History Main / ScienceFantasy

25th Jun '16 6:34:05 PM Galacton
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* The ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' franchise in general. The series has always been a big fan of robots, and machinery and has also dabbled in artificial life-form creation, aliens, time travel, and alternate dimensions but it also contains many supernatural elements like the Chaos Emeralds and gods.

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* The ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' franchise in general. general has heavy sci-fi themes. The series has always been a big fan of robots, and machinery and has also dabbled in time travel, alternate dimensions, aliens, and artificial life-form creation, aliens, time travel, and alternate dimensions creation but it also contains many supernatural elements like the Chaos Emeralds and ancient gods.
13th Jun '16 4:34:20 PM ElectroKraken
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* The universe of ''Fanfic/SonicXDarkChaos'', beings essentially a twisted mixture of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' and ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'', runs entirely with this. It combines SpaceOpera science fiction mixed in with magical Chaos powers, Lovecraftian horrors, and SufficientlyAdvancedAliens.

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* The universe of ''Fanfic/SonicXDarkChaos'', beings being essentially a twisted mixture of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' and ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'', runs entirely with this. It combines SpaceOpera science fiction mixed in with magical Chaos powers, Lovecraftian horrors, and SufficientlyAdvancedAliens.
13th Jun '16 1:42:58 PM WillKeaton
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* ''VideoGame/{{Perimeter}}'' has {{Physical God}}s with Sufficiently Advanced Technology that reside in floating cities. You lead super-advanced, ShapeShifting robotic soldiers fighting demons on alien worlds. FasterThanLightTravel is achieved by sending things through the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noosphere noosphere]].

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* ''VideoGame/{{Perimeter}}'' has {{Physical God}}s with Sufficiently Advanced Technology that reside in floating cities. You lead super-advanced, ShapeShifting robotic soldiers fighting demons on alien worlds. FasterThanLightTravel is achieved by sending things through the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noosphere noosphere]].noosphere.]]
13th Jun '16 1:41:14 PM WillKeaton
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* Literature/ASymphonyOfEternity: Is a {{SpaceOpera}} set in a universe [[{{Magitek}} where magic is used instead of technology]], the aliens are varried and diverse with no two characters alike and the story is set around the backdrop of an Epic Galactic War with roman legion like units and Greek Phalanxes fighting by the side of magically powered tanks and space fighters that share the sky and outer space with power armours and pegasus riders.

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* Literature/ASymphonyOfEternity: Is ''Literature/ASymphonyOfEternity'' is a {{SpaceOpera}} set in a universe [[{{Magitek}} where magic is used instead of technology]], the aliens are varried and diverse with no two characters alike and the story is set around the backdrop of an Epic Galactic War with roman legion like units and Greek Phalanxes fighting by the side of magically powered tanks and space fighters that share the sky and outer space with power armours and pegasus riders.
13th Jun '16 1:39:58 PM WillKeaton
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* Franchise/MassEffect fic ''[[Fanfic/CrucibleMassEffect Crucible]]'' started with the time travelled Ad Astra which continue the sci-fi theme from canon, then the existence of living stars was revealed which kinda ventured out of this, and then ghosts/souls started to popping here and there and finally ''[[{{Psychopomp}} Death]]'' himself appeared which firmly pushed the series into Fantasy theme. And don't even get into what [[spoiler: Shepard]] actually is and was or whom she's connected to.

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* Franchise/MassEffect ''Franchise/MassEffect'' fic ''[[Fanfic/CrucibleMassEffect Crucible]]'' started with the time travelled Ad Astra which continue the sci-fi theme from canon, then the existence of living stars was revealed which kinda ventured out of this, and then ghosts/souls started to popping here and there and finally ''[[{{Psychopomp}} Death]]'' himself appeared which firmly pushed the series into Fantasy theme. And don't even get into what [[spoiler: Shepard]] actually is and was or whom she's connected to.



** Not to mention the whole premise of the book is a boy trying to steal gold from a leprechaun- done up as a high-tech heist movie! The boy is an wealthy evil prodigy, the gold is a ransom, and the leprechaun is actually an agent of Lower Elements Police reconnaissance (LEPrecon).

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** Not to mention the whole premise of the book is a boy trying to steal gold from a leprechaun- done up as a high-tech heist movie! The boy is an wealthy evil prodigy, the gold is a ransom, and the leprechaun is actually an agent of Lower Elements Police reconnaissance (LEPrecon).([=LEPrecon=]).
10th Jun '16 8:32:36 AM KakuradyDrakenar
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* Disneyland, wherein fairy tale castles and {{Funny Animal}}s exist side by side with futuretech exhibits.

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* Disneyland, [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Disneyland]], wherein fairy tale castles and {{Funny Animal}}s exist side by side with futuretech exhibits.
1st Jun '16 1:30:23 AM PaulA
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** ''Literature/{{Roadmarks}}'' mixes science fiction tropes like robots and cyborgs with fantasy tropes like dragons and mystical powers in a setting where characters casually travel the length and breadth of human history. (Reader's choice which side the time travel falls on.)
31st May '16 9:10:15 PM gcreative
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* "Sufficiently Advanced Technology" by Christopher Nuttall. The story is of a Post-Singularity, Spacefaring society with vast technology that discovers an anomalous planet where wizards rule over feudal cities.

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* The Literature/StarshipsMage series by Creator/GlynnStewart uses magic as the key to faster-than-light travel, allowing humanity to colonize the stars after the war that created mage-kind.
* "Sufficiently Advanced Technology" by Christopher Nuttall.Creator/ChristopherNuttall. The story is of a Post-Singularity, Spacefaring society with vast technology that discovers an anomalous planet where wizards rule over feudal cities.
31st May '16 8:44:27 PM gcreative
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* Creator/SergeyLukyanenko's ''Literature/ALordFromPlanetEarth'' trilogy is, while set in a sci-fi universe, definitely quite a lot of fantasy elements. Similar to ''Franchise/StarWars'', the author has create the setting in such a way as to force people to fight using swords instead of much more advanced weaponry using AppliedPhlebotinum that he doesn't even bother trying to explain (a commonly-used field that prevents any destructive reaction in its radius, including nuclear and [[AntiMatter annihilation]]). The twist is, the protagonist is a former army sergeant from Earth whose experiences in 20th-century hot spots have resulted in a CombatPragmatist, who immediately tries to come up with ways to get around the fact that he has never held a sword in his life prior to the events of the book. Most characters think that his methods are dishonorable and atrocious. Also, like any fantasy story, it has a princess that requires saving.


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* Creator/SergeyLukyanenko's ''Literature/ALordFromPlanetEarth'' trilogy is, while set in a sci-fi universe, definitely quite a lot of fantasy elements. Similar to ''Franchise/StarWars'', the author has create the setting in such a way as to force people to fight using swords instead of much more advanced weaponry using AppliedPhlebotinum that he doesn't even bother trying to explain (a commonly-used field that prevents any destructive reaction in its radius, including nuclear and [[AntiMatter annihilation]]). The twist is, the protagonist is a former army sergeant from Earth whose experiences in 20th-century hot spots have resulted in a CombatPragmatist, who immediately tries to come up with ways to get around the fact that he has never held a sword in his life prior to the events of the book. Most characters think that his methods are dishonorable and atrocious. Also, like any fantasy story, it has a princess that requires saving.
31st May '16 8:43:03 PM gcreative
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* According to its author, the universe of ''Literature/PlayPlaces'' is science fantasy and ''not'' scifi, although this has yet to be seen from the ending.

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* According to its author, the universe of ''Literature/PlayPlaces'' is science fantasy ''Literature/TheActsOfCaine'' mixes a Cyberpunk future Dystopy with a HighFantasy world ''far'' DarkerAndEdgier and ''not'' scifi, although this has yet to be seen from the ending.BloodierAndGorier than your usual one.



* The ''Literature/YoungWizards'' series by Creator/DianeDuane, especially from the third book onwards. What do you do with your MagicAIsMagicA FunctionalMagic that looks suspiciously like [[ProgrammingLanguage programming]]? Go to Mars. And then explore the rest of the galaxy and meet up with aliens.

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* Creator/SergeyLukyanenko's ''Literature/ALordFromPlanetEarth'' trilogy is, while set in a sci-fi universe, definitely quite a lot of fantasy elements. Similar to ''Franchise/StarWars'', the author has create the setting in such a way as to force people to fight using swords instead of much more advanced weaponry using AppliedPhlebotinum that he doesn't even bother trying to explain (a commonly-used field that prevents any destructive reaction in its radius, including nuclear and [[AntiMatter annihilation]]). The ''Literature/YoungWizards'' series by Creator/DianeDuane, especially twist is, the protagonist is a former army sergeant from the third book onwards. What do you do with your MagicAIsMagicA FunctionalMagic that looks suspiciously like [[ProgrammingLanguage programming]]? Go Earth whose experiences in 20th-century hot spots have resulted in a CombatPragmatist, who immediately tries to Mars. And then explore the rest of the galaxy and meet come up with aliens.ways to get around the fact that he has never held a sword in his life prior to the events of the book. Most characters think that his methods are dishonorable and atrocious. Also, like any fantasy story, it has a princess that requires saving.
* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'': A blue centaur gives a bunch of kids the ability to transform into animals so they can fight monsters. Could have been a fantasy book, but it just so happens the "centaur" is an alien, and the morphing powers have perfectly scientific explanations (alters your DNA etc.)
* Creator/PiersAnthony's ''Literature/ApprenticeAdept'' series fits perfectly. The setting is one world split across two realities. One of them is called Proton, which is high tech, while the other is known as Phaze, where magic prevails.



* Heinlein's ''Literature/GloryRoad'' is a reconstruction of pulp adventure novels with an ordinary modern day man swashbuckling his way across several savage planets inhabited by "dragons" and other such beasties in search of a device that recorded the memories of all the Empresses of the Fifty Universes.
* Creator/PiersAnthony's ''Literature/ApprenticeAdept'' series fits perfectly. The setting is one world split across two realities. One of them is called Proton, which is high tech, while the other is known as Phaze, where magic prevails.
* "Sufficiently Advanced Technology" by Christopher Nuttall. The story is of a Post-Singularity, Spacefaring society with vast technology that discovers an anomalous planet where wizards rule over feudal cities.

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* Heinlein's ''Literature/GloryRoad'' Literature/BelisariusSeries has sword-bearing warriors, robots, scizo-tech, time-travel, visions of the future, and all, all mixed up.
* Samantha Shannon's ''Literature/TheBoneSeason''
is a reconstruction of pulp adventure novels set in an Alternate History CyberPunk England and adds in people with an ordinary modern day man swashbuckling his way across several savage planets inhabited by "dragons" Psychic Powers and other such beasties Rephaim, a race that combines characteristics of TheFairFolk and vampires.
* Creator/GeneWolfe's ''Literature/BookOfTheNewSun'' series is set AfterTheEnd
in search a SchizoTech world mixing feudalism (and a LowFantasy style of narration) with space travel, androids, laser weapons, etc. However, there is a device that recorded the memories protagonist gets a hold of all called the Empresses Claw of the Fifty Universes.
Conciliator which appears to be magical with no scientific explanation. Generally sold as science fiction.
** One reviewer comparing the tetralogy with the fifth book, ''The Urth of the New Sun'' described the first four books as "science fiction pretending to be fantasy", and the fifth as "fantasy pretending to be science fiction".
* Creator/PiersAnthony's ''Literature/ApprenticeAdept'' A lot of Jack Chalker's novels and series fits perfectly. The setting is one world split across two realities. One of them is mixed up the two, often with SufficientlyAdvancedAlien (or sometimes human) tech providing a backdrop in which magical-like effects (sometimes called Proton, which magic by the user who didn't understand it) were possible. The ''Literature/WellWorld'' series is high tech, an example of the alien version, while the other is known as Phaze, where magic prevails.
* "Sufficiently Advanced Technology"
''Flux and Anchor'' series had the AppliedPhlebotinum created by Christopher Nuttall. The story is humans.
** His ''Four Lords
of a Post-Singularity, Spacefaring society the Diamond'' series features four planets seeded with vast technology a sort of alien parasite that discovers an anomalous provides people with strange powers, each unique to one of the four planets. The third book in particular involves a planet where wizards rule over feudal cities.people can effectively perform magic, and it's even called magic in the book.
* The ''Literature/DanteValentine'' series is set a few hundred years in the future on an Earth where demons, {{necromancy}}, {{golem}}s, HealingHands, and [[{{Satan}} the Devil himself]] exist side-by-side with computers, firearms, {{Hover Board}}s, and FrickinLaserBeams. The series uses elements of SufficientlyAnalyzedMagic (e.g. the setting's version of [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]], the Nichtvren, reproduce partially through a retroviral infection), but [[ScienceCannotComprehendPhlebotinum not everything can apparently be analyzed]] (there's apparently an "etheric transfer" involved in Nichtvren as well).



* DavidWeber's ''Literature/HellsGate'' series is about two human civilizations coming into contact with each other through inter-universal portals. One civilization, The Union of Aracana, is a very {{Magitek}} civilization with wizards, dragons (that are genetically engineered) and the the main fighting weapons are swords and crossbows. The other one, The Empire of Sharona, has PsychicPowers and other little things like rifles, machine guns, cannons, steam engines, armored personnel carriers, trains, battleships, etc... Neither side reacts well to the existence of the other.
* Creator/AnneMcCaffrey:
** The ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' books feature intelligent, telepathic, teleporting, and occasionally time-traveling dragons. These are just genetically engineered upgrades of preexisting diminutive "dragons", which have similar powers, though this LostTechnology aspect isn't explored until the prequels. Later books also feature a supercomputer. [[WordOfGod McCaffrey has always maintained that]] the books are Science Fiction rather than fantasy, as everything is based on hard science, and she has spoken to many authorities in various sciences to work out the specifics of the world and the things that happen on it.
** In ''Literature/TheShipWho Won'', a RolePlayingGame-obsessed space ship crew discovers a planet where magic actually works. ([[spoiler:Until they discover the inhabitants are just abusing a [[MagicFromTechnology Sufficiently Advanced]] weather-control system]]). Definitely sold as Sci-Fi.
** ''[[Literature/AcornaSeries Acorna]]'' and sequels are about a foundling creature who looks like a "unicorn girl," complete with a horn on her forehead, unearthly beauty, and the power to purify water and air. Except she's not exactly magical: she's an alien, and the setting is basic science fiction with spaceships and interplanetary travel. Double subverted when it is revealed that her species is genetically-engineered by aliens who combined their own DNA with that of unicorns they rescued from Earth.
* Julian May's ''Pliocene Exile/Galactic Milieu'' books feature aliens and spaceships, but also planet-shaking psychic powers, elves and goblins. Generally sold as Sci-Fi.
** In all fairness, the elves and goblins are clearly referred to as alien races throughout the series.
* Terry Brooks's ''Literature/{{Shannara}}'' series takes place in our future, AfterTheEnd, and includes robots and mad computers, but also elves and magic. Generally sold as fantasy.



* Keith Hartman's ''Drew Parke'' books are set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture and mix holography and cloning tech with elements of MagicalRealism such as visions and RitualMagic done by a Wiccan circle.
* ''Literature/EckoRising'' by Daanie Ware combines a high tech cyberpunk world with that of fantasy.
* ''Literature/TheFirstDwarfKing'' uses this beautifully. Much of the first act takes place in a world populated by humans, elves, dwarves, orcs, and demons. Sounds like a StandardFantasySetting, right? Well, the races have gotten to the point where they use guns in the place of bows and arrows, which they wield [[SwordAndGun tandem with swords, axes, and warhammers]]. In addition, the second act reveals [[spoiler: a race of [[TheGreys aliens]] living on an island off the coast, whose society utilizes the equivalent of 21st century technology. Just to make things even more complicated, the aliens' closest allies are a race of LizardFolk who live in MedievalStasis ''by choice'', yet have also developed a fleet of airships. The lizards also have a ChurchMilitant whose members can call upon their god to summon katanas out of thin air.]] And that's just ''scratching the surface''.
** The story also uses this trope in its setting and backstory. The universe was created by [[{{God}} an omnipotent entity]] who used evolution to set the races on their course to sentience. Humans, elves, dwarves, orcs, and Redariam evolved from apes, while the Tarsi evolved from ancient reptiles. You may wipe your brains off the monitor now.
* ''Literature/{{Freakling}}'' by Lana Krumwiede is set in an after the end {{crapsaccharine world}} with some advanced technology and where people have psychic powers.
* Julian May's ''Pliocene Exile/Galactic Milieu'' books feature aliens and spaceships, but also planet-shaking psychic powers, elves and goblins. Generally sold as Sci-Fi.
** In all fairness, the elves and goblins are clearly referred to as alien races throughout the series.
* Everything that happens in ''Literature/TheGiver'' is mostly within the realm of reality, except for the psychic way memories are passed from The Giver to The Receiver. No science is involved, just physical contact and concentration, implying use of some form of magic or supernatural ability.
* Heinlein's ''Literature/GloryRoad'' is a reconstruction of pulp adventure novels with an ordinary modern day man swashbuckling his way across several savage planets inhabited by "dragons" and other such beasties in search of a device that recorded the memories of all the Empresses of the Fifty Universes.
* Creator/SimonRGreen's novels are set in a Verse that's about half supernatural horror/fantasy and half gonzo MadScience.
* Mary Gentle's ''Literature/{{Grunts}}'' starts out as a stereotypical fantasy world told from the point of view of a tribe of Orcs. There's a Last Battle, a Dark Lord, a Nameless Necromancer, halfling thieves, [[{{Mordor}} The Dark Lands]], and all the things you'd normally expect to find in a HighFantasy world. Then the orcs get their hands on modern firearms (from our universe via a magic portal). Cue an elephant made to fly with anti-gravity and a cloaking stealth dragon. Then [[BugWar Aliens]] invade!
* ''Literature/HisDarkMaterials'' should fit in this. There are plenty of things that should go well with science fiction (the fact that Dust is a particle, the numerous technologies that look as if they came from various degrees of civilization, from SteamPunk worlds to things akin to those you'd see on hard science fiction (especially in the last book), the alternate evolutionary paths of life on Earth seen in some worlds like that of the mulefa, etc.), but there are plenty of themes that should connect it to at least LowFantasy (the witches, the fact that Dust is conscious, the armoured polar bears, etc.)
* Creator/NeilGaiman and Micheal Reaves' book ''Literature/{{Interworld}}'' features a multiverse organized as an arc, with the worlds on one side being ones where magic is in control, and worlds on the other where science is the dominant paradigm. Each end is ruled by a multiplanar empire, one representing Magic and one representing Science, which are both trying to take over the entire multiverse. There is a third organization, made up of different versions of the main character, who fight both sides and have the ability to travel freely between worlds, who move about the center of the arc.



* Creator/GeneWolfe's ''Literature/BookOfTheNewSun'' series is set AfterTheEnd in a SchizoTech world mixing feudalism (and a LowFantasy style of narration) with space travel, androids, laser weapons, etc. However, there is a device the protagonist gets a hold of called the Claw of the Conciliator which appears to be magical with no scientific explanation. Generally sold as science fiction.
** One reviewer comparing the tetralogy with the fifth book, ''The Urth of the New Sun'' described the first four books as "science fiction pretending to be fantasy", and the fifth as "fantasy pretending to be science fiction".

to:

* Creator/GeneWolfe's ''Literature/BookOfTheNewSun'' series Creator/AnneMcCaffrey:
** The ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' books feature intelligent, telepathic, teleporting, and occasionally time-traveling dragons. These are just genetically engineered upgrades of preexisting diminutive "dragons", which have similar powers, though this LostTechnology aspect isn't explored until the prequels. Later books also feature a supercomputer. [[WordOfGod McCaffrey has always maintained that]] the books are Science Fiction rather than fantasy, as everything
is set AfterTheEnd based on hard science, and she has spoken to many authorities in a SchizoTech various sciences to work out the specifics of the world mixing feudalism (and and the things that happen on it.
** In ''Literature/TheShipWho Won'',
a LowFantasy style of narration) with RolePlayingGame-obsessed space travel, androids, laser ship crew discovers a planet where magic actually works. ([[spoiler:Until they discover the inhabitants are just abusing a [[MagicFromTechnology Sufficiently Advanced]] weather-control system]]). Definitely sold as Sci-Fi.
** ''[[Literature/AcornaSeries Acorna]]'' and sequels are about a foundling creature who looks like a "unicorn girl," complete with a horn on her forehead, unearthly beauty, and the power to purify water and air. Except she's not exactly magical: she's an alien, and the setting is basic science fiction with spaceships and interplanetary travel. Double subverted when it is revealed that her species is genetically-engineered by aliens who combined their own DNA with that of unicorns they rescued from Earth.
* ''Literature/TheNightLand'' by Creator/WilliamHopeHodgson takes elements such as evil spirits, haunted houses, and your classic KnightInShiningArmor and throws them in with things like air-ships, chainsaw-like
weapons, etc. However, there is a device and energy-based superweapons.
* Much of NnediOkorafor's work falls into this category. ''Literature/TheShadowSpeaker'' and ''Literature/ZahrahTheWindseeker'' both are mixtures of sci-fi and fantasy, though ''Zahrah
the protagonist gets Windseeker'' is more explicitly fantasy. Both take place in futuristic worlds that are very high tech (the former takes place in a hold of called future Earth and the Claw of the Conciliator which appears latter takes place on another planet that is similar to be Earth) that also have various people with magical with no scientific explanation. Generally sold as science fiction.
** One reviewer comparing
powers.
* Creator/OrsonScottCard, in
the tetralogy with afterword to an audio recording of ''Literature/EndersGame'', talks about trying to sell a short story based in the fifth book, world of ''The Urth Worthing Saga''. He mentions that one of his rejections said that it was a good story, but it wasn't right for the magazine, as it was Fantasy rather than Science Fiction. He said that the reason it was considered Fantasy was because none of the New Sun'' described scientific backdrop was present in the first four books as "science fiction pretending to be fantasy", story. In the end, he concluded that the only difference between Fantasy and Science Fiction is that "Fantasy has trees, SciFi has rivets."
* According to its author,
the fifth as "fantasy pretending to be universe of ''Literature/PlayPlaces'' is science fiction".fantasy and ''not'' scifi, although this has yet to be seen from the ending.



* Creator/NeilGaiman and Micheal Reaves' book ''Literature/{{Interworld}}'' features a multiverse organized as an arc, with the worlds on one side being ones where magic is in control, and worlds on the other where science is the dominant paradigm. Each end is ruled by a multiplanar empire, one representing Magic and one representing Science, which are both trying to take over the entire multiverse. There is a third organization, made up of different versions of the main character, who fight both sides and have the ability to travel freely between worlds, who move about the center of the arc.

to:

* Creator/NeilGaiman and Micheal Reaves' book ''Literature/{{Interworld}}'' features a multiverse organized as an arc, Aldrea Alien's Literature/TheRogueKing series starts with spaceships crashing on an alien world, which is largely controlled by gods and the worlds on one side being ones larger population have some form of magic.
* Terry Brooks's ''Literature/{{Shannara}}'' series takes place in our future, AfterTheEnd, and includes robots and mad computers, but also elves and magic. Generally sold as fantasy.
* "Sufficiently Advanced Technology" by Christopher Nuttall. The story is of a Post-Singularity, Spacefaring society with vast technology that discovers an anomalous planet where wizards rule over feudal cities.
* Eoin Colfer's ''The Supernaturalist'' combines a CyberPunk future with invisble (to all but a very few), soul eating [[spoiler: (or so it appears)]] cryptozoological creatures called Parasites.
* Literature/ASymphonyOfEternity: Is a {{SpaceOpera}} set in a universe [[{{Magitek}}
where magic is in control, used instead of technology]], the aliens are varried and worlds diverse with no two characters alike and the story is set around the backdrop of an Epic Galactic War with roman legion like units and Greek Phalanxes fighting by the side of magically powered tanks and space fighters that share the sky and outer space with power armours and pegasus riders.
* The 1997 novel Literature/TaleOfTheComet by RolandGreen has an alien ship crashland on a StandardFantasySetting. The survivors and the natives band together to fight a [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Borg]] {{Expy}}, and some of the aliens learn magic by watching a native Wizard.
* Christopher Stasheff's ''Literature/WarlockOfGramarye'' series dances mockingly
on the edge of SF. Most of it takes place in a cod-Elizabethan land of swords and sorcery, knights and lords, witches and fairies, but all the magic is more or less explained away by a mixture of psi powers, alien life forms and SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology.
* Creator/DavidWeber is [[Literature/HonorHarrington best known]] for his SpaceOpera and MilitaryScienceFiction, but he occasionally plays with this trope:
** The ''Literature/HellsGate'' series is about two human civilizations that come into contact with each
other through inter-universal portals. One civilization, The Union of Aracana, is a very {{Magitek}} civilization with wizards and genetically engineered dragons, where science is the dominant paradigm. Each end is ruled by a multiplanar empire, one representing Magic and one representing Science, which are both trying to take over the entire multiverse. There is a third organization, made up of different versions of the main character, who fight both sides weapons for fighting are swords and have crossbows. The second civilization, The Empire of Sharona, has PsychicPowers along with some [[BlatantLies minor advantages]] like rifles, machine guns, cannons, steam engines, trains, armored personnel carriers and battleships. Neither side reacts well to the ability to travel freely between worlds, who move about the center existence of the arc.other.
** ''Literature/InFuryBorn'' features a SpaceMarine protagonist who is possessed by a literal Greek goddess (one of the Furies, the goddesses of vengeance who torment evildoers). This makes for a somewhat jarring GenreShift in the omnibus edition after Weber added two prequel novels of straight-up MilitaryScienceFiction.
* ''Literature/TheWitchesOfKarres'' by James Schmidt is about a spaceship captain who rescues three little girls who turn out to be the titular witches. Yes, you could call it "psychic powers," but actually everyone in the book calls it "klatha magic."
* The ''Literature/YoungWizards'' series by Creator/DianeDuane, especially from the third book onwards. What do you do with your MagicAIsMagicA FunctionalMagic that looks suspiciously like [[ProgrammingLanguage programming]]? Go to Mars. And then explore the rest of the galaxy and meet up with aliens.



** ''Literature/LordOfLight'' featured apparent Hindu Gods--actually humans with mutant powers--on a far-future colony world.



* A lot of Jack Chalker's novels and series mixed up the two, often with SufficientlyAdvancedAlien (or sometimes human) tech providing a backdrop in which magical-like effects (sometimes called magic by the user who didn't understand it) were possible. The ''Literature/WellWorld'' series is an example of the alien version, while the ''Flux and Anchor'' series had the AppliedPhlebotinum created by humans.
** His ''Four Lords of the Diamond'' series features four planets seeded with a sort of alien parasite that provides people with strange powers, each unique to one of the four planets. The third book in particular involves a planet where people can effectively perform magic, and it's even called magic in the book.
* Mary Gentle's ''Literature/{{Grunts}}'' starts out as a stereotypical fantasy world told from the point of view of a tribe of Orcs. There's a Last Battle, a Dark Lord, a Nameless Necromancer, halfling thieves, [[{{Mordor}} The Dark Lands]], and all the things you'd normally expect to find in a HighFantasy world. Then the orcs get their hands on modern firearms (from our universe via a magic portal). Cue an elephant made to fly with anti-gravity and a cloaking stealth dragon. Then [[BugWar Aliens]] invade!
* ''Literature/HisDarkMaterials'' should fit in this. There are plenty of things that should go well with science fiction (the fact that Dust is a particle, the numerous technologies that look as if they came from various degrees of civilization, from SteamPunk worlds to things akin to those you'd see on hard science fiction (especially in the last book), the alternate evolutionary paths of life on Earth seen in some worlds like that of the mulefa, etc.), but there are plenty of themes that should connect it to at least LowFantasy (the witches, the fact that Dust is conscious, the armoured polar bears, etc.)
* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'': A blue centaur gives a bunch of kids the ability to transform into animals so they can fight monsters. Could have been a fantasy book, but it just so happens the "centaur" is an alien, and the morphing powers have perfectly scientific explanations (alters your DNA etc.)
* Creator/OrsonScottCard, in the afterword to an audio recording of ''Literature/EndersGame'', talks about trying to sell a short story based in the world of ''The Worthing Saga''. He mentions that one of his rejections said that it was a good story, but it wasn't right for the magazine, as it was Fantasy rather than Science Fiction. He said that the reason it was considered Fantasy was because none of the scientific backdrop was present in the story. In the end, he concluded that the only difference between Fantasy and Science Fiction is that "Fantasy has trees, SciFi has rivets."
* Literature/BelisariusSeries has sword-bearing warriors, robots, scizo-tech, time-travel, visions of the future, and all, all mixed up.
* The 1997 novel Literature/TaleOfTheComet by RolandGreen has an alien ship crashland on a StandardFantasySetting. The survivors and the natives band together to fight a [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Borg]] {{Expy}}, and some of the aliens learn magic by watching a native Wizard.
* ''Literature/{{Freakling}}'' by Lana Krumwiede is set in an after the end {{crapsaccharine world}} with some advanced technology and where people have psychic powers.
* Keith Hartman's ''Drew Parke'' books are set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture and mix holography and cloning tech with elements of MagicalRealism such as visions and RitualMagic done by a Wiccan circle.
* ''Literature/TheNightLand'' by Creator/WilliamHopeHodgson takes elements such as evil spirits, haunted houses, and your classic KnightInShiningArmor and throws them in with things like air-ships, chainsaw-like weapons, and energy-based superweapons.
* Much of NnediOkorafor's work falls into this category. ''Literature/TheShadowSpeaker'' and ''Literature/ZahrahTheWindseeker'' both are mixtures of sci-fi and fantasy, though ''Zahrah the Windseeker'' is more explicitly fantasy. Both take place in futuristic worlds that are very high tech (the former takes place in a future Earth and the latter takes place on another planet that is similar to Earth) that also have various people with magical powers.
* Creator/SergeyLukyanenko's ''Literature/ALordFromPlanetEarth'' trilogy is, while set in a sci-fi universe, definitely quite a lot of fantasy elements. Similar to ''Franchise/StarWars'', the author has create the setting in such a way as to force people to fight using swords instead of much more advanced weaponry using AppliedPhlebotinum that he doesn't even bother trying to explain (a commonly-used field that prevents any destructive reaction in its radius, including nuclear and [[AntiMatter annihilation]]). The twist is, the protagonist is a former army sergeant from Earth whose experiences in 20th-century hot spots have resulted in a CombatPragmatist, who immediately tries to come up with ways to get around the fact that he has never held a sword in his life prior to the events of the book. Most characters think that his methods are dishonorable and atrocious. Also, like any fantasy story, it has a princess that requires saving.
* ''Literature/TheWitchesOfKarres'' by James Schmidt is about a spaceship captain who rescues three little girls who turn out to be the titular witches. Yes, you could call it "psychic powers," but actually everyone in the book calls it "klatha magic."
* ''Literature/EckoRising'' by Daanie Ware combines a high tech cyberpunk world with that of fantasy.
* ''Literature/TheActsOfCaine'' mixes a Cyberpunk future Dystopy with a HighFantasy world ''far'' DarkerAndEdgier and BloodierAndGorier than your usual one.
* Samantha Shannon's ''Literature/TheBoneSeason'' is set in an Alternate History CyberPunk England and adds in people with Psychic Powers and Rephaim, a race that combines characteristics of TheFairFolk and vampires.
* Creator/SimonRGreen's novels are set in a Verse that's about half supernatural horror/fantasy and half gonzo MadScience.
* Eoin Colfer's ''The Supernaturalist'' combines a CyberPunk future with invisble (to all but a very few), soul eating [[spoiler: (or so it appears)]] cryptozoological creatures called Parasites.
* Christopher Stasheff's ''Literature/WarlockOfGramarye'' series dances mockingly on the edge of SF. Most of it takes place in a cod-Elizabethan land of swords and sorcery, knights and lords, witches and fairies, but all the magic is more or less explained away by a mixture of psi powers, alien life forms and SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology.
* Aldrea Alien's Literature/TheRogueKing series starts with spaceships crashing on an alien world, which is largely controlled by gods and the larger population have some form of magic.
* Everything that happens in ''Literature/TheGiver'' is mostly within the realm of reality, except for the psychic way memories are passed from The Giver to The Receiver. No science is involved, just physical contact and concentration, implying use of some form of magic or supernatural ability.
* ''Literature/TheFirstDwarfKing'' uses this beautifully. Much of the first act takes place in a world populated by humans, elves, dwarves, orcs, and demons. Sounds like a StandardFantasySetting, right? Well, the races have gotten to the point where they use guns in the place of bows and arrows, which they wield [[SwordAndGun tandem with swords, axes, and warhammers]]. In addition, the second act reveals [[spoiler: a race of [[TheGreys aliens]] living on an island off the coast, whose society utilizes the equivalent of 21st century technology. Just to make things even more complicated, the aliens' closest allies are a race of LizardFolk who live in MedievalStasis ''by choice'', yet have also developed a fleet of airships. The lizards also have a ChurchMilitant whose members can call upon their god to summon katanas out of thin air.]] And that's just ''scratching the surface''.
** The story also uses this trope in its setting and backstory. The universe was created by [[{{God}} an omnipotent entity]] who used evolution to set the races on their course to sentience. Humans, elves, dwarves, orcs, and Redariam evolved from apes, while the Tarsi evolved from ancient reptiles. You may wipe your brains off the monitor now.
* The ''Literature/DanteValentine'' series is set a few hundred years in the future on an Earth where demons, {{necromancy}}, {{golem}}s, HealingHands, and [[{{Satan}} the Devil himself]] exist side-by-side with computers, firearms, {{Hover Board}}s, and FrickinLaserBeams. The series uses elements of SufficientlyAnalyzedMagic (e.g. the setting's version of [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]], the Nichtvren, reproduce partially through a retroviral infection), but [[ScienceCannotComprehendPhlebotinum not everything can apparently be analyzed]] (there's apparently an "etheric transfer" involved in Nichtvren as well).
* Creator/DavidWeber's ''Literature/InFuryBorn'' features a SpaceMarine protagonist who is possessed by a literal Greek goddess (one of the Furies, the goddesses of vengeance who torment evildoers). This makes for a somewhat jarring GenreShift in the omnibus edition after Weber added two prequel novels of straight-up MilitaryScienceFiction.
* Literature/ASymphonyOfEternity: Is a {{SpaceOpera}} set in a universe [[{{Magitek}} where magic is used instead of technology]], the aliens are varried and diverse with no two characters alike and the story is set around the backdrop of an Epic Galactic War with roman legion like units and Greek Phalanxes fighting by the side of magically powered tanks and space fighters that share the sky and outer space with power armours and pegasus riders.

to:

* A lot of Jack Chalker's novels and series mixed up the two, often ** ''Literature/LordOfLight'' featured apparent Hindu Gods--actually humans with SufficientlyAdvancedAlien (or sometimes human) tech providing mutant powers--on a backdrop in which magical-like effects (sometimes called magic by the user who didn't understand it) were possible. The ''Literature/WellWorld'' series is an example of the alien version, while the ''Flux and Anchor'' series had the AppliedPhlebotinum created by humans.
** His ''Four Lords of the Diamond'' series features four planets seeded with a sort of alien parasite that provides people with strange powers, each unique to one of the four planets. The third book in particular involves a planet where people can effectively perform magic, and it's even called magic in the book.
* Mary Gentle's ''Literature/{{Grunts}}'' starts out as a stereotypical fantasy world told from the point of view of a tribe of Orcs. There's a Last Battle, a Dark Lord, a Nameless Necromancer, halfling thieves, [[{{Mordor}} The Dark Lands]], and all the things you'd normally expect to find in a HighFantasy world. Then the orcs get their hands on modern firearms (from our universe via a magic portal). Cue an elephant made to fly with anti-gravity and a cloaking stealth dragon. Then [[BugWar Aliens]] invade!
* ''Literature/HisDarkMaterials'' should fit in this. There are plenty of things that should go well with science fiction (the fact that Dust is a particle, the numerous technologies that look as if they came from various degrees of civilization, from SteamPunk worlds to things akin to those you'd see on hard science fiction (especially in the last book), the alternate evolutionary paths of life on Earth seen in some worlds like that of the mulefa, etc.), but there are plenty of themes that should connect it to at least LowFantasy (the witches, the fact that Dust is conscious, the armoured polar bears, etc.)
* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'': A blue centaur gives a bunch of kids the ability to transform into animals so they can fight monsters. Could have been a fantasy book, but it just so happens the "centaur" is an alien, and the morphing powers have perfectly scientific explanations (alters your DNA etc.)
* Creator/OrsonScottCard, in the afterword to an audio recording of ''Literature/EndersGame'', talks about trying to sell a short story based in the world of ''The Worthing Saga''. He mentions that one of his rejections said that it was a good story, but it wasn't right for the magazine, as it was Fantasy rather than Science Fiction. He said that the reason it was considered Fantasy was because none of the scientific backdrop was present in the story. In the end, he concluded that the only difference between Fantasy and Science Fiction is that "Fantasy has trees, SciFi has rivets."
* Literature/BelisariusSeries has sword-bearing warriors, robots, scizo-tech, time-travel, visions of the future, and all, all mixed up.
* The 1997 novel Literature/TaleOfTheComet by RolandGreen has an alien ship crashland on a StandardFantasySetting. The survivors and the natives band together to fight a [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Borg]] {{Expy}}, and some of the aliens learn magic by watching a native Wizard.
* ''Literature/{{Freakling}}'' by Lana Krumwiede is set in an after the end {{crapsaccharine world}} with some advanced technology and where people have psychic powers.
* Keith Hartman's ''Drew Parke'' books are set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture and mix holography and cloning tech with elements of MagicalRealism such as visions and RitualMagic done by a Wiccan circle.
* ''Literature/TheNightLand'' by Creator/WilliamHopeHodgson takes elements such as evil spirits, haunted houses, and your classic KnightInShiningArmor and throws them in with things like air-ships, chainsaw-like weapons, and energy-based superweapons.
* Much of NnediOkorafor's work falls into this category. ''Literature/TheShadowSpeaker'' and ''Literature/ZahrahTheWindseeker'' both are mixtures of sci-fi and fantasy, though ''Zahrah the Windseeker'' is more explicitly fantasy. Both take place in futuristic worlds that are very high tech (the former takes place in a future Earth and the latter takes place on another planet that is similar to Earth) that also have various people with magical powers.
* Creator/SergeyLukyanenko's ''Literature/ALordFromPlanetEarth'' trilogy is, while set in a sci-fi universe, definitely quite a lot of fantasy elements. Similar to ''Franchise/StarWars'', the author has create the setting in such a way as to force people to fight using swords instead of much more advanced weaponry using AppliedPhlebotinum that he doesn't even bother trying to explain (a commonly-used field that prevents any destructive reaction in its radius, including nuclear and [[AntiMatter annihilation]]). The twist is, the protagonist is a former army sergeant from Earth whose experiences in 20th-century hot spots have resulted in a CombatPragmatist, who immediately tries to come up with ways to get around the fact that he has never held a sword in his life prior to the events of the book. Most characters think that his methods are dishonorable and atrocious. Also, like any fantasy story, it has a princess that requires saving.
* ''Literature/TheWitchesOfKarres'' by James Schmidt is about a spaceship captain who rescues three little girls who turn out to be the titular witches. Yes, you could call it "psychic powers," but actually everyone in the book calls it "klatha magic."
* ''Literature/EckoRising'' by Daanie Ware combines a high tech cyberpunk world with that of fantasy.
* ''Literature/TheActsOfCaine'' mixes a Cyberpunk future Dystopy with a HighFantasy world ''far'' DarkerAndEdgier and BloodierAndGorier than your usual one.
* Samantha Shannon's ''Literature/TheBoneSeason'' is set in an Alternate History CyberPunk England and adds in people with Psychic Powers and Rephaim, a race that combines characteristics of TheFairFolk and vampires.
* Creator/SimonRGreen's novels are set in a Verse that's about half supernatural horror/fantasy and half gonzo MadScience.
* Eoin Colfer's ''The Supernaturalist'' combines a CyberPunk future with invisble (to all but a very few), soul eating [[spoiler: (or so it appears)]] cryptozoological creatures called Parasites.
* Christopher Stasheff's ''Literature/WarlockOfGramarye'' series dances mockingly on the edge of SF. Most of it takes place in a cod-Elizabethan land of swords and sorcery, knights and lords, witches and fairies, but all the magic is more or less explained away by a mixture of psi powers, alien life forms and SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology.
* Aldrea Alien's Literature/TheRogueKing series starts with spaceships crashing on an alien world, which is largely controlled by gods and the larger population have some form of magic.
* Everything that happens in ''Literature/TheGiver'' is mostly within the realm of reality, except for the psychic way memories are passed from The Giver to The Receiver. No science is involved, just physical contact and concentration, implying use of some form of magic or supernatural ability.
* ''Literature/TheFirstDwarfKing'' uses this beautifully. Much of the first act takes place in a world populated by humans, elves, dwarves, orcs, and demons. Sounds like a StandardFantasySetting, right? Well, the races have gotten to the point where they use guns in the place of bows and arrows, which they wield [[SwordAndGun tandem with swords, axes, and warhammers]]. In addition, the second act reveals [[spoiler: a race of [[TheGreys aliens]] living on an island off the coast, whose society utilizes the equivalent of 21st century technology. Just to make things even more complicated, the aliens' closest allies are a race of LizardFolk who live in MedievalStasis ''by choice'', yet have also developed a fleet of airships. The lizards also have a ChurchMilitant whose members can call upon their god to summon katanas out of thin air.]] And that's just ''scratching the surface''.
** The story also uses this trope in its setting and backstory. The universe was created by [[{{God}} an omnipotent entity]] who used evolution to set the races on their course to sentience. Humans, elves, dwarves, orcs, and Redariam evolved from apes, while the Tarsi evolved from ancient reptiles. You may wipe your brains off the monitor now.
* The ''Literature/DanteValentine'' series is set a few hundred years in the future on an Earth where demons, {{necromancy}}, {{golem}}s, HealingHands, and [[{{Satan}} the Devil himself]] exist side-by-side with computers, firearms, {{Hover Board}}s, and FrickinLaserBeams. The series uses elements of SufficientlyAnalyzedMagic (e.g. the setting's version of [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]], the Nichtvren, reproduce partially through a retroviral infection), but [[ScienceCannotComprehendPhlebotinum not everything can apparently be analyzed]] (there's apparently an "etheric transfer" involved in Nichtvren as well).
* Creator/DavidWeber's ''Literature/InFuryBorn'' features a SpaceMarine protagonist who is possessed by a literal Greek goddess (one of the Furies, the goddesses of vengeance who torment evildoers). This makes for a somewhat jarring GenreShift in the omnibus edition after Weber added two prequel novels of straight-up MilitaryScienceFiction.
* Literature/ASymphonyOfEternity: Is a {{SpaceOpera}} set in a universe [[{{Magitek}} where magic is used instead of technology]], the aliens are varried and diverse with no two characters alike and the story is set around the backdrop of an Epic Galactic War with roman legion like units and Greek Phalanxes fighting by the side of magically powered tanks and space fighters that share the sky and outer space with power armours and pegasus riders.
far-future colony world.
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