History Main / ScrewTheRulesIHaveSupernaturalPowers

6th Dec '16 9:42:28 AM LaszloZapacik
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** Marik creates a Shadow Game against Joey, who he repeatedly attacks with his monsters not for the purposes of defeating Joey within the rules of the game, but by draining his energy so much that Joey passes out. Incredibly, Kaiba declares that this is allowed and awards victory to Marik.
** In the final against Yugi, Marik is fused to the Winged Dragon of Ra due to his creation of a Shadow Game, so is able to use a De-Fusion card to separate himself. But Marik was only fused to Ra ''in the Shadow Realm'' - in the Duel Monsters game itself, they were never fused to begin with.
5th Dec '16 8:42:59 AM LBHills
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* This attitude is almost universal among the Princes in ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfAmber,'' since their principal power is walking between dimensions. There can be no consequences for the actions they take out in 'Shadow' (their word for any dimension except their own), since they can simply depart after they have what they want.
5th Dec '16 8:34:31 AM LBHills
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Compare DrunkWithPower, WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity. Related to BeneathTheMask because super powers reveal how a person would act without any fear of reprisal. In this trope case that HiddenSelf is anything but {{lawful|Good}}. See SuperSupremacist for someone with superpowers who skips over the "get away with crime" part and goes for straight-up subjugating the non-superpowered.

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Compare DrunkWithPower, WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity. Related to BeneathTheMask and WhatYouAreInTheDark because super powers reveal how a person would act without any fear of reprisal. In this trope case that HiddenSelf is anything but {{lawful|Good}}. See SuperSupremacist for someone with superpowers who skips over the "get away with crime" part and goes for straight-up subjugating the non-superpowered.
21st Oct '16 3:10:40 PM Discar
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* ''Literature/TheStormlightArchives'': In Alethkar (and most likely other Vorin nations like Jah Keved), Shardbearers are above most laws. It is illegal to imprison them; they can only be executed, and of course only for the most heinous of crimes. In most cases, when a Shardbearer is accused of a crime, the accuser is imprisoned for slander without anyone even bothering to see if the accusation is justified. While a large part of this is due to the Alethi's degeneration into {{Blood Knight}}s and their worship of the kind of slaughter that Shardbearers can wreak, there is a pragmatic side as well. Since they bear Shardblades that they can summon at any time and use to cut through anything, imprisoning them is a laughable prospect. Though note that it ''is'' possible to force a Shardbearer to give up his Blade without killing him. It's just the Alethi see ownership of Shards as a sacred right, and refuse to take them except in duels.

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* ''Literature/TheStormlightArchives'': ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'': In Alethkar (and most likely other Vorin nations like Jah Keved), Shardbearers are above most laws. It is illegal to imprison them; they can only be executed, and of course only for the most heinous of crimes. In most cases, when a Shardbearer is accused of a crime, the accuser is imprisoned for slander without anyone even bothering to see if the accusation is justified. While a large part of this is due to the Alethi's degeneration into {{Blood Knight}}s and their worship of the kind of slaughter that Shardbearers can wreak, there is a pragmatic side as well. Since they bear Shardblades that they can summon at any time and use to cut through anything, imprisoning them is a laughable prospect. Though note that it ''is'' possible to force a Shardbearer to give up his Blade without killing him. It's just the Alethi see ownership of Shards as a sacred right, and refuse to take them except in duels.
21st Oct '16 3:09:48 PM Discar
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* ''Literature/TheStormlightArchives'': In Alethkar (and most likely other Vorin nations like Jah Keved), Shardbearers are above most laws. It is illegal to imprison them; they can only be executed, and of course only for the most heinous of crimes. In most cases, when a Shardbearer is accused of a crime, the accuser is imprisoned for slander without anyone even bothering to see if the accusation is justified. While a large part of this is due to the Alethi's degeneration into {{Blood Knight}}s and their worship of the kind of slaughter that Shardbearers can wreak, there is a pragmatic side as well. Since they bear Shardblades that they can summon at any time and use to cut through anything, imprisoning them is a laughable prospect. Though note that it ''is'' possible to force a Shardbearer to give up his Blade without killing him. It's just the Alethi see ownership of Shards as a sacred right, and refuse to take them except in duels.
6th Oct '16 5:31:57 PM MarkLungo
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* Creator/BrianMichaelBendis' ''Comicbook/{{Powers}}'' also briefly explores this fallen-hero theme (much like ''Irredeemable'', but only for a short story arc). This trope gets uttered almost literally in one issue, where a man walks up to a bank teller and tells her simply, "I have powers. Give me all the money."
* There's a similar example to the one above in the Marvel series Comicbook/{{Exiles}}, where, in an alternate reality, Blob walks into a bank and hands the teller a note saying "This is a robbery. I am a bulletproof mutant. Quietly hand over the money." A security guard starts firing at him, and Blob merely shouts "Can't you people read?"
* "Mark Milton", aka Hyperion in ''ComicBook/SupremePower'' gets this revelation along with some basic {{Ubermensch}} / TheUnfettered philosophy when he learns he's an alien and was lied to since birth to make him a tool of the government.
* U-Go-Girl of ''Comicbook/XMen'' spinoff team ''Comicbook/XStatix'' originally decided to use her teleportation to commit crime, intelligently - stealing tons of petty stuff and not challenging any superheroes. She got bored of it after 15 minutes when she got everything she always wanted and ended up returning it and becoming a superheroine instead.
* The entire story of ''Comicbook/FinalCrisis Aftermath: Run!'' The more power the Human Flame gets, the more petty his behaviour becomes. (And he was a minor-league supervillain to ''start'' with.) Note that in the first few issues, he betrays his wife and daughter and sets small dogs on fire. It gets ''worse'' from there.
* Pretty much the basic premise of ''{{Comicbook/Wanted}}''. The Fraternity were a group of supervillains who had triumphed and actually retconned the superheroes out of their reality. As a result, anyone with super powers was a member of the Fraternity, and anyone wearing a Fraternity badge, or driving a car with Fraternity plates could get away with ''anything'' and ''everything''.
* The kids in ''Comicbook/{{Runaways}}'' pretty much do this, but they only screw ''some'' rules. They aren't actually breaking every law they think of. Just child protection laws, truancy rules, etc. They're still superheroes after all.
* The Invisible Man from ''Comicbook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' uses his invisibility to kill a police officer and steal his clothes because he was cold. This is perfectly in character with the original (see under "Literature", below).
* ComicBook/{{Invincible}} mentions this during a crossover with Comicbook/TheAstoundingWolfMan. When Wolf-Man asks if Invincible will get in trouble for breaking government property and beating up superheroes, Invincible shrugs it off, saying that as long as he's strong enough to save the earth, he gets a pass. While he often blows off the rules for good reason, Invincible increasingly starts to believe that because he's the most powerful superhero on Earth, the rules don't apply to him all. This is treated as a decidedly negative trait, and eventually backfires badly.
* Comicbook/TheAuthority, though for their case it might be more of 'Screw The Rules I Have Supernatural Powers - And I Will Make New Rules!'
* The ComicBook/{{New 52}} version of young Franchise/{{Superman}} in ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' and the first story arc of Franchise/{{Justice League|OfAmerica}}, which take place in his early superhero years. He laughs at the cops, throws [=CEOs=] into rivers, chokes Batman, etc. He grows out of it and is much more humble in the present.
* In ''Comicbook/TheBoys'' every superhero is this. They have superpowers and they decide that they can do anything they want, and feel that the government can't stop them.

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* Creator/BrianMichaelBendis' ''Comicbook/{{Powers}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Powers}}'' also briefly explores this fallen-hero theme (much like ''Irredeemable'', but only for a short story arc). This trope gets uttered almost literally in one issue, where a man walks up to a bank teller and tells her simply, "I have powers. Give me all the money."
* There's a similar example to the one above in the Marvel Creator/MarvelComics series Comicbook/{{Exiles}}, ''ComicBook/{{Exiles}}'', where, in an alternate reality, Blob walks into a bank and hands the teller a note saying "This is a robbery. I am a bulletproof mutant. Quietly hand over the money." A security guard starts firing at him, and Blob merely shouts "Can't you people read?"
* "Mark Milton", aka Hyperion in ''ComicBook/SupremePower'' gets this revelation along with some basic {{Ubermensch}} / TheUnfettered {{Ubermensch}}[=/=]TheUnfettered philosophy when he learns he's an alien and was lied to since birth to make him a tool of the government.
* U-Go-Girl of ''Comicbook/XMen'' ''ComicBook/XMen'' spinoff team ''Comicbook/XStatix'' ''ComicBook/XStatix'' originally decided to use her teleportation to commit crime, intelligently - stealing tons of petty stuff and not challenging any superheroes. She got bored of it after 15 minutes when she got everything she always wanted and ended up returning it and becoming a superheroine instead.
* The entire story of ''Comicbook/FinalCrisis ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis Aftermath: Run!'' The more power the Human Flame gets, the more petty his behaviour becomes. (And he was a minor-league supervillain to ''start'' with.) Note that in the first few issues, he betrays his wife and daughter and sets small dogs on fire. It gets ''worse'' from there.
* Pretty much the basic premise of ''{{Comicbook/Wanted}}''.''ComicBook/{{Wanted}}''. The Fraternity were a group of supervillains who had triumphed and actually retconned the superheroes out of their reality. As a result, anyone with super powers was a member of the Fraternity, and anyone wearing a Fraternity badge, or driving a car with Fraternity plates could get away with ''anything'' and ''everything''.
* The kids in ''Comicbook/{{Runaways}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Runaways}}'' pretty much do this, but they only screw ''some'' rules. They aren't actually breaking every law they think of. Just child protection laws, truancy rules, etc. They're still superheroes after all.
* The Invisible Man from ''Comicbook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' uses his invisibility to kill a police officer and steal his clothes because he was cold. This is perfectly in character with the original (see under "Literature", below).
* ComicBook/{{Invincible}} ''ComicBook/{{Invincible}}'' mentions this during a crossover with Comicbook/TheAstoundingWolfMan.''ComicBook/TheAstoundingWolfMan''. When Wolf-Man asks if Invincible will get in trouble for breaking government property and beating up superheroes, Invincible shrugs it off, saying that as long as he's strong enough to save the earth, he gets a pass. While he often blows off the rules for good reason, Invincible increasingly starts to believe that because he's the most powerful superhero on Earth, the rules don't apply to him all. This is treated as a decidedly negative trait, and eventually backfires badly.
* Comicbook/TheAuthority, ''ComicBook/TheAuthority'', though for their case it might be more of 'Screw The Rules I Have Supernatural Powers - And I Will Make New Rules!'
* The ComicBook/{{New 52}} ''ComicBook/{{New 52}}'' version of young Franchise/{{Superman}} in ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' and the first story arc of Franchise/{{Justice League|OfAmerica}}, which take place in his early superhero years. He laughs at the cops, throws [=CEOs=] into rivers, chokes Batman, etc. He grows out of it and is much more humble in the present.
* In ''Comicbook/TheBoys'' ''ComicBook/TheBoys'' every superhero is this. They have superpowers and they decide that they can do anything they want, and feel that the government can't stop them.
24th Sep '16 4:17:46 AM Morgenthaler
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** It comes up more in Vampire because the only real threat to most vampires from breaking the masquerade is retaliation from the people intent on keeping it. Most other splats involve a more direct mechanical penalty that's difficult to cover over with further power use or roleplay: werewolves drive anyone in line of sight into a killing rage or madness, mages are bitch-slapped by the laws of physics or break the world and let [[EldritchAbomination something]] in to say hello, ghosts can be banished by mortals extremely easily, etc. The only other splat that's as easy to indulge in this trope as Vampire is HunterTheReckoning, which can lead to a lot of fast escalation since the two are each others' greatest natural enemies.

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** It comes up more in Vampire because the only real threat to most vampires from breaking the masquerade is retaliation from the people intent on keeping it. Most other splats involve a more direct mechanical penalty that's difficult to cover over with further power use or roleplay: werewolves drive anyone in line of sight into a killing rage or madness, mages are bitch-slapped by the laws of physics or break the world and let [[EldritchAbomination something]] in to say hello, ghosts can be banished by mortals extremely easily, etc. The only other splat that's as easy to indulge in this trope as Vampire is HunterTheReckoning, TabletopGame/HunterTheReckoning, which can lead to a lot of fast escalation since the two are each others' greatest natural enemies.
31st Aug '16 7:56:36 PM BurgerLord
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* Sans from ''Videogame/{{Undertale}}'' during the final fight on the KillEmAll route. [[spoiler:He uses telekinesis, dodges all of your attacks, switches out attacks (either through [[RealityWarper quantum physics manipulation]] or stopping time) and attacks you in the menu.]]
19th Aug '16 12:37:10 PM merotoker
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* Using her ability to [[TimeStandStill stop time]], [[Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica Homura Akemi]] stole all kinds of weaponry from the JSDF and Yakuza to help her fight Witches. All of them are stored in some kind of BagOfHolding behind her shield. [[FridgeBrilliance A smart choice as well]], since [[spoiler: it means her soul gem won't corrupt as fast as those of other Magical Girls and collecting grief seeds is much easier for her.]]

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* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'': Using her ability to [[TimeStandStill stop time]], [[Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica Homura Akemi]] Akemi stole all kinds of weaponry from the JSDF and Yakuza to help her fight Witches. All of them are stored in some kind of BagOfHolding behind her shield. [[FridgeBrilliance A smart choice as well]], since [[spoiler: it means her soul gem won't corrupt as fast as those of other Magical Girls and collecting grief seeds is much easier for her.]]her]].



* The ComicBook/{{New 52}} version of young Franchise/{{Superman}} in ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' and the first story arc of [[JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League]]; which take place in his early superhero years. He laughs at the cops, throws [=CEOs=] into rivers, chokes Batman, etc. He grows out of it and is much more humble in the present.

to:

* The ComicBook/{{New 52}} version of young Franchise/{{Superman}} in ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' and the first story arc of [[JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League]]; Franchise/{{Justice League|OfAmerica}}, which take place in his early superhero years. He laughs at the cops, throws [=CEOs=] into rivers, chokes Batman, etc. He grows out of it and is much more humble in the present.



* In ''Literature/NotJustAWitch'', the villain wants to make money with the fur of snow leopards, and for this reason [[spoiler: tricks the titular witch into turning all inmates of a prison into snow leopards, by pretending he just wants to keep the beautiful animals as living garden decoration.]]

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* In ''Literature/NotJustAWitch'', the villain wants to make money with the fur of snow leopards, and for this reason [[spoiler: tricks the titular witch into turning all inmates of a prison into snow leopards, by pretending he just wants to keep the beautiful animals as living garden decoration.]]decoration]].



* Kind of the entire point of most plots - romantic and non - in the first few seasons of ''{{Series/Smallville}}''. The meteor [[MonsterOfTheWeek freak of the week]] suffers "Kryptonite Psychosis" and uses their meteor-given powers for their own selfish gain, perfectly willing to commit multiple murders to further their goals before Clark stops them and they get sent to the Belle Reve mental institution. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d numerous times by characters [[FantasticRacism biased against meteor freaks]]. Clark himself qualifies when under the influence of Red Kryptonite. His Red K-activated personality, Kal, acts out Clark's basic wants and needs without concerning himself with the consequences of his actions, and is not only unconcerned with [[TheMasquerade keeping his powers a secret]], but is even tempted to go public with them because he believes that his powers make him infallible.

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* Kind of the entire point of most plots - romantic and non - in the first few seasons of ''{{Series/Smallville}}''. The meteor [[MonsterOfTheWeek freak of the week]] suffers "Kryptonite Psychosis" and uses their meteor-given powers for their own selfish gain, perfectly willing to commit multiple murders to further their goals before Clark stops them and they get sent to the Belle Reve mental institution. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d numerous times by characters [[FantasticRacism biased against meteor freaks]]. Clark himself qualifies when under the influence of Red Kryptonite. His Red K-activated personality, Kal, acts out Clark's basic wants and needs without concerning himself with the consequences of his actions, and is not only unconcerned with [[TheMasquerade [[{{Masquerade}} keeping his powers a secret]], but is even tempted to go public with them because he believes that his powers make him infallible.



* Widespread among vampires on ''Series/TrueBlood''. Although their public relations campaign claims that they just want to be a [[FriendlyNeighborhoodVampire part of normal human society]], including having equal civil rights, they have no problem with breaking the law if they think they can get away with it. In particular they are not above using mind control on humans and/or feeding from people without their consent. In one episode, Bill even subverts the rule that vampires aren't allowed to enter a human's home without an invitation by glamoring one of them and having that person invite him. In another episode, Eric physically threatens Sookie (who can't be glamored) into inviting him in, although this is only because he senses a werewolf in her house.

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* Widespread among vampires on ''Series/TrueBlood''. Although their public relations campaign claims that they just want to be a [[FriendlyNeighborhoodVampire part of normal human society]], including having equal civil rights, they have no problem with breaking the law if they think they can get away with it. In particular they are not above using mind control on humans and/or feeding from people without their consent. In one episode, Bill even subverts [[MustBeInvited the rule that vampires aren't allowed to enter a human's home without an invitation invitation]] by glamoring one of them and having that person invite him. In another episode, Eric physically threatens Sookie (who can't be glamored) into inviting him in, although this is only because he senses a werewolf in her house.
27th Jul '16 11:46:12 AM intastiel
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* More or less the motto of the Bondsmagi in the ''Literature/GentlemanBastard'' series. When the old Therin emperor tried to regulate them, they sent him their fee schedule. When he followed up with an army, they annihilated it, then incinerated his capital city for good measure, establishing twin policies of JoinOrDie for anyone with magical talent and ruthless DisproportionateRetribution against anyone who challenges them.
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