History Main / SelfBackingVocalist

25th Apr '16 12:49:56 PM DaibhidC
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** In his stage show ''That Was the Future'', when demonstrating how smartphones can do things science fiction writers never imagined, he records and mixes his own backing vocals ''live''.
15th Apr '16 2:44:56 PM lakingsif
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** During his solo career, Collins did all three voice parts for his cover of the Supremes' "You Can't Hurry Love", to the point where he plays the entire trio in the video.

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** During his solo career, Collins did all three voice parts for his cover of the Supremes' Music/TheSupremes' "You Can't Hurry Love", to the point where he plays the entire trio in the video.
4th Apr '16 2:51:46 PM margdean56
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Occasionally, when recording a song, there's no backing vocalist available to bring out the melody and harmony. The most common solution is for the artist in question to record his or her ''own'' backing vocals and then overdub them into the final recording. In some cases, this can also be done several times over to create a "chorus of one" effect. The trope has been in use since the 1940s, when technology first allowed for the combination of several recorded tracks into one recording (also known as multitracking). Many modern equipment makes this trope easier and can even apply the effect in real time. May overlap with SoloDuet.

to:

Occasionally, when recording a song, there's no backing vocalist available to bring out the melody and harmony. The most common solution is for the artist in question to record his or her ''own'' backing vocals and then overdub them into the final recording. In some cases, this can also be done several times over to create a "chorus of one" effect. The trope has been in use since the 1940s, when technology first allowed for the combination of several recorded tracks into one recording (also known as multitracking). Many modern Modern equipment makes this trope easier and can even apply the effect in real time. May overlap with SoloDuet.
17th Dec '15 6:05:44 AM RAMChYLD
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Occasionally, when recording a song, there's no backing vocalist available to bring out the melody and harmony. The most common solution is for the artist in question to record his or her ''own'' backing vocals and then overdub them into the final recording. In some cases, this can also be done several times over to create a "chorus of one" effect. The trope has been in use since the 1940s, when technology first allowed for the combination of several recorded tracks into one recording (also known as multitracking). May overlap with SoloDuet.

to:

Occasionally, when recording a song, there's no backing vocalist available to bring out the melody and harmony. The most common solution is for the artist in question to record his or her ''own'' backing vocals and then overdub them into the final recording. In some cases, this can also be done several times over to create a "chorus of one" effect. The trope has been in use since the 1940s, when technology first allowed for the combination of several recorded tracks into one recording (also known as multitracking). Many modern equipment makes this trope easier and can even apply the effect in real time. May overlap with SoloDuet.
SoloDuet.
25th Nov '15 3:16:02 AM Adept
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* If you're working with a single {{Vocaloid}} or {{UTAU}} voicebank, this often comes into play.

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* If you're working with a single {{Vocaloid}} Music/{{Vocaloid}} or {{UTAU}} Music/{{UTAU}} voicebank, this often comes into play.
8th Oct '15 9:38:16 PM JMQwilleran
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* In certain shows, particularly shows targeted at children, where two or more characters are voiced by the same performed, this effect has been used to have those characters singing in harmony. For example, there have certainly been ''Franchise/WinnieThePooh'' songs with Pooh and Tigger since Creator/JimCummings performing both in which Pooh and Tigger sang in harmony. And this was also done on ''Series/BearInTheBigBlueHouse''.

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* In certain shows, particularly shows targeted at children, where two or more characters are voiced by the same performed, performer, this effect has been used to have those characters singing in harmony. For example, there have certainly been ''Franchise/WinnieThePooh'' songs with Pooh and Tigger since Creator/JimCummings performing both in which Pooh and Tigger sang in harmony. And this was also done on ''Series/BearInTheBigBlueHouse''.
8th Oct '15 9:37:34 PM JMQwilleran
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Added DiffLines:

* In certain shows, particularly shows targeted at children, where two or more characters are voiced by the same performed, this effect has been used to have those characters singing in harmony. For example, there have certainly been ''Franchise/WinnieThePooh'' songs with Pooh and Tigger since Creator/JimCummings performing both in which Pooh and Tigger sang in harmony. And this was also done on ''Series/BearInTheBigBlueHouse''.
2nd Oct '15 4:29:56 PM nombretomado
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* Part of OzzyOsbourne's signature sound, at least on his solo records.

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* Part of OzzyOsbourne's Music/OzzyOsbourne's signature sound, at least on his solo records.
20th Sep '15 5:39:15 PM igordebraga
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* Relatively uncommon in Music/{{Blink 182}}, as they've got the unwritten rule that the lead vocals are sung by the person who wrote the track, and harmonies by the one who didn't (the drummer doesn't sing). But it did happen occasionally: Online Songs is a clear example.
** Also, on Feeling This, the outro features one Mark and three Toms harmonizing.

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* Relatively uncommon in Music/{{Blink 182}}, as they've got the unwritten rule that the lead vocals are sung by the person who wrote the track, and harmonies by the one who didn't (the drummer doesn't sing). But it did happen occasionally: Online Songs "Online Songs" is a clear example.
** Also, on Feeling This, "Feeling This", the outro features one Mark and three Toms harmonizing.



* On "Fourth of July" from Music/{{Soundgarden}}'s album ''Superunknown'' Chris Cornell recorded two vocal tracks, one in which he sings in a high falsetto, the other in a deep baritone. The two tracks are layered on top of each other which, coupled with the words he's singing and the melody, sounds very spooky indeed.

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* On "Fourth of July" from Music/{{Soundgarden}}'s album ''Superunknown'' Chris Cornell recorded two vocal tracks, one in which he sings in a high falsetto, the other in a deep baritone. The two tracks are layered on top of each other which, coupled with the words he's singing and the melody, sounds very spooky indeed. Similarly, "Rowing" in ''King Animal'' has so much double-tracking in the intro that live it's always a recorded tape. And in that album, aside from a guest, Chris is the only person credited with singing. (live, drummer Matt Cameron does the backing vocals)
20th Aug '15 2:32:05 PM Miso
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* Most of Music/{{Rush}}'s early albums (up to "Grace Under Pressure") feature no vocal harmony at all (one exception being the song "Take a Friend" on their self-titled debut,) but since then, the majority of their songs have features what some fans call "The Choir of Geddys" with extensively multi-tracked, often intricate harmonies, all performed by Lee. On tour, the vocal tracks are triggered as needed by one of the three band members on keyboards, foot pedals or a percussion MIDI controller. Even though the harmony tracks are recorded triggers, Lee is singing all of the main vocals live during the shows. While guitarist Alex Lifeson is often seen at a microphone singing during the shows, his mike is actually turned down quite low because (as Lifeson himself has joked) while he *loves* to sing, he's NOT allowed to (and if you've ever heard a bootleg taken from the signal before it's run through the soundboard, you'll understand why!) The band goofs on this by showing an on-screen censorship notice while Lifeson "sings" into a dead mic on La Villa Strangiato (which doesn't have vocals to begin with!) in their 1989 concert film "A Show of Hands."

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* Most of Music/{{Rush}}'s early albums (up to "Grace Under Pressure") feature no vocal harmony at all (one exception being the song "Take a Friend" on their self-titled debut,) but since debut). Since then, the majority of their songs have features what some fans call however, intricate multi-tracked harmonies are often performed entirely by Lee in "The Choir of Geddys" with extensively multi-tracked, often intricate harmonies, all performed by Lee. On tour, the Of Geddies," including live, when his vocal tracks samples are triggered as needed by one of the three band members on keyboards, foot synth keys or effect pedals at Geddy or a percussion MIDI controller. Even Alex Lifeson's feet (or, occasionally, on Neil Peart's drumset). Alex also occasionally provides backing vocals during live songs, though the harmony tracks are recorded triggers, Lee is singing all of the main vocals live during the shows. While guitarist Alex Lifeson is often seen at a they aren't necessarily good and his microphone singing is often given ''far'' less volume than Geddy's. During the Clockwork Angels tour in 2012-2013, Alex would often mock Geddy's "wish them well" harmony in the eponymous song before going into a nonsensical rant during the shows, his mike is actually turned down quite low because (as Lifeson himself has joked) while he *loves* to sing, he's NOT allowed to (and if you've ever heard a bootleg taken from the signal before it's run through the soundboard, you'll understand why!) The band goofs on this by showing an on-screen censorship notice while Lifeson "sings" into a dead mic on La Villa Strangiato (which doesn't have vocals to begin with!) in their 1989 concert film "A Show of Hands."instrumental break.
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