History Main / ScienceFantasy

11th Jan '17 3:35:40 PM fearlessnikki
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* ''{{Anime/Digimon}}'' is set in a digital world that in later seasons is accessed by a computer. The titular Mons have magical powers and many are based off mythical beasts.


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* ''{{Series/Shadowhunters}}'' is this in contrast to [[Literature/TheMortalInstruments the books it was based on]]. In the books, the Shadowhunters used ancient magic and tools to track demons. In the show, the Institute is shown having lots of high-tech machinery and security systems to do the tracking.


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* ''Series/TinMan'' is a retelling of the Wizard of Oz in a sci-fi setting. Essentially it's meant to be the original Oz that Dorothy landed in - with a few hundred years' worth of industrial advancement. There are some CyberPunk elements, but the villain is still a WickedWitch who's planning to bring about TheNightThatNeverEnds.
8th Jan '17 11:31:39 PM Xtifr
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* Averted with the first two ''Franchise/{{Fable}}'' games which were were straight fantasy. ''VideoGame/FableIII'' however was in the industrial revolution, while the magic and swords were kept, the two [=DLCs=] Understone and Traitor's Keep featured steampunk robots with latter even including a potion to turn your dog into a robot.

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* Averted with the first two ''Franchise/{{Fable}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Fable}}'' games which were were straight fantasy. ''VideoGame/FableIII'' however was in the industrial revolution, while the magic and swords were kept, the two [=DLCs=] Understone and Traitor's Keep featured steampunk robots with latter even including a potion to turn your dog into a robot.
6th Jan '17 8:30:01 PM MememasterFlex
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* Creator/{{RoosterTeeth}}'s ''WebAnimation/RWBY'' is this but without space travel, featuring (among other things) characters with magical abilities, robots, airships, and smartphones called "Scrolls".

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* Creator/{{RoosterTeeth}}'s ''WebAnimation/RWBY'' ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'' is this but without space travel, featuring (among other things) characters with magical abilities, robots, airships, and smartphones called "Scrolls".
6th Jan '17 8:28:48 PM MememasterFlex
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* Creator/{{RoosterTeeth}}'s ''WebAnimation/RWBY'' is this but without space travel, featuring (among other things) characters with magical abilities, robots, airships, and smartphones called "Scrolls".
3rd Jan '17 11:47:50 AM thekeyofe
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*** The spinoff game ''VideoGame/DirgeOfCerberus'' and the ''[[Anime/FinalFantasyVIIAdventChildren Advent Children]]'' film feature cell phones more prominently, though they do exist in the game, referred to as a "PHS."

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*** The original game had a cell phone-like device, referred to as a 'PHS.' The spinoff game ''VideoGame/DirgeOfCerberus'' and the film ''[[Anime/FinalFantasyVIIAdventChildren Advent Children]]'' film feature these cell phones much more prominently, though they do exist in the game, referred to as a "PHS."prominently.
30th Nov '16 11:12:46 AM TimeTravelinc
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* ''Franchise/TheTwilightZone'' which was the earliest tv series in America to show that the line between Fantasy and Science Fiction, blurred, from [[spoiler:ghostly flying saucers]] to tales of a man who could create anything with a tape recorder.
17th Nov '16 9:38:35 PM Gregzilla
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' looooves itself this trope. An entire book is devoted to the various planets in Golarion's solar system. There is also a nation in the setting called Numeria, where a spaceship crashed smack in the middle of a savage, barbaric land thousands of years ago. To top it all off, an entire Adventure Path, "Iron Gods", was based in that nation (further supplemented with both an ENTIRE book on sci-fi technology, and another book that details the various alien races you can play as, including androids!) which asks the question, "what happens when an artificial intelligence gains the ability to grant spells to its followers?".

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' looooves itself this trope. An entire book is devoted to the various planets in Golarion's solar system. There is also a nation in the setting called Numeria, where a spaceship crashed smack in the middle of a savage, barbaric land thousands of years ago. To top it all off, an entire Adventure Path, "Iron Gods", was based in that nation (further which asks the question, "what happens when an artificial intelligence [[DeusEstMachina gains the ability to grant spells to its followers]]?". This Adventure Path was further supplemented with both an ENTIRE entire book on sci-fi technology, technology and technological magic, and another book that details the various alien races you can play as, including androids!) which asks the question, "what happens when an artificial intelligence gains the ability to grant spells to its followers?".[[ArtificialHuman androids]].
14th Nov '16 7:52:44 AM TheFantasyChronicler
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* ''LightNovel/ScrappedPrincess'' blends fantasy and sci-fi elements, with a world seemingly in MedievalStasis where magic and TronLines abound. Then adds RuinsOfTheModernAge [[spoiler: and the Skid into the mix and the existences of Xeferis, and Natalie, who're [[EmpathicWeapon dragoons]] that link with their masters. And the Peacemakers, who are a powerful race of alien overlords who can enslave the minds of all who gaze upon them. And their true forms resemble HumongousMecha!]]

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* ''LightNovel/ScrappedPrincess'' blends fantasy and sci-fi elements, with a world seemingly ''Manga/{{ARIA}}'' is set in MedievalStasis where magic and TronLines abound. a replica of Venice on the planet Aqua (née UsefulNotes/{{Mars}}), there are elaborate technological control systems [[{{Terraform}} maintaining the environment]] -- floating islands for climate control, underground facilities for enhancing the planet's gravity -- the works. Then adds RuinsOfTheModernAge [[spoiler: the cast is caught up in supernatural time travel and ghosts of the past appear. This sounds like the setting for a gripping tale of planetary exploration and the Skid into technological and social struggles of the mix and the existences of Xeferis, and Natalie, who're [[EmpathicWeapon dragoons]] that link colonists as they deal with a mysterious past. But really, it's just an excuse for SceneryPorn, as the female gondoliers float through a beautiful, peaceful city in their masters. And the Peacemakers, who are a powerful race of alien overlords who can enslave the minds of all who gaze upon them. And their true forms resemble HumongousMecha!]][[SliceOfLife happy-go-lucky lives]].



* In ''Anime/PanzerWorldGalient'' the setting was a typical medieval fantasy world... with giant robots thrown in the mix. Later events show [[spoiler:the setting to be closer to a science fiction story set in a medieval society (with a plot inspired by heroic fantasy tropes) than it is a high fantasy story that features giant robots.]]

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* In ''Anime/PanzerWorldGalient'' ''LightNovel/ACertainMagicalIndex'' the setting was a typical medieval tag line is "when science and magic cross paths", and draws liberally from all sorts of speculative fiction and fantasy world... with giant robots thrown in the mix. Later events show [[spoiler:the setting to be closer to a science fiction tropes for each story set in arcs.
* ''Manga/DragonBall'' starts out as
a medieval society (with new rendition of a plot inspired fantastic Chinese folk tale, with some science-fiction elements on the side (everything made by heroic fantasy tropes) than Capsule Corp). In ''Anime/DragonBallZ'' we get alien invaders, space travel, and androids and it is a high fantasy story that features giant robots.]]all gets weirder from there. The final arc involved WizardsFromOuterSpace and an unstoppable pink blob-monster from near the dawn of time.



* ''Manga/{{Hunter x Hunter}}'' is set in a world brimming with strange fantasy creatures and mythical locations juxtaposed with modern cities and cutting-edge technology, and characters can manipulate their auras to use Nen, which gives them access to fantastic abilities.



* In ''Franchise/LyricalNanoha'', the Space-Time Administration Bureau that the main characters work for is like ''Franchise/StarTrek'''s Federation, except where ''Star Trek'' would have a piece of TechnoBabble to power its futuristic devices, ''Nanoha'' just uses magic. Magical {{Energy Weapon}}s, magical FasterThanLightTravel, magical {{Cyborg}}s, magical artificial intelligence with Windows-esque error codes...



* In ''Franchise/LyricalNanoha'', the Space-Time Administration Bureau that the main characters work for is like ''Franchise/StarTrek'''s Federation, except where ''Star Trek'' would have a piece of TechnoBabble to power its futuristic devices, ''Nanoha'' just uses magic. Magical {{Energy Weapon}}s, magical FasterThanLightTravel, magical {{Cyborg}}s, magical artificial intelligence with Windows-esque error codes...

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* In ''Franchise/LyricalNanoha'', the Space-Time Administration Bureau that the main characters work for is like ''Franchise/StarTrek'''s Federation, except where ''Star Trek'' would have a piece of TechnoBabble The Korean manga (manwah) ''Webcomic/{{Noblesse}}'' features an 800-year old vampire awakening in modern-day Korea, his having to power its futuristic devices, ''Nanoha'' just uses magic. Magical {{Energy Weapon}}s, magical FasterThanLightTravel, magical {{Cyborg}}s, magical artificial intelligence deal with Windows-esque error codes...an age-old betrayal and his fellow Noble Vampires, who wield immensely powerful Soul Weapons passed down from generation to generation, containing the spirits and powers of their previous owners. Oh, and the bad guys is an international military organization known as the Union, which runs SuperSoldier experiments with modified humans, werewolves, and vampires.



* In ''Anime/PanzerWorldGalient'' the setting was a typical medieval fantasy world... with giant robots thrown in the mix. Later events show [[spoiler:the setting to be closer to a science fiction story set in a medieval society (with a plot inspired by heroic fantasy tropes) than it is a high fantasy story that features giant robots.]]
* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' is a MagicalGirl show. The science part comes in when Kyubey's motivation for recruiting magical girls is revealed. [[spoiler:He and his race are SufficientlyAdvancedAliens attempting to stop the heat death of the universe. Magical girls and witches ''really are'' magical and not bound by the laws of physics, so the energy they produce can be used to fight entropy.]]
* ''LightNovel/ScrappedPrincess'' blends fantasy and sci-fi elements, with a world seemingly in MedievalStasis where magic and TronLines abound. Then adds RuinsOfTheModernAge [[spoiler: and the Skid into the mix and the existences of Xeferis, and Natalie, who're [[EmpathicWeapon dragoons]] that link with their masters. And the Peacemakers, who are a powerful race of alien overlords who can enslave the minds of all who gaze upon them. And their true forms resemble HumongousMecha!]]



* ''Manga/WolfsRain'': Technology meets mythology. And how. [[spoiler: In an incredibly [[MindScrew twist]] at the end of the series, you'd think the entire story happened centuries in the future, when in reality it was 10,000 years in the past.]]
* ''Manga/DragonBall'' starts out as a new rendition of a fantastic Chinese folk tale, with some science-fiction elements on the side (everything made by Capsule Corp). In ''Anime/DragonBallZ'' we get alien invaders, space travel, and androids and it all gets weirder from there. The final arc involved WizardsFromOuterSpace and an unstoppable pink blob-monster from near the dawn of time.
* The Korean manga (manwah) ''Webcomic/{{Noblesse}}'' features an 800-year old vampire awakening in modern-day Korea, his having to deal with an age-old betrayal and his fellow Noble Vampires, who wield immensely powerful Soul Weapons passed down from generation to generation, containing the spirits and powers of their previous owners. Oh, and the bad guys is an international military organization known as the Union, which runs SuperSoldier experiments with modified humans, werewolves, and vampires.
* ''Manga/{{ARIA}}'' is set in a replica of Venice on the planet Aqua (née UsefulNotes/{{Mars}}), there are elaborate technological control systems [[{{Terraform}} maintaining the environment]] -- floating islands for climate control, underground facilities for enhancing the planet's gravity -- the works. Then the cast is caught up in supernatural time travel and ghosts of the past appear. This sounds like the setting for a gripping tale of planetary exploration and the technological and social struggles of the colonists as they deal with a mysterious past. But really, it's just an excuse for SceneryPorn, as the female gondoliers float through a beautiful, peaceful city in their [[SliceOfLife happy-go-lucky lives]].
* ''LightNovel/ACertainMagicalIndex'' the tag line is "when science and magic cross paths", and draws liberally from all sorts of speculative fiction and fantasy tropes for each story arcs.
* ''Manga/{{Zombiepowder}}'' flavors it with Western themes. At the same time as you have gunplay, [[ChainsawGood chainswords]], bounty hunting, and gangs of outlaws, you have strange arts bordering on magic, people who can teleport, and rings that eat life force and can use it to revive the dead and make the living immortal.
* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' is a MagicalGirl show. The science part comes in when Kyubey's motivation for recruiting magical girls is revealed. [[spoiler:He and his race are SufficientlyAdvancedAliens attempting to stop the heat death of the universe. Magical girls and witches ''really are'' magical and not bound by the laws of physics, so the energy they produce can be used to fight entropy.]]



* ''Manga/{{Hunter x Hunter}}'' is set in a world brimming with strange fantasy creatures and mythical locations juxtaposed with modern cities and cutting-edge technology, and characters can manipulate their auras to use Nen, which gives them access to fantastic abilities.

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* ''Manga/{{Hunter x Hunter}}'' is set ''Manga/WolfsRain'': Technology meets mythology. And how. [[spoiler: In an incredibly [[MindScrew twist]] at the end of the series, you'd think the entire story happened centuries in a world brimming the future, when in reality it was 10,000 years in the past.]]
* ''Manga/{{Zombiepowder}}'' flavors it
with Western themes. At the same time as you have gunplay, [[ChainsawGood chainswords]], bounty hunting, and gangs of outlaws, you have strange fantasy creatures arts bordering on magic, people who can teleport, and mythical locations juxtaposed with modern cities rings that eat life force and cutting-edge technology, can use it to revive the dead and characters can manipulate their auras to use Nen, which gives them access to fantastic abilities.make the living immortal.



* ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'': The Dreddverse is mostly a sci-fi dystopian urban sprawl with robots, mutants, hoverships, and colonization of deep space, but there are quite a lot of supernatural elements, including psychics, undead enemies, demonic possession, and various types of magic.



* ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'': The Dreddverse is mostly a sci-fi dystopian urban sprawl with robots, mutants, hoverships, and colonization of deep space, but there are quite a lot of supernatural elements, including psychics, undead enemies, demonic possession, and various types of magic.



* ''Fanfic/UndocumentedFeatures'', a MegaCrossover, fuses many {{Fantasy}} and ScienceFiction sources into a single narrative. For example, a [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse God]] used ''[[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons dimension door]]'' to get his party onto the [[Franchise/StarTrek Klingon]] SpacePirates' ship, whereupon their sorceress summoned a protective [[PetalPower wall of roses]] as they hacked the computer to gain control of the ship -- all while a SpaceBattle was going between the two ships outside.

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* ''Fanfic/UndocumentedFeatures'', ''Blog/AlwaysHavingJuice'' is set on an alien planet in a MegaCrossover, fuses many {{Fantasy}} fictional planetary system with at least two other life-sustaining planets in it, and ScienceFiction sources into a single narrative. For example, a [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse God]] used ''[[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons dimension door]]'' to get his party onto the [[Franchise/StarTrek Klingon]] SpacePirates' ship, whereupon EveryoneIsASuper (and because of their sorceress summoned a protective [[PetalPower wall of roses]] as they hacked BizarreAlienBiology if one's not, it's curtains for them...) with {{Floating Continent}}s kept afloat by magical (and occasionally evil) artifacts from the computer to gain control ancient past. That's just the tip of the ship -- all while a SpaceBattle was going between the two ships outside.iceberg.



* ''Franchise/MassEffect'' fic ''[[Fanfic/CrucibleMassEffect Crucible]]'' started with the time travelled Ad Astra which continue the sci-fi theme from canon, then the existence of living stars was revealed which kinda ventured out of this, and then ghosts/souls started to popping here and there and finally ''[[{{Psychopomp}} Death]]'' himself appeared which firmly pushed the series into Fantasy theme. And don't even get into what [[spoiler: Shepard]] actually is and was or whom she's connected to.



* ''Blog/AlwaysHavingJuice'' is set on an alien planet in a fictional planetary system with at least two other life-sustaining planets in it, and EveryoneIsASuper (and because of their BizarreAlienBiology if one's not, it's curtains for them...) with {{Floating Continent}}s kept afloat by magical (and occasionally evil) artifacts from the ancient past. That's just the tip of the iceberg.
* ''Fanfic/WithStringsAttached'' completely blurs the lines between fantasy and science fiction. The planet C'hou has the quasi-Victorian land of Ketafa, with its guns, factories, and occasional motorized vehicle, and the exceptionally nonstandard fantasy continent of Baravada; the Fans influence events via {{Magitek}} and watch things on their computer screen; and the four visit three wildly different worlds on their Vasyn quest, including a 1950s parallel New York-Xanth expy, a universe where science has overtaken magic (but it still has its adherents), and a more traditionally magical world of adventure that was partially put together with {{Magitek}}.



* ''Franchise/MassEffect'' fic ''[[Fanfic/CrucibleMassEffect Crucible]]'' started with the time travelled Ad Astra which continue the sci-fi theme from canon, then the existence of living stars was revealed which kinda ventured out of this, and then ghosts/souls started to popping here and there and finally ''[[{{Psychopomp}} Death]]'' himself appeared which firmly pushed the series into Fantasy theme. And don't even get into what [[spoiler: Shepard]] actually is and was or whom she's connected to.

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* ''Franchise/MassEffect'' fic ''[[Fanfic/CrucibleMassEffect Crucible]]'' started The universe of ''Fanfic/SonicXDarkChaos'', being essentially a twisted mixture of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' and ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'', runs entirely with the time travelled Ad Astra which continue the sci-fi theme from canon, then the existence of living stars was revealed which kinda ventured out of this, this. It combines SpaceOpera science fiction mixed in with magical Chaos powers, Lovecraftian horrors, and then ghosts/souls started to popping here SufficientlyAdvancedAliens.
* ''Fanfic/UndocumentedFeatures'', a MegaCrossover, fuses many {{Fantasy}}
and there and finally ''[[{{Psychopomp}} Death]]'' himself appeared which firmly pushed the series ScienceFiction sources into Fantasy theme. And don't even a single narrative. For example, a [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse God]] used ''[[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons dimension door]]'' to get into what [[spoiler: Shepard]] actually is his party onto the [[Franchise/StarTrek Klingon]] SpacePirates' ship, whereupon their sorceress summoned a protective [[PetalPower wall of roses]] as they hacked the computer to gain control of the ship -- all while a SpaceBattle was going between the two ships outside.
* ''Fanfic/WithStringsAttached'' completely blurs the lines between fantasy
and science fiction. The planet C'hou has the quasi-Victorian land of Ketafa, with its guns, factories, and occasional motorized vehicle, and the exceptionally nonstandard fantasy continent of Baravada; the Fans influence events via {{Magitek}} and watch things on their computer screen; and the four visit three wildly different worlds on their Vasyn quest, including a 1950s parallel New York-Xanth expy, a universe where science has overtaken magic (but it still has its adherents), and a more traditionally magical world of adventure that was or whom she's connected to.partially put together with {{Magitek}}.



* ''Franchise/TheChroniclesOfRiddick'' series shifted into this with ''Film/TheChroniclesOfRiddick'', the second film. ''Film/PitchBlack'' was fairly hard sci-fi, but ''Riddick 2'' introduces superhuman warriors on a holy crusade led by an EvilOverlord, elemental alien seers, and a prophecy saying that Riddick (now the last living member of an extinct {{Proud Warrior Race|Guy}} destroyed by the Overlord) will be the one to kill the Necromonger leader. It still comes off as a strange mix with LowFantasy, as the harder elements are still present in every scene that doesn't involve the Necros.
* ''Film/ElectricDreams'': A 1980s era home computer achieves sentience because it's owner accidentally spills sparkling wine on the keyboard. It also seizes control of all the household appliances, and starts writing love songs for it's owner's girlfriend (much like ''Theatre/CyranoDeBergerac''). Naturally, a LoveTriangle Ensues.
* The ''Franchise/{{Godzilla}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Gamera}}'' franchises have monsters of both magical and scientific origin fighting or teaming up with each other, sometimes within the same movie.
* ''Film/{{Immortal}}'' is set in the future and features things such as flying cars, human augmentation, and other sci-fi conventions, but there are also Egyptian gods running amok with supernatural powers.
* ''Franchise/TheMatrix'': Neo is "TheChosenOne", prophecied by an ''oracle'', and he has special powers that allow him to fly, bend spoons, and dodge bullets. Oh, but it's only cause he's in a computer simulation run by intelligent machines (until the sequels, where he has powers outside it as well, which Morpheus says come from [[{{God}} "the Source"]]).



* ''Film/SuckerPunch'': The third battle scene is this at level 11. When Goblins are perfectly capable of being catapulted onto your World-war 2 gunship, and your assault rifle's bullets are just bouncing off that big dragon's hide, you realize that yeah, I'm in a Science Fantasy scene.



* ''Film/SuckerPunch'': The third battle scene is this at level 11. When Goblins are perfectly capable of being catapulted onto your World-war 2 gunship, and your assault rifle's bullets are just bouncing off that big dragon's hide, you realize that yeah, I'm in a Science Fantasy scene.
* ''Franchise/TheMatrix'': Neo is "TheChosenOne", prophecied by an ''oracle'', and he has special powers that allow him to fly, bend spoons, and dodge bullets. Oh, but it's only cause he's in a computer simulation run by intelligent machines (until the sequels, where he has powers outside it as well, which Morpheus says come from [[{{God}} "the Source"]]).
* The ''Franchise/{{Godzilla}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Gamera}}'' franchises have monsters of both magical and scientific origin fighting or teaming up with each other, sometimes within the same movie.
* ''Film/{{Immortal}}'' is set in the future and features things such as flying cars, human augmentation, and other sci-fi conventions, but there are also Egyptian gods running amok with supernatural powers.
* ''Franchise/TheChroniclesOfRiddick'' series shifted into this with ''Film/TheChroniclesOfRiddick'', the second film. ''Film/PitchBlack'' was fairly hard sci-fi, but ''Riddick 2'' introduces superhuman warriors on a holy crusade led by an EvilOverlord, elemental alien seers, and a prophecy saying that Riddick (now the last living member of an extinct {{Proud Warrior Race|Guy}} destroyed by the Overlord) will be the one to kill the Necromonger leader. It still comes off as a strange mix with LowFantasy, as the harder elements are still present in every scene that doesn't involve the Necros.
* ''Film/ElectricDreams'': A 1980s era home computer achieves sentience because it's owner accidentally spills sparkling wine on the keyboard. It also seizes control of all the household appliances, and starts writing love songs for it's owner's girlfriend (much like ''Theatre/CyranoDeBergerac''). Naturally, a LoveTriangle Ensues.



* Creator/AnneMcCaffrey:
** The ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' books feature intelligent, telepathic, teleporting, and occasionally time-traveling dragons. These are just genetically engineered upgrades of preexisting diminutive "dragons", which have similar powers, though this LostTechnology aspect isn't explored until the prequels. Later books also feature a supercomputer. [[WordOfGod McCaffrey has always maintained that]] the books are Science Fiction rather than fantasy, as everything is based on hard science, and she has spoken to many authorities in various sciences to work out the specifics of the world and the things that happen on it.
** In ''Literature/TheShipWho Won'', a RolePlayingGame-obsessed space ship crew discovers a planet where magic actually works. ([[spoiler:Until they discover the inhabitants are just abusing a [[MagicFromTechnology Sufficiently Advanced]] weather-control system]]). Definitely sold as Sci-Fi.
** ''[[Literature/AcornaSeries Acorna]]'' and sequels are about a foundling creature who looks like a "unicorn girl," complete with a horn on her forehead, unearthly beauty, and the power to purify water and air. Except she's not exactly magical: she's an alien, and the setting is basic science fiction with spaceships and interplanetary travel. Double subverted when it is revealed that her species is genetically-engineered by aliens who combined their own DNA with that of unicorns they rescued from Earth.



* A lot of Creator/JackChalker's novels and series mixed up the two, often with SufficientlyAdvancedAlien (or sometimes human) tech providing a backdrop in which magical-like effects (sometimes called magic by the user who didn't understand it) were possible.
** The ''Literature/WellWorld'' series is an example of the alien version.
** The ''Literature/SoulRider'' series had the AppliedPhlebotinum created by humans, whose descendants then forgot its origins.
** His ''Four Lords of the Diamond'' series features four planets seeded with a sort of alien parasite that provides people with strange powers, each unique to one of the four planets. The third book in particular involves a planet where people can effectively perform magic, and it's even called magic in the book.



* Creator/DavidWeber is [[Literature/HonorHarrington best known]] for his SpaceOpera and MilitaryScienceFiction, but he occasionally plays with this trope:
** The ''Literature/HellsGate'' series is about two human civilizations that come into contact with each other through inter-universal portals. One civilization, The Union of Aracana, is a very {{Magitek}} civilization with wizards and genetically engineered dragons, where the main weapons for fighting are swords and crossbows. The second civilization, The Empire of Sharona, has PsychicPowers along with some [[BlatantLies minor advantages]] like rifles, machine guns, cannons, steam engines, trains, armored personnel carriers and battleships. Neither side reacts well to the existence of the other.
** ''Literature/InFuryBorn'' features a SpaceMarine protagonist who is possessed by a literal Greek goddess (one of the Furies, the goddesses of vengeance who torment evildoers). This makes for a somewhat jarring GenreShift in the omnibus edition after Weber added two prequel novels of straight-up MilitaryScienceFiction.



* Creator/SimonRGreen's novels are set in a Verse that's about half supernatural horror/fantasy and half gonzo MadScience.



* A lot of Creator/JackChalker's novels and series mixed up the two, often with SufficientlyAdvancedAlien (or sometimes human) tech providing a backdrop in which magical-like effects (sometimes called magic by the user who didn't understand it) were possible.
** The ''Literature/WellWorld'' series is an example of the alien version.
** The ''Literature/SoulRider'' series had the AppliedPhlebotinum created by humans, whose descendants then forgot its origins.
** His ''Four Lords of the Diamond'' series features four planets seeded with a sort of alien parasite that provides people with strange powers, each unique to one of the four planets. The third book in particular involves a planet where people can effectively perform magic, and it's even called magic in the book.



* Creator/AnneMcCaffrey:
** The ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' books feature intelligent, telepathic, teleporting, and occasionally time-traveling dragons. These are just genetically engineered upgrades of preexisting diminutive "dragons", which have similar powers, though this LostTechnology aspect isn't explored until the prequels. Later books also feature a supercomputer. [[WordOfGod McCaffrey has always maintained that]] the books are Science Fiction rather than fantasy, as everything is based on hard science, and she has spoken to many authorities in various sciences to work out the specifics of the world and the things that happen on it.
** In ''Literature/TheShipWho Won'', a RolePlayingGame-obsessed space ship crew discovers a planet where magic actually works. ([[spoiler:Until they discover the inhabitants are just abusing a [[MagicFromTechnology Sufficiently Advanced]] weather-control system]]). Definitely sold as Sci-Fi.
** ''[[Literature/AcornaSeries Acorna]]'' and sequels are about a foundling creature who looks like a "unicorn girl," complete with a horn on her forehead, unearthly beauty, and the power to purify water and air. Except she's not exactly magical: she's an alien, and the setting is basic science fiction with spaceships and interplanetary travel. Double subverted when it is revealed that her species is genetically-engineered by aliens who combined their own DNA with that of unicorns they rescued from Earth.



* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/NomesTrilogy'' is a good example of genre blending. All three books are written as a ''[[Literature/TheBorrowers Borrowers]]''/''[[Literature/TheLittles Littles]]'' sort of "tiny people living undetectably amongst us" story, except that it is revealed that the Nomes are in fact aliens marooned on Earth who have devolved somewhat, who only realize what they are when "The Thing", a mysterious box that one of the characters carries, starts talking and turns out to be a sentient computer.



* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/NomesTrilogy'' is a good example of genre blending. All three books are written as a ''[[Literature/TheBorrowers Borrowers]]''/''[[Literature/TheLittles Littles]]'' sort of "tiny people living undetectably amongst us" story, except that it is revealed that the Nomes are in fact aliens marooned on Earth who have devolved somewhat, who only realize what they are when "The Thing", a mysterious box that one of the characters carries, starts talking and turns out to be a sentient computer.

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* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/NomesTrilogy'' is a good example of genre blending. All three books are written as a ''[[Literature/TheBorrowers Borrowers]]''/''[[Literature/TheLittles Littles]]'' sort of "tiny people living undetectably amongst us" story, except that it is revealed that Creator/RogerZelazny liked to challenge the Nomes are boundaries between Science Fiction and Fantasy, and was known for blending in fact aliens marooned elements from Mythology:
** ''Literature/CreaturesOfLightAndDarkness'', often considered a companion novel to ''Lord of Light'', featured ''actual'' Egyptian Gods in a StandardSciFiSetting.
** ''Eye of Cat'' had Native American Gods in a far-future setting.
** ''Jack of Shadows'' takes place
on Earth who have devolved somewhat, who only realize what they are when "The Thing", a mysterious box that one of the planet which is half-magic (dark side), and half technological (sunlit side). The titular antihero moves effortlessly between both.
** ''Literature/LordOfLight'' featured apparent Hindu Gods--actually humans with mutant powers--on a far-future colony world.
** ''Literature/{{Roadmarks}}'' mixes science fiction tropes like robots and cyborgs with fantasy tropes like dragons and mystical powers in a setting where
characters carries, starts talking casually travel the length and turns out to be a sentient computer.breadth of human history. (Reader's choice which side the time travel falls on.)



* Creator/SimonRGreen's novels are set in a Verse that's about half supernatural horror/fantasy and half gonzo MadScience.



* Creator/DavidWeber is [[Literature/HonorHarrington best known]] for his SpaceOpera and MilitaryScienceFiction, but he occasionally plays with this trope:
** The ''Literature/HellsGate'' series is about two human civilizations that come into contact with each other through inter-universal portals. One civilization, The Union of Aracana, is a very {{Magitek}} civilization with wizards and genetically engineered dragons, where the main weapons for fighting are swords and crossbows. The second civilization, The Empire of Sharona, has PsychicPowers along with some [[BlatantLies minor advantages]] like rifles, machine guns, cannons, steam engines, trains, armored personnel carriers and battleships. Neither side reacts well to the existence of the other.
** ''Literature/InFuryBorn'' features a SpaceMarine protagonist who is possessed by a literal Greek goddess (one of the Furies, the goddesses of vengeance who torment evildoers). This makes for a somewhat jarring GenreShift in the omnibus edition after Weber added two prequel novels of straight-up MilitaryScienceFiction.



* Creator/RogerZelazny liked to challenge the boundaries between Science Fiction and Fantasy, and was known for blending in elements from Mythology:
** ''Literature/CreaturesOfLightAndDarkness'', often considered a companion novel to ''Lord of Light'', featured ''actual'' Egyptian Gods in a StandardSciFiSetting.
** ''Eye of Cat'' had Native American Gods in a far-future setting.
** ''Jack of Shadows'' takes place on a planet which is half-magic (dark side), and half technological (sunlit side). The titular antihero moves effortlessly between both.
** ''Literature/LordOfLight'' featured apparent Hindu Gods--actually humans with mutant powers--on a far-future colony world.
** ''Literature/{{Roadmarks}}'' mixes science fiction tropes like robots and cyborgs with fantasy tropes like dragons and mystical powers in a setting where characters casually travel the length and breadth of human history. (Reader's choice which side the time travel falls on.)



* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' dives head first into this in its fourth season, which introduces the explicitly supernatural ComicBook/GhostRider into the MarvelCinematicUniverse and has a plot line which revolves around S.H.I.E.L.D. competing with a literal ''ghost'' to recover a TomeOfEldritchLore called the Darkhold, all existing contemporaneously with the usual sci-fi schtick of the Marvel universe. The same season even contains a subplot about a [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Life Model Decoy]] named Aida and [[DoAndroidsDream her awakening as an artificial intelligence.]]
** Prior to the fourth season, the show already contained some trace elements of ScienceFantasy, such as the various Asgardian characters who occasionally showed up help S.H.I.E.L.D. (including two guest appearances by Lady Sif from ''Film/{{Thor}}'').
* ''Series/BabylonFive'' started out looking like pure sci-fi and eventually ended up here. The transmigration of souls, technomages, and the first sapient being in the galaxy (now an immortal) coexisted with psychic powers, hyperdrives, and battleships.
* Both the [[Series/BattlestarGalactica1978 original]] and [[Series/BattlestarGalactica2003 reimagined]] ''Franchise/BattlestarGalactica'' included a large amount of cosmology and theology. Much of it appeared to be in the form of SufficientlyAdvancedAliens, particularly in the form of the mythical Lords of Kobol and the angelic seraphs from ''War of the Gods''. The original series had a liberal dose of thinly disguised references to the Book of Mormon, the Christian Bible, Judaism, and Islam. The reimagined series settled for Greco-Roman mythology.
* The second season of ''Series/BuckRogersInTheTwentyFifthCentury'' has a lot of fantasy involved. In "Journey to Oasis", it has orc-like monsters, a cave filled with deathtraps, and a living sword with an invisible wielder.
* The trope is one of the major themes of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' season 4. The penultimate episode is an epic battle between the forces of science and the supernatural, orchestrated by a BigBad who has a foot in both camps.



* ''Series/SirArthurConanDoylesTheLostWorld'' had the 1920s Challenger Expedition that were stranded on a Prehistoric Plateau not only dealing with Dinosaurs and Apemen but a huge assortment of other Fantasy/Scifi themes. Everything from witches and disembodied spirits to space aliens and time travel. The supernatural plots usually had Challenger scoffing at the idea of such rubbish and that everything they encountered had an answer based in science.



* The trope is one of the major themes of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' season 4. The penultimate episode is an epic battle between the forces of science and the supernatural, orchestrated by a BigBad who has a foot in both camps.
* The second season of ''Series/BuckRogersInTheTwentyFifthCentury'' has a lot of fantasy involved. In "Journey to Oasis", it has orc-like monsters, a cave filled with deathtraps, and a living sword with an invisible wielder.
* Both the [[Series/BattlestarGalactica1978 original]] and [[Series/BattlestarGalactica2003 reimagined]] ''Franchise/BattlestarGalactica'' included a large amount of cosmology and theology. Much of it appeared to be in the form of SufficientlyAdvancedAliens, particularly in the form of the mythical Lords of Kobol and the angelic seraphs from ''War of the Gods''. The original series had a liberal dose of thinly disguised references to the Book of Mormon, the Christian Bible, Judaism, and Islam. The reimagined series settled for Greco-Roman mythology.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'' started out looking like pure sci-fi and eventually ended up here. The transmigration of souls, technomages, and the first sapient being in the galaxy (now an immortal) coexisted with psychic powers, hyperdrive, and battleships.
* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' dives head first into this in its fourth season, which introduces the explicitly supernatural ComicBook/GhostRider into the MarvelCinematicUniverse and has a plot line which revolves around S.H.I.E.L.D. competing with a literal ''ghost'' to recover a TomeOfEldritchLore called the Darkhold, all existing contemporaneously with the usual sci-fi schtick of the Marvel universe. The same season even contains a subplot about a [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Life Model Decoy]] named Aida and [[DoAndroidsDream her awakening as an artificial intelligence.]]
** Prior to the fourth season, the show already contained some trace elements of ScienceFantasy, such as the various Asgardian characters who occasionally showed up help S.H.I.E.L.D. (including two guest appearances by Lady Sif from ''Film/{{Thor}}'').

to:

* The trope is one of ''Series/SirArthurConanDoylesTheLostWorld'' had the major themes of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' season 4. The penultimate episode is an epic battle between the forces of science and the supernatural, orchestrated by 1920s Challenger Expedition that were stranded on a BigBad who has a foot in both camps.
* The second season of ''Series/BuckRogersInTheTwentyFifthCentury'' has a lot of fantasy involved. In "Journey to Oasis", it has orc-like monsters, a cave filled
Prehistoric Plateau not only dealing with deathtraps, Dinosaurs and Apemen but a living sword with an invisible wielder.
* Both the [[Series/BattlestarGalactica1978 original]] and [[Series/BattlestarGalactica2003 reimagined]] ''Franchise/BattlestarGalactica'' included a large amount
huge assortment of cosmology and theology. Much of it appeared to be in the form of SufficientlyAdvancedAliens, particularly in the form of the mythical Lords of Kobol and the angelic seraphs other Fantasy/Scifi themes. Everything from ''War of the Gods''. witches and disembodied spirits to space aliens and time travel. The original series had a liberal dose of thinly disguised references to the Book of Mormon, the Christian Bible, Judaism, and Islam. The reimagined series settled for Greco-Roman mythology.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'' started out looking like pure sci-fi and eventually ended up here. The transmigration of souls, technomages, and the first sapient being in the galaxy (now an immortal) coexisted with psychic powers, hyperdrive, and battleships.
* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' dives head first into this in its fourth season, which introduces the explicitly
supernatural ComicBook/GhostRider into plots usually had Challenger scoffing at the MarvelCinematicUniverse and has a plot line which revolves around S.H.I.E.L.D. competing with a literal ''ghost'' to recover a TomeOfEldritchLore called the Darkhold, all existing contemporaneously with the usual sci-fi schtick idea of the Marvel universe. The same season even contains a subplot about a [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Life Model Decoy]] named Aida and [[DoAndroidsDream her awakening as an artificial intelligence.]]
** Prior to the fourth season, the show already contained some trace elements of ScienceFantasy,
such as the various Asgardian characters who occasionally showed up help S.H.I.E.L.D. (including two guest appearances by Lady Sif from ''Film/{{Thor}}'').rubbish and that everything they encountered had an answer based in science.



* Usually, ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' is average fantasy, but whenever [[CyberneticsEatYourSoul Phy]][[AlwaysChaoticEvil re]][[BodyHorror xia]] is involved, it becomes this. Especially now that they have access to Blue mana.
** Blue mana in general tends to lean in this direction, especially with the Frankenstein-esque {{Mad Scientist}}s on Innistrad, and the Izzet League on Ravnica, who were practically built around this trope.

to:

* Usually, ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' ''TabletopGame/D20Modern''. The standard setting is average fantasy, UrbanFantasy, but whenever [[CyberneticsEatYourSoul Phy]][[AlwaysChaoticEvil re]][[BodyHorror xia]] there's plenty of options for adding sf into the mix. The bodak, for example, is involved, it becomes this. Especially now a [[OurZombiesAreDifferent zombie]] [[TheGreys Grey]].
** Technically, the game is "whatever the GM wants". The only explicitly Science Fantasy campaign setting is ''From the Dark Heart Of Space'' from ''d20 Future''. Though ''Dark Matter'' comes close.
** The supplement ''d20 Cyberscape'' has a sample {{cyberpunk}} setting and devotes two paragraphs and an illustration to a variant with magic and fantasy races.
** A relatively obscure, but critically well-regarded, third-party book called the Second World Sourcebook was explicitly written to enable the standard "d20 System" (i.e. 3rd Edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'') and ''TabletopGame/D20Modern'' to be used together, mixing and matching characters created under both sets of rules. It posits, among other things, an extensive network of portals between a D&D style StandardFantasySetting and our own world. Though
that they have access to Blue mana.
** Blue mana in general tends to lean in
probably sounds more like UrbanFantasy, the results would more closely resemble this direction, especially trope in practise.
* ''TabletopGame/DragonMech''. The setting was simple StandardFantasySetting. Now, there are also [[AlienInvasion alien invaders from the moon]] and SteamPunk HumongousMecha that developed to fight them.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Dragonstar}}'' is a D20 RolePlayingGame that combines ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' fantasy roleplay roles
with the Frankenstein-esque {{Mad Scientist}}s on Innistrad, a ScienceFiction setting with interstellar travel, robots, and the Izzet League on Ravnica, who were practically built around this trope.other features of futuristic technology. Thus you get wizards with laser pistols and an interstellar empire ruled by dragons.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' is the quintessential CyberPunk UrbanFantasy. It's set in a world after TheMagicComesBack, with elves, dwarves, trolls, orcs, and dragons, but it's also set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture, so instead of forging axes underneath mountains, said dwarves are more likely to use cybernetic interfaces to pilot unmanned combat drones.
* ''TabletopGame/GURPSTechnomancer''. The first above-ground atomic explosion in the U.S. releases magic into the world. As a result, people can cast spells and weird hybrid creatures are born, but only in the area covered by magical fallout.



* ''TabletopGame/FadingSuns'' throws out any distinction between science fiction and fantasy, though the closer the narration veers toward omniscient, the more likely something is to sound like sci-fi. In general, it's a FeudalFuture where sci-fi stuff has taken on mystical and fantasy elements. Psis aren't just trained minds, they're sorcerers (and bear occult markings...which may just be genetic mutation); the family's ancestral sword is a wireblade; cyborgs have replaced part of their body with occult magic, and the sacred jumpgates represent the light of the Pancreator. And then you get into stuff such as theurgy and Antinomy, which calls upon what appears to be the divine or demonic forces respectively...but it [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane might also be]] SufficientlyAdvancedAliens, or just another expression of humanity's potential.
* ''TabletopGame/FengShui'' takes place in a universe where robot monkeys coexist with sorcerers and demonic creatures.
* ''TabletopGame/GURPSTechnomancer''. The first above-ground atomic explosion in the U.S. releases magic into the world. As a result, people can cast spells and weird hybrid creatures are born, but only in the area covered by magical fallout.
* ''TabletopGame/MageTheAscension'' features groups that use science and groups that use magic.
* Usually, ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' is average fantasy, but whenever [[CyberneticsEatYourSoul Phy]][[AlwaysChaoticEvil re]][[BodyHorror xia]] is involved, it becomes this. Especially now that they have access to Blue mana.
** Blue mana in general tends to lean in this direction, especially with the Frankenstein-esque {{Mad Scientist}}s on Innistrad, and the Izzet League on Ravnica, who were practically built around this trope.
* Monte Cook's ''TabletopGame/{{Numenera}}'' is inspired by works like Gene Wolfe's ''Book of the New Sun'', and is set a billion years into our future. The setting, called by its inhabitants the Ninth World, mixes a society with medieval technology with technological artifacts left behind by the previous civilizations that have risen and fallen over the previous billion years. Monte has cited ClarkesThirdLaw to explain the presence of things that would otherwise be at home in a fantasy setting such as "wizards" (Nanos, whose powers are derived from cybernetic implants, extradimensional aliens, or other non-supernatural sources), "gods" (alien entities or ancient AIs), and floating cities (kept aloft by some sort of anti-gravity or repulsor tech).



* ''TabletopGame/D20Modern''. The standard setting is UrbanFantasy, but there's plenty of options for adding sf into the mix. The bodak, for example, is a [[OurZombiesAreDifferent zombie]] [[TheGreys Grey]].
** Technically, the game is "whatever the GM wants". The only explicitly Science Fantasy campaign setting is ''From the Dark Heart Of Space'' from ''d20 Future''. Though ''Dark Matter'' comes close.
** The supplement ''d20 Cyberscape'' has a sample {{cyberpunk}} setting and devotes two paragraphs and an illustration to a variant with magic and fantasy races.
** A relatively obscure, but critically well-regarded, third-party book called the Second World Sourcebook was explicitly written to enable the standard "d20 System" (i.e. 3rd Edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'') and ''TabletopGame/D20Modern'' to be used together, mixing and matching characters created under both sets of rules. It posits, among other things, an extensive network of portals between a D&D style StandardFantasySetting and our own world. Though that probably sounds more like UrbanFantasy, the results would more closely resemble this trope in practise.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Dragonstar}}'' is a D20 RolePlayingGame that combines ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' fantasy roleplay roles with a ScienceFiction setting with interstellar travel, robots, and other features of futuristic technology. Thus you get wizards with laser pistols and an interstellar empire ruled by dragons.
* ''TabletopGame/FengShui'' takes place in a universe where robot monkeys coexist with sorcerers and demonic creatures.



* ''TabletopGame/MageTheAscension'' features groups that use science and groups that use magic.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}''. It takes place in a (far) future SpaceOpera setting, has [[CoolStarships spaceships]], [[EnergyWeapon lasers]], extraterrestrials, PsychicPowers, HumongousMecha and an army of genetically-engineered SuperSoldier [[SpaceMarine Space Marines]]. Did we mention that the said spaceships travel through [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace hell]], said lasers are [[HolyHandGrenade blessed by the Emperor]], the extraterrestrials are basically your standard fantasy races [[RecycledInSpace IN SPACE]], the individuals who use PsychicPowers are referred to as witches and sorcerers, the HumongousMecha are LostTechnology worshiped by the resident CargoCult and the Space Marines are fanatical knights? Add to that the fact that a huge chunk of technology in the setting has a medieval Gothic aesthetic to it.
* Monte Cook's ''TabletopGame/{{Numenera}}'' is inspired by works like Gene Wolfe's ''Book of the New Sun'', and is set a billion years into our future. The setting, called by its inhabitants the Ninth World, mixes a society with medieval technology with technological artifacts left behind by the previous civilizations that have risen and fallen over the previous billion years. Monte has cited ClarkesThirdLaw to explain the presence of things that would otherwise be at home in a fantasy setting such as "wizards" (Nanos, whose powers are derived from cybernetic implants, extradimensional aliens, or other non-supernatural sources), "gods" (alien entities or ancient AIs), and floating cities (kept aloft by some sort of anti-gravity or repulsor tech).
* ''TabletopGame/DragonMech''. The setting was simple StandardFantasySetting. Now, there are also [[AlienInvasion alien invaders from the moon]] and SteamPunk HumongousMecha that developed to fight them.
* ''TabletopGame/FadingSuns'' throws out any distinction between science fiction and fantasy, though the closer the narration veers toward omniscient, the more likely something is to sound like sci-fi. In general, it's a FeudalFuture where sci-fi stuff has taken on mystical and fantasy elements. Psis aren't just trained minds, they're sorcerers (and bear occult markings...which may just be genetic mutation); the family's ancestral sword is a wireblade; cyborgs have replaced part of their body with occult magic, and the sacred jumpgates represent the light of the Pancreator. And then you get into stuff such as theurgy and Antinomy, which calls upon what appears to be the divine or demonic forces respectively...but it [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane might also be]] SufficientlyAdvancedAliens, or just another expression of humanity's potential.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/MageTheAscension'' features groups that ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' is the quintessential CyberPunk UrbanFantasy. It's set in a world after TheMagicComesBack, with elves, dwarves, trolls, orcs, and dragons, but it's also set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture, so instead of forging axes underneath mountains, said dwarves are more likely to use science and groups that use magic.
cybernetic interfaces to pilot unmanned combat drones.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}''. It takes place in a (far) future SpaceOpera setting, has [[CoolStarships spaceships]], [[EnergyWeapon lasers]], extraterrestrials, PsychicPowers, HumongousMecha and an army of genetically-engineered SuperSoldier [[SpaceMarine Space Marines]]. Did we mention that the said spaceships travel through [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace hell]], said lasers are [[HolyHandGrenade blessed by the Emperor]], the extraterrestrials are basically your standard fantasy races [[RecycledInSpace IN SPACE]], the individuals who use PsychicPowers are referred to as witches and sorcerers, the HumongousMecha are LostTechnology worshiped by the resident CargoCult and the Space Marines are fanatical knights? Add to that the fact that a huge chunk of technology in the setting has a medieval Gothic aesthetic to it.
* Monte Cook's ''TabletopGame/{{Numenera}}'' is inspired by works like Gene Wolfe's ''Book of the New Sun'', and is set a billion years into our future. The setting, called by its inhabitants the Ninth World, mixes a society with medieval technology with technological artifacts left behind by the previous civilizations that have risen and fallen over the previous billion years. Monte has cited ClarkesThirdLaw to explain the presence of things that would otherwise be at home in a fantasy setting such as "wizards" (Nanos, whose powers are derived from cybernetic implants, extradimensional aliens, or other non-supernatural sources), "gods" (alien entities or ancient AIs), and floating cities (kept aloft by some sort of anti-gravity or repulsor tech).
* ''TabletopGame/DragonMech''. The setting was simple StandardFantasySetting. Now, there are also [[AlienInvasion alien invaders from the moon]] and SteamPunk HumongousMecha that developed to fight them.
* ''TabletopGame/FadingSuns'' throws out any distinction between science fiction and fantasy, though the closer the narration veers toward omniscient, the more likely something is to sound like sci-fi. In general, it's a FeudalFuture where sci-fi stuff has taken on mystical and fantasy elements. Psis aren't just trained minds, they're sorcerers (and bear occult markings...which may just be genetic mutation); the family's ancestral sword is a wireblade; cyborgs have replaced part of their body with occult magic, and the sacred jumpgates represent the light of the Pancreator. And then you get into stuff such as theurgy and Antinomy, which calls upon what appears to be the divine or demonic forces respectively...but it [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane might also be]] SufficientlyAdvancedAliens, or just another expression of humanity's potential.
it.



* ''VideoGame/{{Albion}}'', a game where a spaceship in the future lands on a world with magic instead of technology. A lot of the time is spent in primarily fantastic or scifistic settings, but they eventually mix, and both elements are present at least a little most of the time.
* The ''[[VideoGame/ArTonelicoMelodyOfElemia Ar tonelico]]'' series features girls who [[MagicMusic control magical powers with their songs]] and goddesses who control the giant towers that humanity has been forced to live in after a disaster destroyed the world's land. The [[AllThereInTheManual backstory of the series]] reveals that this disaster was caused by the technology of a highly advanced civilization. The towers themselves were built by these civilizations. The villain in the first game invades the tower's systems with viruses that can take physical form and possess many of the tower's robot guardians. The magic wielding girls themselves are actually an [[ArtificialHuman artificial race]] designed to use magical powers based on the intricate principles of "wave science."
** The prequel series, ''[[VideoGame/ArNosurge Surge Concerto]]'' takes this even further, as Ra Ciela's civilization is even more advanced than Ar Ciel's, and one of the series' games even takes place almost entirely on a spaceship. However, there's still the same magic music and gods as is usual for this universe.
* ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'' is a mixture of more specific genres: HighFantasy and SteamPunk. The overarching story is fantasy epic, set in a more dystopian land that includes race and class conflict and the growing pains of an industrializing society as themes. Magic vs. technology is less a war than an ideological clash that can at least find common ground in its goals if not its practical methods.
* ''VideoGame/AsurasWrath'' IS this trope with a [[Myth/HinduMythology Hindu]] and [[UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} Buddhist]] twist.
* Although ''VideoGame/{{Battleborn}}'' is a deeply sci-fi based game in the vein of ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'', it has a number of things that are more fantasy in basis. These include among things, [[MagicFromScience magical abilities derived from science grounded concepts]] and {{Magitek}}-like technology. The most notable of all of these however are the Eldrid, an entire faction consisting of fantasy inspired individuals whose number includes a [[MushroomMan sentient Fungus]], a SpaceElf, [[OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame a space dwarf]], and [[{{Snowlem}} a skeletal ice golem]].
* ''VideoGame/CastleCrashers'' starts out in what is, ostensibly, a quirky LowFantasy setting, with a war against a barbarian tribe, evil wizards, and the classic chestnut of the princesses getting kidnapped. Upon crossing the ocean, you immediately thwart an AlienInvasion by the VideoGame/{{Alien Hominid}}s.
* ''VideoGame/CaveStory'' takes place on a FloatingContinent, which is inhabited by fantastic creatures such as [[FunnyAnimal bunny-shaped Mimigas]], ([[NonHumanUndead undead]]) [[SandIsWater sand-dwelling crocodiles]] or humanoid cockroaches, ruled over by an old witch who's responsible for an abomination that keeps the island afloat from inside a chamber protected with terminals and water control. There's also an incubator corridor that keeps dragon eggs and RidiculouslyHumanRobots.
* ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'': An apocalyptic future with destroyed [[DomedHometown domed cities]] caused by a CosmicHorror, combined with a medieval SwordAndSorcery setting in the past. And it's all connected by TimeTravel.
* ''VideoGame/CosmicFantasy''.
* ''VideoGame/{{Crystalis}}'', a ''[[Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda Zelda]]''-esque top-down action-adventure game for the NES, takes place in a [[AfterTheEnd post-apocalyptic future]] where human civilization has regressed to medieval times and embraced magic over technology. The game's BigBad has taken control of a floating tower and is threatening the world with powerful magic and LostTechnology.
* ''VideoGame/{{Destiny}}'' definitely belongs in this genre, with wizards, magic, souls ripping from the bodies of deceased enemies, and necromancers existing in a universe teeming with time-travelling robots, aliens, and spaceships. [[WordofGod Bungie]] has even described the game as being "mythic science fiction".
* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' features an invasion by demons from hell ... thwarted by a ''space marine'' on ''UsefulNotes/{{Mars}}'' with a ''plasma rifle.''
** Demons with cybernetic implants. One of them is called Cyberdemon.
* Alongside it's many [[StandardFantasySetting standard fantasy elements]] ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' also feature spaceships used by gods; time traveling, terminatorish robots with laser weapons; and astronauts (the mananauts and Sunbirds of Alinor), and in extension: more spaceships. And this is just the tip of the iceberg.
** Also, the realms of Aeterius and Oblivion were originally presented as simply this world's equivalent of Heaven and Hell. Then ''The Elder Scrolls Adventures: Redguard'' featured an observatory where the realms of Oblivion appeared as planets orbiting Nirn (the mortal world) and the gods as even more distant planets at the edge of a solar system. So, the Oblivion Gates? Those may or may not be Franchise/{{stargate}}s in disguise.
** Becomes a bit more complicated when you learn that the planets (and moons) are actually the bodies of dead gods, the sun and probably stars are holes in reality caused by fleeing gods, and that the Dwemer/dwarves were a race of militant atheists who accidentally unexisted themselves trying ''to gain godhood''. Science is literally magic.
*** Or not. The one factor that really distinguishes TES lore from in-universe texts in other RPG settings is that it is specifically stated (and shown a few times) to be unreliable - things can be either misinterpreted, exaggerated or just plain wrong, and racial/social biases are also part of the lore design (e.g. a Khajit creation myth might be true or just a myth in itself, but when it's retold in a book by an Imperial historian, it's a given that there's misrepresentation/wrong translation and so on present). This basically reflects our real world's inherent uncertainty mythologies and religious beliefs. Hence, planets in TES ''might'' really be the bodies of dead gods, but they might also be just that - planets. Same with everything else.
* ''VideoGame/EndlessLegend'' mixes the sciencey bits of [[VideoGame/EndlessSpace its predecessor]] with fantasy, as the game takes place on a former [[{{Precursors}} Concrete Endless]] world which has been populated by the [[LostColony survivors a wrecked spaceship]]. Suits of AnimatedArmor [[PracticalCurrency powered by money]] argue with [[OurDragonsAreDifferent sentient dragons]] in the courts, on the battlefield PowerArmor-wearing hatchetmen follow their HumongousMecha into battle against witches and wizards who get their [[BloodMagic power from pain]], while an empire of malfunctioning robots converts bands of orcs and trolls to join their cause in destroying the ruins of the Endless.
* Averted with the first two ''Franchise/{{Fable}}'' games which were were straight fantasy. ''VideoGame/FableIII'' however was in the industrial revolution, while the magic and swords were kept, the two [=DLCs=] Understone and Traitor's Keep featured steampunk robots with latter even including a potion to turn your dog into a robot.



* The ''VideoGame/RidgeRacer'' games mix realistic vehicle physics and driving physics as well as fantasy symbolism. The later games in the series even have ''exaggerated driving physics which is no means a possible science'' as well as NitroBoost.
* Averted with the first two ''Franchise/{{Fable}}'' games which were were straight fantasy. ''VideoGame/FableIII'' however was in the industrial revolution, while the magic and swords were kept, the two [=DLCs=] Understone and Traitor's Keep featured steampunk robots with latter even including a potion to turn your dog into a robot.
* ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}''. Besides the beautiful sand that submerged the world, glyphs, magical cloth, and the impaired buildings, technology is uncommon at most. You fly using the energy bundled in your scarf, and although there exists an ancient language you can't seem to talk at all, even the game hardly shows any text beside from the logo and closing credits. Singing near large pieces of cloth can release "cloth creatures" from the machines' remnants. Glyphs and confluences teach you the history of a civilization started by your ancestors. The reason why the game [[spoiler: takes place AfterTheEnd is the machines powered by energy from red banners destroyed the world in a war against the White Robes]].

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Geneforge}}'' is another examples of this. The ''VideoGame/RidgeRacer'' games mix realistic vehicle physics and driving physics as well as fantasy symbolism. The later games in Shapers are a sect of wizards who can literally create life, but the series even have ''exaggerated driving physics which methodology is no means a possible science'' strongly implied to be at its heart pure sci-fi. Most of its machinery is explained as well as NitroBoost.
* Averted with the first two ''Franchise/{{Fable}}'' games which were were straight fantasy. ''VideoGame/FableIII'' however was in the industrial revolution, while the magic and swords were kept, the two [=DLCs=] Understone and Traitor's Keep featured steampunk robots with latter even including a potion
being carefully designed semi-living creatures that, for example, shift to turn your dog into open a robot.
* ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}''. Besides the beautiful sand that submerged the world, glyphs, magical cloth, and the impaired buildings, technology is uncommon at most. You fly using the energy bundled in your scarf, and although there exists an ancient language you can't seem to talk at all, even the game hardly shows any text beside from the logo and closing credits. Singing near large pieces of cloth can
door when someone approaches, or release "cloth creatures" from the machines' remnants. Glyphs and confluences teach you the history a cloud of a civilization started spores that signals other creations to, say, not explode. You've even got General Alwan, who's kept alive by your ancestors. The reason why the game [[spoiler: takes place AfterTheEnd what is the machines powered by energy from red banners destroyed the world in a war against the White Robes]].basically intravenous magic.



* ''VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}}'' tends to mix the two so thoroughly that it can make one dizzy. The prologue starts with two warring [[OurTitansAreDifferent titans]] whose dead bodies make up the entire world, and then it transitions to advanced HumanAliens (Homs) fighting a war against relentless killer robots. The robots can only be stopped by a [[CoolSword legendary ancient sword called the Monado]], which turns out to be equipped with a LaserBlade. Then the Monado starts granting the protagonist visions of the future, but that turns out to have a reasonable scientific explanation. Later on the team finds the High Entia, who are a race capable of manipulating [[MagicByAnyOtherName ether]], yet that didn't stop them from advancing their technology to great levels. It concludes with [[spoiler: a flashback to when their world was created by two scientists from our world trying to create a new one, destroying their own in the process and turning them into the two titans and their computer system into the Monado]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Albion}}'', a game where a spaceship in the future lands on a world with magic instead of technology. A lot of the time is spent in primarily fantastic or scifistic settings, but they eventually mix, and both elements are present at least a little most of the time.
* ''VideoGame/{{Crystalis}}'', a ''[[Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda Zelda]]''-esque top-down action-adventure game for the NES, takes place in a [[AfterTheEnd post-apocalyptic future]] where human civilization has regressed to medieval times and embraced magic over technology. The game's BigBad has taken control of a floating tower and is threatening the world with powerful magic and LostTechnology.
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Sacred}} Sacred 2]]'' is a good example, although the barrier between {{Magitek}} and actual technology is difficult to define. You have artificial beings (both cibernetic and organic), lasers, lightsabers, force fields, strange energies and ''Franchise/ResidentEvil''-esque mutant zombies in a HighFantasy premise.
* The ''[[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros Super Mario]]'' games are set in a [[Main/MagicalLand magical land]] where [[FunnyAnimals funny animals]], castles, [[TheKingdom a monarchy]], and cute monsters collide with modern technology, aliens, robots, time machines, and space travel.
* ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'': An apocalyptic future with destroyed [[DomedHometown domed cities]] caused by a CosmicHorror, combined with a medieval SwordAndSorcery setting in the past. And it's all connected by TimeTravel.
* ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'': While the series is fundamentally fantastic, there's still a fair bit of science going on in the sidelines. Most of it caused by the kappa, who are an entire race of {{mad scientist}}s, but neither of the attempts at nuclear fusion involved them at all.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}}'' tends to mix the two so thoroughly The ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' series flirts with this. It's hinted that it can make one dizzy. the Mists are actually something akin to {{Hyperspace}} and the humans and Forgotten are confirmed to have been brought to Tyria from another planet by the gods (who may or may not be SufficientlyAdvancedAliens). The prologue starts charr and asura races, on the other hand, are racing headlong into this trope from the other direction - the asura have {{magitek}} with two warring [[OurTitansAreDifferent titans]] whose dead bodies make up a definite sci-fi feel, while the entire charr are in the midst of an industrial revolution and continuing to advance at a breakneck pace.
* The ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' series of games, set in a future where a new, unlimited source of power has been discovered... called "Magic." Humanoid robots and artificially created killing machines coexist with people who can summon the power of the elements and fight with melee weapons (admittedly, melee weapons which can spit fire and lightning).
* ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}''. Besides the beautiful sand that submerged the
world, glyphs, magical cloth, and then it transitions the impaired buildings, technology is uncommon at most. You fly using the energy bundled in your scarf, and although there exists an ancient language you can't seem to advanced HumanAliens (Homs) fighting talk at all, even the game hardly shows any text beside from the logo and closing credits. Singing near large pieces of cloth can release "cloth creatures" from the machines' remnants. Glyphs and confluences teach you the history of a civilization started by your ancestors. The reason why the game [[spoiler: takes place AfterTheEnd is the machines powered by energy from red banners destroyed the world in a war against relentless killer robots. The robots can only be stopped by a [[CoolSword legendary ancient sword called the Monado]], which turns out to be equipped with a LaserBlade. Then the Monado starts granting the protagonist visions of the future, but that turns out to have a reasonable scientific explanation. Later on the team finds the High Entia, who are a race capable of manipulating [[MagicByAnyOtherName ether]], yet that didn't stop them from advancing their technology to great levels. It concludes with [[spoiler: a flashback to when their world was created by two scientists from our world trying to create a new one, destroying their own in the process and turning them into the two titans and their computer system into the Monado]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Albion}}'', a game where a spaceship in the future lands on a world with magic instead of technology. A lot of the time is spent in primarily fantastic or scifistic settings, but they eventually mix, and both elements are present at least a little most of the time.
* ''VideoGame/{{Crystalis}}'', a ''[[Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda Zelda]]''-esque top-down action-adventure game for the NES, takes place in a [[AfterTheEnd post-apocalyptic future]] where human civilization has regressed to medieval times and embraced magic over technology. The game's BigBad has taken control of a floating tower and is threatening the world with powerful magic and LostTechnology.
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Sacred}} Sacred 2]]'' is a good example, although the barrier between {{Magitek}} and actual technology is difficult to define. You have artificial beings (both cibernetic and organic), lasers, lightsabers, force fields, strange energies and ''Franchise/ResidentEvil''-esque mutant zombies in a HighFantasy premise.
* The ''[[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros Super Mario]]'' games are set in a [[Main/MagicalLand magical land]] where [[FunnyAnimals funny animals]], castles, [[TheKingdom a monarchy]], and cute monsters collide with modern technology, aliens, robots, time machines, and space travel.
* ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'': An apocalyptic future with destroyed [[DomedHometown domed cities]] caused by a CosmicHorror, combined with a medieval SwordAndSorcery setting in the past. And it's all connected by TimeTravel.
* ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'': While the series is fundamentally fantastic, there's still a fair bit of science going on in the sidelines. Most of it caused by the kappa, who are an entire race of {{mad scientist}}s, but neither of the attempts at nuclear fusion involved them at all.
White Robes]].



* The ''[[Franchise/{{Kirby}} Kirby]]'' series takes place on an alien planet and features [[EldritchAbomination Eldritch]] [[LovecraftLite Abominations]], spaceships, and interplanetary travel alongside fantasy tropes such as castles, knights, dragons, and magical artifacts.
* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' has shades of this in that a few games use technology beyond what one could expect from a fantasy setting, from the trains of ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSpiritTracks Spirit Tracks]]'' to the Ancient Robots of ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword Skyward Sword]]''. In addition, TimeTravel and related tropes are a recurring element within the franchise.
* In the ''VideoGame/TheLongestJourney'' series, magic and technology once coexisted. Past misues of the two brought the PowersThatBe to separate the two into Stark (technology, "our" world) and Arcadia (magic/medieval world). Attempts to alter this balance are what drives the plot.
* ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey'' is set during an era called the "Magic-Industrial Revolution". It has swords and sorcery alongside muskets and tanks, idyllic villages with [[HauntedHouse haunted houses]] near dirty steel and concrete cities and mortals and immortals [[spoiler: the latter from another world]] fighting alongside, and against one another. The opening sequence alone features a battle between armored knights and barbarian warriors utilizing very [[DungeonPunk steam-punkish]] weapons (one of the most interesting being a machine that resurrects dead soldiers, powered by [[MagicalIncantation magical chanting]]). Then there's Grandstaff, which is described as a "MagicStaff". It's actually an enormous mechanical TOWER that channels magic. The entire game is one massive [[FantasyKitchenSink kitchen]] [[SciFiKitchenSink sink]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Metro 2033}}'' takes place in a fairly standard GrimDark version of AfterTheEnd, with hostile mutants, scattered human survivors, and a climax that involves using pre-cataclysmic weapons. There are also enough murderous ghosts for one of the characters to have a theory on them (Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory were ''also'' atomized), including a bona fide AfterlifeExpress.
** The [[VideoGame/MetroLastLight sequel]] takes this even further at one point, actually throwing a player into a hellish supernatural dimension [[spoiler: where one of the game's big moral choices takes place]]. Also features a legitimately haunted airplane wreck.



* Similarly, the primarily high fantasy ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' and ''{{Heretic}}''[=/=]''VideoGame/{{Hexen}}'' series briefly skirted with SF on a number of occasions, resulting in the occasional raygun, spaceship, time machine, or [[spoiler:demonic]] supercomputer.
* The ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' series of games, set in a future where a new, unlimited source of power has been discovered... called "Magic." Humanoid robots and artificially created killing machines coexist with people who can summon the power of the elements and fight with melee weapons (admittedly, melee weapons which can spit fire and lightning).
* The Amiga classic ''VideoGame/ShadowOfTheBeast'' is set in a Roger Dean-inspired fantasy world called Karamoon, which features sword-wielding orcs, medieval architecture, goblins, morningstars, mechanical claws, jetpacks, and (in the third game) robots.

to:

* Similarly, the primarily high fantasy ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' and ''{{Heretic}}''[=/=]''VideoGame/{{Hexen}}'' series briefly skirted with SF on a number of occasions, resulting in the occasional raygun, spaceship, time machine, or [[spoiler:demonic]] supercomputer.
* The ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' series of games, set in a future where a new, unlimited source of power has been discovered... called "Magic." Humanoid robots and artificially created killing machines coexist with people who can summon the power of the ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' universe also combines elements of both science-fiction (cyborgs, advanced weaponry, parallel dimensions, spaceships) and fight with melee weapons (admittedly, melee weapons which can spit fire and lightning).
* The Amiga classic ''VideoGame/ShadowOfTheBeast'' is set in a Roger Dean-inspired
fantasy world called Karamoon, which features sword-wielding orcs, medieval architecture, goblins, morningstars, mechanical claws, jetpacks, and (in the third game) robots.(magic, dragons, gods, demons).



* Alongside it's many [[StandardFantasySetting standard fantasy elements]] ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' also feature spaceships used by gods; time traveling, terminatorish robots with laser weapons; and astronauts (the mananauts and Sunbirds of Alinor), and in extension: more spaceships. And this is just the tip of the iceberg.
** Also, the realms of Aeterius and Oblivion were originally presented as simply this world's equivalent of Heaven and Hell. Then ''The Elder Scrolls Adventures: Redguard'' featured an observatory where the realms of Oblivion appeared as planets orbiting Nirn (the mortal world) and the gods as even more distant planets at the edge of a solar system. So, the Oblivion Gates? Those may or may not be Franchise/{{stargate}}s in disguise.
** Becomes a bit more complicated when you learn that the planets (and moons) are actually the bodies of dead gods, the sun and probably stars are holes in reality caused by fleeing gods, and that the Dwemer/dwarves were a race of militant atheists who accidentally unexisted themselves trying ''to gain godhood''. Science is literally magic.
*** Or not. The one factor that really distinguishes TES lore from in-universe texts in other RPG settings is that it is specifically stated (and shown a few times) to be unreliable - things can be either misinterpreted, exaggerated or just plain wrong, and racial/social biases are also part of the lore design (e.g. a Khajit creation myth might be true or just a myth in itself, but when it's retold in a book by an Imperial historian, it's a given that there's misrepresentation/wrong translation and so on present). This basically reflects our real world's inherent uncertainty mythologies and religious beliefs. Hence, planets in TES ''might'' really be the bodies of dead gods, but they might also be just that - planets. Same with everything else.
* ''The Unholy War'' was a strategy game that took this to an extreme, with an army of fantasy creatures fighting an army of science fiction characters.
* In the ''VideoGame/TheLongestJourney'' series, magic and technology once coexisted. Past misues of the two brought the PowersThatBe to separate the two into Stark (technology, "our" world) and Arcadia (magic/medieval world). Attempts to alter this balance are what drives the plot.
* The ''Franchise/StarOcean'' series typically takes characters from a science fiction setting, and then plunges them deep into fantasy, while ever hinting at science fiction overtones throughout the stories.
** Special mention goes to ''VideoGame/StarOceanTillTheEndOfTime'', by having Fayt and Cliff, who're members of the Pangalactic Federation, crash land on Elicoor II, a planet who's inhabitants are a [[MedievalStasis type-3 civilization.]] Fayt and Cliff go to great lengths to conceal the true nature of their identities to avoid unnecessary trouble, leading to predictable results. [[spoiler: Except for the part where they learn that their universe, and everything in it, is one big virtual game!]]
* Starting around the sixth game in the series, the ''VideoGame/{{Wizardry}}'' games dove head-first into combining fantasy and sci-fi, where spells, magical creatures, and arcane artifacts are found hand-in-hand with spacefaring aliens, starships, and advanced energy weapons.
** ''Wizardry VII'' was the first of the series to embrace this trope-while the party is firmly grounded in fantasy, and the world seems to be with the full range of usual fantasy creatures and items, there's also the fact that the party arrived on the world by a starship, the BigBad has a robotic army, two more alien races are engaged in a power struggle over the planet from their landing zones, and one of the native races travels around in rocket-powered aircraft.
** ''Wizardry 8'' takes this to an even more extreme bent, where powerful magic and advanced technology happily coexist-you'll see sophisticated artificial intelligences talking happily with wizards, flamethrowers and rocket launchers wielded by elves, and an alien airbase guarded by potent technological and magical defenses.

to:

* Alongside it's many [[StandardFantasySetting standard fantasy elements]] ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' also feature spaceships used by gods; time traveling, terminatorish robots ''VideoGame/OmikronTheNomadSoul'' features [[MechaMook Mechaguards]], [[AIIsACrapshoot Supercomputers]] and {{Cyberpunk}} Dystopias mixed with laser weapons; [[OurSoulsAreDifferent Soul Magic]] and astronauts (the mananauts and Sunbirds of Alinor), and in extension: more spaceships. And this is just the tip of the iceberg.
** Also, the realms of Aeterius and Oblivion were originally presented as simply this world's equivalent of Heaven and Hell. Then ''The Elder Scrolls Adventures: Redguard'' featured an observatory where the realms of Oblivion appeared as planets orbiting Nirn (the mortal world) and the gods as even more distant planets at the edge of a solar system. So, the Oblivion Gates? Those may or may not be Franchise/{{stargate}}s in disguise.
** Becomes a bit more complicated when you learn
[[TheLegionsOfHell Demonic Invaders.]]
* ''VideoGame/{{Perimeter}}'' has {{Physical God}}s with Sufficiently Advanced Technology
that the planets (and moons) are actually the bodies of dead gods, the sun and probably stars are holes reside in reality caused by fleeing gods, and that the Dwemer/dwarves were a race of militant atheists who accidentally unexisted themselves trying ''to gain godhood''. Science is literally magic.
*** Or not. The one factor that really distinguishes TES lore from in-universe texts in other RPG settings is that it is specifically stated (and shown a few times) to be unreliable - things can be either misinterpreted, exaggerated or just plain wrong, and racial/social biases are also part of the lore design (e.g. a Khajit creation myth might be true or just a myth in itself, but when it's retold in a book by an Imperial historian, it's a given that there's misrepresentation/wrong translation and so on present). This basically reflects our real world's inherent uncertainty mythologies and religious beliefs. Hence, planets in TES ''might'' really be the bodies of dead gods, but they might also be just that - planets. Same with everything else.
* ''The Unholy War'' was a strategy game that took this to an extreme, with an army of fantasy creatures
floating cities. You lead super-advanced, ShapeShifting robotic soldiers fighting an army of science fiction characters.
* In
demons on alien worlds. FasterThanLightTravel is achieved by sending things through the ''VideoGame/TheLongestJourney'' series, magic and technology once coexisted. Past misues of the two brought the PowersThatBe to separate the two into Stark (technology, "our" world) and Arcadia (magic/medieval world). Attempts to alter this balance are what drives the plot.
[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noosphere noosphere.]]
* The ''Franchise/StarOcean'' series typically takes characters from a science fiction setting, and then plunges them deep into fantasy, while ever hinting at science fiction overtones throughout the stories.
** Special mention goes to ''VideoGame/StarOceanTillTheEndOfTime'', by having Fayt and Cliff, who're members of the Pangalactic Federation, crash land on Elicoor II, a planet who's inhabitants are a [[MedievalStasis type-3 civilization.]] Fayt and Cliff go to great lengths to conceal the true nature of their identities to avoid unnecessary trouble, leading to predictable results. [[spoiler: Except for the part where they learn that their universe, and everything in it, is one big virtual game!]]
* Starting around the sixth game in the series, the ''VideoGame/{{Wizardry}}'' games dove head-first into combining fantasy and sci-fi, where spells, magical creatures, and arcane artifacts are found hand-in-hand with spacefaring aliens, starships, and advanced energy weapons.
** ''Wizardry VII'' was the first of
''VideoGame/PhantasyStar'', though as the series to embrace this trope-while the party is firmly grounded in fantasy, and the world seems to be with the full range of usual fantasy creatures and items, there's also the fact that the party arrived on the world by a starship, the BigBad has a robotic army, two progressed, it more alien races are engaged in a power struggle over thoroughly embraced the planet from their landing zones, and one sci-fi side of the native races travels around in rocket-powered aircraft.
** ''Wizardry 8'' takes this to an even more extreme bent, where powerful magic and advanced technology happily coexist-you'll see sophisticated artificial intelligences talking happily with wizards, flamethrowers and rocket launchers wielded by elves, and an alien airbase guarded by potent technological and magical defenses.
things.



* ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}}'' 'verse's technology is roughly at pre-industrial level, where guns are getting common, but swords and bows are still viable. However, the range of technology available is quite large. [[RockBeatsLaser Rock axes]] can down [[{{Magitek}} demonic]] HumongousMecha, and {{Death Ray}}s can be used against ancient evil gods. And the dimension-hopping giants that ride around in spaceships.
** In ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' you can have a mage that can teleport, cast spells, ride a variety of mounts on the ground, from a normal horse, to a demonic unicorn, to a motorcycle on the ground and anything from dragons, to flying carpets, to a rocket in the air. Druids can turn themselves into a bird. Heck, engineering is a profession, where you can make your clothing produce rockets and bombs if you want to.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}}'' 'verse's The ''VideoGame/RidgeRacer'' games mix realistic vehicle physics and driving physics as well as fantasy symbolism. The later games in the series even have ''exaggerated driving physics which is no means a possible science'' as well as NitroBoost.
* ''VideoGame/RiseOfLegends'' features {{Steampunk}} robots and soldiers fighting Genies and and magicians. [[spoiler: That is, until the Alien Gods show up.]]
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Sacred}} Sacred 2]]'' is a good example, although the barrier between {{Magitek}} and actual
technology is roughly at pre-industrial level, where difficult to define. You have artificial beings (both cibernetic and organic), lasers, lightsabers, force fields, strange energies and ''Franchise/ResidentEvil''-esque mutant zombies in a HighFantasy premise.
* ''VideoGame/SaGa2'' is a fantasy game with sci-fi elements. It's centered around gods and the ancient stones called MAGI that give them power, but heroes and enemies include robots as well as magical creatures and humans. Weapon stores sell heavy assault
guns are getting common, but alongside swords and bows are still viable. However, spellbooks.
** In ''VideoGame/SaGa3'',
the range of technology available is quite large. [[RockBeatsLaser Rock axes]] can down [[{{Magitek}} demonic]] HumongousMecha, and {{Death Ray}}s can be used heroes fight against ancient evil gods. And gods to recover the dimension-hopping giants that ride around in spaceships.
** In ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' you can have a mage that can teleport, cast spells, ride a variety
missing parts of mounts on the ground, from a normal horse, to a demonic unicorn, to a motorcycle on the ground and anything from dragons, to flying carpets, to a rocket in the air. Druids can turn themselves into a bird. Heck, engineering is a profession, where you can make your clothing produce rockets and bombs if you want to.their time machine.



* The ''[[VideoGame/ArTonelicoMelodyOfElemia Ar tonelico]]'' series features girls who [[MagicMusic control magical powers with their songs]] and goddesses who control the giant towers that humanity has been forced to live in after a disaster destroyed the world's land. The [[AllThereInTheManual backstory of the series]] reveals that this disaster was caused by the technology of a highly advanced civilization. The towers themselves were built by these civilizations. The villain in the first game invades the tower's systems with viruses that can take physical form and possess many of the tower's robot guardians. The magic wielding girls themselves are actually an [[ArtificialHuman artificial race]] designed to use magical powers based on the intricate principles of "wave science."
** The prequel series, ''[[VideoGame/ArNosurge Surge Concerto]]'' takes this even further, as Ra Ciela's civilization is even more advanced than Ar Ciel's, and one of the series' games even takes place almost entirely on a spaceship. However, there's still the same magic music and gods as is usual for this universe.
* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' features an invasion by demons from hell ... thwarted by a ''space marine'' on ''UsefulNotes/{{Mars}}'' with a ''plasma rifle.''
** Demons with cybernetic implants. One of them is called Cyberdemon.
* The ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' universe also combines elements of both science-fiction (cyborgs, advanced weaponry, parallel dimensions, spaceships) and fantasy (magic, dragons, gods, demons).
* ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'' is a mixture of more specific genres: HighFantasy and SteamPunk. The overarching story is fantasy epic, set in a more dystopian land that includes race and class conflict and the growing pains of an industrializing society as themes. Magic vs. technology is less a war than an ideological clash that can at least find common ground in its goals if not its practical methods.
* ''VideoGame/{{Metro 2033}}'' takes place in a fairly standard GrimDark version of AfterTheEnd, with hostile mutants, scattered human survivors, and a climax that involves using pre-cataclysmic weapons. There are also enough murderous ghosts for one of the characters to have a theory on them (Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory were ''also'' atomized), including a bona fide AfterlifeExpress.
** The [[VideoGame/MetroLastLight sequel]] takes this even further at one point, actually throwing a player into a hellish supernatural dimension [[spoiler: where one of the game's big moral choices takes place]]. Also features a legitimately haunted airplane wreck.
* ''VideoGame/CaveStory'' takes place on a FloatingContinent, which is inhabited by fantastic creatures such as [[FunnyAnimal bunny-shaped Mimigas]], ([[NonHumanUndead undead]]) [[SandIsWater sand-dwelling crocodiles]] or humanoid cockroaches, ruled over by an old witch who's responsible for an abomination that keeps the island afloat from inside a chamber protected with terminals and water control. There's also an incubator corridor that keeps dragon eggs and RidiculouslyHumanRobots.

to:

* The ''[[VideoGame/ArTonelicoMelodyOfElemia Ar tonelico]]'' series Amiga classic ''VideoGame/ShadowOfTheBeast'' is set in a Roger Dean-inspired fantasy world called Karamoon, which features girls who [[MagicMusic control magical powers with their songs]] sword-wielding orcs, medieval architecture, goblins, morningstars, mechanical claws, jetpacks, and goddesses who control (in the giant towers that humanity has been forced to live in after a disaster destroyed the world's land. The [[AllThereInTheManual backstory of the series]] reveals that this disaster was caused by the technology of a highly advanced civilization. The towers themselves were built by these civilizations. The villain in the first game invades the tower's systems with viruses that can take physical form and possess many of the tower's robot guardians. The magic wielding girls themselves are actually an [[ArtificialHuman artificial race]] designed to use magical powers based on the intricate principles of "wave science."
** The prequel series, ''[[VideoGame/ArNosurge Surge Concerto]]'' takes this even further, as Ra Ciela's civilization is even more advanced than Ar Ciel's, and one of the series' games even takes place almost entirely on a spaceship. However, there's still the same magic music and gods as is usual for this universe.
* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' features an invasion by demons from hell ... thwarted by a ''space marine'' on ''UsefulNotes/{{Mars}}'' with a ''plasma rifle.''
** Demons with cybernetic implants. One of them is called Cyberdemon.
* The ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' universe also combines elements of both science-fiction (cyborgs, advanced weaponry, parallel dimensions, spaceships) and fantasy (magic, dragons, gods, demons).
* ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'' is a mixture of more specific genres: HighFantasy and SteamPunk. The overarching story is fantasy epic, set in a more dystopian land that includes race and class conflict and the growing pains of an industrializing society as themes. Magic vs. technology is less a war than an ideological clash that can at least find common ground in its goals if not its practical methods.
* ''VideoGame/{{Metro 2033}}'' takes place in a fairly standard GrimDark version of AfterTheEnd, with hostile mutants, scattered human survivors, and a climax that involves using pre-cataclysmic weapons. There are also enough murderous ghosts for one of the characters to have a theory on them (Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory were ''also'' atomized), including a bona fide AfterlifeExpress.
** The [[VideoGame/MetroLastLight sequel]] takes this even further at one point, actually throwing a player into a hellish supernatural dimension [[spoiler: where one of the game's big moral choices takes place]]. Also features a legitimately haunted airplane wreck.
* ''VideoGame/CaveStory'' takes place on a FloatingContinent, which is inhabited by fantastic creatures such as [[FunnyAnimal bunny-shaped Mimigas]], ([[NonHumanUndead undead]]) [[SandIsWater sand-dwelling crocodiles]] or humanoid cockroaches, ruled over by an old witch who's responsible for an abomination that keeps the island afloat from inside a chamber protected with terminals and water control. There's also an incubator corridor that keeps dragon eggs and RidiculouslyHumanRobots.
third game) robots.



* ''VideoGame/AsurasWrath'' IS this trope with a [[Myth/HinduMythology Hindu]] and [[UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} Buddhist]] twist.
* ''VideoGame/PhantasyStar'', though as the series progressed, it more thoroughly embraced the sci-fi side of things.
* ''VideoGame/CosmicFantasy''.



* The ''[[Franchise/{{Kirby}} Kirby]]'' series takes place on an alien planet and features [[EldritchAbomination Eldritch]] [[LovecraftLite Abominations]], spaceships, and interplanetary travel alongside fantasy tropes such as castles, knights, dragons, and magical artifacts.
* ''VideoGame/{{Geneforge}}'' is another examples of this. The Shapers are a sect of wizards who can literally create life, but the methodology is strongly implied to be at its heart pure sci-fi. Most of its machinery is explained as being carefully designed semi-living creatures that, for example, shift to open a door when someone approaches, or release a cloud of spores that signals other creations to, say, not explode. You've even got General Alwan, who's kept alive by what is basically intravenous magic.
* ''VideoGame/SaGa2'' is a fantasy game with sci-fi elements. It's centered around gods and the ancient stones called MAGI that give them power, but heroes and enemies include robots as well as magical creatures and humans. Weapon stores sell heavy assault guns alongside swords and spellbooks.
** In ''VideoGame/SaGa3'', the heroes fight against evil gods to recover the missing parts of their time machine.
* The ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' series flirts with this. It's hinted that the Mists are actually something akin to {{Hyperspace}} and the humans and Forgotten are confirmed to have been brought to Tyria from another planet by the gods (who may or may not be SufficientlyAdvancedAliens). The charr and asura races, on the other hand, are racing headlong into this trope from the other direction - the asura have {{magitek}} with a definite sci-fi feel, while the charr are in the midst of an industrial revolution and continuing to advance at a breakneck pace.

to:

* The ''[[Franchise/{{Kirby}} Kirby]]'' series ''VideoGame/SpaceStation13'' fits into this category pretty squarely. On one hand, it takes place on an alien planet and features [[EldritchAbomination Eldritch]] [[LovecraftLite Abominations]], upon a highly technologically advanced space station some 500 years into the future, with spaceships, lasers, cyborgs, aliens and interplanetary travel alongside fantasy tropes such as castles, knights, dragons, and magical artifacts.
* ''VideoGame/{{Geneforge}}'' is another examples of this. The Shapers are a sect of wizards who can literally create life, but
generally the methodology is strongly implied standard run-of-the-mill science fiction elements common to be at its heart pure sci-fi. Most of its machinery is explained as being carefully designed semi-living creatures that, for example, shift to open a door when someone approaches, or release a cloud of spores that signals other creations to, say, not explode. You've even got General Alwan, who's kept alive by what is basically intravenous magic.
* ''VideoGame/SaGa2'' is a fantasy game with sci-fi elements. It's centered around gods and the ancient stones called MAGI that give them power, but heroes and enemies include robots as well as magical creatures and humans. Weapon stores sell heavy assault guns alongside swords and spellbooks.
** In ''VideoGame/SaGa3'', the heroes fight against evil gods to recover the missing parts of their time machine.
* The ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' series flirts with this. It's hinted that the Mists are actually something akin to {{Hyperspace}} and the humans and Forgotten are confirmed to have been brought to Tyria from another planet by the gods (who may or may not be SufficientlyAdvancedAliens). The charr and asura races, on
most space settings. On the other hand, are racing headlong some of the factions out to destroy the station or otherwise cause general mayhem to its crew members include murderous demon cults and the Space Wizard Federation, who both employ different kinds of magic to achieve their goals. While not all rounds feature said roles, the ones that do tend to become very weird indeed.
* The ''Franchise/StarOcean'' series typically takes characters from a science fiction setting, and then plunges them deep
into this trope from the other direction - the asura have {{magitek}} with a definite sci-fi feel, fantasy, while ever hinting at science fiction overtones throughout the charr stories.
** Special mention goes to ''VideoGame/StarOceanTillTheEndOfTime'', by having Fayt and Cliff, who're members of the Pangalactic Federation, crash land on Elicoor II, a planet who's inhabitants
are in a [[MedievalStasis type-3 civilization.]] Fayt and Cliff go to great lengths to conceal the midst true nature of an industrial revolution their identities to avoid unnecessary trouble, leading to predictable results. [[spoiler: Except for the part where they learn that their universe, and continuing to advance at everything in it, is one big virtual game!]]
* The ''[[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros Super Mario]]'' games are set in
a breakneck pace.[[Main/MagicalLand magical land]] where [[FunnyAnimals funny animals]], castles, [[TheKingdom a monarchy]], and cute monsters collide with modern technology, aliens, robots, time machines, and space travel.



* ''VideoGame/{{Perimeter}}'' has {{Physical God}}s with Sufficiently Advanced Technology that reside in floating cities. You lead super-advanced, ShapeShifting robotic soldiers fighting demons on alien worlds. FasterThanLightTravel is achieved by sending things through the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noosphere noosphere.]]
* ''VideoGame/{{Destiny}}'' definitely belongs in this genre, with wizards, magic, souls ripping from the bodies of deceased enemies, and necromancers existing in a universe teeming with time-travelling robots, aliens, and spaceships. [[WordofGod Bungie]] has even described the game as being "mythic science fiction".

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Perimeter}}'' has {{Physical God}}s ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'': While the series is fundamentally fantastic, there's still a fair bit of science going on in the sidelines. Most of it caused by the kappa, who are an entire race of {{mad scientist}}s, but neither of the attempts at nuclear fusion involved them at all.
* Similarly, the primarily high fantasy ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' and ''{{Heretic}}''[=/=]''VideoGame/{{Hexen}}'' series briefly skirted
with Sufficiently Advanced Technology SF on a number of occasions, resulting in the occasional raygun, spaceship, time machine, or [[spoiler:demonic]] supercomputer.
* ''The Unholy War'' was a strategy game
that reside in floating cities. You lead super-advanced, ShapeShifting robotic soldiers took this to an extreme, with an army of fantasy creatures fighting demons on alien worlds. FasterThanLightTravel is achieved by sending things through the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noosphere noosphere.]]
* ''VideoGame/{{Destiny}}'' definitely belongs in this genre, with wizards, magic, souls ripping from the bodies
an army of deceased enemies, and necromancers existing in a universe teeming with time-travelling robots, aliens, and spaceships. [[WordofGod Bungie]] has even described the game as being "mythic science fiction".fiction characters.
* ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}}'' 'verse's technology is roughly at pre-industrial level, where guns are getting common, but swords and bows are still viable. However, the range of technology available is quite large. [[RockBeatsLaser Rock axes]] can down [[{{Magitek}} demonic]] HumongousMecha, and {{Death Ray}}s can be used against ancient evil gods. And the dimension-hopping giants that ride around in spaceships.
** In ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' you can have a mage that can teleport, cast spells, ride a variety of mounts on the ground, from a normal horse, to a demonic unicorn, to a motorcycle on the ground and anything from dragons, to flying carpets, to a rocket in the air. Druids can turn themselves into a bird. Heck, engineering is a profession, where you can make your clothing produce rockets and bombs if you want to.



* ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey'' is set during an era called the "Magic-Industrial Revolution". It has swords and sorcery alongside muskets and tanks, idyllic villages with [[HauntedHouse haunted houses]] near dirty steel and concrete cities and mortals and immortals [[spoiler: the latter from another world]] fighting alongside, and against one another. The opening sequence alone features a battle between armored knights and barbarian warriors utilizing very [[DungeonPunk steam-punkish]] weapons (one of the most interesting being a machine that resurrects dead soldiers, powered by [[MagicalIncantation magical chanting]]). Then there's Grandstaff, which is described as a "MagicStaff". It's actually an enormous mechanical TOWER that channels magic. The entire game is one massive [[FantasyKitchenSink kitchen]] [[SciFiKitchenSink sink]].
* ''VideoGame/EndlessLegend'' mixes the sciencey bits of [[VideoGame/EndlessSpace its predecessor]] with fantasy, as the game takes place on a former [[{{Precursors}} Concrete Endless]] world which has been populated by the [[LostColony survivors a wrecked spaceship]]. Suits of AnimatedArmor [[PracticalCurrency powered by money]] argue with [[OurDragonsAreDifferent sentient dragons]] in the courts, on the battlefield PowerArmor-wearing hatchetmen follow their HumongousMecha into battle against witches and wizards who get their [[BloodMagic power from pain]], while an empire of malfunctioning robots converts bands of orcs and trolls to join their cause in destroying the ruins of the Endless.
* ''VideoGame/SpaceStation13'' fits into this category pretty squarely. On one hand, it takes place upon a highly technologically advanced space station some 500 years into the future, with spaceships, lasers, cyborgs, aliens and generally the standard run-of-the-mill science fiction elements common to most space settings. On the other hand, some of the factions out to destroy the station or otherwise cause general mayhem to its crew members include murderous demon cults and the Space Wizard Federation, who both employ different kinds of magic to achieve their goals. While not all rounds feature said roles, the ones that do tend to become very weird indeed.
* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' has shades of this in that a few games use technology beyond what one could expect from a fantasy setting, from the trains of ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSpiritTracks Spirit Tracks]]'' to the Ancient Robots of ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword Skyward Sword]]''. In addition, TimeTravel and related tropes are a recurring element within the franchise.
* ''VideoGame/CastleCrashers'' starts out in what is, ostensibly, a quirky LowFantasy setting, with a war against a barbarian tribe, evil wizards, and the classic chestnut of the princesses getting kidnapped. Upon crossing the ocean, you immediately thwart an AlienInvasion by the VideoGame/{{Alien Hominid}}s.
* Although ''VideoGame/{{Battleborn}}'' is a deeply sci-fi based game in the vein of ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'', it has a number of things that are more fantasy in basis. These include among things, [[MagicFromScience magical abilities derived from science grounded concepts]] and {{Magitek}}-like technology. The most notable of all of these however are the Eldrid, an entire faction consisting of fantasy inspired individuals whose number includes a [[MushroomMan sentient Fungus]], a SpaceElf, [[OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame a space dwarf]], and [[{{Snowlem}} a skeletal ice golem]].
* ''VideoGame/OmikronTheNomadSoul'' features [[MechaMook Mechaguards]], [[AIIsACrapshoot Supercomputers]] and {{Cyberpunk}} Dystopias mixed with [[OurSoulsAreDifferent Soul Magic]] and [[TheLegionsOfHell Demonic Invaders.]]
* ''VideoGame/RiseOfLegends'' features {{Steampunk}} robots and soldiers fighting Genies and and magicians. [[spoiler: That is, until the Alien Gods show up.]]

to:

* ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey'' is set during an era called Starting around the "Magic-Industrial Revolution". It has swords sixth game in the series, the ''VideoGame/{{Wizardry}}'' games dove head-first into combining fantasy and sorcery alongside muskets and tanks, idyllic villages with [[HauntedHouse haunted houses]] near dirty steel and concrete cities and mortals and immortals [[spoiler: the latter from another world]] fighting alongside, and against one another. The opening sequence alone features a battle between armored knights and barbarian warriors utilizing very [[DungeonPunk steam-punkish]] weapons (one of the most interesting being a machine that resurrects dead soldiers, powered by [[MagicalIncantation sci-fi, where spells, magical chanting]]). Then creatures, and arcane artifacts are found hand-in-hand with spacefaring aliens, starships, and advanced energy weapons.
** ''Wizardry VII'' was the first of the series to embrace this trope-while the party is firmly grounded in fantasy, and the world seems to be with the full range of usual fantasy creatures and items,
there's Grandstaff, which is described as a "MagicStaff". It's actually an enormous mechanical TOWER also the fact that channels magic. The entire game is one massive [[FantasyKitchenSink kitchen]] [[SciFiKitchenSink sink]].
* ''VideoGame/EndlessLegend'' mixes
the sciencey bits of [[VideoGame/EndlessSpace its predecessor]] with fantasy, as the game takes place on a former [[{{Precursors}} Concrete Endless]] world which has been populated by the [[LostColony survivors a wrecked spaceship]]. Suits of AnimatedArmor [[PracticalCurrency powered by money]] argue with [[OurDragonsAreDifferent sentient dragons]] in the courts, party arrived on the battlefield PowerArmor-wearing hatchetmen follow world by a starship, the BigBad has a robotic army, two more alien races are engaged in a power struggle over the planet from their HumongousMecha into battle against witches landing zones, and wizards who get their [[BloodMagic power from pain]], while an empire of malfunctioning robots converts bands of orcs and trolls to join their cause in destroying the ruins one of the Endless.
* ''VideoGame/SpaceStation13'' fits into this category pretty squarely. On one hand, it
native races travels around in rocket-powered aircraft.
** ''Wizardry 8''
takes place upon a highly technologically this to an even more extreme bent, where powerful magic and advanced space station some 500 years into the future, with spaceships, lasers, cyborgs, aliens and generally the standard run-of-the-mill science fiction elements common to most space settings. On the other hand, some of the factions out to destroy the station or otherwise cause general mayhem to its crew members include murderous demon cults and the Space Wizard Federation, who both employ different kinds of magic to achieve their goals. While not all rounds feature said roles, the ones that do tend to become very weird indeed.
* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' has shades of this in that a few games use
technology beyond what happily coexist-you'll see sophisticated artificial intelligences talking happily with wizards, flamethrowers and rocket launchers wielded by elves, and an alien airbase guarded by potent technological and magical defenses.
* ''VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}}'' tends to mix the two so thoroughly that it can make
one could expect from a fantasy setting, from the trains of ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSpiritTracks Spirit Tracks]]'' to the Ancient Robots of ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword Skyward Sword]]''. In addition, TimeTravel and related tropes are a recurring element within the franchise.
* ''VideoGame/CastleCrashers''
dizzy. The prologue starts out in what is, ostensibly, a quirky LowFantasy setting, with two warring [[OurTitansAreDifferent titans]] whose dead bodies make up the entire world, and then it transitions to advanced HumanAliens (Homs) fighting a war against relentless killer robots. The robots can only be stopped by a barbarian tribe, evil wizards, and [[CoolSword legendary ancient sword called the classic chestnut Monado]], which turns out to be equipped with a LaserBlade. Then the Monado starts granting the protagonist visions of the princesses getting kidnapped. Upon crossing the ocean, you immediately thwart an AlienInvasion by the VideoGame/{{Alien Hominid}}s.
* Although ''VideoGame/{{Battleborn}}'' is a deeply sci-fi based game in the vein of ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'', it has a number of things
future, but that turns out to have a reasonable scientific explanation. Later on the team finds the High Entia, who are more fantasy in basis. These include among things, [[MagicFromScience magical abilities derived a race capable of manipulating [[MagicByAnyOtherName ether]], yet that didn't stop them from science grounded concepts]] and {{Magitek}}-like technology. The most notable of all of these however are the Eldrid, an entire faction consisting of fantasy inspired individuals whose number includes a [[MushroomMan sentient Fungus]], a SpaceElf, [[OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame a space dwarf]], and [[{{Snowlem}} a skeletal ice golem]].
* ''VideoGame/OmikronTheNomadSoul'' features [[MechaMook Mechaguards]], [[AIIsACrapshoot Supercomputers]] and {{Cyberpunk}} Dystopias mixed
advancing their technology to great levels. It concludes with [[OurSoulsAreDifferent Soul Magic]] and [[TheLegionsOfHell Demonic Invaders.]]
* ''VideoGame/RiseOfLegends'' features {{Steampunk}} robots and soldiers fighting Genies and and magicians.
[[spoiler: That is, until a flashback to when their world was created by two scientists from our world trying to create a new one, destroying their own in the Alien Gods show up.]] process and turning them into the two titans and their computer system into the Monado]].



* ''Webcomic/{{Archipelago}}'' contains a society with witch doctors, bird spirits, undead pirates, sharkmen, living books, ancient demigods, dragons, and ancient magical legacies, all built on the back of a fallen dragon ... by which they mean [[ColonyDrop an ancient spaceship]]. The bird spirits are corrupted AIs; the undead pirate is kept alive through the use of [[{{Cyborg}} cybernetics]]; the sharkmen are genetically-engineered super soldiers; and the magic is implied to be [[SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology all-pervading nanotechnology]].
* ''Webcomic/BrokenSpace'' ([[http://brokenspacecomic.com site]]) features aliens, demons, clockwork, [[SteamPunk steam-power]], magicians, guns, swords, strange Magitek weapons, and divinely powered starships.
* The ''Crushed'' subseries of ''Webcomic/{{Supermegatopia}}'' is technically [[spoiler: the result of a space explorer using SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology to make]] a medieval fantasy world. This later gets ruined by [[spoiler: the Ragnaracoon]], and mixed into an unapologetic mishmash of high technology and high fantasy called Meshworld.
* ''Webcomic/DanAndMabsFurryAdventures'' has both magic and futuristic technology, and combinations of the two.
* Webcomic/TheDragonDoctors make heavy use of magic, but always use it rationally and scientifically (their leader even calls herself a "Magical Scientist"). LegoGenetics are referenced at one point as being only possible with the use of magic to treat traits as conceptual objects.
* ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'' has genetically altered super-mutant assassins, aliens, mad scientists and many magic users, several of whom are main characters. Oh yeah, and one of the magic users can create a fairy version of herself, and Tedd's been hacking a {{Magitek}} [[GenderBender transformation ray gun]] since 2002.



* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' revolves around a very advanced game that [[TheGamePlaysYou Plays You]], is set in a world in which everyone has their own videogame-esque abstract inventory systems, and features a ''lot'' of robots and cyborgs, but it also plays around heavily with fantasy tropes and themes such as princes and princesses, knights, dragons, quests, and magic.
* ''Webcomic/{{Iothera}}'' is a science fantasy with a lot of {{Magitek}}.
* ''Webcomic/LastRes0rt'' is set several thousand years into the future, contains nanotechnology, flying robots, and a galactic society... and also contains lots of creatures that run off of soul-based magic, including vampires, djinn, and zombies. [[FurryComic Also, furries.]] It's labeled {{Cyberpunk}} -- but it's about as Cyberpunk as, say, TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}.
* ''Webcomic/TheMansionOfE'' features robots along with magic.
* ''Webcomic/MegaTokyo'' has both light fantasy elements (mostly {{Magical Girl}}s) and soft sci-fi (stuff related to the TPCD mostly). A DarkMagicalGirl is best friends with a RobotGirl and said DMG used to control people's emotions through an MMORPG.



* Webcomic/TheDragonDoctors make heavy use of magic, but always use it rationally and scientifically (their leader even calls herself a "Magical Scientist"). LegoGenetics are referenced at one point as being only possible with the use of magic to treat traits as conceptual objects.
* ''Webcomic/MegaTokyo'' has both light fantasy elements (mostly {{Magical Girl}}s) and soft sci-fi (stuff related to the TPCD mostly). A DarkMagicalGirl is best friends with a RobotGirl and said DMG used to control people's emotions through an MMORPG.



* ''Webcomic/DanAndMabsFurryAdventures'' has both magic and futuristic technology, and combinations of the two.
* The ''Crushed'' subseries of ''Webcomic/{{Supermegatopia}}'' is technically [[spoiler: the result of a space explorer using SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology to make]] a medieval fantasy world. This later gets ruined by [[spoiler: the Ragnaracoon]], and mixed into an unapologetic mishmash of high technology and high fantasy called Meshworld.
* ''Webcomic/BrokenSpace'' ([[http://brokenspacecomic.com site]]) features aliens, demons, clockwork, [[SteamPunk steam-power]], magicians, guns, swords, strange Magitek weapons, and divinely powered starships.
* ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'' has genetically altered super-mutant assassins, aliens, mad scientists and many magic users, several of whom are main characters. Oh yeah, and one of the magic users can create a fairy version of herself, and Tedd's been hacking a {{Magitek}} [[GenderBender transformation ray gun]] since 2002.
* ''Webcomic/LastRes0rt'' is set several thousand years into the future, contains nanotechnology, flying robots, and a galactic society... and also contains lots of creatures that run off of soul-based magic, including vampires, djinn, and zombies. [[FurryComic Also, furries.]] It's labeled {{Cyberpunk}} -- but it's about as Cyberpunk as, say, TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}.
* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' revolves around a very advanced game that [[TheGamePlaysYou Plays You]], is set in a world in which everyone has their own videogame-esque abstract inventory systems, and features a ''lot'' of robots and cyborgs, but it also plays around heavily with fantasy tropes and themes such as princes and princesses, knights, dragons, quests, and magic.
* ''Webcomic/TheMansionOfE'' features robots along with magic.

to:

* ''Webcomic/DanAndMabsFurryAdventures'' has both magic and futuristic technology, and combinations of the two.
* The ''Crushed'' subseries of ''Webcomic/{{Supermegatopia}}'' is technically [[spoiler: the result of a space explorer using SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology to make]] a medieval fantasy world. This later gets ruined by [[spoiler: the Ragnaracoon]], and mixed into an unapologetic mishmash of high technology and high fantasy called Meshworld.
* ''Webcomic/BrokenSpace'' ([[http://brokenspacecomic.com site]]) features aliens, demons, clockwork, [[SteamPunk steam-power]], magicians, guns, swords, strange Magitek weapons, and divinely powered starships.
* ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'' has genetically altered super-mutant assassins, aliens, mad scientists and many magic users, several of whom are main characters. Oh yeah, and one of the magic users can create a fairy version of herself, and Tedd's been hacking a {{Magitek}} [[GenderBender transformation ray gun]] since 2002.
* ''Webcomic/LastRes0rt'' is set several thousand years into the future, contains nanotechnology, flying robots, and a galactic society... and also contains lots of creatures that run off of soul-based magic, including vampires, djinn, and zombies. [[FurryComic Also, furries.]] It's labeled {{Cyberpunk}} -- but it's about as Cyberpunk as, say, TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}.
* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' revolves around a very advanced game that [[TheGamePlaysYou Plays You]], is set
''Webcomic/TheWaterPhoenixKing'' takes place in a world in which everyone has their own videogame-esque abstract inventory systems, dying universe with fantastic races and features a ''lot'' of robots and cyborgs, but it also plays around heavily with fantasy tropes and themes from scifi, such as princes each species having it's own "technology" which could be nearly anything including forms of "magic"; in the instance of humanity, a poorly made martial-arts style and princesses, knights, dragons, quests, and magic.
* ''Webcomic/TheMansionOfE'' features robots along with magic.
propaganda tool tied to an overbearing god. Who eventually dies, leaving humans at a huge disadvantage while other species still have access to more useful tech like steam-power or sorcery.



* ''Webcomic/{{Iothera}}'' is a science fantasy with a lot of {{Magitek}}.
* ''Webcomic/{{Archipelago}}'' contains a society with witch doctors, bird spirits, undead pirates, sharkmen, living books, ancient demigods, dragons, and ancient magical legacies, all built on the back of a fallen dragon ... by which they mean [[ColonyDrop an ancient spaceship]]. The bird spirits are corrupted AIs; the undead pirate is kept alive through the use of [[{{Cyborg}} cybernetics]]; the sharkmen are genetically-engineered super soldiers; and the magic is implied to be [[SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology all-pervading nanotechnology]].
* ''Webcomic/TheWaterPhoenixKing'' takes place in a dying universe with fantastic races and features from scifi, such as each species having it's own "technology" which could be nearly anything including forms of "magic"; in the instance of humanity, a poorly made martial-arts style and propaganda tool tied to an overbearing god. Who eventually dies, leaving humans at a huge disadvantage while other species still have access to more useful tech like steam-power or sorcery.



* ''Blog/LimyaaelsFantasyRants'' has tips for writing [[http://limyaael.livejournal.com/577404.html science fiction/fantasy hybrids.]]



* ''TabletopGame/TechInfantry'' is like a mish-mash between the ''TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness'' and ''Franchise/StarshipTroopers''. The titular "Tech Infantry" are an army of Mages and Werewolves in PoweredArmor.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/TechInfantry'' is like While ''Literature/ChronoHustle'' starts out as a mish-mash between sci-fi series, it starts including fantasy elements as early as the ''TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness'' and ''Franchise/StarshipTroopers''. The titular "Tech Infantry" are 4th story, in which a powerful magic user is introduced, although it is mentioned by some characters that she is just a powerful psychic. In the following story though, it is confirmed by characters with more information that she is an army of Mages and Werewolves in PoweredArmor.actual magic user. And then the 7th story introduces Greek Gods.
* ''Blog/LimyaaelsFantasyRants'' has tips for writing [[http://limyaael.livejournal.com/577404.html science fiction/fantasy hybrids.]]



* The fictonal {{MMORPG}} in which ''Franchise/{{Noob}}'' happens has TheMagicVersusTechnologyWar as a setting. The magic side is your classic MedievalEuropeanFantasy setting with some informed SteamPunk elements while the technology side's strongholds could get the setting mistaken for ScienceFiction. The fact is best shown in the novels and the ''Literature/{{Neogicia}}'' SpinOff, while the technology elements are somewhat DemotedToExtra in the webseries and almost absent in the comic.



* While ''Literature/ChronoHustle'' starts out as a sci-fi series, it starts including fantasy elements as early as the 4th story, in which a powerful magic user is introduced, although it is mentioned by some characters that she is just a powerful psychic. In the following story though, it is confirmed by characters with more information that she is an actual magic user. And then the 7th story introduces Greek Gods.
* The fictonal {{MMORPG}} in which ''Franchise/{{Noob}}'' happens has TheMagicVersusTechnologyWar as a setting. The magic side is your classic MedievalEuropeanFantasy setting with some informed SteamPunk elements while the technology side's strongholds could get the setting mistaken for ScienceFiction. The fact is best shown in the novels and the ''Literature/{{Neogicia}}'' SpinOff, while the technology elements are somewhat DemotedToExtra in the webseries and almost absent in the comic.

to:

* While ''Literature/ChronoHustle'' starts out as ''TabletopGame/TechInfantry'' is like a sci-fi series, it starts including fantasy elements as early as mish-mash between the 4th story, in which a powerful magic user is introduced, although it is mentioned by some characters that she is just a powerful psychic. In the following story though, it is confirmed by characters with more information that she is an actual magic user. And then the 7th story introduces Greek Gods.
*
''TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness'' and ''Franchise/StarshipTroopers''. The fictonal {{MMORPG}} in which ''Franchise/{{Noob}}'' happens has TheMagicVersusTechnologyWar as a setting. The magic side is your classic MedievalEuropeanFantasy setting with some informed SteamPunk elements while the technology side's strongholds could get the setting mistaken for ScienceFiction. The fact is best shown in the novels titular "Tech Infantry" are an army of Mages and the ''Literature/{{Neogicia}}'' SpinOff, while the technology elements are somewhat DemotedToExtra Werewolves in the webseries and almost absent in the comic.PoweredArmor.



* ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' has goblins, futuristic robots, princesses, wizards, hologram projectors, magic, and mini-anti-gravity chambers. All in a post-apocalyptic Earth.
* ''Franchise/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' uses an interesting take on this trope. The [[WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender first series]] was very much set in a {{Fantasy}} world, with only one faction having any substantial industrial/SteamPunk elements. However, by the time of ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' (70 years after ''Last Airbender'') technology has advanced considerably, with things like cars, airships, airplanes and even [[spoiler:HumongousMecha]] becoming more and more commonplace (especially by the time of Book 4). Essentially, ''Avatar'' shows what happens when a {{Fantasy}} setting breaks its MedievalStasis.
* In ''WesternAnimation/BarbieStarLightAdventure'', while the setting is the futuristic planet of Para-Den, the story beats are that of a fantasy quest.
* The ''Frnachise/{{Ben 10}}'' franchise has aliens, advanced tech, lovecraftesque {{Eldritch Abomination}}s and magicians from an alternate dimension, as well as a species of ''aliens made of magical energy''.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Centurions}}'' was a ScienceFiction series, filled with TechnologyPorn and set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture. On top of that, the writers introduced {{Dracula}}, [[KingArthur Merlin]], a HotWitch and her EvilTwin [[TheGloriousWarOfSisterlyRivalry sister]], an army of [[{{Mummy}} mummies]], {{Atlantis}}, PsychicPowers and accidental TimeTravel into various episodes.



* ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' involves a titular samurai warrior wielding a magic sword, who gets thrown through a time portal into the far future. During his ongoing quest to destroy a powerful shapeshifting demon who rules this world with an iron fist, he repeatedly encounters other warriors, sorcerers, demons, monsters, aliens, robots, etc. in an anachronistic world where the past meets the future.
* Similar to it's ''Franchise/DuelMasters'' inspiration, ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaijudo}}'' is pretty much a mix of sci-fi and fantasy aesthetics and tropes. It is overall a UrbanFantasy tale, involving a mystical parallel universe, spells and fantastical creatures... that can be manipulated through power gloves, are strongly technologically advanced, with the [[LightEmUp light]] ones being living, sapient robots, and the villain is pretty much a MadScientist.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' involves a titular samurai warrior wielding a magic sword, who gets thrown through a time portal into the far future. During his ongoing quest to destroy a powerful shapeshifting demon who rules this world with an iron fist, he repeatedly encounters other warriors, sorcerers, demons, monsters, aliens, robots, etc. in an anachronistic world where the past meets the future.
* Similar to it's ''Franchise/DuelMasters'' inspiration, ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaijudo}}''
''WesternAnimation/DefendersOfTheEarth'' is pretty much a mix another example of sci-fi and a series which often combines elements of fantasy aesthetics and tropes. It is overall a UrbanFantasy tale, involving a mystical parallel universe, spells and fantastical creatures... that can be manipulated through power gloves, science fiction. The extent to which this happens varies from episode to episode. Some are strongly technologically advanced, with the [[LightEmUp light]] ones being living, sapient robots, and the villain is pretty very much a MadScientist.rooted in science fiction, though most of these still contain some fantasy elements. With others, such as "The Carnival of Doctor Kalihari" or "Dracula's Potion", the fantasy element dominates.



* ''Franchise/MastersOfTheUniverse'' in its various incarnations always includes high technology and powerful magic.
* ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats'' has space travel, futuristic vehicles and the like, but also features a magic sword used by the hero and an undead SorcerousOverlord as the main villain.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' had a MagicVersusScience contest between Dr. Venture and Dr. Orpheus (a parody of Dr. Strange), reaching its climax as Orpheus produces fire from his hands. Dr. Venture's scientific one-up? A match.
* ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' has goblins, futuristic robots, princesses, wizards, hologram projectors, magic, and mini-anti-gravity chambers. All in a post-apocalyptic Earth.
* ''WesternAnimation/WinxClub'' focuses mostly on magic since the main characters are fairies with all sorts of magic powers such as [[PlayingWithFire fire]], [[GreenThumb natue]], or [[LightEmUp light]]. Fairies, witches, and wizards dominate the series. The Magic Dimension is also shown to have advanced technology such as laser guns, inter-planetary spaceships, advanced holograms, inter-dimensional phones, and the like that don't seem to rely on magic at all. Tecna is the fairy of technology, showing that magic and technology can be used together.
* ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2003'' you got 4 mutant humanoid turtles who do ninjitsu, and battle ninjas, robots, aliens, and inter-dimensional creatures to boot.
* The ''Frnachise/{{Ben 10}}'' franchise has aliens, advanced tech, lovecraftesque {{Eldritch Abomination}}s and magicians from an alternate dimension, as well as a species of ''aliens made of magical energy''.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Wizards}}'' features a SchizoTech Post-Apocalyptic world that resembles a StandardFantasySetting, in which magic-using elves and fairies wage a war against gun wielding robots, mutants, and Nazis.
* ''Franchise/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' uses an interesting take on this trope. The [[WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender first series]] was very much set in a {{Fantasy}} world, with only one faction having any substantial industrial/SteamPunk elements. However, by the time of ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' (70 years after ''Last Airbender'') technology has advanced considerably, with things like cars, airships, airplanes and even [[spoiler:HumongousMecha]] becoming more and more commonplace (especially by the time of Book 4). Essentially, ''Avatar'' shows what happens when a {{Fantasy}} setting breaks its MedievalStasis.
* In ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' the Crystal Gems are [[TheAgeless ageless]] magical beings that defend humanity, but they're also aliens with advanced technology to boot.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Centurions}}'' was a ScienceFiction series, filled with TechnologyPorn and set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture. On top of that, the writers introduced {{Dracula}}, [[KingArthur Merlin]], a HotWitch and her EvilTwin [[TheGloriousWarOfSisterlyRivalry sister]], an army of [[{{Mummy}} mummies]], {{Atlantis}}, PsychicPowers and accidental TimeTravel into various episodes.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Wakfu}}'' takes place in a universe full of a variety of different from animal people, elves, plant people, and a race of greedy old people, it also has the titular base of magic that's also the life force of all living things, gods and demons, and even reincarnation. On the Science Fiction side, it has aliens, laser weaponry, time travel, and robots.



* ''WesternAnimation/DefendersOfTheEarth'' is another example of a series which often combines elements of fantasy and science fiction. The extent to which this happens varies from episode to episode. Some are very much rooted in science fiction, though most of these still contain some fantasy elements. With others, such as "The Carnival of Doctor Kalihari" or "Dracula's Potion", the fantasy element dominates.



* The ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' episode "Nerds of a Feather" featured a war between fans of the science fiction genre (led by Baljeet) and fans of the fantasy genre (led by Buford), with Phineas and Ferb caught in the middle. They managed to end the feud by having both sides team up against a hologram of a mystical creature armed with weapons.

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* The ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' episode "Nerds Similar to it's ''Franchise/DuelMasters'' inspiration, ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaijudo}}'' is pretty much a mix of a Feather" featured a war between fans of the science fiction genre (led by Baljeet) sci-fi and fans of the fantasy genre (led by Buford), with Phineas aesthetics and Ferb caught in the middle. They managed to end the feud by having both sides team up against tropes. It is overall a hologram of UrbanFantasy tale, involving a mystical creature armed parallel universe, spells and fantastical creatures... that can be manipulated through power gloves, are strongly technologically advanced, with weapons.the [[LightEmUp light]] ones being living, sapient robots, and the villain is pretty much a MadScientist.



* In ''WesternAnimation/BarbieStarLightAdventure'', while the setting is the futuristic planet of Para-Den, the story beats are that of a fantasy quest.

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* ''Franchise/MastersOfTheUniverse'' in its various incarnations always includes high technology and powerful magic.
* The ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' episode "Nerds of a Feather" featured a war between fans of the science fiction genre (led by Baljeet) and fans of the fantasy genre (led by Buford), with Phineas and Ferb caught in the middle. They managed to end the feud by having both sides team up against a hologram of a mystical creature armed with weapons.
* ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' involves a titular samurai warrior wielding a magic sword, who gets thrown through a time portal into the far future. During his ongoing quest to destroy a powerful shapeshifting demon who rules this world with an iron fist, he repeatedly encounters other warriors, sorcerers, demons, monsters, aliens, robots, etc. in an anachronistic world where the past meets the future.
* In ''WesternAnimation/BarbieStarLightAdventure'', while ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' the setting is the Crystal Gems are [[TheAgeless ageless]] magical beings that defend humanity, but they're also aliens with advanced technology to boot.
* ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2003'' you got 4 mutant humanoid turtles who do ninjitsu, and battle ninjas, robots, aliens, and inter-dimensional creatures to boot.
* ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats'' has space travel,
futuristic planet of Para-Den, vehicles and the story beats like, but also features a magic sword used by the hero and an undead SorcerousOverlord as the main villain.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' had a MagicVersusScience contest between Dr. Venture and Dr. Orpheus (a parody of Dr. Strange), reaching its climax as Orpheus produces fire from his hands. Dr. Venture's scientific one-up? A match.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Wakfu}}'' takes place in a universe full of a variety of different from animal people, elves, plant people, and a race of greedy old people, it also has the titular base of magic that's also the life force of all living things, gods and demons, and even reincarnation. On the Science Fiction side, it has aliens, laser weaponry, time travel, and robots.
* ''WesternAnimation/WinxClub'' focuses mostly on magic since the main characters
are fairies with all sorts of magic powers such as [[PlayingWithFire fire]], [[GreenThumb natue]], or [[LightEmUp light]]. Fairies, witches, and wizards dominate the series. The Magic Dimension is also shown to have advanced technology such as laser guns, inter-planetary spaceships, advanced holograms, inter-dimensional phones, and the like that don't seem to rely on magic at all. Tecna is the fairy of technology, showing that magic and technology can be used together.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Wizards}}'' features
a fantasy quest.SchizoTech Post-Apocalyptic world that resembles a StandardFantasySetting, in which magic-using elves and fairies wage a war against gun wielding robots, mutants, and Nazis.
6th Nov '16 3:45:06 PM __Vano
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Subtrope of SpeculativeFiction, under which all {{Fantasy}} and ScienceFiction falls. Compare UrbanFantasy, GaslampFantasy, SpaceOpera, DungeonPunk, and PlanetaryRomance. Contrast HowUnscientific, where the mix of genres seems out of place, MagicVersusScience, where the both aspects are in a rivalry, and TheMagicVersusTechnologyWar, where an in-universe warfare happens between wizards and scientists. Compare and Contrast DoingInTheWizard and DoingInTheScientist, which retcons a fantasy element to a sci fi one and vice versa.

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Subtrope of SpeculativeFiction, under which all {{Fantasy}} and ScienceFiction falls. Compare UrbanFantasy, GaslampFantasy, SpaceOpera, DungeonPunk, and PlanetaryRomance. Contrast HowUnscientific, where the mix of genres seems out of place, MagicVersusScience, where the both aspects are in a rivalry, and TheMagicVersusTechnologyWar, where an in-universe warfare happens between wizards and scientists. Compare and Contrast DoingInTheWizard and DoingInTheScientist, which retcons {{retcon}}s a fantasy element to a sci fi one and vice versa.
1st Nov '16 4:24:15 PM kome360
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Added DiffLines:

** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV'' is about a modern-era king on a journey to steal back the world's ''last'' gigantic mana crystal from a medieval-era nation that has been armed to the teeth with advanced robotics technology. Half of the battles involve fighting robot legions equipped with lances and plate armor or exosuits, and the other battles involve hunting down fantastic beasts that make up most of the planet's ecosystem. Noctis uses magical teleporting swords, but he and his allies can also use artillery installations and handguns.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ScienceFantasy