History Main / ScreensAreCameras

9th Sep '17 1:36:53 AM SeptimusHeap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''ComicBook/{{Spider-Man}}'' comics, the earliest versions of the Spider-Slayer robots worked this way. The robots, piloted remotely by J. Jonah Jameson, would seem to have no technological ''need'' to project JJJ's face onto a TV screen mounted on the robot's "head," but that's exactly what they do.

to:

* In ''ComicBook/{{Spider-Man}}'' ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'' comics, the earliest versions of the Spider-Slayer robots worked this way. The robots, piloted remotely by J. Jonah Jameson, would seem to have no technological ''need'' to project JJJ's face onto a TV screen mounted on the robot's "head," but that's exactly what they do.
3rd Sep '17 10:27:01 PM TheNicestGuy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' plays this straight quite frequently. The most obvious example is the two-way wrist communicator watches worn by the Ventures; they have nothing that looks like a camera, but at least they tend to display faces at a believable angle and distance. In "The Lepidopterists", the trope is [[ExploitedTrope exploited]] by The Monarch. He contacts Jonas Venture, Jr. by video screen to announce he is attacking in his flying cocoon. Jonas shoots it with a death ray, and it is destroyed on the screen. It turns out that The Monarch was actually sitting on a soundstage in front of a TV camera, and the destroyed cocoon was a miniature on a string. He had installed a backdoor into Jonas's communication system so that he could use the attempt on his life as a bureaucratic loophole.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' plays this straight quite frequently. The most obvious example is the two-way wrist communicator watches worn by the Ventures; they have nothing that looks like a camera, but at least they tend to display faces at a believable angle and distance. \\
\\
In "The Lepidopterists", the trope is [[ExploitedTrope exploited]] by The Monarch. He contacts Jonas Venture, Jr. by video screen to announce he is attacking in his flying cocoon. Jonas shoots it the cocoon with a death ray, and it is destroyed on the screen. It turns out that The Monarch was actually sitting on a soundstage in front of a TV camera, and the destroyed cocoon was a miniature on a string. He The Monarch had installed a backdoor into Jonas's communication system so that he could use the attempt on his life as a bureaucratic loophole.
12th Aug '17 6:57:45 AM JackG
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Telescreens in ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' receive and transmit simultaneously, and are a big part of [[BigBrotherIsWatchingYou how Big Brother watches the people of Oceania]].

to:

* The Telescreens in ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' receive and transmit simultaneously, and are a big part of [[BigBrotherIsWatchingYou how Big Brother watches the people of Oceania]]. Even the Thought Police secretly recording the protagonists is done by a telescreen hidden behind a picture on the wall, rather than a smaller hidden camera.
9th Aug '17 3:13:44 PM TheNicestGuy
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' plays this straight quite frequently. The most obvious example is the two-way wrist communicator watches worn by the Ventures; they have nothing that looks like a camera, but at least they tend to display faces at a believable angle and distance. In "The Lepidopterists", the trope is [[ExploitedTrope exploited]] by The Monarch. He contacts Jonas Venture, Jr. by video screen to announce he is attacking in his flying cocoon. Jonas shoots it with a death ray, and it is destroyed on the screen. It turns out that The Monarch was actually sitting on a soundstage in front of a TV camera, and the destroyed cocoon was a miniature on a string. He had installed a backdoor into Jonas's communication system so that he could use the attempt on his life as a bureaucratic loophole.
19th Jan '17 1:17:18 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SSTV (Slow Scanning Television) was a method of image translation used in amateur radio practice before cheap cameras were available. It required only one light sensor instead of a proper camera and used a TV screen [CRT] for scanning. It was a more or less a shadow puppet theater for a [[UsefulNotes/GeneralGamingGamepads light-gun controller]].

to:

* SSTV (Slow Scanning Television) was a method of image translation used in amateur radio practice before cheap cameras were available. It required only one light sensor instead of a proper camera and used a TV screen [CRT] for scanning. It was a more or less a shadow puppet theater for a [[UsefulNotes/GeneralGamingGamepads light-gun controller]].



* The trope might be influenced by the real life fact that early TV cameras used CRTs (in the same way that a microphone and a loudspeaker are essentially the same thing used differently), something that the audience at large probably didn't know, but people in the industry probably would.

to:

* The trope might be influenced by the real life fact that early TV cameras used CRTs [=CRTs=] (in the same way that a microphone and a loudspeaker are essentially the same thing used differently), something that the audience at large probably didn't know, but people in the industry probably would.
10th Oct '16 9:23:24 PM Dravencour
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Telescreens in ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' are this.

to:

* The Telescreens in ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' receive and transmit simultaneously, and are this.a big part of [[BigBrotherIsWatchingYou how Big Brother watches the people of Oceania]].
14th Jan '16 12:21:33 PM Piando
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[AC:{{Anime}}]]

to:

[[AC:{{Anime}}]][[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: Anime ]]




[[AC:ComicBooks]]
* In ''{{Spider-Man}}'' comics, the earliest versions of the Spider-Slayer robots worked this way. The robots, piloted remotely by J. Jonah Jameson, would seem to have no technological ''need'' to project JJJ's face onto a TV screen mounted on the robot's "head," but that's exactly what they do.

[[AC:{{Literature}}]]

to:

\n[[AC:ComicBooks]]\n[[/folder]]

[[folder: Comic Books ]]
* In ''{{Spider-Man}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Spider-Man}}'' comics, the earliest versions of the Spider-Slayer robots worked this way. The robots, piloted remotely by J. Jonah Jameson, would seem to have no technological ''need'' to project JJJ's face onto a TV screen mounted on the robot's "head," but that's exactly what they do.

[[AC:{{Literature}}]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Literature ]]




[[AC:{{Film}}]]

to:

\n[[AC:{{Film}}]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Film ]]



[[AC: Live-Action TV]]

to:

[[AC: [[/folder]]

[[folder:
Live-Action TV]]TV ]]



* Taken to somewhat silly extremes in BigBangTheory, where everyone uses Skype. People on screen will turn their heads to look at the person they are addressing, which means on their end they would be looking at the wall.

[[AC:VideoGames]]
* Many of the screens in the ''VideoGame/HalfLife'' universe seem capable of this, particularly the Combine screens of ''VideoGame/HalfLife2''.

to:

* Taken to somewhat silly extremes in BigBangTheory, Series/TheBigBangTheory, where everyone uses Skype. People on screen will turn their heads to look at the person they are addressing, which means on their end they would be looking at the wall.

[[AC:VideoGames]]
wall.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Video Games ]]
* Many any of the screens in the ''VideoGame/HalfLife'' universe seem capable of this, particularly the Combine screens of ''VideoGame/HalfLife2''.




[[AC:WesternAnimation]]

to:

\n[[AC:WesternAnimation]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Western Animation ]]




[[AC: RealLife]]

to:

\n[[AC: RealLife]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Real Life ]]


Added DiffLines:

[[/folder]]
15th Dec '15 5:34:17 PM MarkLungo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SSTV (Slow Scanning Television) was a method of image translation used in amateur radio practice before cheap cameras were available. It required only one light sensor instead of a proper camera and used a TV screen [CRT] for scanning. It was a more or less a shadow puppet theater for a [[GeneralGamingGamepads light-gun controller]].

to:

* SSTV (Slow Scanning Television) was a method of image translation used in amateur radio practice before cheap cameras were available. It required only one light sensor instead of a proper camera and used a TV screen [CRT] for scanning. It was a more or less a shadow puppet theater for a [[GeneralGamingGamepads [[UsefulNotes/GeneralGamingGamepads light-gun controller]].
4th Oct '15 10:53:45 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''{{Bakugan}}'': Dan and his friends chat over the Internet and no webcam is ever seen.

to:

* ''{{Bakugan}}'': ''Anime/{{Bakugan}}'': Dan and his friends chat over the Internet and no webcam is ever seen.
23rd Aug '15 7:35:53 AM Epithumia
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* During the 1980s a computer magazine published a program to turn the BBC Micro's screen into a camera. After manually entering the the hexadecimal code, readers who thought this trope was in play were likely to receive a [[AprilFoolsDay rapid reality check]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 63. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ScreensAreCameras