History Main / ScienceMarchesOn

21st Aug '16 12:56:35 PM nombretomado
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* In his 1983 comedy show ''Delirious'', EddieMurphy expresses fears about having a girlfriend that spends time with homosexuals, worrying she might kiss them and get AIDS, and then give him AIDS when she kisses him. Scientists have long since disproved the idea of getting AIDS by kissing, barring circumstances like a sore or bleeding inside the mouth. Plus the difference between contracting HIV and getting AIDS. It should also be noted, for those too young to remember, that back in the 80s, homosexuals were seen to be the origin, or more often the sole victims, of AIDS. Later research proved that this wasn't the case, it was just that the symptoms of AIDS appeared in homosexual communities sooner than straight communities, for reasons best not discussed here.

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* In his 1983 comedy show ''Delirious'', EddieMurphy Creator/EddieMurphy expresses fears about having a girlfriend that spends time with homosexuals, worrying she might kiss them and get AIDS, and then give him AIDS when she kisses him. Scientists have long since disproved the idea of getting AIDS by kissing, barring circumstances like a sore or bleeding inside the mouth. Plus the difference between contracting HIV and getting AIDS. It should also be noted, for those too young to remember, that back in the 80s, homosexuals were seen to be the origin, or more often the sole victims, of AIDS. Later research proved that this wasn't the case, it was just that the symptoms of AIDS appeared in homosexual communities sooner than straight communities, for reasons best not discussed here.
15th Aug '16 5:45:09 PM htuttle
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* The original ''XCOM'' game introduced the alien element Elerium-115, so called because it is supposedly the 115th element on the periodic table. This was perfectly feasible when the game originally came out, but the 115th element has since been discovered. It was given a placeholder name (Ununpentium) until a proper name, moscovium, was eventually proposed. It is known that it would not display any of the properties of Elerium shown in the game (particularly the stability).

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* The original ''XCOM'' ''[[VideoGame/XCOMUFODefense X-COM]]'' game introduced the alien element Elerium-115, so called because it is supposedly the 115th element on the periodic table. This was perfectly feasible when the game originally came out, but the 115th element has since been discovered. It was given a placeholder name (Ununpentium) until a proper name, moscovium, was eventually proposed. It is known that it would not display any of the properties of Elerium shown in the game (particularly the stability).



* The XCom series makes much use of a MineralMacGuffin called Elerium, an element that forms in yellow crystals and has an atomic number of 115, and among other interesting properties is vitally important for the construction of anti-gravity drives. This was probably based on [[http://www.beyondweird.com/element115.html claims]] made about element-115 in the 1980s by a UFO enthusiast with the splendidly appropriate name of Bob Lazar. These claims were considered exceedingly dubious even at the time, but it wasn't until element-115 was successfully synthesised that they were fully debunked.

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* The XCom ''{{VideoGame/XCOM}}'' series makes much use of a MineralMacGuffin called Elerium, an element that forms in yellow crystals and has an atomic number of 115, and among other interesting properties is vitally important for the construction of anti-gravity drives. This was probably based on [[http://www.beyondweird.com/element115.html claims]] made about element-115 in the 1980s by a UFO enthusiast with the splendidly appropriate name of Bob Lazar. These claims were considered exceedingly dubious even at the time, but it wasn't until element-115 was successfully synthesised that they were fully debunked.
8th Aug '16 9:01:52 AM Sharlee
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* 1977's ''Film/TheIncredibleMeltingMan'' has humans landing on Saturn's surface. The Voyager probes' analysis of the planet's composition and temperature would establish that Saturn's only solid portion is its core, which is '''much''' too hot and high-pressure for even robots to visit, just a few years later.
7th Aug '16 6:07:51 PM MsChibi
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* The practice of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trepanning trepanning]], which consisted of [[MeatgrinderSurgery boring a hole in the skull]], with the idea that doing so would cure headaches, seizures, head injuries, and mental disorders. It was widely practiced in antiquity, but has (with only a very few exceptions) fallen out of practice today.
5th Aug '16 11:33:17 PM DarkHunter
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* The British quiz show ''Series/{{QI}}'' has a RunningGag of messing with its contestants with the question: "How many moons does the earth have?" The first time it was asked, regular contestant Alan Davies answers (rather resigned, knowing such an easy question can only be a setup) "One" and gets flashing lights, klaxons, and Creator/StephenFry with "Sorry, that is incorrect. The correct answer, of course, is ''2''": Luna and Cruithne. The following season, Stephen asked the same question, which Davies then tries with the previous given correct answer. ''Incorrect''. The answer had changed in the time between episodes: either it's "5", because they found three new Cruithne-like moons, or "1", because none of them count.
** Cruithne is not gravitationally bound to the Earth, so it's genuinely not a moon despite displaying some interesting orbital behavior. QI was deliberately interpreting the word "moon" very loosely just to mess with its panelists.

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* The British quiz show ''Series/{{QI}}'' has a RunningGag of messing with its contestants with the question: "How many moons does the earth have?" Earth have?"
**
The first time it was asked, regular contestant Alan Davies answers (rather resigned, knowing such an easy question can only be a setup) "One" and gets flashing lights, klaxons, and Creator/StephenFry with "Sorry, that is incorrect. The correct answer, of course, is ''2''": Luna and Cruithne. Cruithne (an asteroid that had been temporarily captured by Earth's gravity at the time). Note that no scientist had ever considered Cruithne to be a moon, since it was not permanently locked in orbit; the show was deliberately using an extremely loose definition of "moon" to mess with the contestants.
**
The following season, Stephen asked the same question, which Davies then tries with the previous given correct answer. ''Incorrect''. The answer had changed in the time between episodes: either it's "5", because they found three new Cruithne-like moons, or "1", because none of them count.
** Cruithne is not gravitationally bound to the Earth, so it's genuinely not a moon despite displaying some interesting orbital behavior. QI was deliberately interpreting the word "moon" very loosely just to mess with its panelists.
count.



** The show messed with its contestants again when the same question came up in Series L, with the answer being "Earth has no moon". The reasoning is that the IAU definition of a "planet" includes the requirement that it must have sufficient mass to have cleared its solar orbit of other objects (this is the requirement that Pluto fails). While the Earth's orbit has been cleared, Earth did not manage this on its own: the Moon's mass naturally contributed as well. Therefore, under a rather stretched interpretation of the IAU planetary definition, the Moon is ''itself'' a planet, and is in a binary orbit with the Earth. Naturally the contestant called BS on that idea.

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** The show messed with its contestants again when the same question came up in Series L, with the answer being "Earth has no moon". The reasoning is that the IAU definition of a "planet" includes the requirement that it must have sufficient mass to have cleared its solar orbit of other objects (this is the requirement that Pluto fails). While the Earth's orbit has been cleared, Earth did not manage this on its own: the Moon's mass naturally contributed as well. Therefore, under a rather stretched interpretation of the IAU planetary definition, the Moon is ''itself'' a planet, and is in a binary orbit with the Earth. Naturally the contestant called BS on that idea.
31st Jul '16 1:38:46 PM nombretomado
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* Current versions of the DCComics character the ComicBook/MartianManhunter establish that he was brought to Earth from the distant past, when it's just barely conceivable Mars might have been inhabitable.

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* Current versions of the DCComics Creator/DCComics character the ComicBook/MartianManhunter establish that he was brought to Earth from the distant past, when it's just barely conceivable Mars might have been inhabitable.
17th Jul '16 2:29:53 PM Discar
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* A curious example of this comes from Creator/{{Juvenal}}'s satires, which brought us many still popular phrases and concepts such as 'BreadAndCircuses' to keep the masses happy, wishing for 'a sound mind in a sound body' or asking 'WhoWatchesTheWatchmen?'. He also coined the phrase of a 'rare bird in the land' such as 'black swan' meaning to him a nonexistent thing. For many centuries afterwards and in many languages the phrase meant something that did not exist until somebody discovered a black swan in Australia. The phrase changed its meaning and nowadays is used to describe an idea based on a hypotheses that can be disproven by a single counterexample or [[OutsideContextVillain are extremely hard to predict or anticipate events that throw everything into chaos]].

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* A curious example of this comes from Creator/{{Juvenal}}'s satires, which brought us many still popular phrases and concepts such as 'BreadAndCircuses' to keep the masses happy, wishing for 'a sound mind in a sound body' or asking 'WhoWatchesTheWatchmen?'. He also coined the phrase of a 'rare bird in the land' such as 'black swan' meaning to him a nonexistent thing. For many centuries afterwards and in many languages the phrase meant something that did not exist until somebody discovered a black swan in Australia. The phrase changed its meaning and nowadays is used to describe an idea based on a hypotheses that can be disproven by a single counterexample or [[OutsideContextVillain [[OutsideContextProblem are extremely hard to predict or anticipate events that throw everything into chaos]].
14th Jul '16 12:12:24 PM Yendor
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* The original ''XCOM'' game introduced the alien element Elerium-115, so called because it is supposedly the 115th element on the periodic table. This was perfectly feasible when the game originally came out, but the 115th element has since been discovered. It has a thoroughly boring name (Ununpentium) because it hasn't officially been named yet, but it is known that it would not display any of the properties of Elerium shown in the game (particularly the stability). There is a campaign to name Ununpentium Elerium, though.

to:

* The original ''XCOM'' game introduced the alien element Elerium-115, so called because it is supposedly the 115th element on the periodic table. This was perfectly feasible when the game originally came out, but the 115th element has since been discovered. It has was given a thoroughly boring placeholder name (Ununpentium) because it hasn't officially been named yet, but it until a proper name, moscovium, was eventually proposed. It is known that it would not display any of the properties of Elerium shown in the game (particularly the stability). There is a campaign to name Ununpentium Elerium, though.
stability).
14th Jul '16 11:21:53 AM MsChibi
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* [[ConsummationCounterfeit The idea of the hymen as a reliable indicator for virginity/lack thereof]], akin to the "freshness seal" on many foodstuffs. It is now known that it can break or tear in ways ''completely'' unrelated to sex (horseback riding, for example), and some women are born without one. It's also now known that most women have a hole (or even multiple holes) in it, and some women can have an intact hymen even if they've been sexually active for ''decades'', or even given birth before. The majority of women ''do not'' bleed the first time they have penetrative sex. (There ''are'' some women who do have the "Hollywood hymen" that completely covers the vaginal opening, but that is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperforate_hymen a medical condition]], not the average woman's default state.) Therefore, it is ''not'' a reliable indicator for virginity (or lack thereof.) In fact, all the hymen actually is is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hymen a vestigial remnant of the Mullerian ducts that formed the reproductive tract during fetal development.]]
7th Jul '16 10:52:20 AM Sharlee
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* The [[AnimalNemesis Man-Vs-Rat]] film ''Film/OfUnknownOrigin'' got its title from how, at the time, scientists weren't sure where the Norway rat had lived prior to its becoming dependent upon humanity's leftovers and its diaspora across most of the planet. Studies have since traced the species' likely origin-point to the plains of northern China and Mongolia.
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