History Main / ScrappyWeapon

17th Sep '17 4:08:58 PM SwordsageRagnar
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** [=LRM-20=] Missile Launchers. As the name implies, they fire off a swarm of 20, one point damage missiles out to a max range of 1000 meters (in a game where the average optimal weapon range is typically around 300 to 500 meters. As the only other weapon that can deal up to 20 points of damage with a single shot (not counting Critical hits triggering Ammo Explosions), is the short range, and heavier Autocannon/20, this sounds awesome, right? Wrong. [=LRM-20s=] have long reload times, generate significant heat build up on your mech, have very wide missile spreads, which can cause up to half or more of the missiles to miss even the largest Assault Class mechs, and even if they do hit, that's damage that's scattered on up to 8 hit locations (3 of which, the torso sections, have front and back armor, so technically, 11 total hit locations).



** Flamers. Another case of VideogameFlamethrowersSuck. They are by all means, "Energy Machine Guns", which is to say, versus any enemy mech with Armor protecting them still, do very little damage, but versus exposed Internal Structure, have increased damage, and bonus Critical Hit Chance. And unlike Machine Guns, they have infinite ammo, and can increase the heat of a mech hit with them. However, they also generate heat very quickly on the mech firing them, completely negating the "Over heat your enemy" aspect, are short ranged, and are nowhere near as good as the regular Machine Guns in terms of ease of aiming ([=MGs=] are pinpoint, while it can be hard to hit the section of the enemy mech you want with the Flame Throwers).

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** Flamers. Another case of VideogameFlamethrowersSuck. They are by all means, "Energy Machine Guns", which is to say, versus any enemy mech with Armor protecting them still, do very little damage, but versus exposed Internal Structure, have increased damage, and bonus Critical Hit Chance. And unlike Machine Guns, they have infinite ammo, and can increase the heat of a mech hit with them. However, they also generate heat very quickly on the mech firing them, completely negating the "Over heat your enemy" aspect, are short ranged, and are nowhere near as good as the regular Machine Guns in terms of ease of aiming ([=MGs=] are pinpoint, while it can be hard to hit the section of the enemy mech you want with the Flame Throwers). Latter updates solved the pinpoint damage issue by turning the flames into heat jets, making them far more accurate weapons, and increasing the amount of heat it generates on the target.
16th Sep '17 11:43:19 PM DastardlyDemolition
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** The Soda Popper used to give minicrits when a Hype meter, charged by running, was filled. This ability was awesome, easy to take advantage of, and valuable in Mann vs. Machine. Now, it just gives five extra jumps, which is quite fun, but in terms of direct combat, is much weaker. But in Mann vs. Machine, because damage output is far more important, it's just about useless.

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** The Soda Popper used to give minicrits when a Hype meter, charged by running, was filled. This ability was awesome, easy to take advantage of, and valuable in Mann vs. Machine. Now, it just gives five extra jumps, which is quite fun, but in terms of direct combat, is much weaker. But in Mann vs. Machine, because damage output is far more important, it's just about useless. And then in the Meet Your Match update they made it that you only gain hype with every hit (and you only get 2 weak shots before reloading), completely changing how the gun works and removing any reason to use it's effect.


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** And then there was the nerf the Righteous Bison got in Meet Your Match which removed the ability to hit one target several times,weakening every successive hit that goes through opponents (which means you hit a Soldier with weaker and weaker hits and then tickle his Medic), and making a slow shot move slower. Players hated the needless nerfs and the Bison became nonviable for even the most casual of pub play.
1st Sep '17 5:42:42 PM MyFinalEdits
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** [=LRM-20=] Missile Launchers. As the name implies, they fire off a swarm of 20, one point damage missiles out to a max range of 1000 meters (in a game where the average optimal weapon range is typically around 300 to 500 meters. As the only other weapon that can deal up to 20 points of damage with a single shot (not counting Critical hits triggering Ammo Explosions), is the short range, and heavier Autocannon/20, this sounds awesome, right? Wrong. [=LRM-20s=] have long reload times, generate significant heat build up on your mech, have very wide missile spreads, which can cause up to half or more of the missiles to miss even the largest Assault Class mechs, and even if they do hit, that's damage that's scattered on up to 8 hit locations (3 of which, the torso sections, have front and back armor, so technically, 11 total hit locations). They weigh the m

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** [=LRM-20=] Missile Launchers. As the name implies, they fire off a swarm of 20, one point damage missiles out to a max range of 1000 meters (in a game where the average optimal weapon range is typically around 300 to 500 meters. As the only other weapon that can deal up to 20 points of damage with a single shot (not counting Critical hits triggering Ammo Explosions), is the short range, and heavier Autocannon/20, this sounds awesome, right? Wrong. [=LRM-20s=] have long reload times, generate significant heat build up on your mech, have very wide missile spreads, which can cause up to half or more of the missiles to miss even the largest Assault Class mechs, and even if they do hit, that's damage that's scattered on up to 8 hit locations (3 of which, the torso sections, have front and back armor, so technically, 11 total hit locations).
** [=LRM-20=] Missile Launchers. As the name implies, they fire off a swarm of 20, one point damage missiles out to a max range of 1000 meters (in a game where the average optimal weapon range is typically around 300 to 500 meters. As the only other weapon that can deal up to 20 points of damage with a single shot (not counting Critical hits triggering Ammo Explosions), is the short range, and heavier Autocannon/20, this sounds awesome, right? Wrong. [=LRM-20s=] have long reload times, generate significant heat build up on your mech, have very wide missile spreads, which can cause up to half or more of the missiles to miss even the largest Assault Class mechs, and even if they do hit, that's damage that's scattered on up to 8 hit locations (3 of which, the torso sections, have front and back armor, so technically, 11 total hit locations). They weigh the mmost of all the missile launchers in game right now, they take up a lot critical slots, limiting what else you can place in a section of the mech, and eat through literal tons of ammo. Many players prefer the faster reloads, and more compact spreads of the smaller launchers.
** Flamers. Another case of VideogameFlamethrowersSuck. They are by all means, "Energy Machine Guns", which is to say, versus any enemy mech with Armor protecting them still, do very little damage, but versus exposed Internal Structure, have increased damage, and bonus Critical Hit Chance. And unlike Machine Guns, they have infinite ammo, and can increase the heat of a mech hit with them. However, they also generate heat very quickly on the mech firing them, completely negating the "Over heat your enemy" aspect, are short ranged, and are nowhere near as good as the regular Machine Guns in terms of ease of aiming ([=MGs=] are pinpoint, while it can be hard to hit the section of the enemy mech you want with the Flame Throwers).
* [=SRM2s=] in any Mechwarrior game ever, due to the piddling damage caused by the tiny two-missile salvo. If you're taking the trouble to fit a missile launcher but your build restricts you so much that you can't mount [=SRM4s=] or [=SRM6s=], you're almost certainly better off either compromising on something else in order to install the better launchers or using up the weight with buffs or ammo for other weapons.
* ''VideoGame/AceCombatInfinity'' has the High-Capacity Air-to-Air Missile. It's basically a second set of the standard missiles, with a slower reload time, less ammo, less damage, and no ability to lock onto the more plentiful ground targets. That would be bad enough on its own, but what makes it worse is that it is very, very easy to upgrade every aspect of the standard missiles and completely obsolete the HCAA, while the HCAA - and by extension, every missile-based special weapon - requires most of the tech tree to be completed before one can even begin to upgrade anything other than their capacity. What really makes it scrappy is that damn near every mid- to high-tier and special aircraft gets the HCAA instead of something that actually fills a niche the standard missiles can't already do better - you can count the number of late-game craft that ''don't'' have it on both hands.
* ''VideoGame/Freespace2'' has the Prometheus-R, a supposed retrofit of the well-liked Prometheus from the first game. Unfortunately for you, this retrofit effectively made the weapon worse in every possible way, with a painfully slow rate of fire, high power consumption, and per-shot damage that is barely higher than the starting [[BoringButPractical Subach HL-7]]. Even worse, a few missions force you to use it. Thankfully it is supplanted later on in the game by the Prometheus-S, a variant more up to the standards of the first game's Prometheus. The in-game explanation for this is that the GTVA was in the midst of a gas shortage and couldn't provide fuel for the Prometheus, so the Prometheus-R was a watered-down version meant as a stopgap production. The Prometheus-S is introduced about the same time the GTVA gets its gas mines back, allowing them to begin producing the actual weapon again.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Stealth-Based Games]]
* Just about any melee weapon in the ''VideoGame/{{Tenchu}}'' games (at least ''Wrath of Heaven'') that you can get from a dead {{Mook}}. Especially as they get rid of your one-hit stealth kills. The higher-scoring need-for-powering-up stealth kills. The you're-a-ninja stealth kills. (Well, yeah, the fun-to-do stealth kills.)
* The XM M63 501 in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'' if you decide to use it during the bike chase (Which, owing to this being a ActionBasedMission and it's high ammo capacity, you will). Yes, the weapon is handy, but Snake's constant ''Franchise/{{Rambo}}'' style yelling (which will occur non-stop since you'll be firing in bursts) is [[MostAnnoyingSound literal ear poison]] and tempts many players into using the less effective (but more pleasant to listen to) AK-47 or Skorpion.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Survival Horror]]
* Proximity Mines in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'' might be considered this. Though they have some use in Story mode (usually by leading bosses and strong enemies on them), in Mercenaries they are next to useless, since you need to do melee anyway and you can't even use them to clear the mob in a pinch. No reason to bother with bosses. And in Versus, if you happen to be seen placing them, the enemy player can detonate them by shooting while you are still close. This added to the fact that good players won't be caught stepping on them anyway, since it's easy to tell the set mines from the dropped ones.
* The knife from most of the ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' series was absurdly weak (usually taking several dozen stabs just to knock over the most basic of enemies), had zero range, and took up valuable inventory space, so was typically dumped in the first item box, unless you were just ''that'' good and wanted to give yourself a SelfImposedChallenge. ''[[VideoGame/ResidentEvilCodeVeronica Code Veronica]]'' was the first game to give it even limited usefulness, as one swipe counted as several hits, but it wasn't until ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4'' made it as powerful as the handgun, just trading range for unlimited use and no inventory space used, that it [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap became worthwhile]]. A skilled player could save a lot of ammo using it, and some bosses (particularly Krauser) were actually easier with the knife as it dealt majorly-increased damage against them.
* The Bow Gun in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' isn't any stronger than the handgun and damage potential is wasted since the 3 bolts the weapon shoots out spreads out, which makes it near useless at long range.
* [[VideoGameFlameThrowersSuck The Flamethrower]] as found in various ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' games is almost always useless, as it tends to be unreloadable, short-ranged, with zero stopping power, and one character tends to get it in lieu of [[FakeBalance superior weapons given to the other playable character]]. It was at it's most useful in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' as it was very effective against [[DemonicSpiders the Ivys]], but even then the flame rounds from Claire's grenade launcher were more effective. It was at it's absolute worst in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil'' where Chris gets it late in the game opposed to the bazooka given to Jill ''early'' in the game and can only be used in the underground area limiting it's usefulness to fighting one boss that goes down fairly easy anyways.
* ''VideoGame/SilentHill1'' has two: the Kitchen Knife and the Hand Axe, the first and last melee weapons you get, respectively. The Kitchen Knife is a mandatory pickup, has zero range and in terms of defense is much worse than simply running from danger, and it's as if the game realizes how worthless it is because you can find the Steel Pipe, one of the game's more useful weapons, ''less than a minute later''. The Hand Axe is a barely-noticeable upgrade to the Kitchen Knife, which is rather unacceptable since by then you're 75% through the game and already have the magnificent and deadly [[DropTheHammer Emergency Hammer]]. You don't have to get the Axe, though it does have one use: Breaking the lock keeping you from the sewer. Other weapons can break it, but it requires careful positioning and the Axe makes it easier.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Roguelike]]
* [[DropTheHammer Blunt weapons]] in ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' spent a long time in the wilderness due to a bug in the damage rules, meaning that your dwarves could pound on some poor goblin or kobold for ''months'' in-game without scoring a kill. While that did have [[VideogameCrueltyPotential a certain amount of appeal to many players]], it tended to impair the smooth running of a fortress by making civilian dwarves scared to go near the site of the battle.
** Two handed weapons aren't very popular, because they can't be used with a shield.
** [[WhipItGood Whips, scourges]], and [[EpicFlail flails]]. In this case it's because they tend to be absurdly powerful due to how the game handles chain weapons. While a human in adventurer mode can put them to good use, they're Scrappy in fortress mode, as none of them can be [[UnusableEnemyEquipment manufactured by dwarves, only scavenged off goblins]].
* ''VideoGame/EnterTheGungeon'' has the Klobb, which works almost exactly the same as it does in [[VideoGame/Goldeneye1997 Goldeneye 007]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons 3.0, 3.5, and TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}} made the heavy crossbow nearly useless. A user could fire it a bit further than a light crossbow and on average did one more point of damage on a hit compared to a longbow or a light crossbow. However, the weapon took an entire round to reload, leaving the character useless for an entire turn. Characters who knew how to use a bow would always do better to use the bow if they planned to make more than one attack in a round or spend more than one round shooting. Characters above first level could almost always afford a bow that let them add their strength to the damage, negating the heavy crossbow's advantage to damage. Characters who couldn't use a bow would usually rather shoot and move with a light crossbow or were spellcasters whose actions in combat were almost always better used casting a spell. Feats (special tricks characters learn) were priceless, and using one to select "Rapid Reload" for a heavy crossbow was generally a terrible choice. Even the range advantage was usually useless due to the metagame; most [=GMs=] who use maps don't set many encounters at distances where the extra range comes into play. If the adventure takes place inside a dungeon of any kind, forget it. Many "subpar" weapons have tons of uses for smart players, but the game's rules render heavy crossbows worthless. Even the siangham (a monk weapon which does less damage than the monk's fist) has its uses.
** The double crossbow in Pathfinder is even more AwesomeYetImpractical. It fires two bolts with one trigger pull, but penalizes both shots by -20% to hit (even if you know how to shoot it) and costs a feat just to learn to use. It takes two standard actions to reload, meaning a normal character using it would fire once every three rounds unless he dedicates even more precious feats to the weapon. Meanwhile, the Manyshot or Rapid Shot feats applied to many weapons and imparted lower/no penalties to hit and allowed for similar effects for dedicated ranged characters. If the character was a spell-caster or melee fighter, spending a feat to learn to use a double crossbow was a very bad choice, especially compared to repeating crossbows, longbows, or other options available to these characters.
** Bastard swords saw little use, as they were two handed weapons which did less damage than two handed swords or great axes, and only by spending a feat could a character use it in one hand. Feats were too precious to spend to gain the minimal damage bonus a bastard sword had over a longsword. Magical longswords were also far more common to find whether the loot was based on GM whimsy or random rolls, making longswords even more attractive compared to the bastard sword.
** Exotic weapons in general had this problem except for D&D's spiked chain, which could be a MinMaxersDelight. It was severely [[{{Nerf}} nerfed]] in TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}. Any benefit the exotic weapon provided was grossly overshadowed by the thought of "wasting" a feat and the low chance of finding a magical version of the weapon. If an exotic weapon was associated with a certain race, allowing that race to use it more easily, it would see modest use. The rest almost never saw action.
** Also in 3.5 is the Heavy Mace. It would be a simple bludgeoning weapon... but the problem is the Morningstar does the same amount of damage, costs less, weighs less, ''and'' does piercing damage in addition to bludgeoning. The only advantage the Mace has is being harder to sunder.
** In 1st edition AD&D, only the longsword and two handed sword out of all the melee weapons were really worth using for fighters most of the time unless you used the complicated "Weapon Type vs Armour Type" to hit modifier table which hardly anyone did making any other choice a scrappy weapon. They had the best damage dice for the number of hands required to wield them compared to all other weapons, unless you were unlucky enough to come across an enemy resistant or immune to slashing damage. Once weapon specialisation was added, pretty much every single 1st level fighter selected the longsword as you could double specialise in it (resulting in a very useful +3 to hit and damage while two handed weapons were restricted to single specialisation at +1 to hit and +2 damage) and used their remaining proficiency slot for a missile weapon. This problem remained until 3rd edition rolled around.
* 7thSea, due to an oversight, has the crossbow. The system uses a "keep" roll system, where [=XkY=] means you roll X dice but only keep the Y highest dice. Since you get to add your brawn to your roll (but not keep) for melee weapons it was common to find a weapon that had a lower X than Y. The crossbow has 0k2, but since it's a ranged weapon it never gets any bonuses from strength, meaning there's no way to get any rolls to actually keep.
* ''MiddleEarthRolePlaying'' and ''{{Rolemaster}}'' had the morning star and flail. While they both offered a modest +10 attack bonus and the chance to do a secondary critical hit, both weapons had an 8% chance to fumble on every attack and if you did fumble, you automatically critically hit yourself with them before you even rolled on the fumble table. The bola was even worse, with a -5 attack penalty though again with a chance to do a secondary critical, 7% fumble chance and again you automatically critically hit yourself with it if you did fumble.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Turn-Based Tactics]]
* The [[LittleUselessGun .38 Special]] in ''VideoGame/JaggedAlliance 2''. Pistols in general are relegated to EmergencyWeapon status early on as it is, and revolvers in particular are considered inferior because they have to be reloaded about three times as often as everything else, so that's two strikes against it before we even get to the fact that it does ''lousy'' damage and has poor range and accuracy even by pistol standards. You're almost better off with a knife.
* ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'':
** Bow weapons in ''VideoGame/DisgaeaHourOfDarkness'' were largely overshadowed by gun weapons for players that wanted range damage. Bows had access to Area of Effect attacks, but guns had greater range, and more importantly, damage for them was determined by a combination of the wielder's ATK and HIT stats, while every other weapon in the game relied only one stat for damage, making level stats for a good bow user was more trouble than it was worth. Developers noticed this and the weapons was RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap in later games where they were given better attacks, classes with evilities that can take advantage of bows and nerfing the range on the guns (guns in later games can still hit farther, but only in a straight line).
** Spears in the series tend to either fall into this or at the very least, the weapon version of the CrutchCharacter. Early on, the weapon's extra range on attack in exchange for lesser damage has its perk. However, as you reach further into the game and become more reliant on specials, the weakness of spears really begin to show. Many of its specials require an extra space to be open, making them unwieldy in some situations. Said specials usually allows its user to jump to said extra space, which again, is not always very useful in most situations and while other specials have some good AreaOfEffect specials, those special are hampered by the spear's lower attack strength compared to the stronger and more versatile swords and axes.
* ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars:''
** Missiles are this in the first game on pre-deploy maps, since the game likes to give them to you on maps that ''don't have enemy air units''. Missiles cannot target ground units at all meaning it's only purpose on such maps is to block enemy units and take attacks, and since it's wheels give it poor mobility and it is lacking in armor, it's not even all that useful for ''that'' purpose. Later games don't hand these units out on pre-deploy maps unless the enemy has either aircraft or an airport.
** Dusters from ''Days of Ruin'' are effectively cheaper Fighters that can also attack ground units, but their attack power against ground units, especially tanks, is ''pitiful''. Their MasterOfNone trait is so pronounced that you'd rather just build a copter or save up for a fighter or bomber.
** ''Dual Strike'' has the Stealth plane, an aerial version of the Submarine in that it can become invisible to the enemy (unless adjacent to an enemy unit). They're peerlessly versatile, able to attack ''any'' unit in the game for solid damage. And even after being discovered, hidden Stealths can only be targeted by Fighters and other Stealths. ''However'', they have just under 2/3rds the fuel capacity of other air units, and burn through that meager fuel reserve blisteringly fast just by staying hidden, much less actually ''moving'' while hidden. This means Stealth units require constant resupply to get anywhere, making them much more trouble than they're worth, especially in light of how much they cost to deploy.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Third-Person Shooters]]
* The "Kozlice" shotgun from ''VideoGame/OperationFlashpoint''. It's more accurate than the average game shotgun, but that's where the good bits end. It's weak, only holds two shots (and you can only carry 10 rounds ''total'', as opposed to ''300'' for an assault rifle, due to each individual shell taking up the same inventory space as a 30-round rifle magazine), and takes twice as long to reload as any of the other weapons. It'd almost be more effective if you could use it as a club. Of course since it's there to represent the civilian hunting shotguns which are all most of [[LaResistance the Resistance]] have to start with this is intentional.
* ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar'''s Scorcher flamethrower gets VideoGameFlamethrowersSuck down to a T. It has exceedingly short range, which unfortunately forces you into the killzone for everyone's favorite weapon, the Gnasher shotgun; not only that, but despite being a flamethrower, it lacks any significant DamageOverTime effect which would help justify its existence.
* ''VideoGame/{{Warframe}}'' has a fair number of TierInducedScrappy weapons, but the Akjagara falls under this trope for a different reason. The weapon's stats are fairly unremarkable, which wouldn't be an issue if it weren't for the cost to build it in the first place, requiring an Akbolto and a Dual Skana. While the Dual Skana's build costs aren't too bad, the Akbolto requires two Boltos to craft, each of which requires a Lato (which fortunately is available to purchase for credits). The total cost comes out to 210,000 credits, 7 Orokin Cells, 4 Neurodes, and some other more common resources, in a game where most weapons don't even cost 100,000 credits to build. Add in the fact that you'll need multiple weapon slots for the intermediate steps and that the whole process will take a minimum of 48 hours, and it's not hard to see why players were disgruntled.
* ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'' does a good job averting this for the most part. Most of the weapons are fun to use and are intuitive, though some are almost useless in some modes but are incredibly powerful in other modes to compensate, like the chargers and blasters. However, the Rapid Blasters stand as one of the few weapons that are almost universally considered bad. While they have more range and higher rates of fire than the normal Blaster, they have much less power. It lacks the one hit kill that the other Blaster types are used for while other weapons like .52 and .96 Gals are more reliable for kills due to having a higher range and fire rate. It's not helped by the fact that damage up can't reduce the number of hits needed to splat someone means that it can't be used like the regular blasters and even having the decent subweapon and special sets of Ink Mine and Bubbler or Suction Bomb and Bomb Rush does little to redeem it.
* In ''VideoGame/Splatoon2''
** In multiplayer, the Stingray is easily the least effective special weapon. All it has going for it are its long range and ability to see through walls, both of which are rendered useless by the fact that it's incredibly slow to aim, making it very difficult to hit anyone with it. And to add insult to injury, it takes multiple hits to down an opponent, meaning there's a good chance that they'll get away even if you manage to hit them. It's ''slightly'' more useful in Salmon Run mode due to the Salmonids generally not bothering to dodge and being the only weapon that can kill [[DemonicSpider Flyfish]] without using a bomb, but even then it's situational at best.
** In [[MultiMookMelee Salmon Run]], there are a number of weapons that are notably ill-suited to taking on mobs of enemies at once:
*** Blasters are some of the most difficult-to-use weapons in the mode due to the limited range (which makes them range from not very effective to completely useless when dealing with bosses) and a slow fire rate (which makes them bad at clearing out the {{Mooks}} that try to mob you). Their main selling point, being able to do damage around corners, is almost completely useless.
*** The Goo Tuber has a shorter range compared to other chargers as well as a longer charge time. It does have the ability to hold a full charge for much longer, but this isn't really useful in Salmon Run.
* The grenades and, fittingly enough, the grenade launcher in ''VideoGame/{{Army Men}}'': Sarge's Heroes. They're slow to use and have a tiny blast radius. The former's explosion must be timed perfectly to hit anything, while the latter's shot travels in a ''very'' tight arc that forces you to aim almost straight up for anything beyond close-range. It's infinitely easier to just shoot your enemies, and none of the soldiers take more than a handful of shots anyway. They are halfway decent against tanks, which can only be destroyed with explosives and are obviously much easier to hit; however, they're still made completely worthless by the bazooka in this regard - it's much easier to aim (point and shoot!), has an effective range of ''anywhere'', and has a much bigger, more powerful explosion. Plus you'll usually find one if there's a tank nearby anyway. There's also the mortar, which is like the grenade but with much more power and range, and can be easily used behind cover without the projectile bouncing back toward your feet...
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Wide Open Sandbox]]
* ''VideoGame/TheSaboteur'''s Terror Flamethrower. "[[VideogameFlamethrowersSuck Typical video game flamethrower]]" sums it up fairly well, with its short range and flames that cover up your field of view. It would be good for close-quarters combat in theory, except that at around the same time you gain access to an automatic shotgun with a ridiculous ammo capacity (150 rounds with a dirt-cheap upgrade) that's surprisingly effective at stopping targets well out of the flamethrower's range.
* ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'' has short swords. Theoretically, they're faster than broadswords, but do less damage and are smaller. However, unlike broadswords, your character doesn't swing it in an arc; rather, they jab it straight forward. It's moderately useful against enemies that walk right into your attacks, but worthless against nearly everything else.
* ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' has Golden Swords, which are only as strong as a Wooden Sword and breaks down twice as fast. While Golden Swords compensate their weaknesses by having higher chances of getting stronger enhancements, wasting rare gold resources for a weapon that won't last is a dumb move.
[[/folder]]
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31st Aug '17 5:27:00 PM REV6Pilot
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* The first ''{{VideoGame/Unreal|I}}'' has the DifficultButAwesome [[FunWithAcronyms GES]][[note]]'''G'''reen '''E'''xploding '''S'''hit[[/note]] Bio Rifle. It's a sort of grenade launcher that shoots small blobs of sticky explosive sludge, which deal quite a bit more damage than other fast-firing weapons and [[AIBreaker agile enemies can't dodge like they do straight-firing projectiles]], but do require the player to take into account the parabolic trajectory and slow travel speed of the shots. The secondary fire charges up the shot, making it able to OneHitKill anything that isn't a boss, but reducing its speed so much that hitting the target is easier said than done, and the range becomes so short due to the glob's weight that the resulting SplashDamage more often than not damages the player as well.

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* The first ''{{VideoGame/Unreal|I}}'' has the DifficultButAwesome [[FunWithAcronyms GES]][[note]]'''G'''reen GES]][[labelnote:+]]'''G'''reen '''E'''xploding '''S'''hit[[/note]] '''S'''hit[[/labelnote]] Bio Rifle. It's a sort of grenade launcher that shoots small blobs of sticky explosive sludge, which deal quite a bit more damage than other fast-firing weapons and [[AIBreaker agile enemies can't dodge like they do straight-firing projectiles]], but do require the player to take into account the parabolic trajectory and slow travel speed of the shots. The secondary fire charges up the shot, making it able to OneHitKill anything that isn't a boss, but reducing its speed so much that hitting the target is easier said than done, and the range becomes so short due to the glob's weight that the resulting SplashDamage more often than not damages the player as well.



* ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'': the flashlight makes for an awful weapon. It swings terriby slowly and with range no greater than that of the fists (in the case of the PC version, ''even less'' range than them), to say nothing of the horrendously off-centered beam. And [[WhoForgotTheLights thanks to the graphical design of the game]], you ''have'' to keep switching your gun out for it, leaving you unprepared when you inevitably get ambushed. Once you have a flashlight GameMod like the famous "{{Duct Tape|ForEverything}}" or Sikkmod's headlamp and NightVisionGoggles, it has no practical use, and it wasn't really missed in the [[UpdatedReRelease BFG edition]][[note]]that replaced the handheld flashlight with an armor-mounted lamp that is equally as off-centered and [[TenSecondFlashlight only works for a little while before having to shut down and recharge]], but at least lets you keep a gun ready[[/note]] either.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'': the flashlight makes for an awful weapon. It swings terriby slowly and with range no greater than that of the fists (in the case of the PC version, ''even less'' range than them), to say nothing of the horrendously off-centered beam. And [[WhoForgotTheLights thanks to the graphical design of the game]], you ''have'' to keep switching your gun out for it, leaving you unprepared when you inevitably get ambushed. Once you have a flashlight GameMod like the famous "{{Duct Tape|ForEverything}}" or Sikkmod's headlamp and NightVisionGoggles, it has no practical use, and it wasn't really missed in the [[UpdatedReRelease BFG edition]][[note]]that edition]][[labelnote:+]]that replaced the handheld flashlight with an armor-mounted lamp that is equally as off-centered and [[TenSecondFlashlight only works for a little while before having to shut down and recharge]], but at least lets you keep a gun ready[[/note]] ready[[/labelnote]] either.
31st Aug '17 3:55:21 PM MyFinalEdits
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* The Prankster Bit from ''VideoGame/TronTwoPointOh'' is the game's {{BFG}} and looks pretty cool, but the energy usage is obscene, the damage is overkill against everything you fight, and you get it so late in the game that you're literally unable to fully upgrade it. It's not even worth using against the final boss due to how the game handles damage dealt to it. Aif you use it in too close of quarters (read: ''most'' of that final level), it stands just as good of a chance of killing you as it does of killing your target. Seriously. Stick to Sequencer and just go [[Film/TronLegacy Rinzler]] on your enemies.

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* The Prankster Bit from ''VideoGame/TronTwoPointOh'' is the game's {{BFG}} and looks pretty cool, but the energy usage is obscene, the damage is overkill against everything you fight, and you get it so late in the game that you're literally unable to fully upgrade it. It's not even worth using against the final boss due to how the game handles damage dealt to it. Aif And if you use it in too close of quarters (read: ''most'' of that final level), it stands just as good of a chance of killing you as it does of killing your target. Seriously. Stick to Sequencer and just go [[Film/TronLegacy Rinzler]] on your enemies.
31st Aug '17 3:54:37 PM MyFinalEdits
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* The first ''{{VideoGame/Unreal|I}}'' has the DifficultButAwesome [[FunWithAcronyms GES]][[labelnote:*]]'''G'''reen '''E'''xploding '''S'''hit[[/labelnote]] Bio Rifle. It's a sort of grenade launcher that shoots small blobs of sticky explosive sludge, which deal quite a bit more damage than other fast-firing weapons and [[AIBreaker agile enemies can't dodge like they do straight-firing projectiles]], but do require the player to take into account the parabolic trajectory and slow travel speed of the shots. The secondary fire charges up the shot, making it able to OneHitKill anything that isn't a boss, but reducing its speed so much that hitting the target is easier said than done, and the range becomes so short due to the glob's weight that the resulting SplashDamage more often than not damages the player as well.
** The [[{{VideoGame/UnrealTournament}} Tournament series]] Bio Rifle is essentially the same, but becomes mildly more useful because multiplayer gameplay does occasionally require defensive weaponry, and filling a hallway with green goo is a decent way to make sure anyone passing through in the next few seconds is reduced to red salsa. It's still the least used gun in the game, though, especially since the globs disappear in a handful of seconds; ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament2004'' introduced the Spider Mine launcher in Onslaught mode, which does the Bio Rifle's job for defensive play far better.

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* The first ''{{VideoGame/Unreal|I}}'' has the DifficultButAwesome [[FunWithAcronyms GES]][[labelnote:*]]'''G'''reen GES]][[note]]'''G'''reen '''E'''xploding '''S'''hit[[/labelnote]] '''S'''hit[[/note]] Bio Rifle. It's a sort of grenade launcher that shoots small blobs of sticky explosive sludge, which deal quite a bit more damage than other fast-firing weapons and [[AIBreaker agile enemies can't dodge like they do straight-firing projectiles]], but do require the player to take into account the parabolic trajectory and slow travel speed of the shots. The secondary fire charges up the shot, making it able to OneHitKill anything that isn't a boss, but reducing its speed so much that hitting the target is easier said than done, and the range becomes so short due to the glob's weight that the resulting SplashDamage more often than not damages the player as well.
** The [[{{VideoGame/UnrealTournament}} Tournament series]] * In the ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament'' series, Bio Rifle is essentially the same, but becomes mildly more useful because multiplayer gameplay does occasionally require defensive weaponry, and filling a hallway with green goo is a decent way to make sure anyone passing through in the next few seconds is reduced to red salsa. It's still the least used gun in the game, though, especially since the globs disappear in a handful of seconds; ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament2004'' introduced the Spider Mine launcher in Onslaught mode, which does the Bio Rifle's job for defensive play far better.



* ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'': the flashlight makes for an awful weapon. It swings terriby slowly and with range no greater than that of the fists (in the case of the PC version, ''even less'' range than them), to say nothing of the horrendously off-centered beam. And [[WhoForgotTheLights thanks to the graphical design of the game]], you ''have'' to keep switching your gun out for it, leaving you unprepared when you inevitably get ambushed. Once you have a flashlight GameMod like the famous "{{Duct Tape|ForEverything}}" or Sikkmod's headlamp and NightVisionGoggles, it has no practical use, and it wasn't really missed in the [[UpdatedReRelease BFG edition]][[labelnote:+]]that replaced the handheld flashlight with an armor-mounted lamp that is equally as off-centered and [[TenSecondFlashlight only works for a little while before having to shut down and recharge]], but at least lets you keep a gun ready[[/labelnote]] either.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'': the flashlight makes for an awful weapon. It swings terriby slowly and with range no greater than that of the fists (in the case of the PC version, ''even less'' range than them), to say nothing of the horrendously off-centered beam. And [[WhoForgotTheLights thanks to the graphical design of the game]], you ''have'' to keep switching your gun out for it, leaving you unprepared when you inevitably get ambushed. Once you have a flashlight GameMod like the famous "{{Duct Tape|ForEverything}}" or Sikkmod's headlamp and NightVisionGoggles, it has no practical use, and it wasn't really missed in the [[UpdatedReRelease BFG edition]][[labelnote:+]]that edition]][[note]]that replaced the handheld flashlight with an armor-mounted lamp that is equally as off-centered and [[TenSecondFlashlight only works for a little while before having to shut down and recharge]], but at least lets you keep a gun ready[[/labelnote]] ready[[/note]] either.
31st Aug '17 3:52:47 PM MyFinalEdits
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** The Concussion Impulse Generator sounds like it can do lots of damage in a hurry on paper. In practice, it's merely a scaled up corvette-sized version of the High Energy Plasma Thrower, with marginally improved range but terribly low [=RoF=] and consumes more energy than the HEPT. While it has its uses as a corvette and frigate gun (unless you're flying a Teladi Shrike or Xenon Q, who both have terrible generators to recharge their guns), it's a particularly ineffective weapon for carriers and destroyers. The only reason few players would want to use the CIG is its unique stun effect on fighters and freighters below TL-class just ForTheLulz. Other than that, it's pretty much VendorTrash. ''Albion Prelude'' buffed the weapon generators on all non-Terran corvettes, making the CIG more useful there.

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** The Concussion Impulse Generator sounds like it can do lots of damage in a hurry on paper. In practice, it's merely a scaled up corvette-sized version of the High Energy Plasma Thrower, with marginally improved range but terribly low [=RoF=] and consumes more energy than the HEPT. While it has its uses as a corvette and frigate gun (unless you're flying a Teladi Shrike or Xenon Q, who both have terrible generators to recharge their guns), it's a particularly ineffective weapon for carriers and destroyers. The only reason few players would want to use the CIG is its unique stun effect on fighters and freighters below TL-class just ForTheLulz. Other than that, it's pretty much VendorTrash. ''Albion Prelude'' buffed the weapon generators on all non-Terran corvettes, making the CIG more useful there.



** If the assault rifle didn't have its grenade launcher, it'd be completely worthless. Each shot does anemic damage, requiring a five-round burst ''to the head'' to take out enemies. The recoil makes it completely worthless at range unless you're at least Advanced skill with Rifles. And on top of all of that, the formula for enemy ammo drops means killing enemies with it will never get you any more 7.62x51mm ammo.

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** If the assault rifle didn't have its grenade launcher, it'd be completely worthless. Each shot does anemic damage, requiring a five-round burst ''to the head'' to take out enemies. The recoil makes it completely worthless at range unless you're at least Advanced skill with Rifles. And on top of all of that, the formula for enemy ammo drops means killing enemies with it will never get you any more 7.62x51mm ammo.



* The Prankster Bit from ''VideoGame/TronTwoPointOh'' is the game's {{BFG}} and looks pretty cool, but the energy usage is obscene, the damage is overkill against everything you fight, and you get it so late in the game that you're literally unable to fully upgrade it. It's not even worth using against the final boss due to how the game handles damage dealt to it. Not to mention the fact that if you use it in too close of quarters (read: ''most'' of that final level), it stands just as good of a chance of killing you as it does of killing your target. Seriously. Stick to Sequencer and just go [[Film/TronLegacy Rinzler]] on your enemies.

to:

* The Prankster Bit from ''VideoGame/TronTwoPointOh'' is the game's {{BFG}} and looks pretty cool, but the energy usage is obscene, the damage is overkill against everything you fight, and you get it so late in the game that you're literally unable to fully upgrade it. It's not even worth using against the final boss due to how the game handles damage dealt to it. Not to mention the fact that if Aif you use it in too close of quarters (read: ''most'' of that final level), it stands just as good of a chance of killing you as it does of killing your target. Seriously. Stick to Sequencer and just go [[Film/TronLegacy Rinzler]] on your enemies.



* The first ''{{VideoGame/Unreal|I}}'' has the DifficultButAwesome [[FunWithAcronyms GES]][[labelnote:*]]'''G'''reen '''E'''xploding '''S'''hit[[/labelnote]] Bio Rifle. It's a sort of grenade launcher that shoots small blobs of sticky explosive sludge, which deal quite a bit more damage than other fast-firing weapons and [[AIBreaker agile enemies can't dodge like they do straight-firing projectiles]], but do require the player to take into account the parabolic trajectory and slow travel speed of the shots. The secondary fire charges up the shot, making it pretty much able to OneHitKill anything that isn't a boss, but reducing its speed so much that hitting the target is easier said than done, and the range becomes so short due to the glob's weight that the resulting SplashDamage more often than not damages the player as well.

to:

* The first ''{{VideoGame/Unreal|I}}'' has the DifficultButAwesome [[FunWithAcronyms GES]][[labelnote:*]]'''G'''reen '''E'''xploding '''S'''hit[[/labelnote]] Bio Rifle. It's a sort of grenade launcher that shoots small blobs of sticky explosive sludge, which deal quite a bit more damage than other fast-firing weapons and [[AIBreaker agile enemies can't dodge like they do straight-firing projectiles]], but do require the player to take into account the parabolic trajectory and slow travel speed of the shots. The secondary fire charges up the shot, making it pretty much able to OneHitKill anything that isn't a boss, but reducing its speed so much that hitting the target is easier said than done, and the range becomes so short due to the glob's weight that the resulting SplashDamage more often than not damages the player as well.



* ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'': the flashlight makes for an awful weapon. It swings terriby slowly and with range no greater than that of the fists (in the case of the PC version, ''even less'' range than them), to say nothing of the horrendously off-centered beam. And [[WhoForgotTheLights thanks to the graphical design of the game]], you ''have'' to keep switching your gun out for it, leaving you unprepared when you inevitably get ambushed. Once you have a flashlight GameMod like the famous "{{Duct Tape|ForEverything}}" or Sikkmod's headlamp and NightVisionGoggles, it has pretty much no practical use, and it wasn't really missed in the [[UpdatedReRelease BFG edition]][[labelnote:+]]that replaced the handheld flashlight with an armor-mounted lamp that is equally as off-centered and [[TenSecondFlashlight only works for a little while before having to shut down and recharge]], but at least lets you keep a gun ready[[/labelnote]] either.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'': the flashlight makes for an awful weapon. It swings terriby slowly and with range no greater than that of the fists (in the case of the PC version, ''even less'' range than them), to say nothing of the horrendously off-centered beam. And [[WhoForgotTheLights thanks to the graphical design of the game]], you ''have'' to keep switching your gun out for it, leaving you unprepared when you inevitably get ambushed. Once you have a flashlight GameMod like the famous "{{Duct Tape|ForEverything}}" or Sikkmod's headlamp and NightVisionGoggles, it has pretty much no practical use, and it wasn't really missed in the [[UpdatedReRelease BFG edition]][[labelnote:+]]that replaced the handheld flashlight with an armor-mounted lamp that is equally as off-centered and [[TenSecondFlashlight only works for a little while before having to shut down and recharge]], but at least lets you keep a gun ready[[/labelnote]] either.



** ''VideoGame/MegaMan10'' gives us Thunder Wool, which is nigh impossible to aim, and blows through all its ammo in 6 shots. Even worse, the cloud can be destroyed if an enemy or projectile collides with it. This means you can't reliably use it at close range, since that pretty much guarantees that it'll disappear before it can fire off a bolt, thus wasting a ton of your ammo. To quote one Gamefaqs poster, "Anything the Thunder Wool does, another weapon does better and for less ammo cost."

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** ''VideoGame/MegaMan10'' gives us Thunder Wool, which is nigh impossible to aim, and blows through all its ammo in 6 shots. Even worse, the cloud can be destroyed if an enemy or projectile collides with it. This means you can't reliably use it at close range, since that pretty much guarantees that it'll disappear before it can fire off a bolt, thus wasting a ton of your ammo. To quote one Gamefaqs poster, "Anything the Thunder Wool does, another weapon does better and for less ammo cost."



* Practice Bows in ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade'' if the player character is not built as an archer. You are pretty much doomed in any arena/tournament fight if you spawn with one and you aren't lucky enough to get a new weapon really quick as you can't fight at all in melee with one.

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* Practice Bows in ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade'' if the player character is not built as an archer. You are pretty much doomed in any arena/tournament fight if you spawn with one and you aren't lucky enough to get a new weapon really quick as you can't fight at all in melee with one.



*** The Sturdy Caravan Shotgun from the ''Courier's Stash'' DLC has its own set of problems. It deals slightly better damage than the regular version, is much more durable, and doesn't have the same Guns skill requirement to use effectively... but, due to shoddy programming, it is not affected by either of the shotgun-centric perks and doesn't count for shotgun-focused challenges. Both versions of the caravan shotgun are also hard to use with slug rounds due to the strange decision to use the raised screw from the release lever as a rear sight rather than screwing it in properly and using an ''actual'' sight that [[InterfaceScrew doesn't completely block your view of the target at any range where slugs would be worth using over buckshot.]]

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*** ** The Sturdy Caravan Shotgun from the ''Courier's Stash'' DLC has its own set of problems. It deals slightly better damage than the regular version, is much more durable, and doesn't have the same Guns skill requirement to use effectively... but, due to shoddy programming, it is not affected by either of the shotgun-centric perks and doesn't count for shotgun-focused challenges. Both versions of the caravan shotgun are also hard to use with slug rounds due to the strange decision to use the raised screw from the release lever as a rear sight rather than screwing it in properly and using an ''actual'' sight that [[InterfaceScrew doesn't completely block your view of the target at any range where slugs would be worth using over buckshot.]]



* In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', Polearms. You wouldn't know this by hearing the fanbase, but nobody actually used them in Morrowind because they were worthless. Didn't help that one-handed swords were much more numerous and [[BoringButPractical stronger]]...or that you pretty much ''had'' to have some skill in them.

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* In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', Polearms. You wouldn't know this by hearing the fanbase, but nobody actually used them in Morrowind because they were worthless. Didn't help that one-handed swords were much more numerous and [[BoringButPractical stronger]]...or that you pretty much ''had'' to have some skill in them.



* The Anguis pin in ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'', despite having the highest raw damage number in the game, fails in practically every other way imaginable and then some. First, it's highly inaccurate - in a game where enemies move constantly, this is a big problem. Second, it never reboots, meaning ItOnlyWorksOnce per battle ''chain'' - if you string 16 battles together, you'll only have a single use of Anguis in ''one'' of those battles, and in a game where most battles are either chain battles or long battles, this is a huge problem. Third, the Anguis pin is considered a Reaper-class pin. The player is only allowed to wear one Reaper-class pin into any battle chain, meaning using Anguis takes away from a wide variety of pins that actually have consistent use. What brings Anguis from merely being a bad weapon into the area of players utterly loathing it with a passion, however, is mastering the pin. Anguis takes a ''ridiculously'' long time to master. You can have 99% of the pins in the game mastered, and then spend '''days''' just mastering that one last Anguis pin. And to top it all off, there's a piece of equipment that requires a fully mastered Anguis pin to buy. If you want the game to acknowledge HundredPercentCompletion, you need to have everything in your inventory, which means ''both'' a fully mastered Anguis pin '''and''' the piece of equipment you use one to buy. This means going through the trouble of mastering the pin TWICE. Small wonder people have been known to (deliberately) misspell it as the "Anguish" pin...

to:

* The Anguis pin in ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'', despite having the highest raw damage number in the game, fails in practically every other way imaginable and then some. First, it's highly inaccurate - in a game where enemies move constantly, this is a big problem. Second, it never reboots, meaning ItOnlyWorksOnce per battle ''chain'' - if you string 16 battles together, you'll only have a single use of Anguis in ''one'' of those battles, and in a game where most battles are either chain battles or long battles, this is a huge problem. Third, the Anguis pin is considered a Reaper-class pin. The player is only allowed to wear one Reaper-class pin into any battle chain, meaning using Anguis takes away from a wide variety of pins that actually have consistent use. What brings Anguis from merely being a bad weapon into the area of players utterly loathing it with a passion, however, is mastering the pin. Anguis takes a ''ridiculously'' long time to master. You can have 99% of the pins in the game mastered, and then spend '''days''' just mastering that one last Anguis pin. And to top it all off, there's a piece of equipment that requires a fully mastered Anguis pin to buy. If you want the game to acknowledge HundredPercentCompletion, you need to have everything in your inventory, which means ''both'' a fully mastered Anguis pin '''and''' the piece of equipment you use one to buy. This means going through the trouble of mastering the pin TWICE. Small wonder people have been known to (deliberately) misspell it as the "Anguish" pin...



* The Autocannon/10 and Ultra autocannon/10 in ''VideoGame/MechWarrior Living Legends''. Heavy, pitiful damage, pitiful ammo capacity, slow projectiles, and the gun overheats and jams almost as soon as it feels like you start doing proper damage to the enemy. The Bear Autocannon, a handheld minigun for the [[PoweredArmor Battlearmor]] is so thoroughly in the Joke category that it is literally more effective to ''throw the gun at the enemy''[[note]]which at close range, has a chance to TeleFrag the enemy when the weapon spawns inside them[[/note]] than it is to shoot them with it - the gun has terrible range, next to zero damage against armored targets and other battlearmor, overheats, has a wind-up time, and encroaches on the AC/2 handheld bullet hose, which is better in every single way and fits into the same category.
** The final patch, 0.7.0, ''finally'' [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap rectified the scrappy weapons]]. The AC/10 and UAC/10 are now genuinely scary weapons, and the Bear Autocannon now has a range of 600 meters along with greatly improved damage and accuracy - making it an excellent sniper weapon to take out other battlearmor, and an effective way to piss off mech pilots courtesy of ScratchDamage. However, it has a side effect of making the handheld Small Laser pretty much redundant.

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* The Autocannon/10 and Ultra autocannon/10 in ''VideoGame/MechWarrior Living Legends''.Legends'':
** The Autocannon/10 and Ultra autocannon/10.
Heavy, pitiful damage, pitiful ammo capacity, slow projectiles, and the gun overheats and jams almost as soon as it feels like you start doing proper damage to the enemy. The Bear Autocannon, a handheld minigun for the [[PoweredArmor Battlearmor]] is so thoroughly in the Joke category that it is literally more effective to ''throw the gun at the enemy''[[note]]which at close range, has a chance to TeleFrag the enemy when the weapon spawns inside them[[/note]] than it is to shoot them with it - the gun has terrible range, next to zero damage against armored targets and other battlearmor, overheats, has a wind-up time, and encroaches on the AC/2 handheld bullet hose, which is better in every single way and fits into the same category.
** The final patch, 0.7.0, ''finally'' [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap rectified the scrappy weapons]]. The AC/10 and UAC/10 are now genuinely scary weapons, and the Bear Autocannon now has a range of 600 meters along with greatly improved damage and accuracy - making it an excellent sniper weapon to take out other battlearmor, and an effective way to piss off mech pilots courtesy of ScratchDamage. However, it has a side effect of making the handheld Small Laser pretty much redundant.



** [=LRM-20=] Missile Launchers. As the name implies, they fire off a swarm of 20, one point damage missiles out to a max range of 1000 meters (in a game where the average optimal weapon range is typically around 300 to 500 meters. As the only other weapon that can deal up to 20 points of damage with a single shot (not counting Critical hits triggering Ammo Explosions), is the short range, and heavier Autocannon/20, this sounds awesome, right? Wrong. [=LRM-20s=] have long reload times, generate significant heat build up on your mech, have very wide missile spreads, which can cause up to half or more of the missiles to miss even the largest Assault Class mechs, and even if they do hit, that's damage that's scattered on up to 8 hit locations (3 of which, the torso sections, have front and back armor, so technically, 11 total hit locations). They weigh the most of all the missile launchers in game right now, they take up a lot critical slots, limiting what else you can place in a section of the mech, and eat through literal tons of ammo. Many players prefer the faster reloads, and more compact spreads of the smaller launchers.
** Flamers. Another case of VideogameFlamethrowersSuck. They are by all means, "Energy Machine Guns", which is to say, versus any enemy mech with Armor protecting them still, do very little damage, but versus exposed Internal Structure, have increased damage, and bonus Critical Hit Chance. And unlike Machine Guns, they have infinite ammo, and can increase the heat of a mech hit with them. However, they also generate heat very quickly on the mech firing them, completely negating the "Over heat your enemy" aspect, are short ranged, and are nowhere near as good as the regular Machine Guns in terms of ease of aiming ([=MGs=] are pinpoint, while it can be hard to hit the section of the enemy mech you want with the Flame Throwers).
* [=SRM2s=] in any Mechwarrior game ever, due to the piddling damage caused by the tiny two-missile salvo. If you're taking the trouble to fit a missile launcher but your build restricts you so much that you can't mount [=SRM4s=] or [=SRM6s=], you're almost certainly better off either compromising on something else in order to install the better launchers or using up the weight with buffs or ammo for other weapons.
* ''VideoGame/AceCombatInfinity'' has the High-Capacity Air-to-Air Missile. It's basically a second set of the standard missiles, with a slower reload time, less ammo, less damage, and no ability to lock onto the more plentiful ground targets. That would be bad enough on its own, but what makes it worse is that it is very, very easy to upgrade every aspect of the standard missiles and completely obsolete the HCAA, while the HCAA - and by extension, every missile-based special weapon - requires most of the tech tree to be completed before one can even begin to upgrade anything other than their capacity. What really makes it scrappy is that damn near every mid- to high-tier and special aircraft gets the HCAA instead of something that actually fills a niche the standard missiles can't already do better - you can count the number of late-game craft that ''don't'' have it on both hands.
* ''VideoGame/Freespace2'' has the Prometheus-R, a supposed retrofit of the well-liked Prometheus from the first game. Unfortunately for you, this retrofit effectively made the weapon worse in every possible way, with a painfully slow rate of fire, high power consumption, and per-shot damage that is barely higher than the starting [[BoringButPractical Subach HL-7]]. Even worse, a few missions force you to use it. Thankfully it is supplanted later on in the game by the Prometheus-S, a variant more up to the standards of the first game's Prometheus. The in-game explanation for this is that the GTVA was in the midst of a gas shortage and couldn't provide fuel for the Prometheus, so the Prometheus-R was a watered-down version meant as a stopgap production. The Prometheus-S is introduced about the same time the GTVA gets its gas mines back, allowing them to begin producing the actual weapon again.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Stealth-Based Games]]
* Just about any melee weapon in the ''VideoGame/{{Tenchu}}'' games (at least ''Wrath of Heaven'') that you can get from a dead {{Mook}}. Especially as they get rid of your one-hit stealth kills. The higher-scoring need-for-powering-up stealth kills. The you're-a-ninja stealth kills. (Well, yeah, the fun-to-do stealth kills.)
* The XM M63 501 in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'' if you decide to use it during the bike chase (Which, owing to this being a ActionBasedMission and it's high ammo capacity, you will). Yes, the weapon is handy, but Snake's constant ''Franchise/{{Rambo}}'' style yelling (which will occur non-stop since you'll be firing in bursts) is [[MostAnnoyingSound literal ear poison]] and tempts many players into using the less effective (but more pleasant to listen to) AK-47 or Skorpion.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Survival Horror]]
* Proximity Mines in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'' might be considered this. Though they have some use in Story mode (usually by leading bosses and strong enemies on them), in Mercenaries they are next to useless, since you need to do melee anyway and you can't even use them to clear the mob in a pinch. No reason to bother with bosses. And in Versus, if you happen to be seen placing them, the enemy player can detonate them by shooting while you are still close. This added to the fact that good players won't be caught stepping on them anyway, since it's easy to tell the set mines from the dropped ones.
* The knife from most of the ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' series was absurdly weak (usually taking several dozen stabs just to knock over the most basic of enemies), had zero range, and took up valuable inventory space, so was typically dumped in the first item box, unless you were just ''that'' good and wanted to give yourself a SelfImposedChallenge. ''[[VideoGame/ResidentEvilCodeVeronica Code Veronica]]'' was the first game to give it even limited usefulness, as one swipe counted as several hits, but it wasn't until ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4'' made it as powerful as the handgun, just trading range for unlimited use and no inventory space used, that it [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap became worthwhile]]. A skilled player could save a lot of ammo using it, and some bosses (particularly Krauser) were actually easier with the knife as it dealt majorly-increased damage against them.
* The Bow Gun in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' isn't any stronger than the handgun and damage potential is wasted since the 3 bolts the weapon shoots out spreads out, which makes it near useless at long range.
* [[VideoGameFlameThrowersSuck The Flamethrower]] as found in various ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' games is almost always useless, as it tends to be unreloadable, short-ranged, with zero stopping power, and one character tends to get it in lieu of [[FakeBalance superior weapons given to the other playable character]]. It was at it's most useful in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' as it was very effective against [[DemonicSpiders the Ivys]], but even then the flame rounds from Claire's grenade launcher were more effective. It was at it's absolute worst in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil'' where Chris gets it late in the game opposed to the bazooka given to Jill ''early'' in the game and can only be used in the underground area limiting it's usefulness to fighting one boss that goes down fairly easy anyways.
* ''VideoGame/SilentHill1'' has two: the Kitchen Knife and the Hand Axe, the first and last melee weapons you get, respectively. The Kitchen Knife is a mandatory pickup, has zero range and in terms of defense is much worse than simply running from danger, and it's as if the game realizes how worthless it is because you can find the Steel Pipe, one of the game's more useful weapons, ''less than a minute later''. The Hand Axe is a barely-noticeable upgrade to the Kitchen Knife, which is rather unacceptable since by then you're 75% through the game and already have the magnificent and deadly [[DropTheHammer Emergency Hammer]]. You don't have to get the Axe, though it does have one use: Breaking the lock keeping you from the sewer. Other weapons can break it, but it requires careful positioning and the Axe makes it easier.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Roguelike]]
* [[DropTheHammer Blunt weapons]] in ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' spent a long time in the wilderness due to a bug in the damage rules, meaning that your dwarves could pound on some poor goblin or kobold for ''months'' in-game without scoring a kill. While that did have [[VideogameCrueltyPotential a certain amount of appeal to many players]], it tended to impair the smooth running of a fortress by making civilian dwarves scared to go near the site of the battle.
** Two handed weapons aren't very popular, because they can't be used with a shield.
** [[WhipItGood Whips, scourges]], and [[EpicFlail flails]]. In this case it's because they tend to be absurdly powerful due to how the game handles chain weapons. While a human in adventurer mode can put them to good use, they're Scrappy in fortress mode, as none of them can be [[UnusableEnemyEquipment manufactured by dwarves, only scavenged off goblins]].
* ''VideoGame/EnterTheGungeon'' has the Klobb, which works almost exactly the same as it does in [[VideoGame/Goldeneye1997 Goldeneye 007]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons 3.0, 3.5, and TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}} made the heavy crossbow nearly useless. A user could fire it a bit further than a light crossbow and on average did one more point of damage on a hit compared to a longbow or a light crossbow. However, the weapon took an entire round to reload, leaving the character useless for an entire turn. Characters who knew how to use a bow would always do better to use the bow if they planned to make more than one attack in a round or spend more than one round shooting. Characters above first level could almost always afford a bow that let them add their strength to the damage, negating the heavy crossbow's advantage to damage. Characters who couldn't use a bow would usually rather shoot and move with a light crossbow or were spellcasters whose actions in combat were almost always better used casting a spell. Feats (special tricks characters learn) were priceless, and using one to select "Rapid Reload" for a heavy crossbow was generally a terrible choice. Even the range advantage was usually useless due to the metagame; most [=GMs=] who use maps don't set many encounters at distances where the extra range comes into play. If the adventure takes place inside a dungeon of any kind, forget it. Many "subpar" weapons have tons of uses for smart players, but the game's rules render heavy crossbows worthless. Even the siangham (a monk weapon which does less damage than the monk's fist) has its uses.
** The double crossbow in Pathfinder is even more AwesomeYetImpractical. It fires two bolts with one trigger pull, but penalizes both shots by -20% to hit (even if you know how to shoot it) and costs a feat just to learn to use. It takes two standard actions to reload, meaning a normal character using it would fire once every three rounds unless he dedicates even more precious feats to the weapon. Meanwhile, the Manyshot or Rapid Shot feats applied to many weapons and imparted lower/no penalties to hit and allowed for similar effects for dedicated ranged characters. If the character was a spell-caster or melee fighter, spending a feat to learn to use a double crossbow was a very bad choice, especially compared to repeating crossbows, longbows, or other options available to these characters.
** Bastard swords saw little use, as they were two handed weapons which did less damage than two handed swords or great axes, and only by spending a feat could a character use it in one hand. Feats were too precious to spend to gain the minimal damage bonus a bastard sword had over a longsword. Magical longswords were also far more common to find whether the loot was based on GM whimsy or random rolls, making longswords even more attractive compared to the bastard sword.
** Exotic weapons in general had this problem except for D&D's spiked chain, which could be a MinMaxersDelight. It was severely [[{{Nerf}} nerfed]] in TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}. Any benefit the exotic weapon provided was grossly overshadowed by the thought of "wasting" a feat and the low chance of finding a magical version of the weapon. If an exotic weapon was associated with a certain race, allowing that race to use it more easily, it would see modest use. The rest almost never saw action.
** Also in 3.5 is the Heavy Mace. It would be a simple bludgeoning weapon... but the problem is the Morningstar does the same amount of damage, costs less, weighs less, ''and'' does piercing damage in addition to bludgeoning. The only advantage the Mace has is being harder to sunder.
** In 1st edition AD&D, only the longsword and two handed sword out of all the melee weapons were really worth using for fighters most of the time unless you used the complicated "Weapon Type vs Armour Type" to hit modifier table which hardly anyone did making any other choice a scrappy weapon. They had the best damage dice for the number of hands required to wield them compared to all other weapons, unless you were unlucky enough to come across an enemy resistant or immune to slashing damage. Once weapon specialisation was added, pretty much every single 1st level fighter selected the longsword as you could double specialise in it (resulting in a very useful +3 to hit and damage while two handed weapons were restricted to single specialisation at +1 to hit and +2 damage) and used their remaining proficiency slot for a missile weapon. This problem remained until 3rd edition rolled around.
* 7thSea, due to an oversight, has the crossbow. The system uses a "keep" roll system, where [=XkY=] means you roll X dice but only keep the Y highest dice. Since you get to add your brawn to your roll (but not keep) for melee weapons it was common to find a weapon that had a lower X than Y. The crossbow has 0k2, but since it's a ranged weapon it never gets any bonuses from strength, meaning there's no way to get any rolls to actually keep.
* ''MiddleEarthRolePlaying'' and ''{{Rolemaster}}'' had the morning star and flail. While they both offered a modest +10 attack bonus and the chance to do a secondary critical hit, both weapons had an 8% chance to fumble on every attack and if you did fumble, you automatically critically hit yourself with them before you even rolled on the fumble table. The bola was even worse, with a -5 attack penalty though again with a chance to do a secondary critical, 7% fumble chance and again you automatically critically hit yourself with it if you did fumble.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Turn-Based Tactics]]
* The [[LittleUselessGun .38 Special]] in ''VideoGame/JaggedAlliance 2''. Pistols in general are relegated to EmergencyWeapon status early on as it is, and revolvers in particular are considered inferior because they have to be reloaded about three times as often as everything else, so that's two strikes against it before we even get to the fact that it does ''lousy'' damage and has poor range and accuracy even by pistol standards. You're almost better off with a knife.
* Bow weapons in ''VideoGame/DisgaeaHourOfDarkness'' were largely overshadowed by gun weapons for players that wanted range damage. Bows had access to Area of Effect attacks, but guns had greater range, and more importantly, damage for them was determined by a combination of the wielder's ATK and HIT stats, while every other weapon in the game relied only one stat for damage, making level stats for a good bow user was more trouble than it was worth. Developers noticed this and the weapons was RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap in later games where they were given better attacks, classes with evilities that can take advantage of bows and nerfing the range on the guns (guns in later games can still hit farther, but only in a straight line).
** Spears in the ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'' series tend to either fall into this or at the very least, the weapon version of the CrutchCharacter. Early on, the weapon's extra range on attack in exchange for lesser damage has its perk. However, as you reach further into the game and become more reliant on specials, the weakness of spears really begin to show. Many of its specials require an extra space to be open, making them unwieldy in some situations. Said specials usually allows its user to jump to said extra space, which again, is not always very useful in most situations and while other specials have some good AreaOfEffect specials, those special are hampered by the spear's lower attack strength compared to the stronger and more versatile swords and axes.
* ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars:''
** Missiles are this in the first game on pre-deploy maps, since the game likes to give them to you on maps that ''don't have enemy air units''. Missiles cannot target ground units at all meaning it's only purpose on such maps is to block enemy units and take attacks, and since it's wheels give it poor mobility and it is lacking in armor, it's not even all that useful for ''that'' purpose. Later games don't hand these units out on pre-deploy maps unless the enemy has either aircraft or an airport.
** Dusters from ''Days of Ruin'' are effectively cheaper Fighters that can also attack ground units, but their attack power against ground units, especially tanks, is ''pitiful''. Their MasterOfNone trait is so pronounced that you'd rather just build a copter or save up for a fighter or bomber.
** ''Dual Strike'' has the Stealth plane, an aerial version of the Submarine in that it can become invisible to the enemy (unless adjacent to an enemy unit). They're peerlessly versatile, able to attack ''any'' unit in the game for solid damage. And even after being discovered, hidden Stealths can only be targeted by Fighters and other Stealths. ''However'', they have just under 2/3rds the fuel capacity of other air units, and burn through that meager fuel reserve blisteringly fast just by staying hidden, much less actually ''moving'' while hidden. This means Stealth units require constant resupply to get anywhere, making them much more trouble than they're worth, especially in light of how much they cost to deploy.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Third-Person Shooters]]
* The "Kozlice" shotgun from ''VideoGame/OperationFlashpoint''. It's more accurate than the average game shotgun, but that's where the good bits end. It's weak, only holds two shots (and you can only carry 10 rounds ''total'', as opposed to ''300'' for an assault rifle, due to each individual shell taking up the same inventory space as a 30-round rifle magazine), and takes twice as long to reload as any of the other weapons. It'd almost be more effective if you could use it as a club. Of course since it's there to represent the civilian hunting shotguns which are all most of [[LaResistance the Resistance]] have to start with this is intentional.
* ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar'''s Scorcher flamethrower gets VideoGameFlamethrowersSuck down to a T. It has exceedingly short range, which unfortunately forces you into the killzone for everyone's favorite weapon, the Gnasher shotgun; not only that, but despite being a flamethrower, it lacks any significant DamageOverTime effect which would help justify its existence.
* ''VideoGame/{{Warframe}}'' has a fair number of TierInducedScrappy weapons, but the Akjagara falls under this trope for a different reason. The weapon's stats are fairly unremarkable, which wouldn't be an issue if it weren't for the cost to build it in the first place, requiring an Akbolto and a Dual Skana. While the Dual Skana's build costs aren't too bad, the Akbolto requires two Boltos to craft, each of which requires a Lato (which fortunately is available to purchase for credits). The total cost comes out to 210,000 credits, 7 Orokin Cells, 4 Neurodes, and some other more common resources, in a game where most weapons don't even cost 100,000 credits to build. Add in the fact that you'll need multiple weapon slots for the intermediate steps and that the whole process will take a minimum of 48 hours, and it's not hard to see why players were disgruntled.
* ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'' does a good job averting this for the most part. Most of the weapons are fun to use and are intuitive, though some are almost useless in some modes but are incredibly powerful in other modes to compensate, like the chargers and blasters. However, the Rapid Blasters stand as one of the few weapons that are almost universally considered bad. While they have more range and higher rates of fire than the normal Blaster, they have much less power. It lacks the one hit kill that the other Blaster types are used for while other weapons like .52 and .96 Gals are more reliable for kills due to having a higher range and fire rate. It's not helped by the fact that damage up can't reduce the number of hits needed to splat someone means that it can't be used like the regular blasters and even having the decent subweapon and special sets of Ink Mine and Bubbler or Suction Bomb and Bomb Rush does little to redeem it.
* In ''VideoGame/Splatoon2''
** In multiplayer, the Stingray is easily the least effective special weapon. All it has going for it are its long range and ability to see through walls, both of which are rendered useless by the fact that it's incredibly slow to aim, making it very difficult to hit anyone with it. And to add insult to injury, it takes multiple hits to down an opponent, meaning there's a good chance that they'll get away even if you manage to hit them. It's ''slightly'' more useful in Salmon Run mode due to the Salmonids generally not bothering to dodge and being the only weapon that can kill [[DemonicSpider Flyfish]] without using a bomb, but even then it's situational at best.
** In [[MultiMookMelee Salmon Run]], there are a number of weapons that are notably ill-suited to taking on mobs of enemies at once:
*** Blasters are some of the most difficult-to-use weapons in the mode due to the limited range (which makes them range from not very effective to completely useless when dealing with bosses) and a slow fire rate (which makes them bad at clearing out the {{Mooks}} that try to mob you). Their main selling point, being able to do damage around corners, is almost completely useless.
*** The Goo Tuber has a shorter range compared to other chargers as well as a longer charge time. It does have the ability to hold a full charge for much longer, but this isn't really useful in Salmon Run.
* The grenades and, fittingly enough, the grenade launcher in ''VideoGame/{{Army Men}}'': Sarge's Heroes. They're slow to use and have a tiny blast radius. The former's explosion must be timed perfectly to hit anything, while the latter's shot travels in a ''very'' tight arc that forces you to aim almost straight up for anything beyond close-range. It's infinitely easier to just shoot your enemies, and none of the soldiers take more than a handful of shots anyway. They are halfway decent against tanks, which can only be destroyed with explosives and are obviously much easier to hit; however, they're still made completely worthless by the bazooka in this regard - it's much easier to aim (point and shoot!), has an effective range of ''anywhere'', and has a much bigger, more powerful explosion. Plus you'll usually find one if there's a tank nearby anyway. There's also the mortar, which is like the grenade but with much more power and range, and can be easily used behind cover without the projectile bouncing back toward your feet...
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Wide Open Sandbox]]
* ''VideoGame/TheSaboteur'''s Terror Flamethrower. "[[VideogameFlamethrowersSuck Typical video game flamethrower]]" sums it up fairly well, with its short range and flames that cover up your field of view. It would be good for close-quarters combat in theory, except that at around the same time you gain access to an automatic shotgun with a ridiculous ammo capacity (150 rounds with a dirt-cheap upgrade) that's surprisingly effective at stopping targets well out of the flamethrower's range.
* ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'' has short swords. Theoretically, they're faster than broadswords, but do less damage and are smaller. However, unlike broadswords, your character doesn't swing it in an arc; rather, they jab it straight forward. It's moderately useful against enemies that walk right into your attacks, but worthless against nearly everything else.
* ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' has Golden Swords, which are only as strong as a Wooden Sword and breaks down twice as fast. While Golden Swords compensate their weaknesses by having higher chances of getting stronger enhancements, wasting rare gold resources for a weapon that won't last is a dumb move.
[[/folder]]
----

to:

** [=LRM-20=] Missile Launchers. As the name implies, they fire off a swarm of 20, one point damage missiles out to a max range of 1000 meters (in a game where the average optimal weapon range is typically around 300 to 500 meters. As the only other weapon that can deal up to 20 points of damage with a single shot (not counting Critical hits triggering Ammo Explosions), is the short range, and heavier Autocannon/20, this sounds awesome, right? Wrong. [=LRM-20s=] have long reload times, generate significant heat build up on your mech, have very wide missile spreads, which can cause up to half or more of the missiles to miss even the largest Assault Class mechs, and even if they do hit, that's damage that's scattered on up to 8 hit locations (3 of which, the torso sections, have front and back armor, so technically, 11 total hit locations). They weigh the most of all the missile launchers in game right now, they take up a lot critical slots, limiting what else you can place in a section of the mech, and eat through literal tons of ammo. Many players prefer the faster reloads, and more compact spreads of the smaller launchers.
** Flamers. Another case of VideogameFlamethrowersSuck. They are by all means, "Energy Machine Guns", which is to say, versus any enemy mech with Armor protecting them still, do very little damage, but versus exposed Internal Structure, have increased damage, and bonus Critical Hit Chance. And unlike Machine Guns, they have infinite ammo, and can increase the heat of a mech hit with them. However, they also generate heat very quickly on the mech firing them, completely negating the "Over heat your enemy" aspect, are short ranged, and are nowhere near as good as the regular Machine Guns in terms of ease of aiming ([=MGs=] are pinpoint, while it can be hard to hit the section of the enemy mech you want with the Flame Throwers).
* [=SRM2s=] in any Mechwarrior game ever, due to the piddling damage caused by the tiny two-missile salvo. If you're taking the trouble to fit a missile launcher but your build restricts you so much that you can't mount [=SRM4s=] or [=SRM6s=], you're almost certainly better off either compromising on something else in order to install the better launchers or using up the weight with buffs or ammo for other weapons.
* ''VideoGame/AceCombatInfinity'' has the High-Capacity Air-to-Air Missile. It's basically a second set of the standard missiles, with a slower reload time, less ammo, less damage, and no ability to lock onto the more plentiful ground targets. That would be bad enough on its own, but what makes it worse is that it is very, very easy to upgrade every aspect of the standard missiles and completely obsolete the HCAA, while the HCAA - and by extension, every missile-based special weapon - requires most of the tech tree to be completed before one can even begin to upgrade anything other than their capacity. What really makes it scrappy is that damn near every mid- to high-tier and special aircraft gets the HCAA instead of something that actually fills a niche the standard missiles can't already do better - you can count the number of late-game craft that ''don't'' have it on both hands.
* ''VideoGame/Freespace2'' has the Prometheus-R, a supposed retrofit of the well-liked Prometheus from the first game. Unfortunately for you, this retrofit effectively made the weapon worse in every possible way, with a painfully slow rate of fire, high power consumption, and per-shot damage that is barely higher than the starting [[BoringButPractical Subach HL-7]]. Even worse, a few missions force you to use it. Thankfully it is supplanted later on in the game by the Prometheus-S, a variant more up to the standards of the first game's Prometheus. The in-game explanation for this is that the GTVA was in the midst of a gas shortage and couldn't provide fuel for the Prometheus, so the Prometheus-R was a watered-down version meant as a stopgap production. The Prometheus-S is introduced about the same time the GTVA gets its gas mines back, allowing them to begin producing the actual weapon again.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Stealth-Based Games]]
* Just about any melee weapon in the ''VideoGame/{{Tenchu}}'' games (at least ''Wrath of Heaven'') that you can get from a dead {{Mook}}. Especially as they get rid of your one-hit stealth kills. The higher-scoring need-for-powering-up stealth kills. The you're-a-ninja stealth kills. (Well, yeah, the fun-to-do stealth kills.)
* The XM M63 501 in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'' if you decide to use it during the bike chase (Which, owing to this being a ActionBasedMission and it's high ammo capacity, you will). Yes, the weapon is handy, but Snake's constant ''Franchise/{{Rambo}}'' style yelling (which will occur non-stop since you'll be firing in bursts) is [[MostAnnoyingSound literal ear poison]] and tempts many players into using the less effective (but more pleasant to listen to) AK-47 or Skorpion.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Survival Horror]]
* Proximity Mines in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'' might be considered this. Though they have some use in Story mode (usually by leading bosses and strong enemies on them), in Mercenaries they are next to useless, since you need to do melee anyway and you can't even use them to clear the mob in a pinch. No reason to bother with bosses. And in Versus, if you happen to be seen placing them, the enemy player can detonate them by shooting while you are still close. This added to the fact that good players won't be caught stepping on them anyway, since it's easy to tell the set mines from the dropped ones.
* The knife from most of the ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' series was absurdly weak (usually taking several dozen stabs just to knock over the most basic of enemies), had zero range, and took up valuable inventory space, so was typically dumped in the first item box, unless you were just ''that'' good and wanted to give yourself a SelfImposedChallenge. ''[[VideoGame/ResidentEvilCodeVeronica Code Veronica]]'' was the first game to give it even limited usefulness, as one swipe counted as several hits, but it wasn't until ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4'' made it as powerful as the handgun, just trading range for unlimited use and no inventory space used, that it [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap became worthwhile]]. A skilled player could save a lot of ammo using it, and some bosses (particularly Krauser) were actually easier with the knife as it dealt majorly-increased damage against them.
* The Bow Gun in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' isn't any stronger than the handgun and damage potential is wasted since the 3 bolts the weapon shoots out spreads out, which makes it near useless at long range.
* [[VideoGameFlameThrowersSuck The Flamethrower]] as found in various ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' games is almost always useless, as it tends to be unreloadable, short-ranged, with zero stopping power, and one character tends to get it in lieu of [[FakeBalance superior weapons given to the other playable character]]. It was at it's most useful in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' as it was very effective against [[DemonicSpiders the Ivys]], but even then the flame rounds from Claire's grenade launcher were more effective. It was at it's absolute worst in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil'' where Chris gets it late in the game opposed to the bazooka given to Jill ''early'' in the game and can only be used in the underground area limiting it's usefulness to fighting one boss that goes down fairly easy anyways.
* ''VideoGame/SilentHill1'' has two: the Kitchen Knife and the Hand Axe, the first and last melee weapons you get, respectively. The Kitchen Knife is a mandatory pickup, has zero range and in terms of defense is much worse than simply running from danger, and it's as if the game realizes how worthless it is because you can find the Steel Pipe, one of the game's more useful weapons, ''less than a minute later''. The Hand Axe is a barely-noticeable upgrade to the Kitchen Knife, which is rather unacceptable since by then you're 75% through the game and already have the magnificent and deadly [[DropTheHammer Emergency Hammer]]. You don't have to get the Axe, though it does have one use: Breaking the lock keeping you from the sewer. Other weapons can break it, but it requires careful positioning and the Axe makes it easier.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Roguelike]]
* [[DropTheHammer Blunt weapons]] in ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' spent a long time in the wilderness due to a bug in the damage rules, meaning that your dwarves could pound on some poor goblin or kobold for ''months'' in-game without scoring a kill. While that did have [[VideogameCrueltyPotential a certain amount of appeal to many players]], it tended to impair the smooth running of a fortress by making civilian dwarves scared to go near the site of the battle.
** Two handed weapons aren't very popular, because they can't be used with a shield.
** [[WhipItGood Whips, scourges]], and [[EpicFlail flails]]. In this case it's because they tend to be absurdly powerful due to how the game handles chain weapons. While a human in adventurer mode can put them to good use, they're Scrappy in fortress mode, as none of them can be [[UnusableEnemyEquipment manufactured by dwarves, only scavenged off goblins]].
* ''VideoGame/EnterTheGungeon'' has the Klobb, which works almost exactly the same as it does in [[VideoGame/Goldeneye1997 Goldeneye 007]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons 3.0, 3.5, and TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}} made the heavy crossbow nearly useless. A user could fire it a bit further than a light crossbow and on average did one more point of damage on a hit compared to a longbow or a light crossbow. However, the weapon took an entire round to reload, leaving the character useless for an entire turn. Characters who knew how to use a bow would always do better to use the bow if they planned to make more than one attack in a round or spend more than one round shooting. Characters above first level could almost always afford a bow that let them add their strength to the damage, negating the heavy crossbow's advantage to damage. Characters who couldn't use a bow would usually rather shoot and move with a light crossbow or were spellcasters whose actions in combat were almost always better used casting a spell. Feats (special tricks characters learn) were priceless, and using one to select "Rapid Reload" for a heavy crossbow was generally a terrible choice. Even the range advantage was usually useless due to the metagame; most [=GMs=] who use maps don't set many encounters at distances where the extra range comes into play. If the adventure takes place inside a dungeon of any kind, forget it. Many "subpar" weapons have tons of uses for smart players, but the game's rules render heavy crossbows worthless. Even the siangham (a monk weapon which does less damage than the monk's fist) has its uses.
** The double crossbow in Pathfinder is even more AwesomeYetImpractical. It fires two bolts with one trigger pull, but penalizes both shots by -20% to hit (even if you know how to shoot it) and costs a feat just to learn to use. It takes two standard actions to reload, meaning a normal character using it would fire once every three rounds unless he dedicates even more precious feats to the weapon. Meanwhile, the Manyshot or Rapid Shot feats applied to many weapons and imparted lower/no penalties to hit and allowed for similar effects for dedicated ranged characters. If the character was a spell-caster or melee fighter, spending a feat to learn to use a double crossbow was a very bad choice, especially compared to repeating crossbows, longbows, or other options available to these characters.
** Bastard swords saw little use, as they were two handed weapons which did less damage than two handed swords or great axes, and only by spending a feat could a character use it in one hand. Feats were too precious to spend to gain the minimal damage bonus a bastard sword had over a longsword. Magical longswords were also far more common to find whether the loot was based on GM whimsy or random rolls, making longswords even more attractive compared to the bastard sword.
** Exotic weapons in general had this problem except for D&D's spiked chain, which could be a MinMaxersDelight. It was severely [[{{Nerf}} nerfed]] in TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}. Any benefit the exotic weapon provided was grossly overshadowed by the thought of "wasting" a feat and the low chance of finding a magical version of the weapon. If an exotic weapon was associated with a certain race, allowing that race to use it more easily, it would see modest use. The rest almost never saw action.
** Also in 3.5 is the Heavy Mace. It would be a simple bludgeoning weapon... but the problem is the Morningstar does the same amount of damage, costs less, weighs less, ''and'' does piercing damage in addition to bludgeoning. The only advantage the Mace has is being harder to sunder.
** In 1st edition AD&D, only the longsword and two handed sword out of all the melee weapons were really worth using for fighters most of the time unless you used the complicated "Weapon Type vs Armour Type" to hit modifier table which hardly anyone did making any other choice a scrappy weapon. They had the best damage dice for the number of hands required to wield them compared to all other weapons, unless you were unlucky enough to come across an enemy resistant or immune to slashing damage. Once weapon specialisation was added, pretty much every single 1st level fighter selected the longsword as you could double specialise in it (resulting in a very useful +3 to hit and damage while two handed weapons were restricted to single specialisation at +1 to hit and +2 damage) and used their remaining proficiency slot for a missile weapon. This problem remained until 3rd edition rolled around.
* 7thSea, due to an oversight, has the crossbow. The system uses a "keep" roll system, where [=XkY=] means you roll X dice but only keep the Y highest dice. Since you get to add your brawn to your roll (but not keep) for melee weapons it was common to find a weapon that had a lower X than Y. The crossbow has 0k2, but since it's a ranged weapon it never gets any bonuses from strength, meaning there's no way to get any rolls to actually keep.
* ''MiddleEarthRolePlaying'' and ''{{Rolemaster}}'' had the morning star and flail. While they both offered a modest +10 attack bonus and the chance to do a secondary critical hit, both weapons had an 8% chance to fumble on every attack and if you did fumble, you automatically critically hit yourself with them before you even rolled on the fumble table. The bola was even worse, with a -5 attack penalty though again with a chance to do a secondary critical, 7% fumble chance and again you automatically critically hit yourself with it if you did fumble.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Turn-Based Tactics]]
* The [[LittleUselessGun .38 Special]] in ''VideoGame/JaggedAlliance 2''. Pistols in general are relegated to EmergencyWeapon status early on as it is, and revolvers in particular are considered inferior because they have to be reloaded about three times as often as everything else, so that's two strikes against it before we even get to the fact that it does ''lousy'' damage and has poor range and accuracy even by pistol standards. You're almost better off with a knife.
* Bow weapons in ''VideoGame/DisgaeaHourOfDarkness'' were largely overshadowed by gun weapons for players that wanted range damage. Bows had access to Area of Effect attacks, but guns had greater range, and more importantly, damage for them was determined by a combination of the wielder's ATK and HIT stats, while every other weapon in the game relied only one stat for damage, making level stats for a good bow user was more trouble than it was worth. Developers noticed this and the weapons was RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap in later games where they were given better attacks, classes with evilities that can take advantage of bows and nerfing the range on the guns (guns in later games can still hit farther, but only in a straight line).
** Spears in the ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'' series tend to either fall into this or at the very least, the weapon version of the CrutchCharacter. Early on, the weapon's extra range on attack in exchange for lesser damage has its perk. However, as you reach further into the game and become more reliant on specials, the weakness of spears really begin to show. Many of its specials require an extra space to be open, making them unwieldy in some situations. Said specials usually allows its user to jump to said extra space, which again, is not always very useful in most situations and while other specials have some good AreaOfEffect specials, those special are hampered by the spear's lower attack strength compared to the stronger and more versatile swords and axes.
* ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars:''
** Missiles are this in the first game on pre-deploy maps, since the game likes to give them to you on maps that ''don't have enemy air units''. Missiles cannot target ground units at all meaning it's only purpose on such maps is to block enemy units and take attacks, and since it's wheels give it poor mobility and it is lacking in armor, it's not even all that useful for ''that'' purpose. Later games don't hand these units out on pre-deploy maps unless the enemy has either aircraft or an airport.
** Dusters from ''Days of Ruin'' are effectively cheaper Fighters that can also attack ground units, but their attack power against ground units, especially tanks, is ''pitiful''. Their MasterOfNone trait is so pronounced that you'd rather just build a copter or save up for a fighter or bomber.
** ''Dual Strike'' has the Stealth plane, an aerial version of the Submarine in that it can become invisible to the enemy (unless adjacent to an enemy unit). They're peerlessly versatile, able to attack ''any'' unit in the game for solid damage. And even after being discovered, hidden Stealths can only be targeted by Fighters and other Stealths. ''However'', they have just under 2/3rds the fuel capacity of other air units, and burn through that meager fuel reserve blisteringly fast just by staying hidden, much less actually ''moving'' while hidden. This means Stealth units require constant resupply to get anywhere, making them much more trouble than they're worth, especially in light of how much they cost to deploy.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Third-Person Shooters]]
* The "Kozlice" shotgun from ''VideoGame/OperationFlashpoint''. It's more accurate than the average game shotgun, but that's where the good bits end. It's weak, only holds two shots (and you can only carry 10 rounds ''total'', as opposed to ''300'' for an assault rifle, due to each individual shell taking up the same inventory space as a 30-round rifle magazine), and takes twice as long to reload as any of the other weapons. It'd almost be more effective if you could use it as a club. Of course since it's there to represent the civilian hunting shotguns which are all most of [[LaResistance the Resistance]] have to start with this is intentional.
* ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar'''s Scorcher flamethrower gets VideoGameFlamethrowersSuck down to a T. It has exceedingly short range, which unfortunately forces you into the killzone for everyone's favorite weapon, the Gnasher shotgun; not only that, but despite being a flamethrower, it lacks any significant DamageOverTime effect which would help justify its existence.
* ''VideoGame/{{Warframe}}'' has a fair number of TierInducedScrappy weapons, but the Akjagara falls under this trope for a different reason. The weapon's stats are fairly unremarkable, which wouldn't be an issue if it weren't for the cost to build it in the first place, requiring an Akbolto and a Dual Skana. While the Dual Skana's build costs aren't too bad, the Akbolto requires two Boltos to craft, each of which requires a Lato (which fortunately is available to purchase for credits). The total cost comes out to 210,000 credits, 7 Orokin Cells, 4 Neurodes, and some other more common resources, in a game where most weapons don't even cost 100,000 credits to build. Add in the fact that you'll need multiple weapon slots for the intermediate steps and that the whole process will take a minimum of 48 hours, and it's not hard to see why players were disgruntled.
* ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'' does a good job averting this for the most part. Most of the weapons are fun to use and are intuitive, though some are almost useless in some modes but are incredibly powerful in other modes to compensate, like the chargers and blasters. However, the Rapid Blasters stand as one of the few weapons that are almost universally considered bad. While they have more range and higher rates of fire than the normal Blaster, they have much less power. It lacks the one hit kill that the other Blaster types are used for while other weapons like .52 and .96 Gals are more reliable for kills due to having a higher range and fire rate. It's not helped by the fact that damage up can't reduce the number of hits needed to splat someone means that it can't be used like the regular blasters and even having the decent subweapon and special sets of Ink Mine and Bubbler or Suction Bomb and Bomb Rush does little to redeem it.
* In ''VideoGame/Splatoon2''
** In multiplayer, the Stingray is easily the least effective special weapon. All it has going for it are its long range and ability to see through walls, both of which are rendered useless by the fact that it's incredibly slow to aim, making it very difficult to hit anyone with it. And to add insult to injury, it takes multiple hits to down an opponent, meaning there's a good chance that they'll get away even if you manage to hit them. It's ''slightly'' more useful in Salmon Run mode due to the Salmonids generally not bothering to dodge and being the only weapon that can kill [[DemonicSpider Flyfish]] without using a bomb, but even then it's situational at best.
** In [[MultiMookMelee Salmon Run]], there are a number of weapons that are notably ill-suited to taking on mobs of enemies at once:
*** Blasters are some of the most difficult-to-use weapons in the mode due to the limited range (which makes them range from not very effective to completely useless when dealing with bosses) and a slow fire rate (which makes them bad at clearing out the {{Mooks}} that try to mob you). Their main selling point, being able to do damage around corners, is almost completely useless.
*** The Goo Tuber has a shorter range compared to other chargers as well as a longer charge time. It does have the ability to hold a full charge for much longer, but this isn't really useful in Salmon Run.
* The grenades and, fittingly enough, the grenade launcher in ''VideoGame/{{Army Men}}'': Sarge's Heroes. They're slow to use and have a tiny blast radius. The former's explosion must be timed perfectly to hit anything, while the latter's shot travels in a ''very'' tight arc that forces you to aim almost straight up for anything beyond close-range. It's infinitely easier to just shoot your enemies, and none of the soldiers take more than a handful of shots anyway. They are halfway decent against tanks, which can only be destroyed with explosives and are obviously much easier to hit; however, they're still made completely worthless by the bazooka in this regard - it's much easier to aim (point and shoot!), has an effective range of ''anywhere'', and has a much bigger, more powerful explosion. Plus you'll usually find one if there's a tank nearby anyway. There's also the mortar, which is like the grenade but with much more power and range, and can be easily used behind cover without the projectile bouncing back toward your feet...
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Wide Open Sandbox]]
* ''VideoGame/TheSaboteur'''s Terror Flamethrower. "[[VideogameFlamethrowersSuck Typical video game flamethrower]]" sums it up fairly well, with its short range and flames that cover up your field of view. It would be good for close-quarters combat in theory, except that at around the same time you gain access to an automatic shotgun with a ridiculous ammo capacity (150 rounds with a dirt-cheap upgrade) that's surprisingly effective at stopping targets well out of the flamethrower's range.
* ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'' has short swords. Theoretically, they're faster than broadswords, but do less damage and are smaller. However, unlike broadswords, your character doesn't swing it in an arc; rather, they jab it straight forward. It's moderately useful against enemies that walk right into your attacks, but worthless against nearly everything else.
* ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' has Golden Swords, which are only as strong as a Wooden Sword and breaks down twice as fast. While Golden Swords compensate their weaknesses by having higher chances of getting stronger enhancements, wasting rare gold resources for a weapon that won't last is a dumb move.
[[/folder]]
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31st Aug '17 1:38:05 PM REV6Pilot
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'': the flashlight makes for an awful weapon. It swings terriby slowly and with range no greater than that of the fists (in the case of the PC version, ''even less'' range than them), to say nothing of the horrendously off-centered beam. And [[WhoForgotTheLights thanks to the graphical design of the game]], you ''have'' to keep switching your gun out for it, leaving you unprepared when you inevitably get ambushed. Once you have a flashlight GameMod like the famous "{{Duct Tape|ForEverything}}" or Sikkmod's headlamp and NightVisionGoggles, it has pretty much no practical use, and it wasn't really missed in the [[UpdatedReRelease BFG edition]][[labelnote:+]]that replaced the handheld flashlight with an armor-mounted lamp that is equally as off-centered and [[TenSecondFlashlight only works for a little while before having to shut down and recharge]], but at least lets you keep a gun ready[[/labelnote]] either.
14th Aug '17 8:04:20 PM JapaneseTeeth
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** In multiplayer, the Stingray is easily the least effective special weapon. All it has going for it are its long range and ability to see through walls, both of which are rendered useless by the fact that it's incredibly slow to aim, making it very difficult to hit anyone with it. And to add insult to injury, it takes multiple hits to down an opponent, meaning there's a good chance that they'll get away even if you manage to hit them. It's ''slightly'' more useful in Salmon Run mode due to the Salmonids generally not bothering to dodge and being the only weapon that can kill [[DemonicSpider Flyfish]] without using a bomb, but even then it's situation at best.
** In [[HordeMode Salmon Run]], there are a number of weapons that are notably ill-suited to taking on mobs of enemies at once:

to:

** In multiplayer, the Stingray is easily the least effective special weapon. All it has going for it are its long range and ability to see through walls, both of which are rendered useless by the fact that it's incredibly slow to aim, making it very difficult to hit anyone with it. And to add insult to injury, it takes multiple hits to down an opponent, meaning there's a good chance that they'll get away even if you manage to hit them. It's ''slightly'' more useful in Salmon Run mode due to the Salmonids generally not bothering to dodge and being the only weapon that can kill [[DemonicSpider Flyfish]] without using a bomb, but even then it's situation situational at best.
** In [[HordeMode [[MultiMookMelee Salmon Run]], there are a number of weapons that are notably ill-suited to taking on mobs of enemies at once:
10th Aug '17 6:56:58 AM LightCleric
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** The Razorback, a sniper weapon, does nothing except prevent one backstab and handicap the Spy that tried to do it for a few seconds. However, wielding it requires you to give up your secondary weapon, meaning that you have to rely on your rifle and melee weapon for self-defense. Oh, and the only class to use backstabs also has a revolver that can kill you in three hits (or two, if they have the [[BoomHeadshot Ambassador]], which came out in the same update as the Razorback), and can ''see'' your backstab-preventing shield. Since its release, it has been indirectly buffed by the introduction of new knives that give bonuses for backstabbing people, since it can deny Spies those bonuses and make them much more vulnerable, but still remains largely useless outside of Medieval Mode (where the shields are the only secondary items you ''can'' use). That said, the Razorback has actually been 'banned'* in UGC Highlander matches since season 20. A skilled sniper properly supported by his teammates can ravage an enemy team, and an overhealed Sniper requires two *headshots* from the Ambassador. Because the Spy's revolver becomes less accurate when fired multiple times in succession, landing the second before being murdered yourself can be an impossible task.

to:

** The Razorback, a sniper weapon, does nothing except prevent one backstab and handicap the Spy that tried to do it for a few seconds. However, wielding it requires you to give up your secondary weapon, meaning that you have to rely on your rifle and melee weapon for self-defense. Oh, and the only class to use backstabs also has a revolver that can kill you in three hits (or two, if they have the [[BoomHeadshot Ambassador]], which came out in the same update as the Razorback), and can ''see'' your backstab-preventing shield. Since its release, it has been indirectly buffed by the introduction of new knives that give bonuses for backstabbing people, since it can deny Spies those bonuses and make them much more vulnerable, but still remains largely useless outside of Medieval Mode (where the shields are the only secondary items you ''can'' use). That said, the Razorback has actually been 'banned'* 'banned' in competitive UGC Highlander matches since season 20. A skilled sniper properly supported by his teammates can ravage an enemy team, and an overhealed Sniper requires two *headshots* 'headshots from the Ambassador. Because the Spy's revolver becomes less accurate when fired multiple times in succession, landing the second before being murdered yourself can be an impossible task.
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