History Main / SelfFulfillingSpoiler

8th Dec '12 6:33:48 PM nemui10pm
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[[redirect:Administrivia/SelfFullfillingSpoiler]]

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[[redirect:Administrivia/SelfFullfillingSpoiler]][[redirect:Administrivia/SelfFulfillingSpoiler]]
30th Oct '12 11:17:31 AM Lophotrochozoa
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This is the particularly aggravating practice of using spoiler tags that make it quite clear what they're concealing by their length and/or position, or the wording of the surrounding sentence. This, of course, defeats the entire point of using them at all. Often, even if they can't tell the specifics, it can lead the reader to have a fair idea just from the fact that there's ''something'' spoilery there.

Sometimes people don't seem to be aware of which words should be spoilered in order to make the sentence both understandable and non-spoilery to people who don't want to be spoiled. For instance, [[ItWasHisSled it goes without saying]] that examples on the LukeIAmYourFather page all have a certain kind of spoiler, so rather than saying:

* In ''The Empire Strikes Back'', Luke Skywalker finds out that Darth Vader [[spoiler: is his father]].

...where you are attempting to hide details already obvious by the fact that you are ''on a page named "Luke, I Am Your Father"'', you can make it:

* In ''The Empire Strikes Back'', [[spoiler: Luke Skywalker]] finds out that [[spoiler: Darth Vader]] is his father.

Which explains why the example is on that page, but doesn't give up the details (though admittedly, the details of this one are [[ItWasHisSled long since spoiled anyway]]).

Doing it this way:

* In ''The Empire Strikes Back'', [[spoiler: Luke Skywalker finds out that Darth Vader is his father]].

or this way:

* In ''[[spoiler:The Empire Strikes Back]]'', [[spoiler:Luke Skywalker]] finds out that Darth Vader is his father.

is '''less than worthless''', because the first is left saying nothing at all, while the second one hides the ''most'' important part of the example (the name of the work).

The best workaround in a case where a SelfFulfillingSpoiler seems necessary is to rephrase it until it ''isn't''. For instance, if a character's gender turns out not to be what the viewer/reader/player was led to believe it was, it doesn't do much good to put the correct pronoun in spoiler tags. But "the time [[spoiler: her]] arm was injured provides a good example of this" can be changed to "the arm injury provides a good example of this" (opinions about "passive voice" aside). This can require some creativity.

Be particularly careful with short names: If you say "In HarryPotter, [[spoiler:Ron]] has a wand with a unicorn hair core", it's pretty obvious there aren't many characters whose names will fit in a spoiler box of that size, which will make it relatively clear which character you're talking about -- this goes double for any character with a OneLetterName.

Some tropes, such as TheHeroDies, are [[SpoileredRotten inherently spoilers]] -- their ''very presence'' on a work page is a spoiler in and of itself. Generally these should be spoiler-tagged, but even then the trope title can be easily deduced by the length of the spoiler box and its alphabetic placement within the list of tropes (not to mention the URL that displays when you mouse-over the link); or there could be so many that spoiler-tagging them all would render the page downright unreadable. For these sort of cases, an alternate solution is to put all inherently spoilery tropes in a category of their own at the bottom of the page.

This page is a subset of our SpoilerPolicy.

to:

This is the particularly aggravating practice of using spoiler tags that make it quite clear what they're concealing by their length and/or position, or the wording of the surrounding sentence. This, of course, defeats the entire point of using them at all. Often, even if they can't tell the specifics, it can lead the reader to have a fair idea just from the fact that there's ''something'' spoilery there.

Sometimes people don't seem to be aware of which words should be spoilered in order to make the sentence both understandable and non-spoilery to people who don't want to be spoiled. For instance, [[ItWasHisSled it goes without saying]] that examples on the LukeIAmYourFather page all have a certain kind of spoiler, so rather than saying:

* In ''The Empire Strikes Back'', Luke Skywalker finds out that Darth Vader [[spoiler: is his father]].

...where you are attempting to hide details already obvious by the fact that you are ''on a page named "Luke, I Am Your Father"'', you can make it:

* In ''The Empire Strikes Back'', [[spoiler: Luke Skywalker]] finds out that [[spoiler: Darth Vader]] is his father.

Which explains why the example is on that page, but doesn't give up the details (though admittedly, the details of this one are [[ItWasHisSled long since spoiled anyway]]).

Doing it this way:

* In ''The Empire Strikes Back'', [[spoiler: Luke Skywalker finds out that Darth Vader is his father]].

or this way:

* In ''[[spoiler:The Empire Strikes Back]]'', [[spoiler:Luke Skywalker]] finds out that Darth Vader is his father.

is '''less than worthless''', because the first is left saying nothing at all, while the second one hides the ''most'' important part of the example (the name of the work).

The best workaround in a case where a SelfFulfillingSpoiler seems necessary is to rephrase it until it ''isn't''. For instance, if a character's gender turns out not to be what the viewer/reader/player was led to believe it was, it doesn't do much good to put the correct pronoun in spoiler tags. But "the time [[spoiler: her]] arm was injured provides a good example of this" can be changed to "the arm injury provides a good example of this" (opinions about "passive voice" aside). This can require some creativity.

Be particularly careful with short names: If you say "In HarryPotter, [[spoiler:Ron]] has a wand with a unicorn hair core", it's pretty obvious there aren't many characters whose names will fit in a spoiler box of that size, which will make it relatively clear which character you're talking about -- this goes double for any character with a OneLetterName.

Some tropes, such as TheHeroDies, are [[SpoileredRotten inherently spoilers]] -- their ''very presence'' on a work page is a spoiler in and of itself. Generally these should be spoiler-tagged, but even then the trope title can be easily deduced by the length of the spoiler box and its alphabetic placement within the list of tropes (not to mention the URL that displays when you mouse-over the link); or there could be so many that spoiler-tagging them all would render the page downright unreadable. For these sort of cases, an alternate solution is to put all inherently spoilery tropes in a category of their own at the bottom of the page.

This page is a subset of our SpoilerPolicy.
[[redirect:Administrivia/SelfFullfillingSpoiler]]
25th Oct '12 4:59:05 PM classicforreal
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Sometimes people don't seem to be aware of which words should be spoilered in order to make the sentence both understandable and non-spoilery to people who don't want to be spoiled. For instance, it goes without saying that examples on the LukeIAmYourFather page all have a certain kind of spoiler, so rather than saying:

to:

Sometimes people don't seem to be aware of which words should be spoilered in order to make the sentence both understandable and non-spoilery to people who don't want to be spoiled. For instance, [[ItWasHisSled it goes without saying saying]] that examples on the LukeIAmYourFather page all have a certain kind of spoiler, so rather than saying:
17th Oct '12 7:00:17 PM IchigoMontoya
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Which explains why the example is on that page, but doesn't give up the details (though admittedly, the details of this one are [[ExpiredSpoiler long since spoiled anyway]])

to:

Which explains why the example is on that page, but doesn't give up the details (though admittedly, the details of this one are [[ExpiredSpoiler [[ItWasHisSled long since spoiled anyway]])
anyway]]).
3rd Jan '12 2:26:17 AM khalini
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This page is a subset of our SpoilerPolicy.

to:

This page is a subset of our SpoilerPolicy.
14th Nov '11 12:00:21 PM Stratadrake
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where you are spoilering something that is already obvious by the very fact that you are on a certain page, you can make it:

to:

...where you are spoilering something that is attempting to hide details already obvious by the very fact that you are on ''on a certain page, page named "Luke, I Am Your Father"'', you can make it:
14th Nov '11 11:58:02 AM Stratadrake
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Which explains why the example is on that page, but doesn't give up the details.

to:

Which explains why the example is on that page, but doesn't give up the details.
details (though admittedly, the details of this one are [[ExpiredSpoiler long since spoiled anyway]])



is less than worthless.

The best workaround in a case where a SelfFulfillingSpoiler seems necessary is to rephrase it until it ''isn't''. For instance, if a character's gender turns out not to be what the viewer/reader/player was led to believe it was, it doesn't do much good to put the correct pronoun in spoiler tags. But "the time [[spoiler: her]] arm was injured provides a good example of this" can be changed to "the arm injury provides a good example of this." This can require some creativity. Be particularly careful with short names: If you say "In HarryPotter, [[spoiler:Ron]] has a wand with a unicorn hair core", it's pretty obvious which character you're talking about. This goes double for any character with a OneLetterName.

Some tropes, such as TheHeroDies, are inherent spoilers- they give away something important just by their very presence on a work page. Generally these should be spoiler-tagged, but sometimes the trope title is given away by length and alphabetic position, or there are so many of them the page becomes downright unreadable. For these sort of cases, an alternate solution is to put all inherently spoilery tropes in a category of their own at the bottom of the page.

to:

is less '''less than worthless.

worthless''', because the first is left saying nothing at all, while the second one hides the ''most'' important part of the example (the name of the work).

The best workaround in a case where a SelfFulfillingSpoiler seems necessary is to rephrase it until it ''isn't''. For instance, if a character's gender turns out not to be what the viewer/reader/player was led to believe it was, it doesn't do much good to put the correct pronoun in spoiler tags. But "the time [[spoiler: her]] arm was injured provides a good example of this" can be changed to "the arm injury provides a good example of this." this" (opinions about "passive voice" aside). This can require some creativity. creativity.

Be particularly careful with short names: If you say "In HarryPotter, [[spoiler:Ron]] has a wand with a unicorn hair core", it's pretty obvious there aren't many characters whose names will fit in a spoiler box of that size, which will make it relatively clear which character you're talking about. This about -- this goes double for any character with a OneLetterName.

Some tropes, such as TheHeroDies, are inherent spoilers- they give away something important just by [[SpoileredRotten inherently spoilers]] -- their very presence ''very presence'' on a work page. page is a spoiler in and of itself. Generally these should be spoiler-tagged, but sometimes even then the trope title is given away can be easily deduced by the length of the spoiler box and its alphabetic position, placement within the list of tropes (not to mention the URL that displays when you mouse-over the link); or there are could be so many of that spoiler-tagging them all would render the page becomes downright unreadable. For these sort of cases, an alternate solution is to put all inherently spoilery tropes in a category of their own at the bottom of the page.
16th Aug '11 2:57:52 PM DionShmion
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Some tropes, such as TheHeroDies, are inherent spoilers- they give away something important just by their very presence on a page. Generally these should be spoiler-tagged, but sometimes the trope title is given away by length and alphabetic position, or there are so many of them the page becomes downright unreadable. For these sort of cases, an alternate solution is to put all inherently spoilery tropes in a category of their own at the bottom of the page.

to:

Some tropes, such as TheHeroDies, are inherent spoilers- they give away something important just by their very presence on a work page. Generally these should be spoiler-tagged, but sometimes the trope title is given away by length and alphabetic position, or there are so many of them the page becomes downright unreadable. For these sort of cases, an alternate solution is to put all inherently spoilery tropes in a category of their own at the bottom of the page.
29th Dec '10 10:58:30 AM TripleElation
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Some tropes, such as TheHeroDies, are inherent spoilers, I.e. they can spoil just by their very presence on a page. Because of this, the name should be spoiler tagged, though even if this is done, it is still sometimes possible to figure out which trope it is by its alphabetic position and be spoiled, If this is the case, or if the all white lines look ugly, they should be gathered together at the bottom of the page under a new header.

to:

Some tropes, such as TheHeroDies, are inherent spoilers, I.e. spoilers- they can spoil give away something important just by their very presence on a page. Because of this, the name Generally these should be spoiler tagged, though even if this is done, it is still spoiler-tagged, but sometimes possible to figure out which the trope it title is given away by its length and alphabetic position and be spoiled, If this is position, or there are so many of them the case, or if the page becomes downright unreadable. For these sort of cases, an alternate solution is to put all white lines look ugly, they should be gathered together inherently spoilery tropes in a category of their own at the bottom of the page under a new header.
page.
27th Dec '10 1:07:01 PM fawn
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There are several schools of thought on what to do when even having the trope title appear on the page at all is a spoiler. Some tropers support spoiler-tagging trope titles for the benefit of readers glancing an article for "huh, I wonder whether I should give this work a shot" purposes; other tropers would have it that this is where we draw the line, and spoiler considerations are not an excuse to make the wiki unreadable. Another possibility is to put these tropes in a separate inherently spoiling tropes category. We don't have a hard and fast rule on this.

to:

There Some tropes, such as TheHeroDies, are several schools inherent spoilers, I.e. they can spoil just by their very presence on a page. Because of thought on what to do when this, the name should be spoiler tagged, though even having the if this is done, it is still sometimes possible to figure out which trope title appear on it is by its alphabetic position and be spoiled, If this is the case, or if the all white lines look ugly, they should be gathered together at the bottom of the page at all is under a spoiler. Some tropers support spoiler-tagging trope titles for the benefit of readers glancing an article for "huh, I wonder whether I should give this work a shot" purposes; other tropers would have it that this is where we draw the line, and spoiler considerations are not an excuse to make the wiki unreadable. Another possibility is to put these tropes in a separate inherently spoiling tropes category. We don't have a hard and fast rule on this.
new header.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SelfFulfillingSpoiler