History Main / SciFiGhetto

5th Jan '17 2:35:07 PM DustSnitch
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So, you're watching television and come across a show that's set on another planet and has aliens, spaceships and time travel in it. Clearly a work of science fiction, you would assume. However, you also happen to come across an interview with the creator, who is taking pains to stress that his or her work is absolutely ''not'' science fiction and anyone who thinks it can be described as such is misguided or just plain wrong. But it has ''aliens, spaceships and TimeTravel in it;'' how can it ''not'' [[NoTrueScotsman be science fiction]]?

Because of the ScifiGhetto. The Sci-Fi Ghetto reflects a long-lasting stigma which has been applied towards the science fiction genre, which frequently leads creators and marketers to shun "Sci-Fi", "Science Fiction" or "Fantasy" labels as much as possible, even on shows that have clear science fiction or fantastical elements. It also reflects the tendency for critics, academics and other creators to near-automatically dismiss or disdain works which cannot escape this label being applied, regardless of relative quality or merit. Conversely, if these critics, creators and academics ''do'' feel that the work possesses merit by their standards, expect them to strenuously insist that the work is ''not'' science fiction or fantasy [[NoTrueScotsman (How could it be? It's ''good'')]], regardless of how many tortuous hoops they might have to jump through in order to do so.

to:

So, you're watching television and come across a show that's set on another planet and has aliens, spaceships and time travel in it. Clearly a work of science fiction, you would assume. However, you also happen to come across an interview with the creator, who is taking pains to stress that his or her work is absolutely ''not'' science fiction and anyone who thinks it can be described as such is misguided or just plain wrong. But it has ''aliens, spaceships and TimeTravel in it;'' how can it ''not'' [[NoTrueScotsman be science fiction]]?

Because of the ScifiGhetto.
The Sci-Fi Ghetto reflects a long-lasting stigma which has been applied towards the science fiction genre, which frequently leads creators and marketers to shun "Sci-Fi", "Science Fiction" or "Fantasy" labels as much as possible, even on shows that have clear science fiction or fantastical elements. It also reflects the tendency for critics, academics and other creators to near-automatically dismiss or disdain works which cannot escape this label being applied, regardless of relative quality or merit. Conversely, if these critics, creators and academics ''do'' feel that the work possesses merit by their standards, expect them to strenuously insist that the work is ''not'' science fiction or fantasy [[NoTrueScotsman (How could it be? It's ''good'')]], regardless of how many tortuous hoops they might have to jump through in order to do so.
3rd Jan '17 2:27:31 PM rjd1922
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* It can be said that the best-known author of that kind of "ghetto literature" gave their work a bent that set it apart from others of the same category, often combining it with another, usually entirely different genre. Creator/JRRTolkien's body of work had actually more in common with ancient and medieval mythology (which scholars usually don't dismiss outright as frivolous or unworthy of attention) than modern fantasy, though he pretty much gave birth to that genre. Creator/HPLovecraft gave his horror stories a strong scientific-fictional bent, often writing them in the form of letters, diaries or reports. Creator/JKRowling wrote a story that at that times reads more as a boarding school/coming of age/mystery novel, where the fantasy only offers the framework. Creator/CSLewis wrote children novels that also qualified as allegories. Creator/FrankHerbert's ''Franchise/{{Dune}}'' is set so far in the future that it might as well take place in an entirely different universe, and has strong fantasy elements in it. Creator/RobertAHeinlein included social criticism in his work. Creator/GeorgeOrwell's ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' and Aldous Huxley's ''Literature/BraveNewWorld'' are more comments on politics and ideology which might have been set in entirely different genres without altering the stories that much (in fact, Orwell pulled that off when writing Literature/AnimalFarm which has a lot in common with 1984, despite being the one in a sci-fi-setting and the other a fable).

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* It can be said that the best-known author of that kind of "ghetto literature" gave their work a bent that set it apart from others of the same category, often combining it with another, usually entirely different genre. Creator/JRRTolkien's body of work had actually more in common with ancient and medieval mythology (which scholars usually don't dismiss outright as frivolous or unworthy of attention) than modern fantasy, though he pretty much gave birth to that genre. Creator/HPLovecraft gave his horror stories a strong scientific-fictional bent, often writing them in the form of letters, diaries or reports. Creator/JKRowling wrote a story that at that times reads more as a boarding school/coming of age/mystery novel, where the fantasy only offers the framework. Creator/CSLewis wrote children novels that also qualified as allegories. Creator/FrankHerbert's ''Franchise/{{Dune}}'' is set so far in the future that it might as well take place in an entirely different universe, and has strong fantasy elements in it. Creator/RobertAHeinlein included social criticism in his work. Creator/GeorgeOrwell's ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' and Aldous Huxley's ''Literature/BraveNewWorld'' are more comments on politics and ideology which might have been set in entirely different genres without altering the stories that much (in fact, Orwell pulled that off when writing Literature/AnimalFarm ''Literature/AnimalFarm'' which has a lot in common with 1984, ''1984'', despite being the one in a sci-fi-setting and the other a fable).
3rd Jan '17 2:12:27 PM rjd1922
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* ''AtlantaNights'' itself is not a work of science fiction (ostensibly it is a murder mystery) but it merits special mention as its creation lies in the invocation of the SciFiGhetto. Publish America is a Vanity Press whose website claims that it only accepts high quality manuscripts from authors but in actual fact publish anything at the cost of the author. It owns a website called Authors Market in which it stated that in two separate articles that science fiction and fantasy are by nature bad. A set of sci-fi and fantasy authors retaliated and produced a stupendously rubbish manuscript that was accepted by Publish America. Here's a quote from one of the articles, ''Only trust your eyes'', which inspired this retaliation:

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* ''AtlantaNights'' ''Literature/AtlantaNights'' itself is not a work of science fiction (ostensibly it is a murder mystery) but it merits special mention as its creation lies in the invocation of the SciFiGhetto. Publish America is a Vanity Press whose website claims that it only accepts high quality manuscripts from authors but in actual fact publish anything at the cost of the author. It owns a website called Authors Market in which it stated that in two separate articles that science fiction and fantasy are by nature bad. A set of sci-fi and fantasy authors retaliated and produced a stupendously rubbish manuscript that was accepted by Publish America. Here's a quote from one of the articles, ''Only trust your eyes'', which inspired this retaliation:
17th Dec '16 11:13:18 AM DavidDelony
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It's not just the works, either -- [[TheLawOfFanJackassery unfortunate]] [[FanDumb stereotypes]] of science fiction fans as a bunch of weird dorky obsessives with no social skills hasn't helped the overall impression of science fiction as a weird, off-putting, and aloof body of work. Of course, when a literary author is a weird obsessive with no social skills, his introversion and eccentricity are signs of his genius.

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It's not just the works, either -- [[TheLawOfFanJackassery unfortunate]] [[FanDumb stereotypes]] of science fiction fans as a bunch of weird dorky obsessives with no social skills hasn't helped the overall impression of science fiction as a weird, off-putting, and aloof body of work. Of course, when a literary author is a weird obsessive with no social skills, [[BunnyEarsLawyer his introversion and eccentricity are signs of his genius.genius]].
5th Dec '16 1:38:04 PM AgentSniff
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Added DiffLines:

** And never mind that the film was nominated for a japanese academy award.
27th Nov '16 10:20:18 AM 8088ben
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* In-universe example: In one episode of ''Series/{{Frasier}}, Frasier and Niles discover that one of their favorite Shakespearean actors is now making a living playing an android on a ''Star Trek'' [[Expy]]. They attempt to get him back into "real" acting by producing a one-man stage show.

to:

* In-universe example: In one episode of ''Series/{{Frasier}}, ''Series/{{Frasier}}'', Frasier and Niles discover that one of their favorite Shakespearean actors is now making a living playing an android on a ''Star Trek'' [[Expy]].{{Expy}}. They attempt to get him back into "real" acting by producing a one-man stage show.
27th Nov '16 10:16:47 AM 8088ben
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** Not to mention it's based on a novel by Robert J. Sawyer, whose website is called sfwriter.com

to:

** Not to mention it's based on a novel by Robert J. Sawyer, whose website is called sfwriter.comcom.
* In-universe example: In one episode of ''Series/{{Frasier}}, Frasier and Niles discover that one of their favorite Shakespearean actors is now making a living playing an android on a ''Star Trek'' [[Expy]]. They attempt to get him back into "real" acting by producing a one-man stage show.
22nd Nov '16 7:50:26 AM eroock
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Because of the SciFiGhetto. The Sci-Fi Ghetto reflects a long-lasting stigma which has been applied towards the science fiction genre, which frequently leads creators and marketers to shun "Sci-Fi", "Science Fiction" or "Fantasy" labels as much as possible, even on shows that have clear science fiction or fantastical elements. It also reflects the tendency for critics, academics and other creators to near-automatically dismiss or disdain works which cannot escape this label being applied, regardless of relative quality or merit. Conversely, if these critics, creators and academics ''do'' feel that the work possesses merit by their standards, expect them to strenuously insist that the work is ''not'' science fiction or fantasy [[NoTrueScotsman (How could it be? It's ''good'')]], regardless of how many tortuous hoops they might have to jump through in order to do so.

to:

Because of the SciFiGhetto.ScifiGhetto. The Sci-Fi Ghetto reflects a long-lasting stigma which has been applied towards the science fiction genre, which frequently leads creators and marketers to shun "Sci-Fi", "Science Fiction" or "Fantasy" labels as much as possible, even on shows that have clear science fiction or fantastical elements. It also reflects the tendency for critics, academics and other creators to near-automatically dismiss or disdain works which cannot escape this label being applied, regardless of relative quality or merit. Conversely, if these critics, creators and academics ''do'' feel that the work possesses merit by their standards, expect them to strenuously insist that the work is ''not'' science fiction or fantasy [[NoTrueScotsman (How could it be? It's ''good'')]], regardless of how many tortuous hoops they might have to jump through in order to do so.
21st Nov '16 4:28:37 PM Thesedaysthosedays
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Because of the SciFiGhetto. The Sci-Fi Ghetto reflects a long-lasting stigma which has been applied towards the science fiction genre, which frequently leads creators and marketers to shun "Sci-Fi", "Science Fiction" or "Fantasy" labels as much as possible, even on shows that have clear science fiction or fantastical elements. It also reflects the tendency for critics, academics and other creators to near-automatically dismiss or disdain works which cannot escape this label being applied, regardless of relative quality or merit. Conversely, if these critics, creators and academics ''do'' feel that the work possesses merit by their standards, expect them to strenuously insist that the work is ''not'' science fiction or fantasy (How could it be? It's ''good''), regardless of how many tortuous hoops they might have to jump through in order to do so.

to:

Because of the SciFiGhetto. The Sci-Fi Ghetto reflects a long-lasting stigma which has been applied towards the science fiction genre, which frequently leads creators and marketers to shun "Sci-Fi", "Science Fiction" or "Fantasy" labels as much as possible, even on shows that have clear science fiction or fantastical elements. It also reflects the tendency for critics, academics and other creators to near-automatically dismiss or disdain works which cannot escape this label being applied, regardless of relative quality or merit. Conversely, if these critics, creators and academics ''do'' feel that the work possesses merit by their standards, expect them to strenuously insist that the work is ''not'' science fiction or fantasy [[NoTrueScotsman (How could it be? It's ''good''), ''good'')]], regardless of how many tortuous hoops they might have to jump through in order to do so.
10th Nov '16 5:29:19 PM nombretomado
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* SF writer JohnCWright has [[http://www.scifiwright.com/2013/03/science-fiction-what-is-it-good-for/ devoted an essay to the subject]], speculating that the ghettoization came about because mainstream literature, steeped in the post-war nihilism and pessimism, felt distrustful and critical towards any work which appealed to colorful imagination.

to:

* SF writer JohnCWright Creator/JohnCWright has [[http://www.scifiwright.com/2013/03/science-fiction-what-is-it-good-for/ devoted an essay to the subject]], speculating that the ghettoization came about because mainstream literature, steeped in the post-war nihilism and pessimism, felt distrustful and critical towards any work which appealed to colorful imagination.
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