History Main / Scotireland

16th Nov '16 10:33:34 PM LadyNorbert
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* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' has Duff Killigan who is Scottish in every way, save for his very Irish surname.

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* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' has Duff Killigan Killigan, who is Scottish in every way, way - save for his very Irish surname.



* One for the England vs. Wales aspect: The early-90s Creator/HannaBarbera cartoon ''Young Robin Hood'' featured an episode where Prince John had hatched yet another plan to steal the throne of England from his brother Richard. Said plot heavily involved the Duke of Wales. There has never been, in all of history, a Duke of Wales....because ''Wales is not and never has been a duchy''. In fact, during the reign of Richard the Lionheart, Wales was still ruled by its own native princes; it wouldn't be properly absorbed into the English crown's holdings until the reign of Edward I.
* Miner Smurf of ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' is spoken of as having either an Irish or a Scottish accent, which isn't helped by the fact that [[Creator/AlanYoung his voice actor]] would also do [[WesternAnimation/DuckTales Scrooge McDuck]].

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* One for the England vs. Wales aspect: The early-90s Creator/HannaBarbera cartoon ''Young Robin Hood'' featured an episode where Prince John had hatched yet another plan to steal the throne of England from his brother Richard. Said plot heavily involved the Duke of Wales. There has never been, in all of history, a Duke of Wales....Wales... because ''Wales is not and never has been a duchy''. In [[note]]In fact, during the reign of Richard the Lionheart, Wales was still ruled by its own native princes; it wouldn't be properly absorbed into the English crown's holdings until the reign of Edward I.
I. Presumably the whole "Duke of Wales" thing was invented for the show so they wouldn't need to explain all of that, but the presentation just seems more like CriticalResearchFailure.[[/note]]
* Miner Smurf of ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' is spoken of mentioned as having either an Irish or a Scottish accent, which isn't helped by the fact that [[Creator/AlanYoung his voice actor]] would also do [[WesternAnimation/DuckTales Scrooge McDuck]].
9th Sep '16 6:55:18 AM fearlessnikki
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* Parodied in ''{{Film/Ondine}}'' which features a selkie in rural Ireland. Selkies are traditionally Scottish creatures, which is lampshaded by a Scottish character. The Irish equivalent of a selkie is the less popular merrow.


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* ''Series/OnceUponATime'' Season 5 featured rather a lot of Irish actors playing the characters from Dun Broch, a FantasyCounterpartCulture of Scotland.


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* One press junket promoting ''{{WesternAnimation/Brave}}'' - a movie set in Scotland - featured background music from Dropkick Murphys - an Irish band.
17th Aug '16 10:56:30 AM fearlessnikki
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* ''Film/AGuideToRecognizingYourSaints'' has a Scottish teen moving to the area, and it's a RunningGag that the others frequently mistake him for Irish. It's possibly a nod to the [[BasedOnATrueStory actual guy he's based on]] being Irish in real life.
14th Aug '16 3:59:22 PM thatmadork
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* In the VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar total conversion mod ''[[VideoGame/{{Thera}} Thera: Legacy of the Great Torment]]'', the Gaelic Nations (and Tethra, the landmass they're situated on) is a veritable Frankenstein's monster of every single Celtic trope you could possibly imagine. You have snow-capped highlands and rolling green hills, you have {{BFS}}-wielding kilt-clad highlanders, almost-stark-naked iron-age fanatics, Welsh longbowmen, chanting druids, magic tomes, magic swords, legends about the Morrigan and Cuchulainn, and loads of guys with blue woad on their faces and names like "O'Neill". Naturally right across the water from Tethra and coveting her with a greedy eye is the kingdom of Avalon, which is basically England with huge influences of King Arthur.

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* In the VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar total conversion mod ''[[VideoGame/{{Thera}} Thera: Legacy of the Great Torment]]'', the Gaelic Nations (and Tethra, the landmass they're situated on) is a veritable Frankenstein's monster of every single Celtic trope you could possibly imagine. You have snow-capped highlands and rolling green hills, you have {{BFS}}-wielding kilt-clad highlanders, almost-stark-naked iron-age fanatics, Welsh longbowmen, chanting druids, magic tomes, magic swords, [[Myth/CelticMythology legends about the Morrigan and Cuchulainn, Cuchulainn]], and loads of guys with blue woad on their faces and names like "O'Neill". Naturally right across the water from Tethra and coveting her with a greedy eye is the kingdom of Avalon, which is basically England with huge influences of King Arthur.
14th Aug '16 3:58:33 PM thatmadork
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Added DiffLines:

* In the VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar total conversion mod ''[[VideoGame/{{Thera}} Thera: Legacy of the Great Torment]]'', the Gaelic Nations (and Tethra, the landmass they're situated on) is a veritable Frankenstein's monster of every single Celtic trope you could possibly imagine. You have snow-capped highlands and rolling green hills, you have {{BFS}}-wielding kilt-clad highlanders, almost-stark-naked iron-age fanatics, Welsh longbowmen, chanting druids, magic tomes, magic swords, legends about the Morrigan and Cuchulainn, and loads of guys with blue woad on their faces and names like "O'Neill". Naturally right across the water from Tethra and coveting her with a greedy eye is the kingdom of Avalon, which is basically England with huge influences of King Arthur.
24th Jun '16 12:00:05 PM kquinn0830
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* ''Film/TwentyFifthHour'' and ''Film/TheDeparted'' are particularly bad as both feature Irish-American storylines yet include rousing renditions of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotland_the_Brave "Scotland the Brave"]]. ''The Departed'' features Scottish, English and American actors playing Irish-American gangsters but, bizarrely, no actual Irish actors.

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* ''Film/TwentyFifthHour'' and ''Film/TheDeparted'' are particularly bad as both feature Irish-American storylines yet include rousing renditions of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotland_the_Brave "Scotland the Brave"]]. ''The Departed'' features Scottish, English and American actors playing Irish-American gangsters but, bizarrely, no actual with Creator/MarkWahlberg being the only one with Irish actors.ancestry.
30th May '16 7:57:15 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* In an episode of ''{{Seinfeld}}'', Jerry and George end up sharing a limousine with a couple of Neo-Nazis. Jerry pretends to be Irish, reminiscing about things such as ''"the peat, ah, the peat"''. However, his accent comes across as Scottish to one of the Nazis, to which Jerry replies: ''"We were living around the border"''. Jerry's attempt ends with him saying, "Scotland, Ireland? What's the difference, lassie?"

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* In an episode of ''{{Seinfeld}}'', ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'', Jerry and George end up sharing a limousine with a couple of Neo-Nazis. Jerry pretends to be Irish, reminiscing about things such as ''"the peat, ah, the peat"''. However, his accent comes across as Scottish to one of the Nazis, to which Jerry replies: ''"We were living around the border"''. Jerry's attempt ends with him saying, "Scotland, Ireland? What's the difference, lassie?"
9th Mar '16 1:38:34 PM Hossmeister
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* In an episode of ''{{Black Books}}'' some American tourists refer to Bernard, (who is Irish) as a "Scotchman".

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* In an episode of ''{{Black Books}}'' ''Series/BlackBook'' some American tourists refer to Bernard, (who is Irish) as a "Scotchman".
9th Mar '16 1:35:19 PM Hossmeister
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6th Mar '16 3:22:30 PM Redmess
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The prevalence of this trope in American media is probably due to the fact that, to untrained U.S. ears, Scottish and Irish accents sound remarkably similar. This trope does not exist in Canadian media, however, as the Irish and the Scots are seen as completely distinct races. It's said that the longer an Irishman lives in Canada the more Canadian he gets, but the longer a Scotsman lives in Canada the more Scots he gets. Some Scotsmen have lived in Canada for so long that their accent has become completely indecipherable.


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The prevalence of this trope in American media is probably due to the fact that, to untrained U.S. ears, Scottish and Irish accents sound remarkably similar. This trope does not exist in Canadian media, however, as the Irish and the Scots are seen as completely distinct races.nationalities. It's said that the longer an Irishman lives in Canada the more Canadian he gets, but the longer a Scotsman lives in Canada the more Scots he gets. Some Scotsmen have lived in Canada for so long that their accent has become completely indecipherable.

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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Scotireland