History Main / ScrappyMechanic

25th May '16 4:42:12 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/HeavyWeapon'' for the PC. Your tank aims using the mouse cursor, that's fine. The problem is that it ''also moves towards the mouse cursor'', making it annoying to dodge attacks while aiming. This makes facing enemies like [[AdvancingBossOfDoom Bulldozers]] (which move towards you and OneHitKill you if you brush against them) a complete pain. Thankfully, Creator/PopCap realized this mistake and made aiming and moving separate in the PS3 and Xbox360 releases.

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* ''VideoGame/HeavyWeapon'' for the PC. Your tank aims using the mouse cursor, that's fine. The problem is that it ''also moves towards the mouse cursor'', making it annoying to dodge attacks while aiming. This makes facing enemies like [[AdvancingBossOfDoom Bulldozers]] (which move towards you and OneHitKill you if you brush against them) a complete pain. Thankfully, Creator/PopCap realized this mistake and made aiming and moving separate in the PS3 UsefulNotes/{{PS3}} and Xbox360 UsefulNotes/XBox360 releases.
25th May '16 2:51:37 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* {{Pinball}} outlanes can be this especially for new players; it's not uncommon on some tables to pull the plunger and then watch the ball helplessly make a beeline for either of the outlines without ever touching a flipper, or for a player to make a successful shot only for it to make for the outlanes afterwards, again beyond flipper control, resulting in what beginners perceive as a form of FakeDifficulty. While a nudge can save a ball from an outlane at the last split-second, it requires being able to anticipate when the ball is about to be lost to an outline, and nudging can easily lead to a [[NoFairCheating "TILT"]] if it's not done delicately enough.
* {{Skill Shot}}s involving flashing lanes at the back of the table are often dismissed for being [[LuckBasedMission Luck Shots]] in practice; even Creator/RogerSharpe admitted that his pinball-saving skill shot was a stroke of luck, i.e. he proved pinball wasn't about luck ''[[{{Irony}} through sheer luck]]'' (pinball tables had been [[BannedInChina banned in some jurisdictions]] on accusations of being gambling machines). Even other kinds of plunger-based skill shots can still fall under this trope depending on how well-maintained the plunger is. Perhaps because of this, some tables use flipper-based skill shots instead, where the player has to hit the ball into a designated target with the flippers immediately after launch.
* {{Video Mode}}s are seen by some as interrupting the flow of a pinball game and being fairly [[UnexpectedGameplayChange out-of-place]]; after all, why play ''pinball'' and end up playing a ''video game''? Creator/PatLawlor, among a few other pinball creators, is known for refusing to put video modes in tables as a result.
25th May '16 2:47:57 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* In general, combo-based scoring systems, due to how [[UnstableEquilibrium a single mistake can completely ruin one's score]] and force a restart if one is trying to get a high score. Specifically, combo bonuses heavily bias against a few evenly-distributed mistakes, while the penalty for an EpicFail at the very beginning or ending of the song (LifeMeter in games that have it notwithstanding) is comparatively minimal. This is in contrast to a real-life music performance, where audiences tend to notice mistakes more during the beginnings and ends of songs and sets than mistakes in the middle. Ironically, combo-based scoring is found in rhythm games that tend to cater more towards "casual" players, while more challenging games like ''VideoGame/{{beatmania}} IIDX'' use more "flat" scoring systems that are based purely on accuracy and won't completely cripple a player's score over one miss.
25th May '16 2:40:27 AM LucaEarlgrey
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[[folder:General]]
* For a player with disability or using an emulator, any mechanic that utterly relies on a sense that they can't use is bound to become a scrappy mechanic for them, even if normal players would find it acceptable. This is typically an issue for the hearing impaired; video games inherently require at least passable vision to even view what is displayed on the screen, the senses of smell and taste is irrelevant to gaming (at present anyhow), and touch tends only to be used for vibration functions on rumble controllers (although emulators will struggle with not having a rumble-feature if an actual game mechanic relies on it). But sound is an expected aspect of video games, although the degree to which it is used varies from game to game. For games that only use sound to set the mood, a player with a hearing loss can manage to at least play the game from beginning to end without any unusual frustration. But for games which rely on sound for practical purposes like detection, pitch-based puzzles and the like will frustrate such a player who will have no legitimate options to continue but to find a guide, a friend with intact hearing who can communicate effectively what is happening, or engage in trial and error gameplay. Additionally, games without subtitles when players speak (especially during cut-scenes) will ruin the experience and possibly prevent such players from understanding the plot.
* On a similar note to the above, many games and game systems that operate on the assumption that the player is right-handed if the player is left-handed; various UsefulNotes/NintendoDS and UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS games such as ''VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising'' and ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin'', for example, require the player to use the D-pad or Circle Pad and the touchscreen at the same time, and the UsefulNotes/{{Atari 2600}} stock controller places the button to the left of the joystick, making the 2600 nigh-unplayable for lefties unless they invest in a third-party controller or make modifications to the controller that will void the warranty (warranty is irrelevant now due to the console being long out of production, but imagine being a lefty in the late 70's and early 80's).
* Games like ''Evergrace II'' where all the characters you play have a shared life bar. This leads to frustrating moments, especially if some of the characters you control are played by the computer. In a similar vein, shared [[VideoGameLives lives]], especially if the life counter does not increase to accomodate the extra players. ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' and ''VideoGame/{{Darius}}burst Another Chronicle'' are two such examples; you can quickly go from zero deaths to GameOver if you're playing with three other players and experience a TotalPartyKill.
* Quitting PC Games. Games for the PC seldom have an "Exit Game" option in the pause menu. Typically you have to quit your current game, wait for it to load, go to the title screen, ''then'' hit "Exit Game" from there. Some games even force you to watch the intro cinematics again, prompting a lot of users to just use task manager or, if available, the Alt+F4 or Command-W keyboard shortcut to quit their game more quickly.
* The analog buttons on the PS2's [=DualShock=] 2 had the same issue, such as in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'' where pushing the look button hard in a locker caused you to bang Raiden's head into the locker door and alert any nearby guards. Incidentally, ''Franchise/MetalGear'' is probably the only non-flight sim series that actually takes advantage of the "analog" part of the analog buttons.
* ''Metal of Honor: Frontline''. They made the dumb decision to make the ''fire button'' analog, so if you didn't press it hard enough ''[[WhatWereYouThinking your gun would not fire]]''. Many players ran around the first level wondering if their controller was broken because this 'feature' was not mention anywhere.
* To some, [[PressXToNotDie Quick Time Events]] are a horrible implementation that interrupt the gameplay at the most inappropriate times just to activate a glorified cutscene. [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee]] may have something to do with it, since it is one of his pet peeves.
* TankControls are severely divided by two factions. On one side, those who believe tank controls are a challenging feature; and on the other, people who believe tank controls are a lumbering dinosaur that should be long obsolete thanks to much more refined controls. The latter hates them for feeling clunky and making the character act all sluggish especially when trying to escape the thing that's trying to kill them.
* If you try to play the Creator/BlizzardEntertainment games ''VideoGame/DiabloIII'', ''VideoGame/StarCraftII'' or ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' in an internet cafe when the Internet at home is down, your Blizzard account will sometimes be locked due to different login sequence. You will have to answer the safety question or enter the serial number to unlock your account. This is made for safety reasons, but most other players find it extremely frustrating.
** Google has gotten in on this too, making it annoying at best and ''impossible'' at worst for people to access their e-mail or Google Docs at home after logging into it at school or work (or vice-versa).
* ShallIRepeatThat becomes a ScrappyMechanic if the cursor defaults to "Yes, I do want to hear that again" after a long monologue conversation, as a player [[ButtonMashing mashing the "A" button]] to skip the NPC's text as quickly as possible ''will'' accidentally make the NPC repeat himself/herself over and over and over again until they scroll down and select "No, I don't want to hear that again". [[StopHelpingMe Kaepora Gaebora]] from ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' is most notorious for this, since he actually varies between "Do you want to hear what I said again?" and "Do you understand?", and the cursor ''does'' always default to whichever one makes him repeat everything.
* Some forms require you to fill out your zip/postal code, yet some countries do not use them.
* Friend Codes on Nintendo's consoles/games (Wii, 3DS, and any DS game with online play). Both people having to share a randomly generated combination of 12 numbers with each other before being allowed to play with each other annoyed a lot of gamers... especially when they had to put in a new code for each and every game. Made slightly better with the 3DS, which shares one Friend Code for all games and the console itself. As of the WiiU, the friend codes are gone and replaced with adding your friend's usernames instead.
* Anything in a game that [[BribingYourWayToVictory costs actual money to acquire]], particularly outside of [[MassivelyMultiplayerOnlineRolePlayingGame MMORPG]] games, especially in app games. Amazon's Underground service attempts to fix this, although [[NoExportForYou unfortunately it's only available in the United States and a few countries in Europe.]]
* Any game where the text scrolls slowly can get on the player's nerves pretty quickly, as it will take several seconds to get through each line of monologue/dialogue, unnecessarily wasting a lot of time. Examples include the aforementioned ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time]]'' (though the [[Nintendo3DS 3DS]] [[VideoGameRemake remake]] has much [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap quicker text speed]]) and ''VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}''. See also ScrollingText.
* {{Escort Mission}}s. While these can be done well (''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4'' is considered one of the few ways to do this right), almost every escort mission sucks. They're often bogged down by the escort being controlled by an [=AI=] that is so [[ArtificialStupidity mind-bogglingly stupid]], you're left wondering if it's trying to get itself killed. The sections are often filled with some of the most powerful enemies in the game. The escort is often given no means of self-defense. Said escort usually has a frighteningly low amount of health, and you often have no way to restore it. Thankfully, developers seem to be getting wise to this, as escort missions began to steadily decline with games released in TheNewTens, or at least given some way to mitigate some of the more annoying issues associated with this mechanic.
* Every game ever made that has a time-limit for no justifiable reason. Admittedly this was a [[TheArtifact throw-back from arcade games]] (which the home versions were based on) intended to keep people feeding more quarters into the machine by forcing them to waste lives by not allowing them to take their time to plan out their actions and thus make more mistakes, park their character into a safe spot so that they could take a break or make use of InfiniteOneUp tricks, all of which could drive away other potential players due to having them get tired of waiting for their turn or alternatively giving the player a chance to get enough lives to beat the game on a single credit regardless of how recklessly they play, but there is still no valid reason whatsoever for [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Mario]] to just abruptly drop dead because you didn't get through World 8-1 fast enough.
* Stun mechanics, or crowd control in PVP environments. One or two isn't bad - but when there's [[DiminishingReturnsForBalance no way to reduce the time spent stunned]] (or otherwise locked down), or [[CycleOfHurting the effects could be easily chained]]? Oh, and the ''only'' counter to them takes up a precious inventory space and isn't all that useful for the character you're playing? Cue keyboard breaking.
* RegionCoding, particularly on video game systems. The idea is to prevent people from cheating their own markets out of revenue by buying a game available for their home region from a different region, especially if their home region receives the game later. But region locking quickly becomes a royal pain when you consider that thousands of games [[NoExportForYou never leave their home regions]]. The only legal and safe option is to buy a system of the region of the game(s) you want. Modifying one's own system will violate warranties and can brick or physically damage it (and since you broke the warranty, your only options are third-party repairs), and piracy can not only cause serious trouble depending on where you live, but some games have [[CopyProtection measures to thwart it]].
** When the Nintendo3DS was revealed to have region locking, this caused a lot of uproar. With previous Nintendo handhelds, if you travel to another region (e.g. from North America to Japan or to Europe) and buy games there, you can play them on your system, no questions asked. Even Magazine/NintendoPower acknowledged the region-free and travel-friendly properties of the GameBoyAdvance, which was released ten years prior to the 3DS, when a reader asked them about travelling and purchasing games. 3DS? No chance.
** Similar to region locking, IP checks that keep you from accessing online services outside your region and credit card address checks that don't allow you to pay with a credit card which is not for the same region as the online store you are trying to access. IP locks have forced players to take roundabout measures such as [=VPNs=] just to play [[NoExportForYou region-exclusive]] games such as ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline2'' and ''VideoGame/KantaiCollection''.
* Xbox Live introduced security proofs, which basically means adding an alternate email address and/or phone number to your Xbox Live account. However, this resulted in gamers being pestered by messages asking for their password as well as prompting them to add more proofs. Throw in security codes being emailed all over the place, and the process of signing into an Xbox Live account turns from something that took a few seconds at most into a giant hassle. God help anyone who attached their gamertag to an old Microsoft account whose password is long forgotten.
* A lot of modern commercial PC games do not accept game controllers that are not recognized as {{Xbox 360}} controllers. In some cases, third-party tools such as [=x360ce=] will allow you to get a non-360 controller working, but in other cases, you're out of luck.
** Conversely, some doujin PC games do not natively recognize Xbox 360 controllers. Even if they do, they generally do not recognize the D-pad as directional input, as the directions on a D-pad are recognized as POV hats rather than directional control. If you're using an Xbox 360 arcade stick, for instance, you will need to either use tools like [=JoyToKey=] or set your stick to left stick mode, which is notorious for being laggy due to the way it is implemented.
** Another issue comes in cases where you get a game that requires you to hold both the left and right trigger for any reason - since your computer treats the analog triggers the same as a joystick's throttle, holding both triggers is as far as the game's concerned the same as ''not'' pressing either of them.
* Nintendo's practice of tying your digital purchases to your console which means you need to send the console back to them if its broken if you want to move your games to a new one and that you lose your games forever if your console is stolen.
* Miiverse, the social network Nintendo made, has been given a new rule—it's now impossible to make multiple comments on ANY post outside the user's own for three minutes at a time. A patch later on reduced it down to two minutes. The entire rule was set to cut back on people spamming posts, though it did little to stop it anyway.
* Online passes for multiplayer or other features of games (e.g. DLC). People who buy new have their time wasted entering access codes (often on lousy console interfaces) and are denied the right to sell the spot on the servers they paid for to someone else. People who buy used have part of the content denied them unless they pony up for a new key (and accept the same inconvenience), screwing over all the people who buy used because they can't afford a new copy. All this assumes passes are available and servers are running properly, allowing them to be redeemed. If there's a problem (e.g. if servers can't handle the high demand just after release, or if they're taken down a year or two after release for the sequel) you may not even be able to play a game you already paid for. The fact even single-player games sometimes require this also screws over any customers who can't easily access to an internet connection.
* Anytime a game which normally gives you free control over the camera angle suddenly decides to [[CameraScrew abruptly wrench the camera around]] because the programmers decided there is ''really'' something over there you needed to see or figured [[StopHelpingMe they would make things easier]]. Often the gamer couldn't care less what the camera is trying to aim at or is busy trying to concentrate on something else, or would much rather set their ''own'' camera angle to line up their jump (which is ''kind of the point'' of giving camera control to the player to begin with).
* With the rise of games having more online connectivity, many games now require you to sign in to your account or connect to a server simply to play the game and it makes sense to do so if you are playing multiplayer. However, being forced to connect online just to play a single player mode can be incredibly annoying, especially if you don't play online to begin with. Unless the game is programmed to be able to work offline, then you're royally screwed if you have connection issues or if the servers are down. This gets doubly worse if you have games that require a separate log in on top of your typical account log in.
** UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} is somewhat better about this by including an "Offline Mode" that you turn on when you are about to disconnect, or anticipate a poor Internet connection. However, you still need to activate it manually. This means, for example, if you bring a laptop with you to, say, a vacation or road trip where consistent wireless Internet is a scarcity or outright nonexistent, but forget to activate Offline Mode prior to departure, you won't be able to play your games during the trip (however, when you open the Steam application when you do not have internet access, you do get the choice of activating Offline mode - but because that would be too easy, sometimes it completely ignores your choice and repeats an "unable to connect" error rather than letting you in). Some games on Steam are DRM-free, but you won't be able to tell prior to purchase without asking other players unless the publisher was kind enough to tout the game as such.
* Online games with crossplay capabilities (the ability to play the game with other players, regardless of the platform they use) is a good idea overall, though it also has its issues. PC gamers need to only connect to the servers that the game is hosting, but console games usually require the player to connect to the console account's server ''and'' the game's server. If something happens to the servers that hosts your account on the console, you won't be able to play that game at all, even if the game's servers are perfectly fine.
* For some, there's automatic updating. Whether it's video games or software programs, everything has to be kept up to date to fix bugs or install new features. There can be occasions where the updates can happen at the most inopportune times and interrupt whatever you were doing. Sometimes you can adjust how updates are handled, but at other times, you'll have no control over it. Even if you don't want to update your stuff at all, the game or program may continue to nag you until you give in and update. Automatic updating is an even worse issue if you're tethering off of a device running on a cellular data plan with limited data transfer; if a game receives an update on the order of a few gigabytes and downloads the update in the background, there goes your data plan![[note]]Windows 10, on the other hand, has a setting that you can enable that will disable automatic updates if you are on a metered connection. This only applies to the Windows Store and Windows Update.[[/note]]
* {{Backtracking}}: God-damned backtracking. Found a key halfway across the world that unlocks a door back at the start of the game you passed by? Great! Now work your way back and spend just as much time getting back as you did getting to the key in the first place. ''{{VideoGame/EquestriaBound}}'' is particularly notable for adding backtracking to a section that was not in [[VideoGame/EarthBound the original game]], meaning you have to go from the fourth town to the first one ''and back'' just to obtain PSI Teleport (although Fluttershy does apologize for the inconvenience). [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3utQsGyE1U There's even a song for it]].
* Forum posting limits. Some forums restrict how many characters a post can contain while others may restrict how many posts a day a user can make. Usually, the intention is to reduce the amount of spam trolls could spew, but it also greatly annoys regular users who may post a lot with legitimate discussions.
* Adding to the above, some forums have a "karma" system where, once you get enough good karma (by making many good posts and few if any reported or troll posts) you become a "privileged" member who can post without limit. However this is ''also'' a scrappy mechanic in it's own right since some websites have ridiculous standards to reach that status (some even expect you to ''pay''), and some newcomers are put off by it feeling it's a kind of clique or cabal mentality.
* UsefulNotes/NintendoDS and UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS:
** DS and 3DS software that allow inputting of text (e.g. for inputting one's personal CatchPhrase), such as ''VideoGame/StreetpassMiiPlaza'' and ''VideoGame/TomodachiLife'' often have a limit of 15 characters. For Japanese and Korean-writing users, this isn't much of a problem, as that's long enough to write a sentence or two. But for those who speak Western languages, 15 characters is barely enough to write more than two or three words, let alone a complete sentence. ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter 3 Ultimate'' and ''4 Ultimate'' are slightly better about it with a 25-character limit. Possibly justified in that longer character limits can cause text to go outside text boxes and cause visual oddities, especially when the aforementioned Eastern script characters are concerned, but it looks silly on North American and European [=3DSes=], which only allow input in Latin-script languages that use a variable-width font, especially when working with text boxes that can accommodate two lines of text yet can't even have one line filled due to character limits. Then there's the problem of a [[ScunthorpeProblem poorly made text filter]] that will sometimes block out actual game terms, like [[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl Probopass]].
** The original DS and DS Lite do not have support for WPA- and [=WPA2=]-encrypted wifi, forcing users to set their wireless routers to WEP just so they could play their Nintendo WFC-enabled DS games online. WEP encryption has been shown to be so weak that [[http://www.aircrack-ng.org/ a freeware program]] can be used to crack it. The other option was to buy a Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection USB dongle, but that came with its own problems, such as requiring specific versions of Windows to use it. Of course none of this matters anymore due to Nintendo shutting down Nintendo WFC in 2014.
** 3DS purchases are not tied to an online account of some sort, despite the [=eShop=] using a Nintendo Network ID to log in. If your 3DS gets lost, stolen, or damaged to the point where you can't do a data transfer to another 3DS, you'll have to make your purchases all over again. Because of this, many users refuse to digitally purchase games, instead preferring physical copies that do not prevent play if inserted into another 3DS.
** The New 3DS and New 3DS XL require you to remove a couple of screws and take off the back flap just to access the [=microSD=] card slot, unlike the "classic" 3DS models which simply require removing a little stub with your finger to access the SD card slot.
* PC games that utilize the Shift key (even moreso if they don't even allow you to remap the controls), since pushing Shift 5 times in rapid succession in Windows triggers the infamous Sticky Keys dialog window unless you explicitly disable Sticky Keys notifications.
* Games with a heavy emphasis on fashion and [[VirtualPaperDoll dressing up your character]] but only restrict you to a limited set of clothing based on your character's gender, such as ''LINE Play''. Did you want to wear a cute dress or look handsome in a suit? You can't do the former if your character is male or the latter is a female. Or worse, what if you want to be able to wear clothes from both gender categories (for example, one day you feel like wearing men's clothes, the next day women's clothes)? You'll have to make a separate character, if that's even possible to do, and even then you might not be able to share data (e.g. friends lists, currency) between both characters.
* Anything that requires the player to rotate a thumb-operated stick repeatedly is the bane of many, many players. Some players use their palm to quickly rotate the stick, but the human palm is particularly sensitive and can easily catch blisters from such stressful motions. Although the original ''VideoGame/MarioParty'' is notorious for this, with subsequent games ditching Control Stick rotation altogether in favor of comparatively safe ButtonMashing, some other games like ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' require rotating the stick for certain contexts too.
* For players who have hands on otherwise region locked mobile games, the times for events, mission requirements and etc. except countdown timers are stated in time zone of ''where the game comes from''. This means they need to manually calculate what is the in-game time based on time zone differences ''every single time the game is booted up'', which is easy but gets tedious. Even games that have been released worldwide can have this issue depending on region - UK player wanting to get an early lead in one of ''VideoGame/AceCombatInfinity''[='=]s ranking events? Better stay up until 4 AM so you can start flying right away.
* Speaking of events, players who play more than one mobile game with in-game event mechanic will need to manage playing time very carefully if they want to get high rankings in all the games, which is not always an option. Also, cycling between games tends to either drain the phone's RAM if the games are minimized or wasting time if closed and reopened repeatedly.
* Unskippable {{cutscene}}s, or at least cutscenes that can't be skipped before seeing them once. That minutes-long cutscene that precedes ThatOneBoss may be SugarWiki/{{awesome|moments}} or [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments emotionally]] [[TearJerker moving]], but it quickly turns into one of the least liked parts of the game if you have to see it again and again even after 20 failed attempts at the boss.
* Password restrictions. Imposing a minimum character length means that some users will have a hard time remembering the longer passwords that they have to enter. Imposing a maximum character length is a problem too, as it heavily limits the number of possible passwords and therefore giving [[TryEverything brute-force]] hackers a higher chance of breaking into someone's account (it takes far less time to try every possible password if the limit is 16 characters (a common limit) than, say, if the limit is 50 characters), and also causes problems with people who use password-creation methods that result in long passwords, such as stringing several random words together a la ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}''[='=]s "correct horse battery staple" password idea.
* It is very common for the commercial soundtracks of games to be missing some of the tracks found in the game or to have heavily-altered or remixed versions instead. While it is sometimes justified due to copyright reasons, often this causes at best [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Trukk Not Munky-esque]] reactions from people who came to like the in-game version and can't develop a taste for the different version, and at worst flat-out encourages piracy due to the pirated versions often having a complete track listing ripped directly from the game. A ''very'' notorious offender was the [=OST=] for ''VideoGame/FarCry4'': most fans bought it looking for the radio music and the amazing ''Bombay Royale'' songs played during some of the most epic moments of the game. What they got instead were the in-game battle themes and nothing else.
* Long-form games where saving your game is [[SaveGameLimits extremely limited]] can be a problem for those who can only play in small bursts. This is especially an issue on older handheld systems that don't have a sleep mode (such as most pre-UsefulNotes/NintendoDS devices), as you can't easily save games on the fly if your device is low on batteries and you don't have a charger or fresh set of replacement batteries on hand. ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaCircleOfTheMoon'' notably was panned for having sparse save points, resulting in [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDissonance the next game in the series]] adding a SuspendSave feature.
[[/folder]]
25th May '16 2:20:15 AM erforce
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* ''{{Burnout}} Revenge'' gave us "Traffic Checking". The idea being that your car can shunt small vehicles that are stationary/going the same way you are, out of the way. The problem however was that this also gave you boost. Normally boost was rewarded for risky driving, but Traffic Checking had no risk attached to it, unless you couldn't tell the back of a car from the back of a bus. Then some of that traffic would happen to bump into your rivals, whether you were trying to do that or not, rewarding you with even more boost. Naturally, smart players would change their strategy from trying to stay in oncoming where possible, to driving going the right way and shunting cars about in the process.

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* ''{{Burnout}} Revenge'' ''VideoGame/BurnoutRevenge'' gave us "Traffic Checking". The idea being that your car can shunt small vehicles that are stationary/going the same way you are, out of the way. The problem however was that this also gave you boost. Normally boost was rewarded for risky driving, but Traffic Checking had no risk attached to it, unless you couldn't tell the back of a car from the back of a bus. Then some of that traffic would happen to bump into your rivals, whether you were trying to do that or not, rewarding you with even more boost. Naturally, smart players would change their strategy from trying to stay in oncoming where possible, to driving going the right way and shunting cars about in the process.
23rd May '16 9:06:11 PM MyFinalEdits
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* A general example from too many survival horror games to list is the simple act of WALKING. Although it's being utilized less often in newer games, one standard feature of survival horrors used to be controlling your character as though they were a tank. Pushing up on the control stick would make you walk forward without respect to the camera, and turning was also done purely from the perspective of the character, making navigating a slow and frustrating exercise. It was intended to ramp up the feelings of helplessness and fear, but some players found it so offputting that they wrote off an entire genre of games.
* Mostly at the beginning of ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil6'' (But still found throughout) the game will decide to disable certain actions of your character. For example, during a tense scene you'll lose the ability to open your inventory or make your character run, instead forcing you to walk ''ever so slowly'' across the wide sprawling room.

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* A general example from too many survival horror games to list is the simple act of WALKING. Although it's being utilized less often in newer games, one standard feature of survival horrors used to be controlling your character as though they were a tank. Pushing up on the control stick would make you walk forward without respect to the camera, and turning was also done purely from the perspective of the character, making navigating a slow and frustrating exercise. It was intended to ramp up the feelings of helplessness and fear, but some players found it so offputting that they wrote off an entire genre of games.
*
''VideoGame/ResidentEvil6'':
**
Mostly at the beginning of ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil6'' (But (but still found throughout) the game will decide to disable certain actions of your character. For example, during a tense scene you'll lose the ability to open your inventory or make your character run, instead forcing you to walk ''ever so slowly'' across the wide sprawling room.
23rd May '16 5:34:36 PM Shadozcreep
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Added DiffLines:

* A general example from too many survival horror games to list is the simple act of WALKING. Although it's being utilized less often in newer games, one standard feature of survival horrors used to be controlling your character as though they were a tank. Pushing up on the control stick would make you walk forward without respect to the camera, and turning was also done purely from the perspective of the character, making navigating a slow and frustrating exercise. It was intended to ramp up the feelings of helplessness and fear, but some players found it so offputting that they wrote off an entire genre of games.
18th May '16 2:27:36 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''DeadliestWarrior'':

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* ''DeadliestWarrior'':''Series/DeadliestWarrior'':
17th May '16 6:45:14 PM hamza678
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* ''ScrappyMechanic/TheSims''


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17th May '16 6:40:11 PM hamza678
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* Ringouts (knocking your opponent out of the arena and into an auto-DQ zone), or any other means of winning a round without actually zeroing out your opponent's health bar are universally reviled. The ''Videogame/VirtuaFighter'' and [[VideoGame/SoulSeries Soul Calibur]]'' series generally include ringouts on most if not all stages. ''Soul Calibur also heavily features juggling and several notably claustrophobic stages where accidental self-ringout is an actual possibility. ''VideoGame/DeadOrAlive'', on the other hand, put a more enjoyable spin on this, transforming most ringouts into events more to the order of '[[FreeFloorFighting you knocked him off the building and down through the flashy neon sign and into the pavement, but then you jump down after him and keep fighting down there]].'

to:

* Ringouts (knocking your opponent out of the arena and into an auto-DQ zone), or any other means of winning a round without actually zeroing out your opponent's health bar are universally reviled. The ''Videogame/VirtuaFighter'' and [[VideoGame/SoulSeries ''[[VideoGame/SoulSeries Soul Calibur]]'' series generally include ringouts on most if not all stages. ''Soul Calibur also heavily features juggling and several notably claustrophobic stages where accidental self-ringout is an actual possibility. ''VideoGame/DeadOrAlive'', on the other hand, put a more enjoyable spin on this, transforming most ringouts into events more to the order of '[[FreeFloorFighting you knocked him off the building and down through the flashy neon sign and into the pavement, but then you jump down after him and keep fighting down there]].'
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ScrappyMechanic