History Main / SherlockHolmesVersusArseneLupin

17th Sep '13 12:17:32 PM StFan
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ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. In 1905 French author Maurice Leblanc, a contemporary of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, introduced his audience to [[Literature/ArseneLupin Arsène Lupin]], GentlemanThief extraordinaire, a character who would go on to have as much success and renown in the non-English speaking world as Doyle's own creation, detective SherlockHolmes. Naturally, when you have the detective's Detective on one side of the pond, and the most gentlemanly of thieves on the other, crossovers are not just considered but inevitable. Alternatively titled as ''Sherlock Holmes: Nemesis'', the fourth game in Frogware's ''Adventure of Sherlock Holmes'' series has a premise that can be described in a single sentence: Arsène Lupin has come to England [[CriminalMindGames and has invited Sherlock Holmes to come out and play]]. !!Sherlock Holmes vs. Arsène Lupin has examples of the following tropes: * ArsonMurderAndJaywalking: During a discussion with a resident of Buckingham Palace, Holmes lists off a long list of reasons to fear Lupin, noting his skill and fiendish, ending with: -->'''Holmes''': And furthermore, [[NationalStereotypes he is French]]! * ContinuityNod: Both to the original canon, and the previous game, ''The Awakened''. Watson is shown to still be suffering from the BadDreams that case brought on. * CriminalMindGames: The Game. Lupin leaves numerous clues at each crime scene that hint towards where he's going to strike next. Holmes notes that he must have been preparing his thefts for months, given the amount of preparation that has gone into laying the breadcrumbs. * DidDoTheResearch: [[spoiler: While investigating the art museum Lupin's promised to rob, you meet an artist named Horace Velmont who later turns out to have been Lupin in disguise. Those who've read the Arsene Lupin stories will already know that was one of his aliases.]] * EdutainmentGame: Not explicitly designed or marketed as one, but it's hard to escape the fact there's a ''lot'' of historical facts flying around in this game. 90% of the exhibits in every location, even the irrelevant ones, have at least some flavour text. * GentlemanThief: Lupin, the UrExample. He's clearly enjoying every minute of it, but there's no malice in what he's doing. * [[spoiler: GracefulLoser]]: [[spoiler: When finally cornered by Holmes at his last target, Lupin's not the least bit upset at being outmaneuvered. He more or less tips his hat to Sherlock and heads home]]. * IdiotBall: Poor Watson does not have his best week. Wanting to avoid letting Holmes know the press is apparently on the scent of the thefts is understandable. [[spoiler: When that same reporter's name is an blindingly obvious anagram of said thief's name? Ohh, Watson...]] * KansasCityShuffle: Lupin's last target is [[spoiler: not Big Ben, but the Tower of London, a target he'd already "robbed" at the beginning of his crime spree]]. * LighterAndSofter: Compared to the preceeding game ''The Awakened''[[hottip:*:Essentially "Holmes vs Cthulhu"]] and the sequel[[hottip:*:"Sherlock Holmes vs ''JackTheRipper''"]], this is a pretty light fare. * MasterOfDisguise: Both Lupin and Holmes are shown to have a skilled knack at disguise. * NintendoHard: The puzzels/hints that Lupin leaves behind can get ridiculously obscure. * NotSoDifferent: Parallels are drawn between Holmes and Lupin - both are well off, highly skilled gentlemen who do what they do mainly as a way to stave off bordeom. * PatrioticFervor: Commentary is made on the fact that Lupin's embarrasing London is delighting the French to no end. They're probably just glad he's not stealing from them for a week. * SignificantAnagram: [[spoiler: Piers U. Alenn]]. Although, come on, it's ''barely'' a spoiler. * {{Troll}}: Lupin's method of thievery involves a good deal of this. For example, when stealing from the National Gallery, he doesn't just make off with his chosen canvas but also stops to take down and replace countless others with the garish paintings of a French artist. [[AndThatsTerrible "What horrors!"]]
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ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. In 1905 French author Maurice Leblanc, a contemporary of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, introduced his audience to [[Literature/ArseneLupin Arsène Lupin]], GentlemanThief extraordinaire, a character who would go on to have as much success and renown in the non-English speaking world as Doyle's own creation, detective SherlockHolmes. Naturally, when you have the detective's Detective on one side of the pond, and the most gentlemanly of thieves on the other, crossovers are not just considered but inevitable. Alternatively titled as ''Sherlock Holmes: Nemesis'', the fourth game in Frogware's ''Adventure of Sherlock Holmes'' series has a premise that can be described in a single sentence: Arsène Lupin has come to England [[CriminalMindGames and has invited Sherlock Holmes to come out and play]]. !!Sherlock Holmes vs. Arsène Lupin has examples of the following tropes: * ArsonMurderAndJaywalking: During a discussion with a resident of Buckingham Palace, Holmes lists off a long list of reasons to fear Lupin, noting his skill and fiendish, ending with: -->'''Holmes''': And furthermore, [[NationalStereotypes he is French]]! * ContinuityNod: Both to the original canon, and the previous game, ''The Awakened''. Watson is shown to still be suffering from the BadDreams that case brought on. * CriminalMindGames: The Game. Lupin leaves numerous clues at each crime scene that hint towards where he's going to strike next. Holmes notes that he must have been preparing his thefts for months, given the amount of preparation that has gone into laying the breadcrumbs. * DidDoTheResearch: [[spoiler: While investigating the art museum Lupin's promised to rob, you meet an artist named Horace Velmont who later turns out to have been Lupin in disguise. Those who've read the Arsene Lupin stories will already know that was one of his aliases.]] * EdutainmentGame: Not explicitly designed or marketed as one, but it's hard to escape the fact there's a ''lot'' of historical facts flying around in this game. 90% of the exhibits in every location, even the irrelevant ones, have at least some flavour text. * GentlemanThief: Lupin, the UrExample. He's clearly enjoying every minute of it, but there's no malice in what he's doing. * [[spoiler: GracefulLoser]]: [[spoiler: When finally cornered by Holmes at his last target, Lupin's not the least bit upset at being outmaneuvered. He more or less tips his hat to Sherlock and heads home]]. * IdiotBall: Poor Watson does not have his best week. Wanting to avoid letting Holmes know the press is apparently on the scent of the thefts is understandable. [[spoiler: When that same reporter's name is an blindingly obvious anagram of said thief's name? Ohh, Watson...]] * KansasCityShuffle: Lupin's last target is [[spoiler: not Big Ben, but the Tower of London, a target he'd already "robbed" at the beginning of his crime spree]]. * LighterAndSofter: Compared to the preceeding game ''The Awakened''[[hottip:*:Essentially "Holmes vs Cthulhu"]] and the sequel[[hottip:*:"Sherlock Holmes vs ''JackTheRipper''"]], this is a pretty light fare. * MasterOfDisguise: Both Lupin and Holmes are shown to have a skilled knack at disguise. * NintendoHard: The puzzels/hints that Lupin leaves behind can get ridiculously obscure. * NotSoDifferent: Parallels are drawn between Holmes and Lupin - both are well off, highly skilled gentlemen who do what they do mainly as a way to stave off bordeom. * PatrioticFervor: Commentary is made on the fact that Lupin's embarrasing London is delighting the French to no end. They're probably just glad he's not stealing from them for a week. * SignificantAnagram: [[spoiler: Piers U. Alenn]]. Although, come on, it's ''barely'' a spoiler. * {{Troll}}: Lupin's method of thievery involves a good deal of this. For example, when stealing from the National Gallery, he doesn't just make off with his chosen canvas but also stops to take down and replace countless others with the garish paintings of a French artist. [[AndThatsTerrible "What horrors!"]][[redirect:VideoGame/SherlockHolmesVersusArseneLupin]]
20th Jun '13 11:11:14 PM starofjusticev21
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* DidDoTheResearch: [[spoiler: While investigating the art museum Lupin's promised to rob, you meet an artist named Horace Velmont who later turns out to have been Lupin in disguise. Those who've read the Arsene Lupin stories will already know that was one of his aliases.]]

* MythologyGag: [[spoiler: While investigating the art museum Lupin's promised to rob, you meet an artist named Horace Velmont who later turns out to have been Lupin in disguise. Those who've read the Arsene Lupin stories will already know that was one of his aliases.]]
29th May '13 8:26:50 AM starofjusticev21
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Added DiffLines:
* MythologyGag: [[spoiler: While investigating the art museum Lupin's promised to rob, you meet an artist named Horace Velmont who later turns out to have been Lupin in disguise. Those who've read the Arsene Lupin stories will already know that was one of his aliases.]]
25th May '13 9:30:59 PM nombretomado
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In 1905 French author Maurice Leblanc, a contemporary of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, introduced his audience to [[ArseneLupin Arsène Lupin]], GentlemanThief extraordinaire, a character who would go on to have as much success and renown in the non-English speaking world as Doyle's own creation, detective SherlockHolmes.
to:
In 1905 French author Maurice Leblanc, a contemporary of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, introduced his audience to [[ArseneLupin [[Literature/ArseneLupin Arsène Lupin]], GentlemanThief extraordinaire, a character who would go on to have as much success and renown in the non-English speaking world as Doyle's own creation, detective SherlockHolmes.
5th Apr '13 7:19:05 PM JIKTV
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-->'''Holmes''': And furthermore, [[AcceptableNationalityTargets he is French]]!
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-->'''Holmes''': And furthermore, [[AcceptableNationalityTargets [[NationalStereotypes he is French]]!
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