History Main / SequelDisplacement

18th Feb '18 6:52:17 PM nombretomado
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* By four games into the VideoGame/TalesSeries, only ''VideoGame/TalesOfDestiny'' and ''VideoGame/TalesOfEternia'' had ever [[NoExportForYou crossed the Pacific]], and those were totally under the radar. Then Namco of America trotted out ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia''. Now some people don't even realize the series started before the PS2, let alone back when the [=Super Famicom=] was middle-age.

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* By four games into the VideoGame/TalesSeries, only ''VideoGame/TalesOfDestiny'' and ''VideoGame/TalesOfEternia'' had ever [[NoExportForYou crossed the Pacific]], and those were totally under the radar. Then Namco of America trotted out ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia''. Now some people don't even realize the series started before the PS2, [=PS2=], let alone back when the [=Super Famicom=] was middle-age.
15th Feb '18 10:08:43 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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** There's also potentially a {{downplayed|trope}} example among the Japanese fandom. While Marth's saga [[FirstInstallmentWins is definitely most popular there]], ''VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight'' (and its remake ''Shadow Dragon'') seems to lag considerably in popularity behind its direct sequel ''VideoGame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem'' (later remade as ''New Mystery of the Emblem''); the world based on that saga in CrisisCrossover ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'' is named after the latter rather than the former. Of course, ''Mystery of the Emblem'' actually ''included'' its precursor as part of the game, minus a few characters that were inexplicably cut (''New Mystery of the Emblem'' is a remake of only the second half of ''Mystery of the Emblem'').

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** There's also potentially a {{downplayed|trope}} example among the Japanese fandom. While Marth's saga [[FirstInstallmentWins is definitely most popular there]], ''VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight'' ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light]]'' (and its remake ''Shadow Dragon'') seems to lag considerably in popularity behind its direct sequel ''VideoGame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem'' ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem Mystery of the Emblem]]'' (later remade as ''New Mystery of the Emblem''); the world based on that saga in CrisisCrossover ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'' is named after the latter rather than the former. Of course, ''Mystery of the Emblem'' actually ''included'' its precursor as part of the game, minus a few characters that were inexplicably cut (''New Mystery of the Emblem'' is a remake of only the second half of ''Mystery of the Emblem'').
15th Feb '18 10:07:06 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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** The first game to not fall under NoExportForYou, ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Blazing Sword]]'', is actually the ''seventh'' in the series. Not only that, in an {{inver|tedTrope}}sion of TheForeignSubtitle, it was released as simply ''Fire Emblem'' in the West, practically encouraging this. This causes some issues, as ''Blazing Sword'' is a ''prequel'' to a game that never got released out of Japan, leaving a lot of players confused by what seem to be a ton of {{Sequel Hook}}s that are actually {{Foregone Conclusion}}s or {{Call Forward}}s. The fandom later discovered earlier games through FanTranslation, but ''Blazing Sword'' is still far more popular than its predecessor outside of Japan.

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** The first game to not fall under NoExportForYou, ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBlazingBlade The Blazing Sword]]'', Blade]]'', is actually the ''seventh'' in the series. Not only that, in an {{inver|tedTrope}}sion of TheForeignSubtitle, it was released as simply ''Fire Emblem'' in the West, practically encouraging this. This causes some issues, as ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' is a ''prequel'' to ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade The Binding Blade]]'', a game that never got released out outside of Japan, leaving a lot of players confused by what seem to be a ton of {{Sequel Hook}}s that are actually {{Foregone Conclusion}}s or {{Call Forward}}s. The Western fandom later discovered earlier games through FanTranslation, {{Fan Translation}}s, but ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' is still far more popular than its predecessor outside of Japan.



** There's also potentially a {{downplayed|trope}} example among the Japanese fandom. While Marth's saga [[FirstInstallmentWins is definitely most popular there]], the first game (and its remake, the 11th) seem to lag considerably behind its direct sequel, the 3rd (remade as the 12th) -- the world based on that saga in CrisisCrossover ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'' being named after the latter rather than the former. Of course, the 3rd game actually ''had'' its precursor as part of the game (minus a few characters that were inexplicably cut; the 12th game is a remake of only the second half of the 3rd).

to:

** There's also potentially a {{downplayed|trope}} example among the Japanese fandom. While Marth's saga [[FirstInstallmentWins is definitely most popular there]], the first game ''VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight'' (and its remake, the 11th) seem remake ''Shadow Dragon'') seems to lag considerably in popularity behind its direct sequel, sequel ''VideoGame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem'' (later remade as ''New Mystery of the 3rd (remade as the 12th) -- Emblem''); the world based on that saga in CrisisCrossover ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'' being is named after the latter rather than the former. Of course, ''Mystery of the 3rd game Emblem'' actually ''had'' ''included'' its precursor as part of the game (minus game, minus a few characters that were inexplicably cut; cut (''New Mystery of the 12th game Emblem'' is a remake of only the second half of ''Mystery of the 3rd).Emblem'').
15th Feb '18 9:44:58 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* Creator/{{Bungie}}'s ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' introduced a lot of things to the first person shooter genre and the video game industry as a whole, but everybody just remembers ''Franchise/{{Halo}}''. This might be considered a case of SpiritualSuccessor Displacement. This is somewhat ironic, as ''Marathon'' itself displaced ''VideoGame/PathwaysIntoDarkness'', Bungie's previous game that ''Marathon'' is a spiritual sequel to.

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* Creator/{{Bungie}}'s ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' introduced a lot of things to the first person shooter genre and the video game industry as a whole, but everybody just remembers ''Franchise/{{Halo}}''. This might be considered a case of SpiritualSuccessor Displacement. This is somewhat ironic, as ''Marathon'' itself displaced ''VideoGame/PathwaysIntoDarkness'', Bungie's previous game that ''Marathon'' is a spiritual (and literal) sequel to.
22nd Jan '18 11:08:26 AM bitemytail
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Dan Garrett is known for being the original ComicBook/BlueBeetle, but much like [[ComicBook/GreenLantern Alan Scott]] and [[ComicBook/TheFlash Jay Garrick]][[note]]except even more so; most fans of the Silver age Flash and Green Lantern knew of the Golden Age versions from anthologies and reprints, but Blue Beetle was a much more obscure character (not even owned by DC until the 1980s), and very few people remembered him at all by the time he became a CanonImmigrant to the DC universe during ''Crisis on Infinite Earths''[[/note]], he's been completely overshadowed by his successor Ted Kord, who in turn has been overshadowed by ''his'' successor Jaime Reyes. The general audiences know them far more than the original.

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* Dan Garrett is known for being the original ComicBook/BlueBeetle, but much like [[ComicBook/GreenLantern Alan Scott]] and [[ComicBook/TheFlash Jay Garrick]][[note]]except even more so; most fans of the Silver age Flash and Green Lantern knew of the Golden Age versions from anthologies and reprints, but Blue Beetle was a much more obscure character (not even owned by DC until the 1980s), and very few people remembered him at all by the time he became a CanonImmigrant to the DC universe during ''Crisis on Infinite Earths''[[/note]], he's been completely overshadowed by his successor Ted Kord, who in turn has been overshadowed by ''his'' successor Jaime Reyes. The general audiences know them far more than the original.
19th Jan '18 5:56:42 AM Cryoclaste
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* Many modern fans are unaware that ''Series/{{Ultraman}}'' was a follow-up to a lesser-known show called ''Series/UltraQ''. And with good reason, as ''Q'' took place before the ''Franchise/UltraSeries'' made a GenreShift into straight-up {{Superhero}} action, and as such comes across closer in tone to ''Series/TheOuterLimits'' or ''Series/TheXFiles''.

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* Many modern fans are unaware that ''Series/{{Ultraman}}'' was a follow-up to a lesser-known show called ''Series/UltraQ''. And with good reason, as ''Q'' took place before the ''Franchise/UltraSeries'' made a GenreShift into straight-up {{Superhero}} action, and as such comes across closer in tone to ''Series/TheOuterLimits'' ''Series/{{The Outer Limits|1963}}'' or ''Series/TheXFiles''.
13th Jan '18 11:33:38 PM bfunc
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Dan Garrett is known for being the original ComicBook/BlueBeetle, but much like [[ComicBook/GreenLantern Alan Scott]] and [[ComicBook/TheFlash Jay Garrick]], he's been completely overshadowed by his successor Ted Kord, who in turn has been overshadowed by ''his'' successor Jaime Reyes. The general audiences know them far more than the original.

to:

Dan Garrett is known for being the original ComicBook/BlueBeetle, but much like [[ComicBook/GreenLantern Alan Scott]] and [[ComicBook/TheFlash Jay Garrick]], Garrick]][[note]]except even more so; most fans of the Silver age Flash and Green Lantern knew of the Golden Age versions from anthologies and reprints, but Blue Beetle was a much more obscure character (not even owned by DC until the 1980s), and very few people remembered him at all by the time he became a CanonImmigrant to the DC universe during ''Crisis on Infinite Earths''[[/note]], he's been completely overshadowed by his successor Ted Kord, who in turn has been overshadowed by ''his'' successor Jaime Reyes. The general audiences know them far more than the original.
12th Jan '18 3:58:53 PM MikeK
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Added DiffLines:

* The Wallflowers were formed in 1988, and their self-titled album was released by Virgin records in 1992 - [[CriticalDissonance the album met with good reviews but poor sales]], they had a mutual parting with the label, and it took them four years to rebuild popularity as a live act, write new material, find a new label, and record another album. As a result, most people know them for their second album, ''Bringing Down The Horse'' and its hit singles.
10th Jan '18 12:18:42 PM bfunc
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* Although created by Creator/StanLee and Creator/JackKirby, ''ComicBook/XMen'' didn't take off as a franchise until its relaunch by Len Wein and Dave Cockrum with the addition of new and highly popular characters like ComicBook/{{Storm}}, Comicbook/{{Nightcrawler}}, and [[WolverinePublicity especially]] ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}. Today, most people remember that particular team when asked to describe the X-Men and their ensuing adventures written by Chris Claremont. AdaptationDisplacement is also in effect here, as the later additions to the team became far better known thanks to the [[Film/XMenFilmSeries movies]] and the [[WesternAnimation/XMen various]] [[WesternAnimation/XMenEvolution animated]] [[WesternAnimation/WolverineAndTheXMen series]]. Characters like Wolverine and Storm are now largely recognizable, while far fewer people would be likely to identify someone like Angel or Polaris.

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* Although created by Creator/StanLee and Creator/JackKirby, ''ComicBook/XMen'' didn't take off as a franchise until its relaunch by Len Wein and Dave Cockrum with the addition of new and highly popular characters like ComicBook/{{Storm}}, Comicbook/{{Nightcrawler}}, and [[WolverinePublicity especially]] ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}. Today, most people remember that particular team when asked to describe the X-Men and their ensuing adventures written by Chris Claremont. AdaptationDisplacement is also in effect here, as the later additions to the team became far better known thanks to the [[Film/XMenFilmSeries movies]] and the [[WesternAnimation/XMen various]] [[WesternAnimation/XMenEvolution animated]] [[WesternAnimation/WolverineAndTheXMen series]]. Characters like Wolverine and Storm are now largely recognizable, while far fewer people would be likely to identify someone like Angel or Polaris. Cyclops and Beast were in both, but while the original Cyclops would be instantly recognizable to modern fans, fans who only know the furry blue version of Beast introduced later might be puzzled by Hank's original (human except for large hands and feet) appearance.
10th Jan '18 12:08:22 PM bfunc
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* Initially played straight regarding ''ComicBook/{{Hawkman}}'', then subverted. Thanks to Hawkgirl's popularity from ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'', a lot of mainstream audiences were far for familiar with the space cop, Thanagarian concept of the Hawks than the original reincarnating Hawks. While ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' would use Carter Hall instead of Katar Hol, that didn't really do much, since it was a relatively minor role, and ''Justice League'' was just more popular in the long run. Then the ''Arrowverse'' used the reincarnating Hawks, and people became much more familiar with that version of them than the space cops.

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* Initially played straight regarding ''ComicBook/{{Hawkman}}'', then subverted. Thanks to Hawkgirl's popularity from ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'', ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' (and previously, the Silver and Bronze Age comic book Hawks), a lot of mainstream audiences were far for more familiar with the space cop, Thanagarian concept of the Hawks than the original Golden Age reincarnating Hawks. While ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' would use Carter Hall instead of Katar Hol, that didn't really do much, since it was a relatively minor role, and ''Justice League'' was just more popular in the long run. Then the ''Arrowverse'' used the reincarnating Hawks, and people became much more familiar with that version of them than the space cops.
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