History Main / ScrewedByTheNetwork

25th Aug '16 10:17:07 PM AmourMitts
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* How about an entire company screwed by the network? In 2001, AOL Time Warner was openly looking to sell Wrestling/{{WCW}}, producer of the highest-rated shows for TNT (''Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro'') and TBS (''WCW Thunder''), fretting over sagging ratings[[note]]In part thanks to the infamous FingerpokeOfDoom incident during a 1999 broadcast of ''Monday Nitro''[[/note]] and growing executive hostility over the industry of professional wrestling. A group of investors, lead by WCW head booker Wrestling/EricBischoff, had a deal in principle to take over the company and absorb the production costs that the network had been covering. However, with WCW eating up two hours of prime-time and the company millions of dollars in the red with no evidence things were going to get any better, Jamie Kellner, then the Turner Networks CEO, decided to cancel all WCW programming from Turner networks, torpedoing the deal. Wrestling/VinceMcMahon (head of WCW's longtime rival World Wrestling Federation) then swooped in and bought out WCW's remaining assets (mostly wrestler contracts and its deep tape library) for pennies on the dollar. That said, Kellner had wanted to cancel the unprofitable company for a quite a while, and the only reason WCW stayed on TV for as long as it did was the intervention of Ted Turner, who had a soft spot for wrestling. Once Turner was out of power at the network, Kellner was supported by just about everyone at the company.[[note]]Wrestling fans note - with a good bit of schadenfreude - that TNT's replacements for Nitro, the Wall Street drama ''Bull'' and a live-action adaptation of ''ComicBook/{{Witchblade}}'' both tanked (though for different reasons: ''Bull'' simply bombed, while ''Witchblade'' was sunk by star Yancey Butler's substance abuse issues) and it would be years before TNT found a Monday Night winner with ''Series/TheCloser.''[[/note]]

to:

* How about an entire company screwed by the network? In 2001, AOL Time Warner was openly looking to sell Wrestling/{{WCW}}, producer of the highest-rated shows for TNT (''Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro'') and TBS (''WCW Thunder''), fretting over sagging ratings[[note]]In part thanks to the infamous FingerpokeOfDoom incident during a 1999 broadcast of ''Monday Nitro''[[/note]] and growing executive hostility over the industry of professional wrestling. A group of investors, lead by WCW head booker Wrestling/EricBischoff, had a deal in principle to take over the company and absorb the production costs that the network had been covering. However, with WCW eating up two hours of prime-time and the company millions of dollars in the red with no evidence things were going to get any better, Jamie Kellner, then the Turner Networks CEO, decided to cancel all WCW programming from Turner networks, torpedoing the deal. Wrestling/VinceMcMahon (head of WCW's longtime rival World Wrestling Federation) then swooped in and bought out WCW's remaining assets (mostly wrestler contracts and its deep tape library) for pennies on the dollar. That said, Kellner had wanted to cancel the unprofitable company for a quite a while, and the only reason WCW stayed on TV for as long as it did was the intervention of Ted Turner, who had a soft spot for wrestling. Once Turner was out of power at the network, Kellner was supported by just about everyone at the company.[[note]]Wrestling fans note - with a good bit of schadenfreude - that TNT's replacements for Nitro, the Wall Street drama ''Bull'' and a live-action adaptation of ''ComicBook/{{Witchblade}}'' both tanked ended up being quickly cancelled (though for different reasons: ''Bull'' simply bombed, bombed in the ratings, while ''Witchblade'' was sunk by star Yancey Butler's substance abuse issues) and it would be years before TNT found a Monday Night winner with ''Series/TheCloser.''[[/note]]
15th Aug '16 10:05:51 AM BugsFan17
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Even Channel Awesome itself is guilty of this: several contributors were either fired from the site due to misunderstandings (including WebVideo/AlisonPregler and Pan-Pizza of WebVideo/RebelTaxi, the latter of whom hadn't even uploaded a video yet) or quit because of mistreatment (such as WebVideo/{{Phelous}}).

to:

** Even Channel Awesome itself is guilty of this: several contributors were either fired from the site due to misunderstandings (including WebVideo/AlisonPregler Creator/AllisonPregler and Pan-Pizza of WebVideo/RebelTaxi, the latter of whom hadn't even uploaded a video yet) or quit because of mistreatment (such as WebVideo/{{Phelous}}).
15th Aug '16 10:04:44 AM BugsFan17
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** Several Channel Awesome contributors (including WebVideo/JesuOtaku) saw their accounts lost in the great Blip purge of 2014.


Added DiffLines:

** Even Channel Awesome itself is guilty of this: several contributors were either fired from the site due to misunderstandings (including WebVideo/AlisonPregler and Pan-Pizza of WebVideo/RebelTaxi, the latter of whom hadn't even uploaded a video yet) or quit because of mistreatment (such as WebVideo/{{Phelous}}).
9th Aug '16 6:54:13 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In 2005, {{ESPN}} opted not to continue its relationship with the NationalHockeyLeague (fresh out of the lockout that canceled the entire 2004-05 season), and the cable rights were taken over by OLN (which then became Versus, and later still, Creator/{{NBC}} Sports), [[NetworkDecay a channel dedicated to outdoor sports]] with distribution not as wide as ESPN's. When NBC finally offered to air the 2007 NHL playoffs, they ''cut away from a series-clinching playoff game IN OVERTIME'' to show 90 minutes of pre-race coverage of the Preakness Stakes, knocking the remainder of the game over to Versus (except in Buffalo, one of the NHL's smallest markets, and Ottawa, where the CBC knows better). Though thankfully, they've learned their lesson (and Versus, now known as the NBC Sports Network following Comcast's acquisition of NBC, has become a lot more established since.) The Preakness Stakes incident was ExecutiveMeddling of its own, as NBC's contract with the race (negotiated years ''before'', mind you) had advertising commitments.

to:

* In 2005, {{ESPN}} opted not to continue its relationship with the NationalHockeyLeague (fresh out of the lockout that canceled the entire 2004-05 season), and the cable rights were taken over by OLN (which then became Versus, and later still, Creator/{{NBC}} Sports), [[NetworkDecay a channel dedicated to outdoor sports]] with distribution not as wide as ESPN's. When NBC finally offered to air the 2007 NHL playoffs, they ''cut away from a series-clinching playoff game IN OVERTIME'' to show 90 minutes of pre-race coverage of the Preakness Stakes, knocking the remainder of the game over to Versus (except in Buffalo, one of the NHL's smallest yet loyal markets, and Ottawa, where the CBC [[Series/HockeyNightInCanada CBC]] knows better).better ''and'' didn't have such a conflict). Though thankfully, they've learned their lesson (and Versus, now known as the NBC Sports Network following Comcast's acquisition of NBC, has become a lot more established since.) The Preakness Stakes incident was ExecutiveMeddling of its own, as NBC's contract with the race (negotiated years ''before'', mind you) had advertising commitments.
28th Jun '16 7:26:14 PM Mario1995
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** There's also all the forced angles and/or shilling Spike tried to wedge onto ''Impact'', because it was one of their highest rated shows and they could exploit that to push other stuff they air. An example can be found in the 2013 Tito Ortiz/Rampage Jackson storyline that was really only there to promote a fight in ''Bellator MMA'').

to:

*** There's also all the forced angles and/or shilling Spike tried to wedge onto ''Impact'', because it was one of their highest rated shows and they could exploit that to push other stuff they air. An example can be found in the 2013 Tito Ortiz/Rampage Jackson storyline that was really only there to promote a fight in ''Bellator MMA'').MMA''.



* WWE's ''Saturday Morning Slam'' on Creator/TheCW[='=]s Creator/{{Vortexx}} was a last ditch effort by The CW (after they had dropped ''[=SmackDown=]'' several years before) to continue business relationships with the WWE. It was moderately successful despite being significantly toned down compared to ''RAW'' and ''[=SmackDown=]'' in order to appease the [[PeripheryDemographic children's fanbase]], despite WWE's overall general focus being on adult men. When time came for contractual renewals, The CW tried to retool the program into a WWE news magazine rather than the taped matches it had during its run. WWE, understandably, rejected The CW's debasing proposal, and the inability to come up with a compromise led to the plug being pulled after just one season.

to:

* WWE's ''Saturday Morning Slam'' on Creator/TheCW[='=]s Creator/{{Vortexx}} was a last ditch effort by The CW (after they had dropped ''[=SmackDown=]'' several years before) to continue business relationships with the WWE. It was moderately successful despite being significantly toned down compared to ''RAW'' and ''[=SmackDown=]'' in order to both appease the [[PeripheryDemographic children's fanbase]], despite WWE's overall general focus primary audience being on adult men. men, and meet The CW's strict TV-Y7 guidelines for its children's programming. When time came for contractual renewals, The CW tried to retool ReTool the program into a WWE news magazine rather than the taped matches it had during its run. WWE, understandably, rejected The CW's debasing proposal, and the inability to come up with a compromise led to the plug being pulled after just one season.
22nd Jun '16 4:23:17 PM MarcoPolo250
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** TNA as a television product seems to be caught up in a complex mishmash of ScrewedByTheNetwork, ExecutiveMeddling from said network, and their own bad decision making at any given time. For instance Viacom and [=DirecTV=] having a squabble pulled TNA from the air as Spike is owned by Viacom and TNA lost viewership on the [=DirecTV=] side for a spell of two weeks. There's also all the forced angles and/or shilling Spike tried to wedge onto TNA TV because it was one of their highest rated shows and they could exploit that to push other stuff they air (an example can be found in the 2013 Tito Ortiz/Rampage Jackson storyline that was really only there to promote a fight happening on a different Spike show, ''Bellator''). And then of course there were the times TNA themselves were at fault for the bullet that wound up in their foot (such as moving ''[=iMPACT=]!'' to Monday night to try to run up against ''WWE RAW'' when the ratings they pulled were nowhere close to being competitive). ''Impact Wrestling'' (their current television product) ended its Spike TV run at the end of 2014, this time with the blame on TNA's shoulders.[[note]]Despite Spike executive mandate warning against it, the company chose to hire back Wrestling/VinceRusso and the flagrant disobedience caused Spike to pull any further contract renewal negotiations.[[/note]] It then moved to NetworkDecay poster child Destination America for 2015, where miniscule ratings from a channel with zero cultural impact meant they had to resort the next year to a brokered programming arrangement with Pop (the former TV Guide Channel); time will tell how that ends up going.

to:

** TNA TNA, as a television product product, seems to be caught up in a complex mishmash of ScrewedByTheNetwork, ExecutiveMeddling from said network, and their own bad decision making at any given time. For instance instance, Viacom and [=DirecTV=] having a squabble pulled TNA ''Impact'' from the air as Spike air. As Creator/SpikeTV is owned by Viacom Viacom, and ''Impact'' was airing on that network, TNA lost viewership on the [=DirecTV=] side for a spell of two weeks. weeks.
***
There's also all the forced angles and/or shilling Spike tried to wedge onto TNA TV ''Impact'', because it was one of their highest rated shows and they could exploit that to push other stuff they air (an air. An example can be found in the 2013 Tito Ortiz/Rampage Jackson storyline that was really only there to promote a fight happening on a different Spike show, ''Bellator''). And then in ''Bellator MMA'').
*** Then,
of course course, there were the times TNA themselves were at fault for the bullet that wound up in their foot (such fault. Such as moving ''[=iMPACT=]!'' when they moved ''Impact'' to Monday night nights to try to run up against ''WWE RAW'' ''Wrestling/WWERaw'', when the ratings they pulled were nowhere close to being competitive). ''Impact Wrestling'' (their current television product) competitive. Or when ''Impact'' ended its run on Spike TV run at the end of 2014, this time with the blame on TNA's shoulders.[[note]]Despite 2014 because, despite Spike executive mandate warning against it, the company chose to hire back Wrestling/VinceRusso and the Wrestling/VinceRusso. The flagrant disobedience caused Spike to pull any further contract renewal negotiations.[[/note]] It then moved to NetworkDecay poster child Destination America for 2015, where miniscule ratings from a channel with zero cultural impact meant they had to resort the next year to a brokered programming arrangement with Pop (the former TV Guide Channel); time will tell how that ends up going.
6th Jun '16 7:44:08 PM Fito
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Journey Into Imagination'' was closed in 1998 despite it being the park's most popular attraction due to sponsorship issues. A year before the closing, Fujifilm, the rival of the ride's original sponsor, Kodak, wanted to turn the ride into a rollercoaster unrelated to the original concept. Kodak did not want to loose their sponsorship, so they wanted to make a cheaper version of the ride focused more on the science behind imagination. Disney accepted the latter company's idea and reopened the ride in 1999. Visitors did not like how the ride removed Dreamfinder and Figment (though he did have cameos during the constellation scene and at the end of the ride) and felt it was nothing but a tie-in to ''Honey, I Shrunk The Audience'' by theming it around the Imagination Institute. They also felt that the new ImageWorks after the ride was nothing but an ad for Kodak's products. After Disney heard all these complaints, they shut down the ride and revamped it again to be about Figment ruining an open house tour of the Imagination Institute, which recieved mixed reception and is viewed nowadays as a [[LoveItOrHateIt ride that you either like or a ride that you don't like at all]]. The revamp was eventually made pointless in 2010, when Kodak decided to drop sponsorship of the ride anyway despite spending all the years prior trying to keep it.

to:

* ''Journey Into Imagination'' was closed in 1998 despite it being the park's most popular attraction due to sponsorship issues. A year before the closing, Fujifilm, the rival of the ride's original sponsor, Kodak, wanted to turn the ride into a rollercoaster unrelated to the original concept. Kodak did not want to loose lose their sponsorship, so they wanted to make a cheaper version of the ride focused more on the science behind imagination. Disney accepted the latter company's idea and reopened the ride in 1999. Visitors did not like how the ride removed Dreamfinder and Figment (though he did have cameos during the constellation scene and at the end of the ride) and felt it was nothing but a tie-in to ''Honey, I Shrunk The Audience'' by theming it around the Imagination Institute. They also felt that the new ImageWorks after the ride was nothing but an ad for Kodak's products. After Disney heard all these complaints, they shut down the ride and revamped it again to be about Figment ruining an open house tour of the Imagination Institute, which recieved mixed reception and is viewed nowadays as a [[LoveItOrHateIt ride that you either like or a ride that you don't like at all]]. The revamp was eventually made pointless in 2010, when Kodak decided to drop sponsorship of the ride anyway despite spending all the years prior trying to keep it.
12th Apr '16 5:55:55 AM longWriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''ComicBook/AmericanFlagg'' provides an InUniverse example: Reuben Flagg, star of the hit series ''Mark Thrust, Sexus Ranger'' loses his job to his own CGI [[InkSuitActor Tromplographic™ duplicate]], then gets drafted into the ''actual'' Plexus Rangers.



[[folder:Fan Fic]]
* Lampshaded InUniverse in ''Fanfic/CalvinAndHobbesTheSeries''
--> '''Hobbes:''' We can't stay here forever? What if ''Series/RedDwarf: TheMovie'' comes out while we're trapped here?\\
'''Calvin:''' Pfft! As if.
[[/folder]]



* ''TabletopGame/{{The Splinter}}'' is an in-universe example. The network in charge of the games in the Realm has zero problems with killing players for the sake of boosting ratings and creating drama. Keep in mind, dying in the game means you die in real life. It's tough to get screwed harder than that.


Added DiffLines:


!!InUniverse Examples:

* ''ComicBook/AmericanFlagg'': Reuben Flagg, star of the hit series ''Mark Thrust, Sexus Ranger'' loses his job to his own CGI [[InkSuitActor Tromplographic™ duplicate]], then gets drafted into the ''actual'' Plexus Rangers.
* Lampshaded InUniverse in ''Fanfic/CalvinAndHobbesTheSeries'':
--> '''Hobbes:''' We can't stay here forever? What if ''Series/RedDwarf: TheMovie'' comes out while we're trapped here?\\
'''Calvin:''' Pfft! As if.
* ''Series/TheMrPotatoHeadShow'': happens often, with the TV executives changing their minds about things ''in the middle of filming an episode'' of Mr. Potato Head's ShowWithinAShow, such as telling them that their superhero episode needs to be educational or a musical.
* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'': Jerry and George had been pushing for a long time to get their "show about nothing" approved by NBC. Finally, their first episode is aired and is successful. However, at the same time, the head executive who had approved the show goes AWOL and is replaced by a vindictive woman who cancels the show out of spite.
* ''TabletopGame/{{The Splinter}}'': The network in charge of the games in the Realm has zero problems with killing players for the sake of boosting ratings and creating drama. Keep in mind, dying in the game means you die in real life. It's tough to get screwed harder than that.

26th Mar '16 10:24:42 AM Mario1995
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Journey Into Imagination'' was closed in 1998 despite it being the park's most popular attraction due to sponsorship issues. A year before the closing, Fujifilm, the rival of the ride's original sponsor, Kodak, wanted to turn the ride into a rollercoaster unrelated to the original concept. Kodak did not want to loose their sponsorship, so they wanted to make a cheaper version of the ride focused more on the science behind imagination. Disney accepted the latter company's idea and reopened the ride in 1999. Visitors did not like how the ride removed Dreamfinder and Figment (though he did have cameos during the constellation scene and at the end of the ride) and felt it was nothing but a tie-in to ''Honey, I Shrunk The Audience'' by theming it around the Imagination Institute. They also felt that the new ImageWorks after the ride was nothing but an ad for Kodak's products. After Disney heard all these complaints, they shut down the ride and revamped it again to be about Figment ruining an open house tour of the Imagination Institute, which recieved mixed reception and is viewed nowadays as a [[LoveItOrHateIt ride that you either like or a ride that you don't like at all]].

to:

* ''Journey Into Imagination'' was closed in 1998 despite it being the park's most popular attraction due to sponsorship issues. A year before the closing, Fujifilm, the rival of the ride's original sponsor, Kodak, wanted to turn the ride into a rollercoaster unrelated to the original concept. Kodak did not want to loose their sponsorship, so they wanted to make a cheaper version of the ride focused more on the science behind imagination. Disney accepted the latter company's idea and reopened the ride in 1999. Visitors did not like how the ride removed Dreamfinder and Figment (though he did have cameos during the constellation scene and at the end of the ride) and felt it was nothing but a tie-in to ''Honey, I Shrunk The Audience'' by theming it around the Imagination Institute. They also felt that the new ImageWorks after the ride was nothing but an ad for Kodak's products. After Disney heard all these complaints, they shut down the ride and revamped it again to be about Figment ruining an open house tour of the Imagination Institute, which recieved mixed reception and is viewed nowadays as a [[LoveItOrHateIt ride that you either like or a ride that you don't like at all]]. The revamp was eventually made pointless in 2010, when Kodak decided to drop sponsorship of the ride anyway despite spending all the years prior trying to keep it.
26th Mar '16 7:41:01 AM mimitchi33
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Journey Into Imagination'' was closed in 1998 despite it being the park's most popular attraction due to sponsorship issues. A year before the closing, Fujifilm, the rival of the ride's original sponsor, Kodak, wanted to turn the ride into a rollercoaster unrelated to the original concept. Kodak did not want to loose their sponsorship, so they wanted to make a cheaper version of the ride focused more on the science behind imagination. Disney accepted the latter company's idea and reopened the ride in 1999. Visitors did not like how the ride removed Dreamfinder and Figment (though he did have cameos during the constellation scene and at the end of the ride) and felt it was nothing but a tie-in to ''Honey, I Shrunk The Audience'' by theming it around the Imagination Institute. They also felt that the new ImageWorks after the ride was nothing but an ad for Kodak's products. After Disney heard all these complaints, they shut down the ride and revamped it again to be about Figment ruining an open house tour of the Imagination Institute, which recieved mixed reception and is viewed nowadays as a [[LoveItOrHateIt ride that you either like or a ride that you don't like at all]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 146. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ScrewedByTheNetwork