History Main / ScienceMarchesOn

11th Jul '17 3:45:07 PM blockboy
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** [[https://news.upenn.edu/news/tully-monster-mystery-far-solved-penn-led-group-argues Come 2017 and Tullimonstrum might have been an invertebrate after all]].
9th Jul '17 11:50:40 PM Random888
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* Prior to the acceptance of plate tectonics, an elaborate series of prehistoric land bridges were posited to explain how similar species had ended up being separated by oceans. In Disney's ''Film/SwissFamilyRobinson'', released in 1960, this land bridge theory is cited to HandWave the movie's use of MisplacedWildlife ([[Literature/TheSwissFamilyRobinson the novel]] also uses this trope, but offers no explanation for it). In addition to since being proved wrong, this has the problem of the land bridge theory having [[AnachronismStew not been developed yet as of the film's Napoleonic era setting]]. But hey, they tried.

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* Prior to the acceptance of plate tectonics, an elaborate series of prehistoric land bridges were posited to explain how similar species had ended up being separated by oceans. In Disney's ''Film/SwissFamilyRobinson'', released in 1960, this land bridge theory is cited to HandWave the movie's use of MisplacedWildlife ([[Literature/TheSwissFamilyRobinson the original novel]] also uses this trope, features MisplacedWildlife, but offers no explanation for it). In addition to since being proved wrong, this has the problem of the land bridge theory having [[AnachronismStew not been developed yet as of the film's Napoleonic era setting]]. But hey, they tried.
9th Jul '17 11:36:20 PM Random888
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* Prior to the acceptance of plate tectonics, an elaborate series of prehistoric land bridges were posited to explain how similar species had ended up being separated by oceans. In Disney's ''Film/SwissFamilyRobinson'', released in 1960, this land bridge theory is cited to HandWave the movie's use of MisplacedWildlife. In addition to since being proved wrong, this has the problem of the land bridge theory having [[AnachronismStew not been developed yet as of the film's Napoleonic era setting]]. But hey, they tried.

to:

* Prior to the acceptance of plate tectonics, an elaborate series of prehistoric land bridges were posited to explain how similar species had ended up being separated by oceans. In Disney's ''Film/SwissFamilyRobinson'', released in 1960, this land bridge theory is cited to HandWave the movie's use of MisplacedWildlife.MisplacedWildlife ([[Literature/TheSwissFamilyRobinson the novel]] also uses this trope, but offers no explanation for it). In addition to since being proved wrong, this has the problem of the land bridge theory having [[AnachronismStew not been developed yet as of the film's Napoleonic era setting]]. But hey, they tried.
9th Jul '17 10:47:12 PM Random888
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to:

* Prior to the acceptance of plate tectonics, an elaborate series of prehistoric land bridges were posited to explain how similar species had ended up being separated by oceans. In Disney's ''Film/SwissFamilyRobinson'', released in 1960, this land bridge theory is cited to HandWave the movie's use of MisplacedWildlife. In addition to since being proved wrong, this has the problem of the land bridge theory having [[AnachronismStew not been developed yet as of the film's Napoleonic era setting]]. But hey, they tried.
9th Jul '17 8:51:14 AM nombretomado
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* ''Literature/RocketShipGalileo'', Heinlein's first novel, has a secret [[StupidJetpackHitler Nazi base on the moon]] ''immediately after UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo!''

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* ''Literature/RocketShipGalileo'', Heinlein's first novel, has a secret [[StupidJetpackHitler Nazi base on the moon]] ''immediately after UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo!''UsefulNotes/WorldWarII!''



* The horrors of WorldWarTwo made many anthropologists of the 50s drop the idea that HumansAreSpecial, intelligent, tool-maker conquerors of Nature and switch to HumansAreBastards instead, the only primate that is a carnivorous, egotistical, weapon-making killer beast that loves violence and is doomed to destroy itself. The influence of this idea can be noted in Pierre Boulle's novel ''[[Literature/PlanetOfTheApes La Planete des Singes]]'', which would later inspire the ''Franchise/PlanetOfTheApes'' movies, as apes were then regarded as what "we" should have been before becoming homicidal beasts: peaceful leaf-eaters sitting in the rainforest, and that once we've wiped us out ourselves they'd build a real harmonious civilization. However, when primatologists actually began to study ape communities in the wild in the 1960s they found that apes (especially chimpanzees) weren't that peaceful in reality and actually had their share of hunting, fights for supremacy, stealing, rape, infanticide, war and cannibalism. As [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Goodall Jane Goodall]] once declared (paraphrasing): "I came thinking that apes were better than us, and I discovered that they were just the same".

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* The horrors of WorldWarTwo UsefulNotes/WorldWarII made many anthropologists of the 50s drop the idea that HumansAreSpecial, intelligent, tool-maker conquerors of Nature and switch to HumansAreBastards instead, the only primate that is a carnivorous, egotistical, weapon-making killer beast that loves violence and is doomed to destroy itself. The influence of this idea can be noted in Pierre Boulle's novel ''[[Literature/PlanetOfTheApes La Planete des Singes]]'', which would later inspire the ''Franchise/PlanetOfTheApes'' movies, as apes were then regarded as what "we" should have been before becoming homicidal beasts: peaceful leaf-eaters sitting in the rainforest, and that once we've wiped us out ourselves they'd build a real harmonious civilization. However, when primatologists actually began to study ape communities in the wild in the 1960s they found that apes (especially chimpanzees) weren't that peaceful in reality and actually had their share of hunting, fights for supremacy, stealing, rape, infanticide, war and cannibalism. As [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Goodall Jane Goodall]] once declared (paraphrasing): "I came thinking that apes were better than us, and I discovered that they were just the same".
8th Jul '17 9:52:16 AM nombretomado
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* In fact, TheOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercury_in_fiction puts]] "Old Mercury" and "New Mercury" in separate sections.

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* In fact, TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercury_in_fiction puts]] "Old Mercury" and "New Mercury" in separate sections.
7th Jul '17 6:07:22 PM DavidDelony
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* In the mid-20th century, it was believed that tornadoes destroyed buildings by exploding them due to air pressure. Survival instructions in the '50s and '60s advised people in the path of a tornado to open windows to equalize air pressure. It was later discovered that it was the winds themselves that damaged buildings and that opening windows wasted valuable time better spent seeking shelter.
22nd Jun '17 3:12:19 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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* It was formerly believed that feathers originated in the theropod lineage at some point during the Jurassic period, with small, arboreal theropods such as ''archeopteryx'' evolving them for flight. However, molecular evidence has shown that the origin of feathers go even further back than that. A paper published in 2006 confirmed that alligators possess the same gene for growing feathers that birds do, which would punt the origin for feathers back to the common ancestor of birds and crocodilians, sometime back in the Triassic period. Indeed, it would appear that bird feathers, dinosaur protofeathers and pterosaur pycnofibres are all variations on the same basal archosaur fuzz, which evolved as a form of insulation rather than for flight. Note that pennaceous (ie: bird-like) feathers have been pushed back farther in the line of feather evolution; the so-called "protofeathers" are actually just crushed pennaceous feathers; thus animals like ''Velociraptor'' (which has quill knobs, a dead giveaway of pennaceous feathering) or ''Yutyrannus'' (with it's featther imprints on the fossil slab it was perserved in) sport pennaceous feathers. Another feathered theropod, ''Sciurumimus'', is an ''incredibly'' basal coelurosaur; it was only ''slightly'' more advanced than the megalosauroids (and was even jumping between being a coelurosaur or megalosauroid for a while).

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* It was formerly believed that feathers originated in the theropod lineage at some point during the Jurassic period, with small, arboreal theropods such as ''archeopteryx'' evolving them for flight. However, molecular evidence has shown that the origin of feathers go even further back than that. A paper published in 2006 confirmed that alligators possess the same gene for growing feathers that birds do, which would punt the origin for feathers back to the common ancestor of birds and crocodilians, sometime back in the Triassic period. Indeed, it would appear that bird feathers, dinosaur protofeathers and pterosaur pycnofibres are all variations on the same basal archosaur fuzz, which evolved as a form of insulation rather than for flight. Note that pennaceous (ie: bird-like) feathers have been pushed back farther in the line of feather evolution; the so-called "protofeathers" are actually just crushed pennaceous feathers; thus animals like ''Velociraptor'' (which has quill knobs, a dead giveaway of pennaceous feathering) or ''Yutyrannus'' (with it's featther its feather imprints on the fossil slab it was perserved preserved in) sport pennaceous feathers. Another feathered theropod, ''Sciurumimus'', is an ''incredibly'' basal coelurosaur; it was only ''slightly'' more advanced than the megalosauroids (and was even jumping between being a coelurosaur or megalosauroid for a while).
19th Jun '17 10:26:18 AM Gosicrystal
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* ''Series/DoctorWho'' has two prominent mentions of ''Brontosaurus'' in the 1970sa small one in the Fourth Doctor's "The brontosaurus is large and placid... and stupid!" speech (which at least has the excuse that [[TalkativeLoon he had no grasp of reality at the time]]), and a big one in "Invasion of the Dinosaurs" where a ''Brontosaurus'' is one of the main dinos encountered. While originally inaccurate, a study published in 2015 has concluded that ''Brontosaurus'' is in fact a valid genus and [[AccidentallyAccurate Doctor Who was actually right all along!]]

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* ''Series/DoctorWho'' has two prominent mentions of ''Brontosaurus'' in the 1970sa small one in the Fourth Doctor's "The brontosaurus is large and placid... and stupid!" speech (which at least has the excuse that [[TalkativeLoon he had no grasp of reality at the time]]), and a big one in "Invasion of the Dinosaurs" where a ''Brontosaurus'' is one of the main dinos encountered. While originally inaccurate, a study published in 2015 has concluded that ''Brontosaurus'' is in fact a valid genus and [[AccidentallyAccurate [[AccidentallyCorrectWriting Doctor Who was actually right all along!]]
18th Jun '17 10:11:37 AM nombretomado
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** Interestingly enough, the film ''was'' originally going to have an accurate (for the time) ''Tyrannosaurus rex''. Paleontologists hired as consultants for the film insisted that the ''T. rex'' be portrayed with only two fingers. WaltDisney stated that the ''T. rex'' should have three fingers in the film because he believed that audiences wouldn't be able to recognize it otherwise. Amusingly, this makes it a reasonably accurate ''Allosaurus'', which actually existed at the same time as Stegosaurus, so the two mistakes cancelled to make it an accurate depiction.

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** Interestingly enough, the film ''was'' originally going to have an accurate (for the time) ''Tyrannosaurus rex''. Paleontologists hired as consultants for the film insisted that the ''T. rex'' be portrayed with only two fingers. WaltDisney Creator/WaltDisney stated that the ''T. rex'' should have three fingers in the film because he believed that audiences wouldn't be able to recognize it otherwise. Amusingly, this makes it a reasonably accurate ''Allosaurus'', which actually existed at the same time as Stegosaurus, so the two mistakes cancelled to make it an accurate depiction.
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