History Main / SeparatedByACommonLanguage

18th Jul '17 10:22:07 PM Fireblood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


It can also be a giveaway when a writer sets a story in a land besides his native one. Many English and Canadian writers write for American audiences. Often they're so good at it that the reader doesn't notice--until a Texan character mentions something that happened "when I was at university." (An American would say "when I was in college" or "...in grad school" or simply "in school", even if he got his degree at a university.)[[note]] This is because the line separating a "University" from a "College" is nearly nonexistent in the USA, as far as everyday speech goes... and "college" frankly takes half the effort to say and spell. Whereas most young, modern British characters would refer to "When I was at Uni"[[/note]]

to:

It can also be a giveaway when a writer sets a story in a land besides his native one. Many English and Canadian writers write for American audiences. Often they're so good at it that the reader doesn't notice--until a Texan character mentions something that happened "when I was at university." (An American would say "when I was in college" or "...in grad school" or simply "in school", even if he got his degree at a university.)[[note]] This is because the line separating a "University" from a "College" is nearly nonexistent in the USA, as far as everyday speech goes... and "college" frankly takes half the effort to say and spell. Whereas most young, modern British characters would refer to "When I was at Uni"[[/note]]
Uni".[[/note]]


Added DiffLines:

* ''{{Film/Timeline}}'': Marek tries to ask Claire if she's "with anyone", or "seeing anyone", but both times she takes him literally, and doesn't get it, as these aren't English expressions in the period.
11th Jul '17 4:08:07 AM Shaid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


-->-- '''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88FuCiac8IE English to American]]''', MikeJ

to:

-->-- '''[[http://www.'''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88FuCiac8IE com/watch?v=5Na7b5MiVak English to American]]''', MikeJ
9th Jul '17 10:04:56 AM billybobfred
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', "Lisa's Wedding": In the time-skip episode (first aired in 1995, set in 2010), Marge talks to Lisa (both are American) on the "picture phone". Lisa is spending her summer with her boyfriend Hugh in England, and Marge tells her she should remember that an elevator is a "lift", a mile is called a "kilometer" and botulism is "steak-and-kidney pie". The elevator/lift one is accurate, the mile/kilometer one is a joke that England might move to the metric system in the future as the rest of Europe (not bloody likely), and the last one is just a jab at the English stereotype of their poor cooking and food standards.
** Or the joke is that miles aren't kilometers.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', "Lisa's Wedding": In the time-skip episode (first aired in 1995, set in 2010), Marge talks to Lisa (both are American) on the "picture phone". Lisa is spending her summer with her boyfriend Hugh in England, and Marge tells her she should remember that an elevator is a "lift", a mile is called a "kilometer" and botulism is "steak-and-kidney pie". The elevator/lift one is accurate, the mile/kilometer one is a joke that England might move to the metric system in the future as the rest of Europe (not bloody likely), likely, and even if they did miles and kilometers still aren't equal in length), and the last one is just a jab at the English stereotype of their poor cooking and food standards.
** Or the joke is that miles aren't kilometers.
standards.
6th Jul '17 1:05:52 PM Sadib
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Or the joke is that miles aren't kilometers.
26th May '17 11:21:40 PM meanmetalmario
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Australian comedian Carl Barron, preforming at the Just for Laughs festival in Montreal, says nobody warned him that "thong" means something ''very'' different in North America than it does in Australia[[note]]g-string underwear as opposed to flip-flop sandals[[/note]], leading to a very strange conversation with a guy in the street.
-->'''Man:''' Hey look, when she bends over, you can see her thong!\\
'''Carl:''' [[SarcasmMode Whoop-de-doo]]. What are you lookin' at her thong for?\\
'''Man:''' It was poppin' out the top of her jeans.\\
'''Carl:''' What was poppin' out the top of her jeans?\\
'''Man:''' Her thong.\\
'''Carl:''' ''[confused]'' Her thong was poppin' out the top of her jeans? What's a friggin' ''thong'' doin' poppin' out the top of her jeans?!\\
'''Man:''' ''[getting annoyed]'' No, when you look down her jeans, you can see her thong!\\
'''Carl:''' Jeez, she must have loose jeans on! ''[{{beat}}]'' By the way, where's the other one?\\
'''Man:''' The other what?\\
'''Carl:''' Thong. They always come in twos.\\
'''Man:''' What do ''you'' know about thongs?\\
'''Carl:''' ''[shrug]'' I wear 'em.\\
'''Man:''' ''[shocked]'' Do ya?!\\
'''Carl:''' Yeah.\\
'''Man:''' When?\\
'''Carl:''' When I'm feelin' hot. When it's cold, I put a sock on first and put the thong over ''that''! What's the big deal? My mum wears 'em, my dad wears 'em...\\
'''Man:''' Are we talkin' about the same thing?\\
'''Carl:''' I don't think so.
18th May '17 1:05:59 AM Nazetrime
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Webcomic/StandStillStaySilent'', has a Danish to Swedish (in theory mutually undestandable) case. Danish Mikkel gives Swedish Emil a list of four items to salvage from a nearby commercial area. Two the items happen to be things for which the Danish and Swedish words are ''not'' the same, causing Emil to tell Mikkel he can't understand half the list.
25th Apr '17 11:30:09 AM XFllo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', "Lisa's Wedding": In the time-skip episode (first aired in 1995, set in 2010), Marge talks to Lisa (both are American) on the "picture phone". Lisa is spending her summer with her boyfriend Hugh in England, and Marge tells her she should remember that an elevator is a "lift", a mile is called a "kilometer" and botulism is "steak-and-kidney pie". The levator/lift one is accurate, the mile/kilometer one is a joke that England might move to the metric system in the future as the rest of Europe (not bloody likely), and the last one is just a jab at the English stereotype of their poor cooking and food standards.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', "Lisa's Wedding": In the time-skip episode (first aired in 1995, set in 2010), Marge talks to Lisa (both are American) on the "picture phone". Lisa is spending her summer with her boyfriend Hugh in England, and Marge tells her she should remember that an elevator is a "lift", a mile is called a "kilometer" and botulism is "steak-and-kidney pie". The levator/lift elevator/lift one is accurate, the mile/kilometer one is a joke that England might move to the metric system in the future as the rest of Europe (not bloody likely), and the last one is just a jab at the English stereotype of their poor cooking and food standards.
25th Apr '17 9:47:17 AM ladyofthelibrary
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' episode [[Recap/PhineasAndFerbAreYouMyMummy "Are You My Mummy?"]], upon hearing Phineas calling for a "mummy", his British stepfather Lawrence thinks Phineas means his mother instead of a mummy from Ancient Egypt.

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' episode [[Recap/PhineasAndFerbAreYouMyMummy "Are You My Mummy?"]], upon hearing Phineas calling for a "mummy", his British stepfather Lawrence thinks Phineas means his mother instead of a mummy from Ancient Egypt. [[FridgeLogic This is particularly ridiculous since Phineas, unlike Lawrence's biological son Ferb, learned to talk in American English and as such, would use terms from said language variant and is old enough that except under certain circumstances, he would call for his mother as "mom" rather than the somewhat babyish "mommy".]]
22nd Apr '17 3:24:58 AM XFllo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', "Lisa's Wedding": In the time-skip episodes (first aired in 1995, set in 2010), Marge talks to Lisa (both are American) on the "picture phone". Lisa is spending her summer with her boyfriend Hugh in England, and Marge tells her she should remember that an elevator is a "lift", a mile is called a "kilometer" and botulism is "steak-and-kidney pie". The levator/lift one is accurate, the mile/kilometer one is a joke that England might move to the metric system in the future as the rest of Europe (not bloody likely), and the last one is just a jab at the English stereotype of their poor cooking and food standards.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', "Lisa's Wedding": In the time-skip episodes episode (first aired in 1995, set in 2010), Marge talks to Lisa (both are American) on the "picture phone". Lisa is spending her summer with her boyfriend Hugh in England, and Marge tells her she should remember that an elevator is a "lift", a mile is called a "kilometer" and botulism is "steak-and-kidney pie". The levator/lift one is accurate, the mile/kilometer one is a joke that England might move to the metric system in the future as the rest of Europe (not bloody likely), and the last one is just a jab at the English stereotype of their poor cooking and food standards.
22nd Apr '17 12:46:35 AM jamespolk
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In Literature/JeevesAndWooster novel ''Right Ho, Jeeves'', Bertie observes that Aunt Dahlia's French chef Anatole had been in service with an American family for several years before coming to work with Aunt Agatha. Bertie pronounces Anatole's English as "fluent, but a bit mixed." In the next paragraph, Anatole mixes up American slang ("Hot dog!", "hit the hay", "mad as a wet hen") with British ("jolly well", "blighters").

to:

* In Literature/JeevesAndWooster novel ''Right Ho, Jeeves'', ''Literature/RightHoJeeves'', Bertie observes that Aunt Dahlia's French chef Anatole had been in service with an American family for several years before coming to work with Aunt Agatha. Bertie pronounces Anatole's English as "fluent, but a bit mixed." In the next paragraph, Anatole mixes up American slang ("Hot dog!", "hit the hay", "mad as a wet hen") with British ("jolly well", "blighters").
This list shows the last 10 events of 796. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SeparatedByACommonLanguage