History Main / SecretAIMoves

10th Sep '17 1:18:42 AM AnotherDuck
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* Most {{Roguelike}} games are internally consistent; usually when they're killing your characters dead it's through the same rules that would let you kill ''them'' if the situation were reversed. ''VideoGame/FTLFasterThanLight'' is not quite this honest; enemy ships have the ability to independently target laser-type weapons to separate rooms of your ship, something that the player cannot do. This means that, if you are particularly unlucky, a single salvo of [[BeamSpam burst laser fire]] from the enemy might [[SubsystemDamage cripple several of your system rooms]], while you can only hammer away at one room if you used the same laser on them.
** This can turn against the A.I. just as easily, however; A.I. ships' attacks are ''random''. So a burst of A.I. laser fire '''could''' damage your cockpit, engine bay and shields all at once. On the other gripping appendage, however, this is inverted; the A.I. ''completely'' lacks the ability to intelligently target your ship, while ''you'' have the ability to destroy the specific sub-system giving you the most grief (usually shields, then weapons), allowing you to hammer their ship's capabilities while they do something stupid like using system-disabling attacks on rooms with no systems in them. Secret Player Move: Targeting Control.

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* Most {{Roguelike}} games are internally consistent; usually when they're killing your characters dead it's through ''VideoGame/FTLFasterThanLight'':
** When you use weapons that fire more than one shot, all shots will hit
the same rules that would let you kill ''them'' if target. However, when the situation were reversed. ''VideoGame/FTLFasterThanLight'' is not quite this honest; enemy ships have enemies use such weapons, the ability to independently target laser-type weapons to separate rooms of your ship, something that shots will hit random targets, spreading the player cannot do. damage out. This means that, if you are particularly unlucky, getting hit by a single salvo of [[BeamSpam burst laser fire]] from the enemy might [[SubsystemDamage cripple can knock out several of your system rooms]], while you can only hammer away at one room if you used the same laser on them.
** This can turn against the A.I. just as easily, however; A.I. ships' attacks are ''random''. So a burst of A.I. laser fire '''could''' damage your cockpit, engine bay and shields all at once. On the other gripping appendage, however, this is inverted; the A.I. ''completely'' lacks the ability to intelligently target your ship, while ''you'' have the ability to destroy the specific sub-system giving you the most grief (usually shields, then weapons), allowing you to hammer their ship's capabilities while they do something stupid like using system-disabling attacks on rooms with no
systems in them. Secret Player Move: Targeting Control.at once, but it also means the enemies can't focus-fire high-priority systems.
8th Sep '17 9:43:17 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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[[quoteright:259:[[VideoGame/MegaManZX http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/queenbeelaserbeams_1587.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:259:What a cheating [[{{Pun}} son-of-a-bee]].]]
8th Sep '17 7:07:14 PM BillyMT
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** What about Sonic, protagonist of the whole series, suddenly being able to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-AMPfjtoVk&t=9m41s summon tornadoes]], when he's fought as a stage boss?
8th Sep '17 6:50:02 PM BillyMT
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** One of the random events that can happen in between jumps is a boarding party teleporting in from out of apparently nowhere and start wrecking havoc on your ship. The thing is, for a good deal of time, this could happen even if your ship had Zoltan Shields, which were specifically designed to deter, among other things, boarding parties warping in. Not even an explanation on how could they do it was given! And then came the Advanced Edition update, which brought the Zoltan Shield Bypass augment, allowing such incursions to happen... Instead of giving it a chance to dodge the encounter due to said shields, as it happens with quite a lot of other pieces of equipment, it allowed all of the random encounters of this nature to preemptively deploy the Bypass.
31st Aug '17 8:35:13 AM HalcyonDayz
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* Notably {{averted}} in [[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons Dungeons & Dragons]] third edition, where you can play as almost any monster in the books, and you can use any ability they have in the books, though due to the painfully restrictive rules for playing monster PCs, they end up being either completely useless (like powers that work well against humanoids like typical player character races but are useless against things like undead and demons) or the monster PC is so underleveled compared to whatever he's fighting that he can't reliable use the power or is too fragile to be going toe to toe with said monsters in the first place. Discussed in Libris Mortis, a supplemental book about undead. {{Played Straight}} in 4th edition.

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* Notably {{averted}} in [[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons Dungeons & Dragons]] third edition, where you can play as almost any monster in the books, and you can use any ability they have in the books, though due to the painfully restrictive rules for playing monster PCs, [=PCs=], they end up being either completely useless (like powers that work well against humanoids like typical player character races but are useless against things like undead and demons) or the monster PC is so underleveled compared to whatever he's fighting that he can't reliable use the power or is too fragile to be going toe to toe with said monsters in the first place. Discussed in Libris Mortis, a supplemental book about undead. {{Played Straight}} in 4th edition.
1st Aug '17 11:38:56 AM gophergiggles
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** Similarly, when you face Belome the second time and he copies your party members, which can all use attacks your normal party members can't ever use. Possibly justified with them being copies rather than the real deal though, and thankfully, their versions of the attacks aren't worse than the ones the actual characters use.

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** Similarly, when you face Belome the second time and he copies your party members, which can all use attacks your normal party members can't ever use. Possibly justified with them being copies rather than the real deal though, and thankfully, their versions of the attacks aren't are worse than the ones the actual characters use.use.
* Entirely averted in ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor''. Vivian as a party member can use all the techniques she used against you when fighting for the Shadow Sirens (Though she needs to learn Firey Jinx via upgrade), and when you face your own party members they only use the techniques available to them as playable characters. Characters like Koops even have the same stat and handicap setups as regular Koopas: having extra defense at the cost of being able to be tossed on his back and rendered helpless for a couple turns.



** He gets Judgement on the player side in the later non Gamecube versions of the game, meaning all moves the boss version has can also be used by the player. However boss Zelos has access to all possible moves, both Strike and Technical, which isn't possible for the player as you can only have one or the other.

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** He gets Judgement on the player side in the later non Gamecube versions of the game, meaning all moves the boss version has can also be used by the player. However boss Zelos has access to all possible moves, both Strike and Technical, which isn't possible for the player as you can only have one or the other.
other. Justified, however, as he's using angelic powers which he doesn't use when in the party.
1st Aug '17 1:04:04 AM AnotherDuck
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* Magus from ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'' is just plain unfair. When you fight him the first time, he has a bunch of crazy moves and a massive number of hit points, but when you get him in your party, most of those moves are unavailable and he has the HP of a normal character. {{Justified|Trope}} in that he gets his power drained by Lavos.
** On the flip side, Magus also gains a Secret ''Player'' Move in the form of Black Hole, a multi-target instant-death spell that would have made his boss fight almost {{Unwinnable}} if he had it back then.
** Through proper leveling, you can actually get back all of Magus's old moves and delight in having a boss character on your team... with the exception of his [[ShieldedCoreBoss Barrier Change]] power, which now just increases magic defense, and his totally awesome looking HP Drain attack called "Geyser", which is gone forever (but has the in-universe justification of involving a ritual circle in his boss room).

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* Magus from ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'' is just plain unfair. When you fight him the first time, he has a bunch of crazy moves and a massive number of hit points, but when you get him in your party, most of those moves are unavailable and he has the HP of a normal character. {{Justified|Trope}} in that he gets his power drained by Lavos.
**
Lavos. On the flip side, Magus also gains a Secret ''Player'' Move in the form of Black Hole, a multi-target instant-death spell that would have made his boss fight almost {{Unwinnable}} if he had it back then.
**
then.\\
\\
Through proper leveling, you can actually get back all of Magus's old moves and delight in having a boss character on your team... with the exception of his [[ShieldedCoreBoss Barrier Change]] power, which now just increases magic defense, and his totally awesome looking HP Drain attack called "Geyser", which is gone forever (but has the in-universe justification of involving a ritual circle in his boss room).



* Lance in the [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue first-generation]] ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games has a Dragonite that knows Barrier, a move which no Dragonite can learn or be taught. In [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver Generation II]] he has an Aerodactyl with Rock Slide, which the player couldn't do until [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Generation III]]. [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules This is not the full extent of complaints against Lance.]]

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* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'':
**
Lance in the [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue first-generation]] ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' games has a Dragonite that knows Barrier, a move which no Dragonite can learn or be taught. In [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver Generation II]] ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'' he has an Aerodactyl with Rock Slide, which the player couldn't do until [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Generation III]].''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire''. [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules This is not the full extent of complaints against Lance.]]



** More than half of the moves used by bosses in ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiStrangeJourney'' can never be obtained. Ouroboros is a particular offender with his two. Mem Aleph actually has zero normal abilities. Not to mention the encounters, with such things as Strange Ray, [[ThatOneAttack Macca/Wastrel Beam]]...
*** Two words: Bomb Status. Can be inflicted on you and your demons. Anyone who is hit with it and not guarding will die and inflict damage equal to their HP to everyone else in this party. Take a guess as to whether your side can use this.

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** More than half of the moves used by bosses in ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiStrangeJourney'' can never be obtained. obtained:
***
Ouroboros is a particular offender with his two. Mem Aleph actually has zero normal abilities. Not to mention the encounters, with such things as Strange Ray, [[ThatOneAttack Macca/Wastrel Beam]]...
*** Two words: Bomb Status. Can Status can be inflicted on you and your demons. Anyone who is hit with it and not guarding will die and inflict damage equal to their HP to everyone else in this party. Take a guess as to whether your side can use this.



* An unusual example: Free-Run in ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'' is something only AI controlled allies could do. Neither Enemies nor Human-Controlled Characters could Free-Run, but your AI-controlled friends could free run all day. This was fixed in [[VideoGame/TalesOfSymphoniaDawnOfTheNewWorld the sequel]], where the player could now use Free Run.

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* ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'':
**
An unusual example: Free-Run in ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'' is something only AI controlled allies could do. Neither Enemies nor Human-Controlled Characters could Free-Run, but your AI-controlled friends could free run all day. This was fixed in [[VideoGame/TalesOfSymphoniaDawnOfTheNewWorld the sequel]], where the player could now use Free Run.



* ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear''

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* ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear''''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'':



* Computer controlled opponents in ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII'' [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard could ignore the time portion of all charge moves]].

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* ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII'':
**
Computer controlled opponents in ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII'' [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard could ignore the time portion of all charge moves]].



* ''[[VideoGame/SoulSeries Soulcalibur III]]'' gives computer players the ability to block anytime they aren't in the process of being thrown through the air. Facing away from you? They can block. Knocked to the ground? They will mysteriously blink from prone to blocking faster than a human player could stand up.

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* ''[[VideoGame/SoulSeries Soulcalibur III]]'' ''VideoGame/SoulSeries'':
** ''Soulcalibur III''
gives computer players the ability to block anytime they aren't in the process of being thrown through the air. Facing away from you? They can block. Knocked to the ground? They will mysteriously blink from prone to blocking faster than a human player could stand up.



* In ''[[VideoGame/GundamVsSeries Gundam vs. Gundam NEXT]]'', the TrueFinalBoss version of the [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEEDDestiny Strike Freedom Gundam]] possesses a unique [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Omnislash]]-style attack combining high-speed {{Diagonal Cut}}s with its {{Attack Drone}}s and requires incredible reflexes to avoid. On top of that, it comes in two stages; after losing 1/3 of its life it summons the support mecha METEOR and spams the battlefield with {{BFG}}s and [[MacrossMissileMassacre missiles]]; knock it down another 1/3, and the METEOR explodes but Freedom enters a SuperMode that lasts until either you or it dies (while the player-controlled version only lasts about 4 seconds).
** This was partly averted years later with ''Extreme Vs. Maxi Boost'', which added a METEOR summon move to the Strike Freedom's moveset.
* This trope is pretty much the whole point of the story mode of the ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' fighting games, ''Immaterial and Missing Power'' and its sequel ''Scarlet Weather Rhapsody''. Each AI opponent you fight possesses special spellcard attack patterns for you to dodge, intermixed with bouts of normal combat, and the spellcards ignore all the normal limitations the player has. This reaches the point where it works less like a fighting game than a multi-form boss battle. Which makes sense, given the BulletHell games that it's based on. That said, this doesn't apply to Arcade and Versus mode.
** Special mention goes to certain spell cards that are much better when the computer uses them in story mode. Youmu's Double Pain briefly creates a duplicate Youmu that can be used for a short attack. When A.I. Youmu uses it in story mode, the duplicate wanders around and attacks until the player manages to beat the spellcard. It doesn't disappear between player heath bars, and can even attack during what would otherwise be a pause in the action.

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* In ''[[VideoGame/GundamVsSeries Gundam vs. Gundam NEXT]]'', the TrueFinalBoss version of the [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEEDDestiny Strike Freedom Gundam]] possesses a unique [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Omnislash]]-style attack combining high-speed {{Diagonal Cut}}s with its {{Attack Drone}}s and requires incredible reflexes to avoid. On top of that, it comes in two stages; after losing 1/3 of its life it summons the support mecha METEOR and spams the battlefield with {{BFG}}s and [[MacrossMissileMassacre missiles]]; knock it down another 1/3, and the METEOR explodes but Freedom enters a SuperMode that lasts until either you or it dies (while the player-controlled version only lasts about 4 seconds).
**
seconds). This was partly averted years later with ''Extreme Vs. Maxi Boost'', which added a METEOR summon move to the Strike Freedom's moveset.
* This trope is pretty much the whole point of the story mode of the ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' fighting games, ''Immaterial and Missing Power'' and its sequel ''Scarlet Weather Rhapsody''. Each AI opponent you fight possesses special spellcard attack patterns for you to dodge, intermixed with bouts of normal combat, and the spellcards ignore all the normal limitations the player has. This reaches the point where it works less like a fighting game than a multi-form boss battle. Which makes sense, given the BulletHell games that it's based on. That said, this doesn't apply to Arcade and Versus mode.
**
mode. Special mention goes to certain spell cards that are much better when the computer uses them in story mode. Youmu's Double Pain briefly creates a duplicate Youmu that can be used for a short attack. When A.I. Youmu uses it in story mode, the duplicate wanders around and attacks until the player manages to beat the spellcard. It doesn't disappear between player heath bars, and can even attack during what would otherwise be a pause in the action.



* Inverted in one case in ''VideoGame/OperationFlashpoint''. With good aim and a lot of luck, you can shoot down enemy helicopters with pretty much any weapon by shooting the crew through the windshield when they line up for a pass, or simply filling the vehicle with holes until its engine quits. Of course, you'll never last long enough to do so if you stand out in the open, but if some good cover is at hand and you have the nerve to try, it's possible. The A.I. ''never'' try to shoot at helicopters with anything but guided anti-aircraft missiles.

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* ''VideoGame/OperationFlashpoint'':
**
Inverted in one case in ''VideoGame/OperationFlashpoint''.case. With good aim and a lot of luck, you can shoot down enemy helicopters with pretty much any weapon by shooting the crew through the windshield when they line up for a pass, or simply filling the vehicle with holes until its engine quits. Of course, you'll never last long enough to do so if you stand out in the open, but if some good cover is at hand and you have the nerve to try, it's possible. The A.I. ''never'' try to shoot at helicopters with anything but guided anti-aircraft missiles.



* The Hunter in the ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' series has a leaping ability he will use if you shoot him from a distance, throwing himself to safety. When you control the Hunter in VS Mode, you can't do the same instant leap ability yourself, but in a strange twist, if there there is an A.I. Hunter in VS Mode, the computer can't use this ability either! This was most likely having the ability disabled for VS Mode to prevent players from making easy escapes and Valve most likely forgot to have this check on the A.I.
** What is also strange, is a human-controlled Hunter in Campaign Mode can do this. This is probably because they simply enabled the move in campaign, but not in Versus, since you can't play as infected in campaign without cheats. The A.I. Hunter in Versus still seems to think he can use this move, and tends to run in circles when he's shot, resulting in ArtificialStupidity.

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* The Hunter in the ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' series has a leaping ability he will use if you shoot him from a distance, throwing himself to safety. When you control the Hunter in VS Mode, you can't do the same instant leap ability yourself, but in a strange twist, if there there is an A.I. Hunter in VS Mode, the computer can't use this ability either! This was most likely having the ability disabled for VS Mode to prevent players from making easy escapes and Valve most likely forgot to have this check on the A.I.
**
I. What is also strange, is a human-controlled Hunter in Campaign Mode can do this. This is probably because they simply enabled the move in campaign, but not in Versus, since you can't play as infected in campaign without cheats. The A.I. Hunter in Versus still seems to think he can use this move, and tends to run in circles when he's shot, resulting in ArtificialStupidity.



** Same for the ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' series - the A.I. on both sides could [[GrenadeHotPotato throw active grenades away from themselves]] from the beginning, but the player did not have the same option until ''Call of Duty 3''.

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** Same for * In the ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' series - the A.I. on both sides could [[GrenadeHotPotato throw active grenades away from themselves]] from the beginning, but the player did not have the same option until ''Call of Duty 3''.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Homeworld}} 2'', your enemies can fly through and hide inside radioactive clouds with impunity (radioactive clouds cause hull degeneration that will kill anything but Movers inside of 30 seconds). You never get the ability to do this without using a special shield projection vessel (which only lasts about the same amount of time).

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* ''VideoGame/{{Homeworld}}'':
**
In ''VideoGame/{{Homeworld}} 2'', the second game, your enemies can fly through and hide inside radioactive clouds with impunity (radioactive clouds cause hull degeneration that will kill anything but Movers inside of 30 seconds). You never get the ability to do this without using a special shield projection vessel (which only lasts about the same amount of time).
1st Aug '17 12:41:31 AM AnotherDuck
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** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbsmckSPmpk Hadouken storm!]]
1st Aug '17 12:35:09 AM AnotherDuck
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** This is noticeable in any game with [[PowerCopying Blue Magic]] (''V'' through ''XI'', plus the ''Tactics Advance'' games) as the class [[TrainingFromHell learns monster moves by being attacked]] with them, meaning you can die by repeatedly trying to learn a move that [[GuideDangIt turns out to be]] this trope.
19th Jul '17 3:01:07 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* In ''VideoGame/JojosBizarreAdventureHeritageForTheFuture'', the story mode NPC-only version of Vanilla Ice uses unique special and super moves, causing much more damage, although they are more predictable.

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* In ''VideoGame/JojosBizarreAdventureHeritageForTheFuture'', ''VideoGame/JoJosBizarreAdventureHeritageForTheFuture'', the story mode NPC-only version of Vanilla Ice uses unique special and super moves, causing much more damage, although they are more predictable.
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