty years, during which Portugal further lost a great amount of power, colonies, and influence.
26th Nov '16 4:27:35 PM TSims
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** And again with the Battle of Jakku, which put the perverbial nail in the coffin of The Empire.
21st Nov '16 1:42:04 PM TSims
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**Arguably the beginning of the end for the empire was when Tarkin blew up Alderaan. Which caused a huge backlash that led to high rebel recruitment.
20th Nov '16 6:40:38 PM jamespolk
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* ''Film/TheSorrowAndThePity'': A documentary about the German conquest of France in 1940, the difficulties of the next four years under German occupation, and how French people are still having problems dealing with it 25 years after liberation. Director Max Ophuls also takes time to interview some of the German generals behind that attack and the latter, despite Denazification cannot help but gloat about their victory.
16th Nov '16 3:46:53 AM SSJMagus
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* Speaking of UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, their teams have plenty of this, helped by the fact that most of their notable defeats can be summed up with a single phrase (The Shot, The Fumble, The Drive, Red Right 88, The Slip). Two were even off-field (The Move, where the Browns were moved overnight to Baltimore; and The Decision, where [=LeBron=] announced his departure).

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* Speaking of UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}}, their teams have plenty of this, helped by the fact that most of their notable defeats can be summed up with a single phrase (The Shot, The Fumble, The Drive, Red Right 88, The Slip). Two were even off-field (The off-field: The Move, where the Browns were moved overnight to Baltimore; Baltimore (to add insult to injury, the renamed Baltimore Ravens would win their first Super Bowl just 5 years later, a victory that Browns fans still believe should rightfully have been thiers); and The Decision, where [=LeBron=] announced his departure).departure.



* During the early 90s, the Buffalo Bills were the best AFC football team in the NFL and went to four straight Super Bowls, only to lose them all. But it's the first SuperBowl loss that people remember the most. Buffalo had their full arsenal with Jim Kelly, one of the best quarterbacks of the 90s leading his team. Their opponents, the New York Giants, were a weaker team on paper. Not to mention they were led by their backup quarterback, Jeff Hostetler , who was at the end of his long career. What should have been a sure win for the Baffalo Bills, turned out to be a close, competitive game that ended in one of the most unforgettable, heartbreaking, field goal kick misses in NFL history, known as "Wide Right".

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* During the early 90s, the Buffalo Bills were the best AFC football team in the NFL and went to four straight Super Bowls, only to lose them all. But it's the first SuperBowl loss that people remember the most. Buffalo had their full arsenal with Jim Kelly, one of the best quarterbacks of the 90s leading his team. Their opponents, the New York Giants, were a weaker team on paper. Not to mention they were led by their backup quarterback, Jeff Hostetler , Hostetler, who was at the end of his long career. What should have been a sure win for the Baffalo Bills, turned out to be a close, competitive game that ended in one of the most unforgettable, heartbreaking, field goal kick misses in NFL history, known as "Wide Right".
16th Nov '16 3:36:01 AM SSJMagus
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* The Battle of Leyte Gulf, following the Battle of the Philippine Sea, was the Imperial Japanese Navy's final attempt to stop the US Navy. With its carrier forces utterly decimated and reduced to being nothing more than a decoy, the IJN sortied the vast majority of its remaining fleet. The Southern Force was summarily obliterated by a perfectly orchestrated night-time ambush, with a Japanese battleship being effectively executed by a firing line composed largely of the American battleships that had been sunk at Pearl Harbor (and then raised and repaired). The Northern Force, comprised of the decoy (as in, largely empty) carriers were all sunk by overwhelming carrier attack. The Center Force, where all of the true strength lay, received a golden opportunity after Halsey chased after the decoy force without so much as leaving a picket ship in the strait leading to his landing forces and escort carriers, stumbling upon Taffy 3: half a dozen slow, unarmored escort carriers and a few destroyers that were in the middle of supporting landing operations and were completely astonished by Center Force's arrival. Cue the most mis-matched naval battle in history, with Taffy 3 actually fighting off one of the most powerful surface action groups ever assembled with nothing more than a few tin-can destroyers, planes armed with just machine guns and light bombs, and audacious, desperate courage. By the end, the Northern Force was decimated, the Southern Force was annihilated, and the Center Force had taken severe losses, with only one escort carrier, two destroyers, and one destroyer escorts sunk to show for it. The Japanese Navy was destroyed as a significant fighting force, its remnants scattering to various locations and being hunted down in detail by the US Navy.

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* The Battle of Leyte Gulf, following the Battle of the Philippine Sea, was the Imperial Japanese Navy's final attempt to stop the US Navy. With its carrier forces utterly decimated and reduced to being nothing more than a decoy, the IJN sortied the vast majority of its remaining fleet. The Southern Force was summarily obliterated by a perfectly orchestrated night-time ambush, with a Japanese battleship being effectively executed by a firing line composed largely of the American battleships that had been sunk at Pearl Harbor (and then raised and repaired). The Northern Force, comprised of the decoy (as in, largely empty) carriers were all sunk by overwhelming carrier attack. The Center Force, where all of the true strength lay, received a golden opportunity after Halsey chased after the decoy force without so much as leaving a picket ship in the strait leading to his landing forces and escort carriers, stumbling upon Taffy 3: half a dozen slow, unarmored escort carriers and a few destroyers destroyers[[note]]A single ship in Center Force, the battleship Yamato, was ''larger and better-armed than all of Taffy 3 combined''.[[/note]] that were in the middle of supporting landing operations and were completely astonished by Center Force's arrival. Cue the most mis-matched naval battle in history, with Taffy 3 actually fighting off one of the most powerful surface action groups ever assembled with nothing more than a few tin-can destroyers, planes armed with just machine guns and light bombs, and audacious, desperate courage. By the end, the Northern Force was decimated, the Southern Force was annihilated, and the Center Force had taken severe losses, with only one escort carrier, two destroyers, and one destroyer escorts sunk to show for it. The Japanese Navy was destroyed as a significant fighting force, its remnants scattering to various locations and being hunted down in detail by the US Navy.
16th Nov '16 3:28:49 AM SSJMagus
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* The Battle of the Philippine Sea, in 1944, became another one for Japan. After two years, they had finally rebuilt their carrier forces, brought their newest and most advanced carrier--the armored carrier Taiho--into play, they had a huge advantage in position, geography, and circumstances (a strong wind that would considerably bolster Japanese carrier attack ranges while reducing the Americans', air bases closer to the enemy to field additional and heavier aircraft as well as land carrier aircraft returning from an extreme range attack on the enemey, etc), and the Americans were in the middle of invading islands that would give America airbases within strategic bombing range of the Japanese home islands. They sent out attack wave after attack wave, considerably more aircraft than they had had at their disposal at Midway, and the wind advantage meant that they were seemingly beyond the range of American reprisal. Only for the Japanese to find out that their pilots, planes, doctrine, technology, and ships were ''horribly'' outmatched when the American forces absolutely annihilated wave after wave of Japanese aircraft, with only minor damage on a battleship to show for it. Then American submarines sank two of their best fleet carriers--including the brand-new and pride-of-the-fleet Taiho, and the American counterattack still managed to catch up to and sink one more fleet carrier. The battle completely dashed any hope of the Japanese Navy turning the war around.

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* The Battle of the Philippine Sea, in 1944, became another one for Japan. After two years, they had finally rebuilt their carrier forces, brought their newest and most advanced carrier--the armored carrier Taiho--into play, they had a huge advantage in position, geography, and circumstances (a strong wind that would considerably bolster Japanese carrier attack ranges while reducing the Americans', air bases closer to the enemy to field additional and heavier aircraft as well as land carrier aircraft returning from an extreme range attack on the enemey, etc), and the Americans were in the middle of invading islands that would give America airbases within strategic bombing range of the Japanese home islands. They sent out attack wave after attack wave, considerably more aircraft than they had had at their disposal at Midway, and the wind advantage meant that they were seemingly beyond the range of American reprisal. Only for the Japanese to find out that their pilots, planes, doctrine, technology, and ships were ''horribly'' outmatched when the American forces absolutely annihilated wave after wave of Japanese aircraft, aircraft (this coming to be known as "the Great Marianas Turkey Shoot"), with only minor damage on a battleship to show for it. Then American submarines sank two of their best fleet carriers--including the brand-new and pride-of-the-fleet Taiho, and the American counterattack still managed to catch up to and sink one more fleet carrier. The battle completely dashed any hope of the Japanese Navy turning the war around.
8th Nov '16 4:28:06 PM IdentityUnknown
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** Same thing would happen 800 years later in year 410, when the Visigoths under Alaric I sacked Rome. The Roman Empire remained as an independent nation and would live to 476, but it was clear to everyone after the sack that Rome was at that point just a shadow of its former glory self, and the only reason why the Huns were not able to finish the job was because of Flavius Aetius (who historians calls "the last true Roman")' tactical genius and his [[EnemyMine alliance with the Visigoths]].

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** Same thing would happen 800 years later in year 410, when the Visigoths under Alaric I sacked Rome. The Roman Empire remained as an independent nation and would live to 476, 1456, but it was clear to everyone after the sack that Rome was at that point just a shadow of its former glory self, and the only reason why the Huns were not able to finish the job was because of Flavius Aetius (who (one of many people historians calls term "the last true Roman")' tactical genius and his [[EnemyMine alliance with the Visigoths]].



** Another great Roman disaster was the Battle of Manzikert in 1071, when the Seljuk Turks routed the much larger Byzantine army and captured Emperor Romanos IV Diogenes. While modern scholars don't consider it a "turning point" anymore, the disaster at Manzikert led to the loss of most of Anatolia (some parts of which irrevocably) and plunging the Empire into a series of civil wars. Until the end of the Empire in 1453 Manzikert was widely known as "that day" and considered one of the most shameful days of the Roman Empire.

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** Another great Roman disaster was the Battle of Manzikert in 1071, when the Seljuk Turks routed the much larger Byzantine Roman army and captured Emperor Romanos IV Diogenes. While modern scholars don't consider it a "turning point" anymore, the disaster at Manzikert led to the loss of most of Anatolia (some parts of which irrevocably) and plunging the Empire into a series of civil wars. Until the end of the Empire in 1453 Manzikert was widely known as "that day" and considered one of the most shameful days of the Roman Empire.



* Though the Turks didn't conquer Constantinople itself until 1453, a Turkish victory at Manzikert in 1071 was a significant blow to the Byzantine Empire, which continually lost territory in Anatolia to the Turks after that. This allowed the first few sieges on Constantinople, as well as the establishment of Turkish cities and military forces. By 1453, the "empire" barely stretched past the city itself (although the plague and Venetian Crusaders did damage to the city as well.)

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* Though the Turks didn't conquer Constantinople itself until 1453, a Turkish victory at Manzikert in 1071 was a significant blow to the Byzantine Roman Empire, which continually lost territory in Anatolia to the Turks after that. This allowed the first few sieges on Constantinople, as well as the establishment of Turkish cities and military forces. By 1453, the "empire" barely stretched past the city itself (although the plague and Venetian Crusaders did damage to the city as well.)
6th Nov '16 10:12:52 PM SaltyWaffles
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* The Battle of the Phillipine Sea, in 1944, became another one for Japan. After two years, they had finally rebuilt their carrier forces, brought their newest and most advanced carrier--the armored carrier Taiho--into play, they had a huge advantage in position, geography, and circumstances (a strong wind that would considerably bolster Japanese carrier attack ranges while reducing the Americans', air bases closer to the enemy to field additional and heavier aircraft as well as land carrier aircraft returning from an extreme range attack on the enemey, etc), and the Americans were in the middle of invading islands that would give America airbases within strategic bombing range of the Japanese home islands. They sent out attack wave after attack wave, considerably more aircraft than they had had at their disposal at Midway, and the wind advantage meant that they were seemingly beyond the range of American reprisal. Only for the Japanese to find out that their pilots, planes, doctrine, technology, and ships were ''horribly'' outmatched when the American forces absolutely annihilated wave after wave of Japanese aircraft, with only minor damage on a battleship to show for it. Then American submarines sank two of their best fleet carriers--including the brand-new and pride-of-the-fleet Taiho, and the American counterattack still managed to catch up to and sink one more fleet carrier. The battle completely dashed any hope of the Japanese Navy turning the war around.
* The Battle of Leyte Gulf, following the Battle of the Phillipine Sea, was the Imperial Japanese Navy's final attempt to stop the US Navy. With its carrier forces utterly decimated and reduced to being nothing more than a decoy, the IJN sortied the vast majority of its remaining fleet. The Southern Force was summarily obliterated by a perfectly orchestrated night-time ambush, with a Japanese battleship being effectively executed by a firing line composed largely of the American battleships that had been sunk at Pearl Harbor (and then raised and repaired). The Northern Force, comprised of the decoy (as in, largely empty) carriers were all sunk by overwhelming carrier attack. The Center Force, where all of the true strength lay, received a golden opportunity after Halsey chased after the decoy force without so much as leaving a picket ship in the strait leading to his landing forces and escort carriers, stumbling upon Taffy 3: half a dozen slow, unarmored escort carriers and a few destroyers that were in the middle of supporting landing operations and were completely astonished by Center Force's arrival. Cue the most mis-matched naval battle in history, with Taffy 3 actually fighting off one of the most powerful surface action groups ever assembled with nothing more than a few tin-can destroyers, planes armed with just machine guns and light bombs, and audacious, desperate courage. By the end, the Northern Force was decimated, the Southern Force was annihilated, and the Center Force had taken severe losses, with only one escort carrier, two destroyers, and one destroyer escorts sunk to show for it. The Japanese Navy was destroyed as a significant fighting force, its remnants scattering to various locations and being hunted down in detail by the US Navy.

to:

* The Battle of the Phillipine Philippine Sea, in 1944, became another one for Japan. After two years, they had finally rebuilt their carrier forces, brought their newest and most advanced carrier--the armored carrier Taiho--into play, they had a huge advantage in position, geography, and circumstances (a strong wind that would considerably bolster Japanese carrier attack ranges while reducing the Americans', air bases closer to the enemy to field additional and heavier aircraft as well as land carrier aircraft returning from an extreme range attack on the enemey, etc), and the Americans were in the middle of invading islands that would give America airbases within strategic bombing range of the Japanese home islands. They sent out attack wave after attack wave, considerably more aircraft than they had had at their disposal at Midway, and the wind advantage meant that they were seemingly beyond the range of American reprisal. Only for the Japanese to find out that their pilots, planes, doctrine, technology, and ships were ''horribly'' outmatched when the American forces absolutely annihilated wave after wave of Japanese aircraft, with only minor damage on a battleship to show for it. Then American submarines sank two of their best fleet carriers--including the brand-new and pride-of-the-fleet Taiho, and the American counterattack still managed to catch up to and sink one more fleet carrier. The battle completely dashed any hope of the Japanese Navy turning the war around.
* The Battle of Leyte Gulf, following the Battle of the Phillipine Philippine Sea, was the Imperial Japanese Navy's final attempt to stop the US Navy. With its carrier forces utterly decimated and reduced to being nothing more than a decoy, the IJN sortied the vast majority of its remaining fleet. The Southern Force was summarily obliterated by a perfectly orchestrated night-time ambush, with a Japanese battleship being effectively executed by a firing line composed largely of the American battleships that had been sunk at Pearl Harbor (and then raised and repaired). The Northern Force, comprised of the decoy (as in, largely empty) carriers were all sunk by overwhelming carrier attack. The Center Force, where all of the true strength lay, received a golden opportunity after Halsey chased after the decoy force without so much as leaving a picket ship in the strait leading to his landing forces and escort carriers, stumbling upon Taffy 3: half a dozen slow, unarmored escort carriers and a few destroyers that were in the middle of supporting landing operations and were completely astonished by Center Force's arrival. Cue the most mis-matched naval battle in history, with Taffy 3 actually fighting off one of the most powerful surface action groups ever assembled with nothing more than a few tin-can destroyers, planes armed with just machine guns and light bombs, and audacious, desperate courage. By the end, the Northern Force was decimated, the Southern Force was annihilated, and the Center Force had taken severe losses, with only one escort carrier, two destroyers, and one destroyer escorts sunk to show for it. The Japanese Navy was destroyed as a significant fighting force, its remnants scattering to various locations and being hunted down in detail by the US Navy.
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