History Main / SevenYearsWar

6th Apr '15 8:26:14 AM Menshevik
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Rather speculative if you have to go to a century later, when Hanover would have survived if it had been smart enough to ally itself with Prussia instead of Austria. Also Hanover was only a "natural target" for France because of its British connection and it NEVER was a "natural target" for Austria. And in the 7 Years War the Duke of Cumberland almost handed over Hanover to the French after losing one battle, while during the War of Austrian succession it was common in Britain to grouse about how George II did not expose his Hanoverian troops enough.
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6th Apr '15 8:16:16 AM Menshevik
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15th Mar '15 6:15:23 PM nombretomado
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2nd Mar '15 5:01:14 AM Turtler
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There was no good reason to delete that part, and the anti-British bias in the logic is quite obvious. Hannover- especially the larger territory that this encompassed- was due Northeast of the Rhineland. And so a major target for any hostile army crossing in the Northern or central sectors. Which is exactly what France tried to do multiple times, and as often as not they were successful, like they were in 1757. Hanoverian survival in the times it happened was reliant on British support to either field a military force capable of defending it, enticing someone else with the ability to do it (Prussia particularly), or both. Something yo uare conveniently omitting from the analysis of events like 1793. Not coincidentally, when the Hanoveria. The "analysis" of the Napoleonic Wars is particualrly questionable. Britain was not content throwing Hanover to the wolves in 1803, any more than they were content with the rest of Amiens. They accepted it because there was absolutely no alternative for Hanover in particular. Nobody on the continent could defeat the French army at the time, and it was impossible to insert the British military into ther egion and have it stand up in a grueling war of attrition, meaning that nobody was going to do like the Anglo-Germans did in 1757. But throughout this Britain sponsored not only Hanoverian soldiers in exile but also the Hanoverian government, quickly rescinded acceptance of its' annexation, and began waging war with France both directly and through *financing rivals that could liberate Hanover when Britain could not.* Contrary to the stereyotype that the KGL- or the British army- was "bogged down" in the Peninsula cicra 1813, they were in hot pursuit of a French army in full retreat, and one that had been since before Napoleon's invasion of Russia (a fact taht can be seen from their battle history and opening a map), while the Austro/Prussian/Russian/Swedish army that did lbierate Hanover did so largely using British muskets and British finances. Ignoring these things is like ignoring the powder in a musket. As for "surviving" like the states you mentioned, the fact that they barely existed outside of noble privledge (even in terms of very limited autonomy) makes "survival" dubious; they all basically became greater appendages of Prussia to a degree that states like Bavaria, Saxony, etc. al. never did by virtue of their size and power. And finally, the reason Britian did not help Hanover was not because it wasn't interested in the war; Britain wans't interested in the war because Hanover had made a rather messy break from the alliance with Britain (refusing to let Victoria inherit against sizable opposition internally; not pursuing the chance to continue what had begun dynastically through treaty, etc). Ultimately, Hanover became terminally dependant on Britain and Prussia for defense; needing at least one to deter conquest. When policies by all involved led the alliance with Britain to cease and Prussia to become an enemy, it was curtains.
13th Nov '14 9:29:01 AM Menshevik
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Hanover being in the trouble in Rhineland is tosh as the Rhineland was nowhere near Hanover. In itself, Hanover lay outside Austria's and France's spheres of interest at the time of the Seven Years War. Prussia would seize Hanover when an opportunity presented itself in the context of a larger war, but would not start a war to conquer Hanover. In 1866 Hanover made the wrong choice of ally in a war in which Britain was not interested, otherwise it would probably have survived as e. g. Brunswick, Lippe and the Hanseatic Cities did. In 1795 Hanover was saved from a French invasion because Prussia took it under its wing, in 1803 Britain was perfectly content to throw Hanover to the wolves and just use its army in exile (the King's German Legion) for any purpose but to liberate Hanover. That came about in 1813 primarily due to the efforts of Russia, Prussia and Sweden (while the KGL was still bogged down in the Peninsular War).
13th Nov '14 8:52:12 AM Ruddigore
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13th Nov '14 8:37:39 AM Ruddigore
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13th Nov '14 8:26:31 AM Ruddigore
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13th Nov '14 8:02:04 AM Ruddigore
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30th Sep '14 2:06:37 AM JulianLapostat
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