History Main / SeparatedByACommonLanguage

16th Mar '17 6:45:10 PM Ramidel
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* In ''Regina's Song'', this is an InvokedTrope. At one point, the protagonist (an English teacher) and his fellow grad students are accosted by a swarm of unwanted reporters for their comments on the Seattle Slasher case. They resort to giving random statements in their favored foreign languages, and the protagonist's contribution is the opening stanza of ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}'' in West Saxon. When asked by the rest of the group, he explains that he's speaking "English," just [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfEnglish English from 1500 years ago]].
14th Mar '17 6:57:59 AM luiz4200
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* In ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' episode [[Recap/PhineasAndFerbAreYouMyMummy "Are You My Mummy?"]], upon hearing Phineas calling for a "mummy", his British stepfather Lawrence thinks Phineas means his mother instead of a mummy from Ancient Egypt.
9th Mar '17 6:09:03 AM Theriocephalus
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* In [[Fanfic/{{Dangerverse}} "Living With Danger"]], the Pack regales Dumbledore and Hagrid about their trip to the US, including the time Sirius walked into a shop and asked for a jumper, meaning what an American would call a sweater. What the clerk thought he was asking for was a dress that is sleeveless and normally worn by young girls (specifically the then-pre-Hogwarts-aged Hermione is referenced).

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* In [[Fanfic/{{Dangerverse}} "Living ''[[Fanfic/{{Dangerverse}} Living With Danger"]], Danger]]'', the Pack regales Dumbledore and Hagrid about with stories of their trip to the US, including the time Sirius walked into a shop and asked for a jumper, meaning what an American would call a sweater. What the clerk thought he was asking for was a dress that is sleeveless and normally worn by young girls (specifically the then-pre-Hogwarts-aged Hermione is referenced).
24th Feb '17 10:01:35 AM Anddrix
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* In some fanfic stories, particularly some of the ones that you can find on fanfiction.net, if a story is written for a show set in America, with American characters, but the Author is from a different country, say the UK, this can often result in words being spelled slightly different (like words that changed in American English over the years, such as words now ending in '-ize' being spelled with '-ise' as they do over there), or slang being slightly different (such as characters saying "lessons" when Americans generally use the words "classes," or "periods" when they talk about school subject classes, where they're more of synonyms in British English), thus has a bit of AnachronismStew thrown in unintentionally.
24th Feb '17 9:51:05 AM Scsigs
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* In some fanfic stories, particularly some of the ones that you can find on fanfiction.net, if a story is written for a show set in America, with American characters, but the Author is from a different country, say the UK, this can often result in words being spelled slightly different (like words that changed in American English over the years, such as words now ending in '-ize' being spelled with '-ise' as they do over there), or slang being slightly different (such as characters saying "lessons" when Americans generally use the words "classes," or "periods" when they talk about school subject classes, where they're more of synonyms in British English), thus has a bit of AnachronismStew thrown in unintentionally.


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** In a deleted scene, Marty talks to 1955 Doc about if he goes through with the plan to seduce his younger, past, mother to get his father to win her over. The conversation leads to Marty saying he might get back to his time turned gay as a result, to which Doc says, "why shouldn't you be happy?", since the modern meaning of the word didn't come about until several years after.
29th Jan '17 6:05:08 AM LadyJafaria
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See also UsefulNotes/AustralianEnglish and DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch. Contrast LanguageBarrier, which is Separated By ''Lack of'' a Common Language.

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See also UsefulNotes/AustralianEnglish and DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch. Compare HaveAGayOldTime, where the same word means different things in two different time periods rather than countries. Contrast LanguageBarrier, which is Separated By ''Lack of'' a Common Language.
26th Jan '17 1:29:36 PM XFllo
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* ''VideoGame/RuneScape'' has several of these due to the fact that the game is made in England. Most of them are pretty subtle, such as differences in spelling, but one that can confuse players is the fact that in England "First Floor" refers to what Americans would refer to as the second floor, instead of the ground floor. Another one is the the item called Biscuits, which actually means Cookies. The wiki is constantly battling well meaning Americans who keep "correcting" the spelling and flooring schemes.
* Some Americans were thrown off a bit when the Don in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIII'' asked the player to deliver a bomb in a "dustcart", leading them to look for a golf cart or other small vehicle instead of the garbage truck he ''actually'' meant. The GTA series is theoretically based in the U.S. but is actually ''made'' in Scotland, which accounts for the use of British English here.
* In the Croft Manor DLC for ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTombRaider'' Lara's personal side notes for all the material she acquires pertaining to her mother refer to her as "Mom". Being an Englishwoman, she should spell it "Mum".
26th Jan '17 1:21:32 PM XFllo
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** A less grevious one, and one that couldn't possibly be changed even if it was: A minigame in ''[[VideoGame/MarioParty Mario Party DS]]'' based around using the touch screen to wind up toy cars as you drive them through a race track is called Twist And Route. This is a pun on the phrase 'twist and shout' - except that due to pronounciation variation, British players either didn't get it or failed to see how it linked to the phrase. [[note]]For British readers, the word 'route' in America is pronounced the same as 'rout', making the two words rhymable. For American readers, the word 'route' in Britain is pronounced the same as 'root', meaning the joke falls flat because the words don't sound anything like each other.[[/note]]
26th Jan '17 1:18:09 PM XFllo
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* ''Film/VetHard'': Non-English example: In this Dutch / Belgian movie, Flemish Belgian character Koen is getting brutally yelled at by another, Dutch, character because his Flemish idiom and accent differ from theirs:

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* ''Film/VetHard'': Non-English example: In this Dutch / Belgian movie, Flemish Belgian character Koen is getting brutally yelled at by another, Dutch, character because his Flemish idiom idioms and accent differ from theirs:
26th Jan '17 1:14:47 PM XFllo
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[[folder:Urban Legends]]
* In Australia, sticky tape is often referred to by the name of the most common manufacture, Durex - which, in the UK happens to be better known for making condoms. Apparently when a visiting Aussie was advised to use Durex as a contraceptive, hilarity/tragedy ensued!
[[/folder]]
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