History Main / SecondHandStorytelling

31st Jan '16 7:23:01 PM stewyworks333
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[[folder:Web Comics]]
* The vast majority of ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' is [[SpeechCentricWork told through dialogue]] (through the form of text boxes called pesterlogs or dialoglogs), leaving other important events to occur offscreen, and talked about later. This includes such moments as [[spoiler: [[OffscreenMomentOfAwesome the Trolls fighting against]] [[StarterVillain the Black King]] and [[TheUnreveal any meetup/fight between the protagonists and]] [[TheGhost the Denizens]]]]
[[/folder]]
20th Oct '15 11:33:38 AM WarriorsGate
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* 90% of plays, out of necessity. Especially [[TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples Shakespeare]]. This was an extremely good strategy for him: not only did Elizabethan theatre use minimal sets and props (making elaborate scenes difficult to stage convincingly) but, more importantly, Shakespeare's greatest strength by far is his use of language, and so he really can describe a scene (even one that would not require elaborate staging) much better than he could show it. Scenes that might appear odd or even {{Narm}}-ish if simply performed on stage can seem much more meaningful when a character describes them, and allows us to hear the character's thoughts about the events as they tell it (Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'s "antic" confrontation of Ophelia, which we hear described from Ophelia's point of view, is one such scene). Nonetheless, many modern film adaptations seem to feel obligated to show the scenes on camera anyway, sometimes with a voiceover, because people have come to expect movies to show everything.
* The Chorus' justly famous opening (and closing) of ''Henry V'' is a HUGE LampshadeHanging for this, with all The Bard's eloquence: ''"...But pardon, and gentles all,The flat unraised spirits that have dared On this unworthy scaffold to bring forth So great an object: can this cockpit hold The vasty fields of France? or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt? O, pardon! since a crooked figure may Attest in little place a million;And let us, ciphers to this great accompt, On your imaginary forces work. . .Think when we talk of horses, that you see them Printing their proud hoofs i' the receiving earth; For 'tis your thoughts that now must deck our kings, Carry them here and there; jumping o'er times, Turning the accomplishment of many years Into an hour-glass: for the which supply, Admit me Chorus to this history; Who prologue-like your humble patience pray, Gently to hear, kindly to judge, our play."''

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* 90% of plays, out of necessity. Especially
*
[[TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples William Shakespeare]]. This was an extremely good strategy for him: not only did Elizabethan theatre use minimal sets and props (making elaborate scenes difficult to stage convincingly) but, more importantly, Shakespeare's greatest strength by far is his use of language, and so he really can describe a scene (even one that would not require elaborate staging) much better than he could show it. Scenes that might appear odd or even {{Narm}}-ish if simply performed on stage can seem much more meaningful when a character describes them, and allows us to hear the character's thoughts about the events as they tell it (Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'s "antic" confrontation of Ophelia, which we hear described from Ophelia's point of view, is one such scene). Nonetheless, many modern film adaptations seem to feel obligated to show the scenes on camera anyway, sometimes with a voiceover, because people have come to expect movies to show everything.
* ** The Chorus' justly famous opening (and closing) of ''Henry V'' is a HUGE LampshadeHanging for this, with all The Bard's eloquence: ''"...But pardon, and gentles all,The flat unraised spirits that have dared On this unworthy scaffold humbly asking the audience to bring forth So great an object: can this cockpit hold The vasty forgive them for not managing to fit the fields of France? or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt? O, pardon! since France on a crooked figure may Attest in little place a million;And let us, ciphers tiny Elizabethan stage.
** The beginning of ''Theatre/MacBeth'' is just one long string of people coming up
to this King Duncan and telling them what a great accompt, On your imaginary warrior and wonderful human being [=MacBeth=] is, for -- pretty-much singlehandedly, the way they tell it -- defeating two Scottish rebels ''and'' their allied invasion forces work. . .Think when we talk of horses, that you see them Printing their proud hoofs i' the receiving earth; For 'tis your thoughts that now must deck our kings, Carry them here and there; jumping o'er times, Turning the accomplishment of many years Into an hour-glass: for the which supply, Admit me Chorus to this history; Who prologue-like your humble patience pray, Gently to hear, kindly to judge, our play."''from both Ireland '''and''' Norway.
17th Oct '15 6:54:59 PM WillKeaton
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* In the ''Anime/GirlsUndPanzer'' and ''Manga/{{Saki}}'' crossover, ''Fanfic/NecessaryToWin'', [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/10130193/7/Necessary-To-Win found here]], the "Interlude" chapters, which involve certain characters telling their backstories to others, alternate between them talking to others in the present, and flashbacks to scenes in the past. WordOfGod has it that what the characters in question ''say'' happened is not necessarily true, and may involve them omitting details, not remembering correctly, or jumping to their own conclusions.

to:

* In the ''Anime/GirlsUndPanzer'' and ''Manga/{{Saki}}'' crossover, ''Fanfic/NecessaryToWin'', [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/10130193/7/Necessary-To-Win found here]], here,]] the "Interlude" chapters, which involve certain characters telling their backstories to others, alternate between them talking to others in the present, and flashbacks to scenes in the past. WordOfGod has it that what the characters in question ''say'' happened is not necessarily true, and may involve them omitting details, not remembering correctly, or jumping to their own conclusions.
22nd Jul '15 2:43:18 PM VPhantom
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* [[FromSoftware FromSoftware's]] [[DemonsSouls Souls]] [[DarkSouls Series]] [[Videogame/{{Bloodborne}} games]] all employ this ''extensively''. Intro movies describe the setting, and select minimum of exposition comes from the few NPCs you'll meet, the ''vast majority'' of story must be extrapolated from environment, item locations and item descriptions.

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* [[FromSoftware FromSoftware's]] [[DemonsSouls Souls]] [[DarkSouls Series]] [[Videogame/{{Bloodborne}} games]] all employ this ''extensively''. Intro movies describe the setting, and select minimum of exposition comes from the few NPCs [=NPCs=] you'll meet, the ''vast majority'' of story must be extrapolated from environment, item locations and item descriptions.
2nd Jun '15 2:21:39 AM PlanetCleaveJohnson
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* [[FromSoftware FromSoftware's]] [[DemonsSouls Souls]] [[DarkSouls Series]] [[Bloodborne games]] all employ this ''extensively''. Intro movies describe the setting, and select minimum of exposition comes from the few NPCs you'll meet, the ''vast majority'' of story must be extrapolated from environment, item locations and item descriptions.

to:

* [[FromSoftware FromSoftware's]] [[DemonsSouls Souls]] [[DarkSouls Series]] [[Bloodborne [[Videogame/{{Bloodborne}} games]] all employ this ''extensively''. Intro movies describe the setting, and select minimum of exposition comes from the few NPCs you'll meet, the ''vast majority'' of story must be extrapolated from environment, item locations and item descriptions.
2nd Jun '15 2:19:45 AM PlanetCleaveJohnson
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Added DiffLines:

* [[FromSoftware FromSoftware's]] [[DemonsSouls Souls]] [[DarkSouls Series]] [[Bloodborne games]] all employ this ''extensively''. Intro movies describe the setting, and select minimum of exposition comes from the few NPCs you'll meet, the ''vast majority'' of story must be extrapolated from environment, item locations and item descriptions.
** One excellent example comes from Demon's Souls. The Valley of Defilement is a slum society sunken so deep into a canyon that it never sees daylight. Poisonous, leechy swamps, droves of plague rats and massive mosquitoes make the place nearly unlivable, but the Church sought to change this some time before the game began. You're never told about this initiative, of course. But you do find the missionary-knights' remains.
*** Risaia of Istarel's spear is found in the cove of three Giant Depraved Ones, high above the swamps and slums, but on the path descending to them. This confesses how the massive foes swarmed her, and sure enough, her body is found further down, in the swamp among leaches.
*** Vito, the Moonlight Knight's Large Sword of Moonlight is found down in the sickly swamps, suspended in a hanging nest of poisonous Phosphorescent Slugs and not far from mosquito swarms. This confesses he was better fit to face the swamp's brutal locals, but died of its harsh conditions.
*** These two knights dead, only The Sixth Saint Maiden Astraea and the implacable Garl Vinland make it any further. The Maiden, who you face as a demon, has evidently given up on converting the swamp, and instead grants the locals immunity to disease and poison by taking their souls and transforming them. She kindly asks you to leave, when encountered as a boss, so she can continue her business. Garl, the ''de facto'' area boss, only attacks if you attempt to approach her.
22nd Feb '15 9:42:06 PM JasonJD48
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* The original ''Literature/{{Dune}}'' novel by Frank Herbert. Interesting scenes or important plot points, such as the initial journey to the planet Arrakis in a spaceship of the mysterious Navigators' Guild or Paul Atreides drinking the lethal Water of Life, are either touched on only fleetingly or narrated by characters in retrospect, several weeks later. The chapter simply ends and cuts away from the action about to unfold to a different scene in the next chapter, with characters sitting around their camp fire and telling each other what happened. In both movie adaptions (the 1984 movie and the 2000 three-part mini-series) we actually get to see it on screen.

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* The original ''Literature/{{Dune}}'' novel by Frank Herbert. Interesting scenes or important plot points, such as the initial journey to the planet Arrakis in a spaceship of the mysterious Navigators' Guild or Paul Atreides drinking the lethal Water of Life, are either touched on only fleetingly or narrated by characters in retrospect, several weeks later. The chapter simply ends and cuts away from the action about to unfold to a different scene in the next chapter, with characters sitting around their camp fire and telling each other what happened. In both movie adaptions (the [[Film/{{Dune}} 1984 movie movie]] and the [[Series/{{Dune}} 2000 three-part mini-series) mini-series]]) we actually get to see it on screen.
2nd Feb '15 12:37:14 PM StFan
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[[AC:{{Anime}} and {{Manga}}]]

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[[AC:{{Anime}} and {{Manga}}]][[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Anime & Manga]]



* Episode 4 of Katanagatari. Towards the end, Togame and Shichika are discussing his [[InterestingSituationDuel Epic battle across land and sky]] with Hakuhei sabi over dinner. The [[OffscreenMomentOfAwesome epic battle]] was shown off screen, with the rest of the episode focusing on his [[AloofOlderBrother sister]], Nanami.

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* Episode 4 of Katanagatari.''LightNovel/{{Katanagatari}}''. Towards the end, Togame and Shichika are discussing his [[InterestingSituationDuel Epic battle across land and sky]] with Hakuhei sabi over dinner. The [[OffscreenMomentOfAwesome epic battle]] was shown off screen, with the rest of the episode focusing on his [[AloofOlderBrother sister]], Nanami.



* In ''{{Manga/Saki}}'', most of what we know about the Miyanaga family is what Saki tells other characters. It's still unclear whether Saki is an UnreliableExpositor, though, although there are some indications that Saki initially doesn't fully understand how much Teru has distanced herself from her.

[[AC: {{Fan Fiction}}]]

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* In ''{{Manga/Saki}}'', ''Manga/{{Saki}}'', most of what we know about the Miyanaga family is what Saki tells other characters. It's still unclear whether Saki is an UnreliableExpositor, though, although there are some indications that Saki initially doesn't fully understand how much Teru has distanced herself from her.

[[AC: {{Fan Fiction}}]]
her.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Fan Works]]



* In the ''Anime/GirlsUndPanzer'' and ''{{Manga/Saki}}'' crossover, ''Fanfic/NecessaryToWin'', [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/10130193/7/Necessary-To-Win found here]], the "Interlude" chapters, which involve certain characters telling their backstories to others, alternate between them talking to others in the present, and flashbacks to scenes in the past. WordOfGod has it that what the characters in question ''say'' happened is not necessarily true, and may involve them omitting details, not remembering correctly, or jumping to their own conclusions.

to:

* In the ''Anime/GirlsUndPanzer'' and ''{{Manga/Saki}}'' ''Manga/{{Saki}}'' crossover, ''Fanfic/NecessaryToWin'', [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/10130193/7/Necessary-To-Win found here]], the "Interlude" chapters, which involve certain characters telling their backstories to others, alternate between them talking to others in the present, and flashbacks to scenes in the past. WordOfGod has it that what the characters in question ''say'' happened is not necessarily true, and may involve them omitting details, not remembering correctly, or jumping to their own conclusions.




[[AC:{{Film}}]]

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\n[[AC:{{Film}}]][[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



* Parodied by Creator/MontyPython in their movie ''And Now For Something Completely Different.'' The "Killer Cars" animated skit featured an apocalyptic battle with a giant monster cat which suddenly cuts away to a man reading a narration of the story to a young child. The man then mentions the cat being destroyed in "a scene of such spectacular proportions that it could never in your life be seen in a low budget film like this. You'll notice my mouth isn't moving, either".

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* Parodied by Creator/MontyPython in their movie ''And Now For for Something Completely Different.'' Different''. The "Killer Cars" animated skit featured an apocalyptic battle with a giant monster cat which suddenly cuts away to a man reading a narration of the story to a young child. The man then mentions the cat being destroyed in "a scene of such spectacular proportions that it could never in your life be seen in a low budget film like this. You'll notice my mouth isn't moving, either".either."



* One of the many, many major problems with the ''[[Film/TheLastAirbender Last Airbender]]'' film, since most of them go into [[OffscreenMomentOfAwesome Offscreen Moments of Awesome]]. When it's for budget reasons, you can understand even if you don't like it... but when the scenes in question include "they became great friends"...
* Quint's USS Indianapolis monologue in ''Film/{{Jaws}}'' which ends up being the best scene in the movie.
* In the opening scene of ''Film/TheGodfather'' Bonasera the undertaker tells Don Corleone the story of how his daughter was brutally beaten by two boys attempting to date rape her. They were taken to trial and found guilty but their sentences were suspended. Bonasera now begs the Don to exact revenge on them.
* ''Film/PulpFiction'' Captain Koons tells young Butch about the history of the gold watch that belonged to Butch's father, grandfather and great-grandfather.

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* One of the many, many major problems with the ''[[Film/TheLastAirbender Last Airbender]]'' film, ''Film/TheLastAirbender'', since most of them go into [[OffscreenMomentOfAwesome Offscreen Moments of Awesome]]. When it's for budget reasons, you can understand even if you don't like it... but when the scenes in question include "they became great friends"...
* Quint's USS Indianapolis monologue in ''Film/{{Jaws}}'' ''Film/{{Jaws}}'', which ends up being the best scene in the movie.
* In the opening scene of ''Film/TheGodfather'' ''Film/TheGodfather'', Bonasera the undertaker tells Don Corleone the story of how his daughter was brutally beaten by two boys attempting to date rape her. They were taken to trial and found guilty but their sentences were suspended. Bonasera now begs the Don to exact revenge on them.
* ''Film/PulpFiction'' ''Film/PulpFiction'': Captain Koons tells young Butch about the history of the gold watch that belonged to Butch's father, grandfather and great-grandfather.



* A rather strange example in the ''[[Film/FridayThe13th2009 Friday the 13th]]'' reboot. The film begins with a violent opening and the next scene has a character DESCRIBE the violent opening that the audience just saw. It was pretty stupid

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* A rather strange example in the ''[[Film/FridayThe13th2009 Friday ''Film/{{Friday the 13th]]'' 13th|2009}}'' reboot. The film begins with a violent opening and the next scene has a character DESCRIBE the violent opening that the audience just saw. It was pretty stupid



* Since TwelveAngryMen is about a jury deliberating a crime, we only ever seen them talking. All information about the crime is related to us by them discussing it amongst themselves.

[[AC:{{Literature}}]]

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* Since TwelveAngryMen ''Film/TwelveAngryMen'' is about a jury deliberating a crime, we only ever seen them talking. All information about the crime is related to us by them discussing it amongst themselves.

[[AC:{{Literature}}]]
themselves.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]



** Gandalf's fight with the Balrog.

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** ** Gandalf's fight with the Balrog.



*** Most of these are actually shown in the film trilogy, with the exception of Théoden's son's death (he's found badly wounded and dies some time later) and Saruman's conquest of the Shire (which was not included).

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*** ** Most of these are actually shown in the film trilogy, with the exception of Théoden's son's death (he's found badly wounded and dies some time later) and Saruman's conquest of the Shire (which was not included).



* Isaac Asimov made such use of this trope that in the introduction to a collected edition of the ''Foundation Trilogy'', he called himself out for it, rather apologetically.

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* Isaac Asimov made such use of this trope that in the introduction to a collected edition of the ''Foundation ''Literature/{{Foundation}} Trilogy'', he called himself out for it, rather apologetically.



** ''Literature/DeathStar'' has Admiral Motti's mentor tell him about an excellent sharpshooter whose blaster misfired in his hand, giving an untrained thug time to shank him. The moral here was that no matter how good something was - say, the Death Star Motti so admired - something could always go wrong.

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** ''Literature/DeathStar'' has Admiral Motti's mentor tell him about an excellent sharpshooter whose blaster misfired in his hand, giving an untrained thug time to shank him. The moral here was that no matter how good something was - say, the Death Star Motti so admired - -- something could always go wrong.



* Roughly half of Stephen King's ''Franchise/TheDarkTower'', ''Wolves of the Calla''.

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* Roughly half of Stephen King's ''Franchise/TheDarkTower'', ''Wolves of the Calla''.''Literature/WolvesOfTheCalla''.



* ''Literature/JamesBond''

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* ''Literature/JamesBond''''Literature/JamesBond'':




[[AC:{{Live-Action TV}}]]

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\n[[AC:{{Live-Action TV}}]][[/folder]]

[[folder:Live-Action TV]]



* ''Marion And Geoff'' is all about a chaffeur talking about these people.
* Every episode of ''GroundedForLife'' makes full use of this trope in combination with {{flashback}}s.
* Used in the Danish 50's drama-series ''Matador'', describing a dramatic fight on a roof. Of course, in this case it was actually done so well, that decades later when the show was rerun, people called in to complain about the fight scene missing. The scene had never actually been shown, just described very vividly.

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* ''Marion And and Geoff'' is all about a chaffeur talking about these people.
* Every episode of ''GroundedForLife'' ''Series/GroundedForLife'' makes full use of this trope in combination with {{flashback}}s.
* Used in the Danish 50's '50s drama-series ''Matador'', describing a dramatic fight on a roof. Of course, in this case it was actually done so well, that decades later when the show was rerun, people called in to complain about the fight scene missing. The scene had never actually been shown, just described very vividly.



* The Bill Brasky sketches in ''SaturdayNightLive'' used this for comedic value. They consisted of several men sitting around, drinking and telling stories about their absent friend Bill Brasky. As the sketch went on, the stories grew increasingly ridiculous and over-the-top. The punchline: when Bill arrives, he's TheFaceless, but shot at an angle that makes him look gigantic - implying the stories really happened.

to:

* The Bill Brasky sketches in ''SaturdayNightLive'' ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' used this for comedic value. They consisted of several men sitting around, drinking and telling stories about their absent friend Bill Brasky. As the sketch went on, the stories grew increasingly ridiculous and over-the-top. The punchline: when Bill arrives, he's TheFaceless, but shot at an angle that makes him look gigantic - implying the stories really happened.



* On ''EverybodyLovesRaymond'' Ray gets a call that his brother Robert, a cop is in injured on the job. When Ray, his wife Debra and his parents Marie and Frank visit him in the hospital, they find out he was gored in the butt by a bull. Robert tells a story of how he and his partner were breaking up an illegal rodeo in Brooklyn and a bull started chasing him. At the end of the episode a tape of the bull chasing him is shown on the news

to:

* On ''EverybodyLovesRaymond'' ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' Ray gets a call that his brother Robert, a cop is in injured on the job. When Ray, his wife Debra and his parents Marie and Frank visit him in the hospital, they find out he was gored in the butt by a bull. Robert tells a story of how he and his partner were breaking up an illegal rodeo in Brooklyn and a bull started chasing him. At the end of the episode a tape of the bull chasing him is shown on the news




[[AC:{{Theatre}}]]
* 90% of plays, out of necessity.
** Especially [[TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples Shakespeare]]. This was an extremely good strategy for him: not only did Elizabethan theatre use minimal sets and props (making elaborate scenes difficult to stage convincingly) but, more importantly, Shakespeare's greatest strength by far is his use of language, and so he really can describe a scene (even one that would not require elaborate staging) much better than he could show it. Scenes that might appear odd or even {{Narm}}-ish if simply performed on stage can seem much more meaningful when a character describes them, and allows us to hear the character's thoughts about the events as they tell it ({{Hamlet}}'s "antic" confrontation of Ophelia, which we hear described from Ophelia's point of view, is one such scene). Nonetheless, many modern film adaptations seem to feel obligated to show the scenes on camera anyway, sometimes with a voiceover, because people have come to expect movies to show everything.
*** The Chorus' justly famous opening (and closing) of ''Henry V'' is a HUGE LampshadeHanging for this, with all The Bard's eloquence: ''". . .But pardon, and gentles all,The flat unraised spirits that have dared On this unworthy scaffold to bring forth So great an object: can this cockpit hold The vasty fields of France? or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt? O, pardon! since a crooked figure may Attest in little place a million;And let us, ciphers to this great accompt, On your imaginary forces work. . .Think when we talk of horses, that you see them Printing their proud hoofs i' the receiving earth; For 'tis your thoughts that now must deck our kings, Carry them here and there; jumping o'er times, Turning the accomplishment of many years Into an hour-glass: for the which supply, Admit me Chorus to this history; Who prologue-like your humble patience pray, Gently to hear, kindly to judge, our play."''
* ''TwelveAngryMen'' is third-hand storytelling. The entire play/film takes place inside the jury room and consists of the jurors arguing about events that they themselves only know about second-hand. It's also an intensely gripping film, regularly appearing around #10 on the IMDB top 250 list, proving once again that TropesAreNotBad.
* A lot of what happens in ''TheWomen'' is told second-hand, in large part to [[TheGhost avoid bringing any male characters on stage]]. Most notably, the marital quarrel between Mary and Stephen Haines is related after the fact by the maid to the cook.

[[AC:VideoGames]]

to:

\n[[AC:{{Theatre}}]]\n[[/folder]]

[[folder:Theater]]
* 90% of plays, out of necessity.
**
necessity. Especially [[TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples Shakespeare]]. This was an extremely good strategy for him: not only did Elizabethan theatre use minimal sets and props (making elaborate scenes difficult to stage convincingly) but, more importantly, Shakespeare's greatest strength by far is his use of language, and so he really can describe a scene (even one that would not require elaborate staging) much better than he could show it. Scenes that might appear odd or even {{Narm}}-ish if simply performed on stage can seem much more meaningful when a character describes them, and allows us to hear the character's thoughts about the events as they tell it ({{Hamlet}}'s (Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'s "antic" confrontation of Ophelia, which we hear described from Ophelia's point of view, is one such scene). Nonetheless, many modern film adaptations seem to feel obligated to show the scenes on camera anyway, sometimes with a voiceover, because people have come to expect movies to show everything.
*** * The Chorus' justly famous opening (and closing) of ''Henry V'' is a HUGE LampshadeHanging for this, with all The Bard's eloquence: ''". . .''"...But pardon, and gentles all,The flat unraised spirits that have dared On this unworthy scaffold to bring forth So great an object: can this cockpit hold The vasty fields of France? or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt? O, pardon! since a crooked figure may Attest in little place a million;And let us, ciphers to this great accompt, On your imaginary forces work. . .Think when we talk of horses, that you see them Printing their proud hoofs i' the receiving earth; For 'tis your thoughts that now must deck our kings, Carry them here and there; jumping o'er times, Turning the accomplishment of many years Into an hour-glass: for the which supply, Admit me Chorus to this history; Who prologue-like your humble patience pray, Gently to hear, kindly to judge, our play."''
* ''TwelveAngryMen'' ''Film/TwelveAngryMen'' is third-hand storytelling. The entire play/film takes place inside the jury room and consists of the jurors arguing about events that they themselves only know about second-hand. It's also an intensely gripping film, regularly appearing around #10 on the IMDB top 250 list, proving once again that TropesAreNotBad.
* A lot of what happens in ''TheWomen'' ''Theatre/TheWomen'' is told second-hand, in large part to [[TheGhost avoid bringing any male characters on stage]]. Most notably, the marital quarrel between Mary and Stephen Haines is related after the fact by the maid to the cook.

[[AC:VideoGames]]
cook.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]




[[AC:WebOriginal]]
* In ''WebVideo/DoctorHorriblesSingAlongBlog'', the titular character's first (and failed) attempt at his initiation into the Evil League of Evil is relayed to the audience by him through his video blog. To wit: "Captain Hammer threw a car at my head."

[[AC:WesternAnimation]]
* ''AllGrownUp!'', "Brother, Can You Spare The Time?": The main plot is set up through an event that Tommy second-hands to the viewer: winning an award for a short film he made.

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\n[[AC:WebOriginal]]\n[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Original]]
* In ''WebVideo/DoctorHorriblesSingAlongBlog'', the titular title character's first (and failed) attempt at his initiation into the Evil League of Evil is relayed to the audience by him through his video blog. To wit: "Captain Hammer threw a car at my head."

[[AC:WesternAnimation]]
"
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* ''AllGrownUp!'', ''WesternAnimation/AllGrownUp'', "Brother, Can You Spare The Time?": The main plot is set up through an event that Tommy second-hands to the viewer: winning an award for a short film he made.



* Parodied in an episode of ''ClerksTheAnimatedSeries'', wherein Dante and Randal resolve not to leave the Quick-Stop for the entirety of the episode. Meanwhile, Jay keeps running in to inform them about the excess of plot occurring outside (including, among other things, the President having his head transplanted onto a gorilla's body and then turned into a vampire).
** [[MyGirlIsASlut And Caitlyn is cheating on Dante.]]

to:

* Parodied in an episode of ''ClerksTheAnimatedSeries'', ''WesternAnimation/ClerksTheAnimatedSeries'', wherein Dante and Randal resolve not to leave the Quick-Stop for the entirety of the episode. Meanwhile, Jay keeps running in to inform them about the excess of plot occurring outside (including, among other things, the President having his head transplanted onto a gorilla's body and then turned into a vampire).
**
vampire). [[MyGirlIsASlut And Caitlyn is cheating on Dante.]]



** Similarly, [[http://the-qlc.com/loserz/go/440 this]] ''Webcomic/{{Loserz}}'' strip, where focus returned to the three main characters after a couple of weeks without them.




to:

[[/folder]]
3rd Dec '14 5:05:54 PM nombretomado
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* In ''DoctorHorriblesSingAlongBlog'', the titular character's first (and failed) attempt at his initiation into the Evil League of Evil is relayed to the audience by him through his video blog. To wit: "Captain Hammer threw a car at my head."

to:

* In ''DoctorHorriblesSingAlongBlog'', ''WebVideo/DoctorHorriblesSingAlongBlog'', the titular character's first (and failed) attempt at his initiation into the Evil League of Evil is relayed to the audience by him through his video blog. To wit: "Captain Hammer threw a car at my head."
18th Nov '14 8:14:30 AM LentilSandEater
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* Hilariously lampshaded in ''The Big Fix'': Moses Wine spends the entire movie with a cast on one arm, explaining to everyone he meets how he broke his arm -- every account different, and every account calculated to make him look sympathetic to the listener (to a civil-rights activist he says, "A couple of cops were hassling this black kid"). In the last scene, [[spoiler:he attempts to demonstrate his facility on his ten-year-old son's skateboard, with the boy shouting after him, "It's not my fault if you break the other arm!"]]

to:

* Hilariously lampshaded The subject of a BrickJoke in ''The Big Fix'': Moses Wine spends the entire movie with a cast on one arm, explaining to everyone he meets how he broke his arm -- every account different, and every account calculated to make him look sympathetic to the listener (to a civil-rights activist he says, "A couple of cops were hassling this black kid"). In the last scene, [[spoiler:he attempts to demonstrate his facility on his ten-year-old son's skateboard, with the boy shouting after him, "It's not my fault if you break the other arm!"]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SecondHandStorytelling