History Main / SequelNumberSnarl

28th Aug '17 5:27:06 PM oknazevad
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* UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows. Internal and external version numbers haven't matched in years. Part of this complexity stems from the different versions being entirely different code bases over the years. Earlier versions were based on the old MS-DOS system (indeed, Windows was originally an add-on program to DOS, not an operating system). This applies to every version up to and including the 95/98/Me versions (DOS-based Windows 4.x, internally). Meanwhile, the NT code base was introduced as a high-end, network-friendly system, released in parallel and aimed at businesses. The ''first'' version of that was NT 3.1 (the same version number DOS-based Windows was on at the time). NT 4.0 was released at the same time as Win 95 (and looked just like it, despite not being internally compatible). It wasn't until Windows XP (NT version 5.0) was released that the home and business lines were fully merged. Vista was NT 6.0, but when it went over like a lead balloon, they intentionally pushed the external number up to 7, while the internal system number was 6.1, as the core internals are only slightly tweaked; Win7 was mostly a user-end overhaul. Windows 8 followed, again overhauling the user-end stuff, so it's internal number is 6.2; it was even more criticized than Vista (because 7 actually was popular and not too old), so a patch job called 8.1 was released, making the internal number 6.3. For the follow up, they wanted to show a big jump, so they skipped the name straight to Windows 10. [[strike:But it's just 6.4 internally!]] Surprisingly, the build number is also 10--specifically 10.0.10240 for the RTM release.

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* UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows. Internal and external version numbers haven't matched in years. Part of this complexity stems from the different versions being entirely different code bases over the years. Earlier versions were based on the old MS-DOS system (indeed, Windows was originally an add-on program to DOS, not an operating system). This applies to every version up to and including the 95/98/Me versions (DOS-based Windows 4.x, internally). Meanwhile, the NT code base was introduced as a high-end, network-friendly system, released in parallel and aimed at businesses. The ''first'' version of that was NT 3.1 (the same version number DOS-based Windows was on at the time).time; the user interface of NT 3.1 looked and functioned just like the DOS version). NT 4.0 was released at the same time as Win 95 (and looked just like it, despite not being internally compatible). It wasn't until Windows XP (NT version 5.0) was released that the home and business lines were fully merged. Vista was NT 6.0, but when it went over like a lead balloon, they intentionally pushed the external number up to 7, while the internal system number was 6.1, as the core internals are only slightly tweaked; Win7 Windows 7 was mostly a user-end overhaul. Windows 8 followed, again overhauling the user-end stuff, so it's internal number is 6.2; it was even more criticized than Vista (because 7 actually was popular and not too old), so a patch job called 8.1 was released, making the internal number 6.3. For the follow up, they wanted to show a big jump, so they skipped the name straight to Windows 10. [[strike:But it's just 6.4 internally!]] Surprisingly, the build number is also 10--specifically 10.0.10240 for the RTM release.
28th Aug '17 5:14:56 PM oknazevad
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* The various ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' editions are titled ''Dungeons & Dragons'', ''Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set'', ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons'', ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition'', ''Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition'', ''Dungeons & Dragons v3.5'' (a minor revision), ''Dungeons & Dragons 4th Edition'', and ''Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition''. While the relationships between early versions isn't hard and fast (they were considered the same game, just aimed at different audiences, and were largely compatible until the Basic Set was revised in 1981), there's no way 5th Edition is actually the 5th version of the game. For extra confusion, ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'', while technically a separate product, is really just a further revision of v3.5, and thus is frequently referred to by fans as "v3.75".

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* The various ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' editions are titled ''Dungeons & Dragons'', ''Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set'', ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons'', ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition'', ''Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition'', ''Dungeons & Dragons v3.5'' (a minor revision), ''Dungeons & Dragons 4th Edition'', and ''Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition''. While the relationships between early versions isn't hard and fast (they were considered the same game, just aimed at different audiences, and were largely compatible until the Basic Set was revised in 1981), there's no way 5th Edition is actually the 5th version of the game. For extra confusion, ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'', while technically a separate product, is really just a further revision of v3.5, and thus is frequently referred to by fans as "v3.75".
28th Aug '17 5:10:34 PM oknazevad
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* The ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'' series started as a trilogy of games on the arcade and NES (as well as other platforms) consisting of the original ''VideoGame/{{Double Dragon|I}}'', ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonIITheRevenge'' and ''Double Dragon 3: The Rosetta Stone'' (or ''Double Dragon III: The Sacred Stones'', as it was titled on the NES). It was a followed by an unnumbered sequel (actually a reboot) for the Super NES titled ''Super Double Dragon'' (a.k.a. ''Return of Double Dragon'' in Japan), which was essentially treated as the unofficial "Double Dragon IV", to the point that when U.S. publisher Tradewest decided to develop a fighting game based on the ''WesternAnimation/DoubleDragon'' animated series, they named their game ''Double Dragon V: The Shadow Falls''. An official ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonIV'' would eventually be released decades later in 2017 for [=PS4=] and PC (via Steam), which was developed by the original team and follows the continuity of the NES versions.

to:

* The ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'' series started as a trilogy of games on the arcade and NES (as well as other platforms) consisting of the original ''VideoGame/{{Double Dragon|I}}'', ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonIITheRevenge'' and ''Double Dragon 3: The Rosetta Stone'' (or ''Double Dragon III: The Sacred Stones'', as it the third NES game, which is an entirely different game only sharing the basic plot premise, was titled on the NES).called). It was a followed by an unnumbered sequel (actually a reboot) for the Super NES titled ''Super Double Dragon'' (a.k.a. ''Return of Double Dragon'' in Japan), which was essentially treated as the unofficial "Double Dragon IV", to the point that when U.S. publisher Tradewest decided to develop a fighting game based on the ''WesternAnimation/DoubleDragon'' animated series, they named their game ''Double Dragon V: The Shadow Falls''. An official ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonIV'' would eventually be released decades later in 2017 for [=PS4=] and PC (via Steam), which was developed by the original team and follows the continuity of the NES versions.
17th Aug '17 3:06:27 PM Saurubiker
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** Things wouldn't get complicated again until the release of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps''. Released between ''[=MGS3=]'' and ''[=MGS4=]'', it was the first ''MGS'' game to be released for a portable system that was advertised as being a mainline game rather than a non-canon spinoff (as was the case with ''VideoGame/MetalGearGhostBabel'' and ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid''), essentially serving as a direct sequel to ''[=MGS3=]''. It was developed by Kojima Productions' B-team, with Creator/HideoKojima having very minimal involvement with its production (who was busy with ''[=MGS4=]'' at the time). Kojima would later write and direct the next PSP game in the series, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker''', which also serves as a sequel to ''[=MGS3=]'', but practically ignores the events of ''Portable Ops'' outside one throwaway line. ''Peace Walker'' was even titled ''Metal Gear Solid 5'' at one point and while the numbered title was dropped from the final release, its plot would be continued in the actual ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV''. As a result, there's some debate whether ''Portable Ops'' or ''Peace Walker'' should count as mainline installments due to their portable origins (although ''Peace Walker'' was ported to consoles) and lack of numbered titles. ''Portable Ops'' in particular tend to be omitted from most of the recent timelines, with ''Peace Walker'' only being recognized due to Kojima's involvement (although that may change due to Kojima's departure from Konami).

to:

** Things wouldn't get complicated again until the release of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps''. Released between ''[=MGS3=]'' and ''[=MGS4=]'', it was the first ''MGS'' game to be released for a portable system that was advertised as being a mainline game entry rather than a non-canon spinoff (as was the case with ''VideoGame/MetalGearGhostBabel'' and ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid''), essentially serving as a direct sequel to ''[=MGS3=]''. It was developed by Kojima Productions' B-team, with Creator/HideoKojima having very himself only had minimal involvement with its production (who production, as he was busy with ''[=MGS4=]'' at the time). time. Kojima would later write and direct the next PSP game in the series, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker''', ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'', which also serves as a sequel to ''[=MGS3=]'', but practically ignores the events of ''Portable Ops'' outside one throwaway line. ''Peace Walker'' was even titled ''Metal Gear Solid 5'' at one point and while the numbered title was dropped from the final release, its plot would be continued in the actual ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV''. As a result, there's some debate whether ''Portable Ops'' or ''Peace Walker'' should count as mainline installments due to their portable origins and lack of numbering in their titles (although ''Peace Walker'' was did get ported to consoles) and lack of numbered titles.consoles). ''Portable Ops'' in particular tend to be omitted from most of the recent timelines, with ''Peace Walker'' only being recognized due to Kojima's involvement (although that may change due to Kojima's departure from Konami).
17th Aug '17 3:03:30 PM Saurubiker
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** Things wouldn't get complicated enough until the release of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps''. Released between ''[=MGS3=]'' and ''[=MGS4=]'', it was the first ''MGS'' game to be released for a portable system that was advertised as being a mainline game rather than a non-canon spinoff (as was the case with ''VideoGame/MetalGearGhostBabel'' and ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid''), essentially serving as a direct sequel to ''[=MGS3=]'' developed by Kojima Productions' B-team while the Creator/HideoKojima and his main team were leading the development of ''[=MGS4=]''. Kojima's team would later develop another PSP game in the series, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker''', which also serves as a sequel to ''[=MGS3=]'', but practically ignores the events of ''Portable Ops'' outside one throwaway line. ''Peace Walker'' was even titled ''Metal Gear Solid 5'' at one point and while the numbered title was dropped from the final release, its plot would be continued in the next numbered title, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV''. As a result, there's some debate whether ''Portable Ops'' or ''Peace Walker'' should count as mainline installments due to their portable origins (although ''Peace Walker'' was ported consoles) and lack of numbered titles. ''Portable Ops'' in particular tend to be omitted from most of the recent timelines, with ''Peace Walker'' only being recognized due to Kojima's involvement (although that may change due to Kojima's departure from Konami).

to:

** Things wouldn't get complicated enough again until the release of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps''. Released between ''[=MGS3=]'' and ''[=MGS4=]'', it was the first ''MGS'' game to be released for a portable system that was advertised as being a mainline game rather than a non-canon spinoff (as was the case with ''VideoGame/MetalGearGhostBabel'' and ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid''), essentially serving as a direct sequel to ''[=MGS3=]'' ''[=MGS3=]''. It was developed by Kojima Productions' B-team while the B-team, with Creator/HideoKojima and his main team were leading having very minimal involvement with its production (who was busy with ''[=MGS4=]'' at the development of ''[=MGS4=]''. Kojima's team time). Kojima would later develop another write and direct the next PSP game in the series, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker''', which also serves as a sequel to ''[=MGS3=]'', but practically ignores the events of ''Portable Ops'' outside one throwaway line. ''Peace Walker'' was even titled ''Metal Gear Solid 5'' at one point and while the numbered title was dropped from the final release, its plot would be continued in the next numbered title, actual ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV''. As a result, there's some debate whether ''Portable Ops'' or ''Peace Walker'' should count as mainline installments due to their portable origins (although ''Peace Walker'' was ported to consoles) and lack of numbered titles. ''Portable Ops'' in particular tend to be omitted from most of the recent timelines, with ''Peace Walker'' only being recognized due to Kojima's involvement (although that may change due to Kojima's departure from Konami).
17th Aug '17 2:59:32 PM Saurubiker
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* In Italy, ''{{Film/Dawn of the Dead|1978}}'' was dubbed under the title of ''Zombi'', spawning two unauthorized sequels by local producer Creator/LucioFulci: ''Film/{{Zombi 2}}'' and ''Film/Zombi3D''. In the U.S., ''Zombi 2'' was retitled ''Zombie'' and marketed as a standalone movie with no ties to ''Dawn of the Dead'', but ''Zombi 3'' kept its original numbering, making it seemed as if there was another movie in-between. To add further confusion, two unrelated movies by ''Zombie 3'' co-producer Claudio Fragasso [[MarketBasedTitle were marketed as]] Zombie sequels in the U.S.: ''After Death'' (aka ''Zombie 4'') and ''Killing Birds'' (a.k.a. ''Zombie 5''). In the UK, all four of these movies were released under the title ''Zombie Flesh Eaters'' title and were numbered appropriately.

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* In Italy, ''{{Film/Dawn of the Dead|1978}}'' was dubbed under the title of ''Zombi'', spawning two unauthorized sequels produced by local producer Creator/LucioFulci: Creator/LucioFulci (who was responsible for the Italian dub): ''Film/{{Zombi 2}}'' and ''Film/Zombi3D''. In the U.S., ''Zombi 2'' was retitled ''Zombie'' and marketed as a standalone movie with no ties to ''Dawn of the Dead'', but ''Zombi 3'' kept its original numbering, making it seemed as if there was another movie in-between. To add further confusion, two unrelated movies by ''Zombie 3'' co-producer Claudio Fragasso [[MarketBasedTitle were marketed as]] Zombie sequels in the U.S.: ''After Death'' (aka ''Zombie 4'') and ''Killing Birds'' (a.k.a. ''Zombie 5''). In the UK, all four of these movies were released under the title ''Zombie Flesh Eaters'' title and were numbered appropriately.



* The ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'' series started as a trilogy of games on the arcade and NES (as well as other platforms) consisting of the original ''VideoGame/{{Double Dragon|I}}'', ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonIITheRevenge'' and ''Double Dragon 3: The Rosetta Stone'' (or ''Double Dragon III: The Sacred Stones'', as it was titled the NES). It was a followed by an unnumbered sequel (actually a reboot) for the Super NES titled ''Super Double Dragon'' (a.k.a. ''Return of Double Dragon'' in Japan), which was essentially treated as the unofficial "Double Dragon IV", to the point that when U.S. publisher Tradewest decided to develop a fighting game based on the ''WesternAnimation/DoubleDragon'' animated series, they named their game ''Double Dragon V: The Shadow Falls''. An official ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonIV'' would eventually be released decades later in 2017 for [=PS4=] and PC (via Steam), which was developed by the original team and follows the continuity of the NES versions.

to:

* The ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'' series started as a trilogy of games on the arcade and NES (as well as other platforms) consisting of the original ''VideoGame/{{Double Dragon|I}}'', ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonIITheRevenge'' and ''Double Dragon 3: The Rosetta Stone'' (or ''Double Dragon III: The Sacred Stones'', as it was titled on the NES). It was a followed by an unnumbered sequel (actually a reboot) for the Super NES titled ''Super Double Dragon'' (a.k.a. ''Return of Double Dragon'' in Japan), which was essentially treated as the unofficial "Double Dragon IV", to the point that when U.S. publisher Tradewest decided to develop a fighting game based on the ''WesternAnimation/DoubleDragon'' animated series, they named their game ''Double Dragon V: The Shadow Falls''. An official ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonIV'' would eventually be released decades later in 2017 for [=PS4=] and PC (via Steam), which was developed by the original team and follows the continuity of the NES versions.



* The ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series naturally started with the [[VideoGame/MetalGear original 1987 game]], first released on the [[UsefulNotes/{{MSX}} MSX2]] computer and then ported to the NES in a [[ReformulatedGame heavily modified way]]. This led to the production of not one, but two ''Metal Gear'' sequels: the sequel to the NES version was titled ''VideoGame/SnakesRevenge'' and was released for the west, whereas the [=MSX2=] sequel, ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'', was available only in Japan. Because of this a lot of people in the west before the internet essentially thought that ''Snake's Revenge'' was the only ''Metal Gear'' sequel, to the point that it was even referred to as ''Snake's Revenge: Metal Gear II'' in magazine coverage. This subtitle has since felt into disuse as awareness of the [=MSX2=] games became more widespread through the plot summaries in the original ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' and their later inclusion in most versions of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3''.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' itself, while being a sequel to the [=MSX2=] games (rather than the more widely available NES games at the time), also served as a soft reboot for the series, as it was the first installment in [=3D=] and was the first canonical game that was given a wider release on a platform that was actually available in North America (hence why it was titled ''Metal Gear Solid'' and not ''Metal Gear 3''). Thus, subsequent mainline entries reset the numbering by being titled ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 2|Sons of Liberty}}'', ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater 3]]'' and ''[[MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots 4]]'' (with the third game being a prequel to the very first ''Metal Gear''). Simple enough.
** Things wouldn't get complicated enough until the release of not one, but two ''MGS'' games for the PlayStationPortable, both serving as direct sequels to ''[=MGS3=]''. The first one, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps'', was released between ''[=MGS3=]'' and ''[=MGS4=]'' and was not directed nor written by Creator/HideoKojima, but was actually made by a B-team within Kojima Productions under a lower budget. Kojima would later lead development of the second PSP game, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'', which practically ignores most of the plot points from ''Portable Ops'' and was at one point titled ''Metal Gear Solid 5''. While the numbered title went unused, the game still sets up the next mainline entry, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV''.

to:

* The ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series naturally started with the [[VideoGame/MetalGear original 1987 game]], first released on for the [[UsefulNotes/{{MSX}} MSX2]] computer and then ported to the NES NES (which was the only version released in a [[ReformulatedGame heavily modified way]].North America). This led to the production of not one, but two ''Metal Gear'' sequels: the sequel to the NES version was titled ''VideoGame/SnakesRevenge'' and was released for the west, whereas the [=MSX2=] sequel, ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'', was available only in Japan. Because of this a lot of people in the west before the internet essentially thought that ''Snake's Revenge'' was the only ''Metal Gear'' sequel, to the point that it was even referred to as ''Snake's Revenge: Metal Gear II'' in magazine coverage. This subtitle has since felt into disuse as awareness of the [=MSX2=] games became more widespread through the plot summaries in the original ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' and their later inclusion in most versions of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3''.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' itself, while being a sequel to the [=MSX2=] games (rather than the more widely available NES games at the time), also served as a soft reboot for the series, as it was the first installment in [=3D=] and was the first canonical game that was given a wider proper worldwide release on a platform that was actually available in North America (hence why it was titled ''Metal Gear Solid'' and not ''Metal Gear 3''). Thus, subsequent mainline entries reset the numbering of the series by being titled ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 2|Sons of Liberty}}'', ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater 3]]'' and ''[[MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots 4]]'' (with the third game being a prequel to the very first ''Metal Gear''). Simple enough.
** Things wouldn't get complicated enough until the release of not one, but two ''MGS'' games for the PlayStationPortable, both serving as direct sequels to ''[=MGS3=]''. The first one, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps'', was released ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps''. Released between ''[=MGS3=]'' and ''[=MGS4=]'' ''[=MGS4=]'', it was the first ''MGS'' game to be released for a portable system that was advertised as being a mainline game rather than a non-canon spinoff (as was the case with ''VideoGame/MetalGearGhostBabel'' and was not directed nor written ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid''), essentially serving as a direct sequel to ''[=MGS3=]'' developed by Creator/HideoKojima, but was actually made by a Kojima Productions' B-team within Kojima Productions under a lower budget. Kojima would later lead while the Creator/HideoKojima and his main team were leading the development of ''[=MGS4=]''. Kojima's team would later develop another PSP game in the second PSP game, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'', series, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker''', which also serves as a sequel to ''[=MGS3=]'', but practically ignores most of the plot points from events of ''Portable Ops'' and outside one throwaway line. ''Peace Walker'' was at one point even titled ''Metal Gear Solid 5''. While 5'' at one point and while the numbered title went unused, was dropped from the game still sets up final release, its plot would be continued in the next mainline entry, numbered title, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV''. As a result, there's some debate whether ''Portable Ops'' or ''Peace Walker'' should count as mainline installments due to their portable origins (although ''Peace Walker'' was ported consoles) and lack of numbered titles. ''Portable Ops'' in particular tend to be omitted from most of the recent timelines, with ''Peace Walker'' only being recognized due to Kojima's involvement (although that may change due to Kojima's departure from Konami).
17th Aug '17 1:25:57 AM Saurubiker
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* ''Franchise/MetalGear''
** The series naturally started with the original ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' , first released on the [[UsefulNotes/{{MSX}} MSX2]] computer and then ported to the NES in a [[ReformulatedGame heavily modified way]]. This led to the production of not one, but two ''Metal Gear'' sequels: the sequel to the NES version was titled ''VideoGame/SnakesRevenge'' and was released for the west, whereas the [=MSX2=] sequel, ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'', was available only in Japan. Because of this a lot of people in the west before the internet essentially treated ''Snake's Revenge'' as the only ''Metal Gear'' sequel, to the point that even ''NintendoPower'' gave it the alternate title ''Snake's Revenge: Metal Gear II'' in its coverage. This subtitle has since felt into disuse as the [=MSX2=] games became more widely available through emulation and their inclusion in later games and compilations.
** When Creator/HideoKojima, who wrote and directed the original [=MSX2=] games, decided to revive the series on the original UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}}, he decided to name the third entry ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' (a title chosen to represent the transition from [=2D=] pixels to [=3D=] polygons) rather than ''Metal Gear 3'', as the [=MSX2=] games he worked on were obscure in the west at the time and he wanted to avoid confusion with the NES versions made without his involvement that were more widely available, essentially making this new game a soft reboot treatment. The subsequent sequels simply adopted the ''Metal Gear Solid'' branding and added numerals and subtitles to their titles (e.g. ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'', ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'' and ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots''). Pretty simple stuff.
** Stuff didn't become complicated again until the announcement of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'' and ''Metal Gear Solid: Rising''. The former is a direct sequel to ''Metal Gear Solid 3'' originally released for the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation Portable}}, similar to the earlier spinoff ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps'', leading many people to treat it as a sequel to said spinoff. Unlike ''Portable Ops'', ''Peace Walker'' was written and directed by Kojima, who developed and promoted the game as a mainline entry rather than just a portable spinoff - it even briefly carried the working title of ''Metal Gear Solid 5: Peace Walker''. While the numeral was dropped from the final title, the game did get a much wider release than ''Portable Ops'' due to its later ports on the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360 home consoles. ''Rising'' on the other hand was a spinoff game developed entirely by newer members of Kojima Productions, made to figure out the direction to take with the next mainline installment. However, the project underwent a troubled development and would be outsourced to Creator/{{PlatinumGames}}, eventually being revamped into ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'', making it one of the few games in the series released without the ''Solid'' branding alongside ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid''.
** After that came the next numbered installment, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'', which despite the Roman numeral, is actually the eighth game directed by Kojima. ''V'' was originally split into two for its initial release: the stand-alone prologue ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVGroundZeroes Ground Zeroes]]'' and the main portion titled ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain The Phantom Pain]]''. Timeline-wise, the game serves as a direct sequel to ''Peace Walker'', as well as a prequel to the original ''Metal Gear''. At any rate, ''The Phantom Pain'' marked the end of Kojima's involvement with the series following his controversial departure from Konami. Konami had already announced the next game in the series, a spinoff titled ''VideoGame/MetalGearSurvive'', but their plans for their next mainline entry of the series (if they have any) seems to be unclear at the moment.

to:

* ''Franchise/MetalGear''
**
The ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series naturally started with the [[VideoGame/MetalGear original ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' , 1987 game]], first released on the [[UsefulNotes/{{MSX}} MSX2]] computer and then ported to the NES in a [[ReformulatedGame heavily modified way]]. This led to the production of not one, but two ''Metal Gear'' sequels: the sequel to the NES version was titled ''VideoGame/SnakesRevenge'' and was released for the west, whereas the [=MSX2=] sequel, ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'', was available only in Japan. Because of this a lot of people in the west before the internet essentially treated thought that ''Snake's Revenge'' as was the only ''Metal Gear'' sequel, to the point that it was even ''NintendoPower'' gave it the alternate title referred to as ''Snake's Revenge: Metal Gear II'' in its magazine coverage. This subtitle has since felt into disuse as awareness of the [=MSX2=] games became more widely available widespread through emulation and their inclusion the plot summaries in later games and compilations.
** When Creator/HideoKojima, who wrote and directed
the original [=MSX2=] games, decided to revive the series on the original UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}}, he decided to name the third entry ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' (a title chosen and their later inclusion in most versions of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3''.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' itself, while being a sequel
to represent the transition from [=2D=] pixels to [=3D=] polygons) rather than ''Metal Gear 3'', as the [=MSX2=] games he worked on were obscure in (rather than the west at the time and he wanted to avoid confusion with the NES versions made without his involvement that were more widely available, essentially making this new game available NES games at the time), also served as a soft reboot treatment. The subsequent sequels simply adopted for the series, as it was the first installment in [=3D=] and was the first canonical game that was given a wider release on a platform that was actually available in North America (hence why it was titled ''Metal Gear Solid'' branding and added numerals and subtitles to their titles (e.g. ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'', ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'' and ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots''). Pretty simple stuff.
** Stuff didn't become complicated again until the announcement of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'' and
not ''Metal Gear Solid: Rising''. The former is 3''). Thus, subsequent mainline entries reset the numbering by being titled ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 2|Sons of Liberty}}'', ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater 3]]'' and ''[[MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots 4]]'' (with the third game being a direct sequel prequel to the very first ''Metal Gear Solid 3'' originally released Gear''). Simple enough.
** Things wouldn't get complicated enough until the release of not one, but two ''MGS'' games
for the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation Portable}}, similar PlayStationPortable, both serving as direct sequels to the earlier spinoff ''[=MGS3=]''. The first one, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps'', leading many people to treat it as a sequel to said spinoff. Unlike ''Portable Ops'', ''Peace Walker'' was written released between ''[=MGS3=]'' and ''[=MGS4=]'' and was not directed nor written by Kojima, who developed and promoted Creator/HideoKojima, but was actually made by a B-team within Kojima Productions under a lower budget. Kojima would later lead development of the game as a mainline entry rather than just a portable spinoff - it even briefly carried second PSP game, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'', which practically ignores most of the working title of ''Metal Gear Solid 5: Peace Walker''. While the numeral was dropped plot points from the final title, the game did get a much wider release than ''Portable Ops'' due to its later ports on and was at one point titled ''Metal Gear Solid 5''. While the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360 home consoles. ''Rising'' on numbered title went unused, the other hand was a spinoff game developed entirely by newer members of Kojima Productions, made to figure out the direction to take with still sets up the next mainline installment. However, the project underwent a troubled development and would be outsourced to Creator/{{PlatinumGames}}, eventually being revamped into ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'', making it one of the few games in the series released without the ''Solid'' branding alongside ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid''.
** After that came the next numbered installment, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV'', which despite the Roman numeral, is actually the eighth game directed by Kojima. ''V'' was originally split into two for its initial release: the stand-alone prologue ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVGroundZeroes Ground Zeroes]]'' and the main portion titled ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain The Phantom Pain]]''. Timeline-wise, the game serves as a direct sequel to ''Peace Walker'', as well as a prequel to the original ''Metal Gear''. At any rate, ''The Phantom Pain'' marked the end of Kojima's involvement with the series following his controversial departure from Konami. Konami had already announced the next game in the series, a spinoff titled ''VideoGame/MetalGearSurvive'', but their plans for their next mainline entry of the series (if they have any) seems to be unclear at the moment.
entry, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidV''.



** The mainline games have two different games titled ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'': the original Japanese version (aka ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels'') and the version that the rest of the world is familiar with (adapted from the Japan-exclusive ''VideoGame/DokiDokiPanic''). This was done since Nintendo of America considered ''Lost Levels'' to be [[MissionPackSequel too much of a rehash]], in addition to being [[SequelDifficultySpike too difficult compared to the original]], and wanted their own version of ''Super Mario Bros. 2'' to publish in its place (presumably to avoid the conundrum of having to renumber ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'' when it came time to localize that game in the west, which is what they would've done had they decided to just skip ''Lost Levels'' completely without releasing a substitute game). Ultimately, both games were recursively made available in both Japan and overseas (with the former receiving ''Super Mario Bros. 2'' under the name ''Super Mario USA''), and were further canonized by the inclusion of their features in future games, so the snarl is now limited to their names.
** Strictly speaking, ''VideoGame/WarioLandSuperMarioLand3'' and ''[[VideoGame/YoshisIsland Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island]]'' aren't really proper sequels of their respective predecessors, but instead [[PoorlyDisguisedPilot spin-offs]], which is why ''their'' own respective sequels dropped the original titles and went by the subtitle instead (e.g. ''Wario Land II'' instead of ''Super Mario Land 4'', ''Yoshi's Island DS'' instead of ''Super Mario World 3''). Interestingly, the original ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' was originally going to be titled ''Super Mario Bros. 4'' and this {{working title}} was still used on the packaging of the Japanese version (it isn't used on the actual title screen).

to:

** The mainline Mario games have two different games titled ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'': the original Japanese version (aka ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels'') and the version that the rest of the world is familiar with (adapted from the Japan-exclusive ''VideoGame/DokiDokiPanic''). This was done since Nintendo of America considered ''Lost Levels'' to be was essentially [[MissionPackSequel too much of a rehash]], in addition to being level pack]] for the first game with the [[SequelDifficultySpike too difficult compared to the original]], difficulty spiked up]], and Nintendo of America wanted a more original game to serve as their own version of ''Super Mario Bros. 2'' to publish in its place (presumably to avoid the conundrum of having to renumber ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'' when it came time to localize that game in the west, which is what they would've done happened had they decided to just skip ''Lost Levels'' completely without releasing a substitute game). Ultimately, both games were recursively made available in both Japan and overseas (with the former receiving ''Super Mario Bros. 2'' under the name ''Super Mario USA''), and were further canonized by the inclusion of their features in future games, so the snarl is now limited to their names.
** Strictly speaking, ''VideoGame/WarioLandSuperMarioLand3'' and ''[[VideoGame/YoshisIsland Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island]]'' aren't really proper sequels of their respective predecessors, but instead [[PoorlyDisguisedPilot spin-offs]], which is why ''their'' own respective sequels dropped the original titles and went by the subtitle instead (e.g. ''Wario Land II'' instead of ''Super Mario Land 4'', ''Yoshi's Island DS'' instead of ''Super Mario World 3''). Interestingly, the original ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' was originally going to be titled ''Super Mario Bros. 4'' and this {{working title}} was still used on the packaging of the Japanese version (it isn't used on in the actual title screen).game).
8th Jul '17 9:58:40 AM nombretomado
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** Season numbering can be quite confusing. Does Nu Who start again, which means distinguishing between two Season Ones? (TheOtherWiki calls Creator/WilliamHartnell's first season Season 1, and Creator/ChristopherEccleston's season Series 1, as does Creator/TheBBC website - while still being at pains to point out that it's all the same series.) Or do you just keep going past Season 26, as many fans do? (ThisVeryWiki's Recap page lists both.) Creator/StevenMoffat confused things further by claiming in ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' that if Creator/MattSmith's first season wasn't Season 31 (because it's all one thing), then it was Series 1 (since it was as much a split from what had come before as the initial relaunch), before later admitting that he'd called it Series 5 in all practical situations. And then there's the split series 6A and 6B (Not to be confused with ''[[{{Fanon}} Season 6b]]'') ... or season 32A and 32B.

to:

** Season numbering can be quite confusing. Does Nu Who start again, which means distinguishing between two Season Ones? (TheOtherWiki (Wiki/TheOtherWiki calls Creator/WilliamHartnell's first season Season 1, and Creator/ChristopherEccleston's season Series 1, as does Creator/TheBBC website - while still being at pains to point out that it's all the same series.) Or do you just keep going past Season 26, as many fans do? (ThisVeryWiki's Recap page lists both.) Creator/StevenMoffat confused things further by claiming in ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' that if Creator/MattSmith's first season wasn't Season 31 (because it's all one thing), then it was Series 1 (since it was as much a split from what had come before as the initial relaunch), before later admitting that he'd called it Series 5 in all practical situations. And then there's the split series 6A and 6B (Not to be confused with ''[[{{Fanon}} Season 6b]]'') ... or season 32A and 32B.
4th Jun '17 6:51:29 PM nombretomado
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** ''[=Gradius ReBirth=]'', WiiWare sequel.

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** ''[=Gradius ReBirth=]'', WiiWare UsefulNotes/WiiWare sequel.
11th May '17 12:21:04 PM Saurubiker
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** Most of these alternate titles were the result of the games being retitled in different regions, but even in Japan the Sega Mark III ports of the first two arcade games were released under different names as well (the original ''Wonder Boy'' was retitled ''Super Wonder Boy'' and ''Wonder Boy: Monster Land'' became ''Super Wonder Boy: Monster World'').

to:

** Most of these alternate titles were the result of the games being retitled in different regions, but even in Japan the Sega Mark III ports of the first two arcade games were released under different names as well (the titles tend to vary in Japan. The original ''Wonder Boy'' was retitled became ''Super Wonder Boy'' and on the Sega Mark III since it was the second ''Wonder Boy: Boy'' port in Japan following an earlier version for the [[UsefulNotes/OtherSegaSystems SG-1000]] (Sega's very first console), while ''Wonder Boy in Monster Land'' became ''Super Wonder Boy: Monster World'').World'' due to the existence of the similarly-titled ''Waiwai Monsterland'' for the Super Cassette Vision. Since the west never had to deal with these issues, the Master System ports simply kept the original arcade titles. The later console games in Japan simply went by the ''Monster World'' moniker.



** The series naturally started with the original ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' , first released on the [[UsefulNotes/{{MSX}} MSX2]] computer and then ported to the NES in a [[ReformulatedGame heavily modified way]]. This led to the production of not one, but two ''Metal Gear'' sequels: the sequel to the NES version was titled ''VideoGame/SnakesRevenge'' and was released for the west. In contrast, the sequel for the [=MSX2=], ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'', was only released in Japan. Because of this, a lot of people in the west before the internet essentially treated ''Snake's Revenge'' as the only ''Metal Gear'' sequel, to the point that even ''NintendoPower'' gave it the subtitle ''Metal Gear II'' in its coverage. This alternate title has since felt into disuse, as awareness of the [=MSX2=] games have since increased as they became more widely available through emulation and their inclusion in later games and compilations.
** When Creator/HideoKojima, who wrote and directed the original [=MSX2=] games, decided to revive the series on the original UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}}, he decided to name the third entry ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' (a title chosen to represent the transition from [=2D=] pixels to [=3D=] polygons) rather than ''Metal Gear 3'', as the [=MSX2=] games he worked on were obscure in the west at the time and he wanted to avoid confusion with the NES versions made without his involvement that were more widely available, essentially giving it a soft reboot treatment. The subsequent sequels simply adopted the ''Metal Gear Solid'' branding and added numerals and subtitles to their titles (e.g. ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'', ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'' and ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots''). Pretty simple stuff.
** Stuff didn't become complicated again until the announcement of both: ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'' and ''Metal Gear Solid: Rising''. The former is a direct sequel to ''Metal Gear Solid 3'' originally released for the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation Portable}}, similar to the earlier spinoff ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps'', leading many people to treat it as a sequel to said spinoff. Unlike ''Portable Ops'', ''Peace Walker'' was written and directed by Kojima, who developed and promoted the game as a mainline entry rather than just a portable spinoff - it even briefly carried the working title of ''Metal Gear Solid 5: Peace Walker''. While the numeral was dropped from the final title, the game did get a much wider release than ''Portable Ops'' due to its later ports on the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360 home consoles. ''Rising'' on the other hand was a spinoff game developed entirely by newer members of Kojima Productions, made to figure out the direction to take with the next mainline installment. However, the project underwent a troubled development and would be outsourced to Creator/{{PlatinumGames}}, eventually being revamped into ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'', making it one of the few games in the series released without the ''Solid'' branding alongside ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid''.

to:

** The series naturally started with the original ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' , first released on the [[UsefulNotes/{{MSX}} MSX2]] computer and then ported to the NES in a [[ReformulatedGame heavily modified way]]. This led to the production of not one, but two ''Metal Gear'' sequels: the sequel to the NES version was titled ''VideoGame/SnakesRevenge'' and was released for the west. In contrast, west, whereas the sequel for the [=MSX2=], [=MSX2=] sequel, ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'', was available only released in Japan. Because of this, this a lot of people in the west before the internet essentially treated ''Snake's Revenge'' as the only ''Metal Gear'' sequel, to the point that even ''NintendoPower'' gave it the subtitle ''Metal alternate title ''Snake's Revenge: Metal Gear II'' in its coverage. This alternate title subtitle has since felt into disuse, disuse as awareness of the [=MSX2=] games have since increased as they became more widely available through emulation and their inclusion in later games and compilations.
** When Creator/HideoKojima, who wrote and directed the original [=MSX2=] games, decided to revive the series on the original UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}}, he decided to name the third entry ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' (a title chosen to represent the transition from [=2D=] pixels to [=3D=] polygons) rather than ''Metal Gear 3'', as the [=MSX2=] games he worked on were obscure in the west at the time and he wanted to avoid confusion with the NES versions made without his involvement that were more widely available, essentially giving it making this new game a soft reboot treatment. The subsequent sequels simply adopted the ''Metal Gear Solid'' branding and added numerals and subtitles to their titles (e.g. ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'', ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'' and ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots''). Pretty simple stuff.
** Stuff didn't become complicated again until the announcement the announcement of both: ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'' and ''Metal Gear Solid: Rising''. The former is a direct sequel to ''Metal Gear Solid 3'' originally released for the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation Portable}}, similar to the earlier spinoff ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps'', leading many people to treat it as a sequel to said spinoff. Unlike ''Portable Ops'', ''Peace Walker'' was written and directed by Kojima, who developed and promoted the game as a mainline entry rather than just a portable spinoff - it even briefly carried the working title of ''Metal Gear Solid 5: Peace Walker''. While the numeral was dropped from the final title, the game did get a much wider release than ''Portable Ops'' due to its later ports on the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360 home consoles. ''Rising'' on the other hand was a spinoff game developed entirely by newer members of Kojima Productions, made to figure out the direction to take with the next mainline installment. However, the project underwent a troubled development and would be outsourced to Creator/{{PlatinumGames}}, eventually being revamped into ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'', making it one of the few games in the series released without the ''Solid'' branding alongside ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid''.
This list shows the last 10 events of 333. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SequelNumberSnarl