History Main / SciFiGhetto

13th Apr '18 8:15:12 PM crazysamaritan
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* Creator/TerryPratchett, however, ''was'' a fantasy writer and ''also'' had stuff to say. He's quoted as saying, however, that he didn't like the term "MagicRealism", because it basically means "a polite way of saying you write fantasy and is more acceptable to certain people." He also commented that ''all'' of his books are considered fantasy and nothing else, regardless of the other genres he dabbles in.
** He also said that people from his publishers told him that they went into bookshops and asked why his hugely successful books weren't being displayed in more prominent places. The answers amounted to "We don't like the fantasy to get out." [[note]]This is an author who's been compared to Creator/GeoffreyChaucer, Creator/CharlesDickens and Creator/MarkTwain by serious critics.[[/note]]
* This quote from the [[http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/21/books/21ballard.html?_r=1=1&sq=JG%20Ballard&st=cse New York Times obituary of J.G. Ballard]]: "His fabulistic style led people to review his work as science fiction... But that's like calling 'Literature/BraveNewWorld' science fiction, or '[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'."
* Works by known science fiction authors tend to be classified as science fiction even when they're not. Creator/IsaacAsimov was particularly subject to that, given the breadth of his writing - Asimov wrote copious amounts of ''non''-fiction, which you would think would be exempt from this problem by its very nature. ''An Easy Introduction to the Slide Rule'' was in a local bookstore's science fiction section.
** Likewise, Creator/AndreNorton has written historical novels, spy stories, and Gothic romances. Guess where you'll find them ('''if''' you find them) in a bookstore or library (granted, at least two of the romances have fantasy elements).
** Inverted by a local public library, which had Creator/{{Harry Turtledove}}'s ''Guns of the South'' (a novel about time travellers changing the outcome of the US Civil War) classed as "Historical Fiction". The cover shows Robert E. Lee holding an AK-47.

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* Creator/TerryPratchett, however, ''was'' Creator/TerryPratchett:
** As
a fantasy writer and ''also'' writer, Pratchett had stuff to say. several opinions on the ghetto. He's quoted as saying, however, saying that he didn't doesn't like the term "MagicRealism", because it basically means "a polite way of saying you write fantasy and is more acceptable to certain people." He also commented that ''all'' of his books are considered fantasy and nothing else, regardless of the other genres he dabbles in.
** He also said Pratchett has shared that people from his publishers told him that they went into bookshops and asked why his hugely successful books weren't being displayed in more prominent places. The answers amounted to "We don't like the fantasy to get out." [[note]]This is an author who's been compared to Creator/GeoffreyChaucer, Creator/CharlesDickens and Creator/MarkTwain by serious critics.[[/note]]
* This A quote from the [[http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/21/books/21ballard.html?_r=1=1&sq=JG%20Ballard&st=cse New York Times obituary of J.G. Ballard]]: "His fabulistic style led people to review his work as science fiction... But that's like calling 'Literature/BraveNewWorld' ''Literature/BraveNewWorld'' science fiction, or '[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'.''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]''."
* Works by Creator/IsaacAsimov:
** Given the breadth of his writing, Dr Asimov frequently encountered a problem where, because he's a
known science fiction authors tend to ScienceFiction author, his works would be classified shelved as science fiction even when they're not. Creator/IsaacAsimov was particularly subject to that, given the breadth of his writing - Dr Asimov wrote copious amounts of ''non''-fiction, which you would think would be exempt from this problem by its very nature. ''An Easy Introduction to the Slide Rule'' was in a local bookstore's science fiction section.
** Likewise, In the introduction to ''Literature/TalesOfTheBlackWidowers'', Dr Asimov talks about readers who write him questions about why a ScienceFiction writer thinks he can write about {{Creator/Shakespeare}}, why a chemist thinks he can write about history, why a {{Creator/Shakespeare}} scholar would bother with ScienceFiction, why a historian would bother writing chemistry essays, and so on, ad nauseum it would seem.
*
Creator/AndreNorton has written historical novels, spy stories, and Gothic romances. Guess where you'll find them ('''if''' you find them) in a bookstore or library (granted, at least two of the romances have fantasy elements).
** * Inverted by a local public library, which had Creator/{{Harry Turtledove}}'s ''Guns of the South'' (a novel about time travellers changing the outcome of the US Civil War) classed as "Historical Fiction". The cover shows Robert E. Lee holding an AK-47.
7th Apr '18 9:05:12 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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** [[https://medium.com/cinenation-show/this-is-why-we-can-t-have-nice-things-the-witch-and-horror-fandom-s-gatekeepers-b2c0bb0d8f9a#.nrrwf3bw4 This article]] by Jason Coffman draws much the same conclusion. He argues that, by narrowing the definition of "horror" strictly to violent, in-your-face grindhouse fare, they're essentially denying that it can be art, dismissing the vast artistic potential within the genre, and feeding the stereotypes that others have of horror films and their fans.

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** * [[https://medium.com/cinenation-show/this-is-why-we-can-t-have-nice-things-the-witch-and-horror-fandom-s-gatekeepers-b2c0bb0d8f9a#.nrrwf3bw4 This article]] by Jason Coffman draws much the same conclusion. He argues that, by narrowing the definition of "horror" strictly to violent, in-your-face grindhouse fare, they're essentially denying that it can be art, dismissing the vast artistic potential within the genre, and feeding the stereotypes that others have of horror films and their fans.




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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oal2RzlQWFA This video]] by Ryan Hollinger discussed the idea of "post-horror", a term [[https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/jul/06/post-horror-films-scary-movies-ghost-story-it-comes-at-night coined]] by Steve Rose of ''The Guardian'' to describe 2010s horror films like ''Film/ItComesAtNight'', ''Film/AGhostStory'', and several of the aforementioned that "[replace] [[JumpScare jump-scares]] with [[NothingIsScarier existential dread]]". Hollinger thinks that the term is rooted in the Ghetto and an attempt to rationalize one's enjoyment of certain films, saying that, while these films may be using horror tropes and iconography to explore heavier themes, at the end of the day they're still fundamentally horror films at heart, even if they don't adhere to the stereotypes of modern horror. He argues that, if one takes the argument to its logical conclusion, then ''Film/TheExorcist'', often held to be one of the scariest films ever made, could be considered "post-horror", as it uses its story primarily to explore Father Karras' crisis of faith while mining little of its horror from jump scares.
26th Mar '18 12:19:31 PM Gravidef
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* [[Creator/AgathaChristie Dame Agatha Christie]] won the title of "The Queen of Crime," but she's also in the running for the Queen of Underappreciated Authors. Here is a short list of her many, ''many'' achievements. She published 66 mystery novels and 14 crime short story collections in her lifetime; the Guinness Book of World Records lists her as the best-selling novelist ''ever'' (it's joked that the only people that outsell her are "God and Shakespeare," as the Bible and the Bard's collected works are the only books above hers on the top-selling list); she wrote ''Theatre/TheMousetrap'', which is the longest continually-running play in the history of the world; she was the first recipient of the Mystery Writers of America's "Grand Master" Award, their highest honor (and she's not even American!); her novel ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'' was voted the best mystery novel of all time by 600 fellow crime writers in 2016; she holds the record for most-translated novelist in history, with her books written in at least 103 languages--to put this one into perspective, the second-most translated author is Jules Verne, and her total number of translations outdo his by over 2,500; and she's one of only eight authors (and one of only two women, the other being Creator/JKRowling) in the world to have an individual book (in her case, ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'') to sell over 100 million copies. Christie also invented and codified countless mystery and, in some cases, overall fiction tropes, including the TwistEnding, EverybodyDidIt, FakingTheDead, LittleOldLadyInvestigates, NeverFoundTheBody, and UnreliableNarrator; no less than Isaac Asimov once commented that it was impossible for a crime author to come up with an "original" solution to a mystery, because Christie ''had already done them all.'' She also [[ShownTheirWork took the time to make her books accurate]], using her real-life time as a physician's assistant to research and memorize poisons for her villains to use. In addition to all of this, Christie was among the first writers to explore the psychology of criminals and explain their motives rather than simply treating them as scheming villains; she was also among the first authors to create a "universe" in her books, as both Poirot and Miss Marple, her other famed detective, age over the course of her novels, with recurring characters falling in love/getting married and children growing from babies to adults. And if this wasn't enough, she was ALSO one of the first novelists to use the AuthorAvatar trope in the form of Ariadne Oliver, a popular crime novelist who's created a Finnish detective (to match Christie's Belgian sleuth Hercule Poirot); Christie was even willing to [[SelfDeprecation poke fun at herself]] for mistakes in her previous books, complain about her fictional detective being a headache, demystify the writing process, and even [[TakeThatAudience take potshots at her fans]] for being overly obsessed with minutia through Oliver. But despite this ''massive'' list of incredible accomplishments that would make any author swoon, her books are shuttled to the mystery section of most libraries and bookstores, often squeezed between every other author on the shelf (they ''are'' mysteries, true, but you'd think they'd get more prominence), and her name rarely comes up in discussions of the greatest authors ever. Sigh...

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* [[Creator/AgathaChristie Dame Agatha Christie]] won the title of "The Queen of Crime," but she's also in the running for the Queen of Underappreciated Authors. Here is a short list of her many, ''many'' achievements. She published 66 mystery novels and 14 crime short story collections in her lifetime; the Guinness Book of World Records lists her as the best-selling novelist ''ever'' (it's joked that the only people that outsell her are "God and Shakespeare," as the Bible and the Bard's collected works are the only books above hers on the top-selling list); she wrote ''Theatre/TheMousetrap'', which is the longest continually-running play in the history of the world; she was the first recipient of the Mystery Writers of America's "Grand Master" Award, their highest honor (and she's not even American!); her novel ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'' was voted the best mystery novel of all time by 600 fellow crime writers in 2016; she holds the record for most-translated novelist in history, with her books written in at least 103 languages--to put this one into perspective, the second-most translated author is Jules Verne, and her total number of translations outdo his by over 2,500; and she's one of only eight authors (and one of only two women, the other being Creator/JKRowling) in the world to have an individual book (in her case, ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'') to sell over 100 million copies. Christie also invented and codified countless mystery and, in some cases, overall fiction tropes, including the TwistEnding, EverybodyDidIt, FakingTheDead, LittleOldLadyInvestigates, NeverFoundTheBody, and UnreliableNarrator; no less than Isaac Asimov once commented that it was impossible for a crime author to come up with an "original" solution to a mystery, because Christie ''had already done them all.'' She also [[ShownTheirWork took the time to make her books accurate]], using her real-life time as a physician's assistant to research and memorize poisons for her villains to use. In addition to all of this, Christie was among the first writers to explore the psychology of criminals and explain their motives rather than simply treating them as scheming villains; she was also among the first authors to create a "universe" in her books, as both Poirot and Miss Marple, her other famed detective, age over the course of her novels, with recurring characters falling in love/getting married and children growing from babies to adults. And if this wasn't enough, she was ALSO one of the first novelists to use the AuthorAvatar trope in the form of Ariadne Oliver, a popular crime novelist who's created a Finnish detective (to match Christie's Belgian sleuth Hercule Poirot); Christie was even willing to [[SelfDeprecation poke fun at herself]] for mistakes in her previous books, complain about her fictional detective being a headache, demystify the writing process, and even [[TakeThatAudience take potshots at her fans]] for being overly obsessed with minutia through Oliver. But despite this ''massive'' list of incredible accomplishments that would make any author swoon, her books are shuttled to the mystery section of most libraries and bookstores, often squeezed between every other author on the shelf (they ''are'' mysteries, true, but you'd think they'd get more prominence), and her name rarely comes up in discussions of the greatest authors ever. Sigh...
26th Mar '18 12:18:12 PM Gravidef
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* [[Creator/AgathaChristie Dame Agatha Christie]] won the title of "The Queen of Crime," but she's also in the running for the Queen of Underappreciated Authors. Here is a short list of her many, ''many'' achievements. She published 66 mystery novels and 14 crime short story collections in her lifetime; the Guinness Book of World Records lists her as the best-selling novelist ''ever'' (it's joked that the only people that outsell her are "God and Shakespeare," as the Bible and the Bard's collected works are the only things above her books on the list); she wrote ''Theatre/TheMousetrap'', which is the longest continually-running play in the history of the world; she was the first recipient of the Mystery Writers of America's "Grand Master" Award, their highest honor (and she's not even American!); her novel ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'' was voted the best mystery novel of all time by 600 fellow crime writers in 2016; she holds the record for most-translated novelist in history, with her books written in 103 languages at least--to put this one into perspective, the second-most translated author is Jules Verne, and her books outdo his on that scale by over 2,500; and she's one of only eight authors (and one of only two women, the other being [[Creator/JKRowling]]) to have an individual book (in her case, ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'') to sell over 100 million copies. Christie also invented and codified countless mystery and, in some cases, overall fiction tropes, including the TwistEnding, EveryoneDidIt, FakingTheDead, NeverFoundTheBody, and UnreliableNarrator; no less than Isaac Asimov once commented that it was impossible for a crime author to come up with an "original" solution to a mystery, because Christie ''had done them all.'' She also [[ShownTheirWork took the time to research her books]], using her real-life time as a physician's assistant to research and memorize poisons for her villains to use. In addition to all of this, Christie was among the first writers to explore the psychology of a criminal and explain their motives rather than simply treating them as scheming villains. And if this wasn't enough, she ALSO was one of the first novelists to use the AuthorAvatar trope in the form of Ariadne Oliver, a popular crime novelist who's created a Finnish detective (to match Christie's Belgian sleuth Hercule Poirot); Christie was even willing to [[SelfDeprication poke fun at herself]] for mistakes in her previous books, demystify the writing process, and even [[TakeThatAudience take potshots at her fans]] for being overly obsessed with minutia through Oliver. But despite this ''massive'' list of incredible accomplishments that would make any author swoon, her books are shuttled to the mystery section of most libraries and bookstores, often squeezed between every other author on the shelf (they ''are'' mysteries, true, but you'd think they'd get more prominence), and her name rarely comes up in discussions of the greatest authors ever. Sigh...

to:

* [[Creator/AgathaChristie Dame Agatha Christie]] won the title of "The Queen of Crime," but she's also in the running for the Queen of Underappreciated Authors. Here is a short list of her many, ''many'' achievements. She published 66 mystery novels and 14 crime short story collections in her lifetime; the Guinness Book of World Records lists her as the best-selling novelist ''ever'' (it's joked that the only people that outsell her are "God and Shakespeare," as the Bible and the Bard's collected works are the only things books above her books hers on the top-selling list); she wrote ''Theatre/TheMousetrap'', which is the longest continually-running play in the history of the world; she was the first recipient of the Mystery Writers of America's "Grand Master" Award, their highest honor (and she's not even American!); her novel ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'' was voted the best mystery novel of all time by 600 fellow crime writers in 2016; she holds the record for most-translated novelist in history, with her books written in at least 103 languages at least--to languages--to put this one into perspective, the second-most translated author is Jules Verne, and her books total number of translations outdo his on that scale by over 2,500; and she's one of only eight authors (and one of only two women, the other being [[Creator/JKRowling]]) Creator/JKRowling) in the world to have an individual book (in her case, ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'') to sell over 100 million copies. Christie also invented and codified countless mystery and, in some cases, overall fiction tropes, including the TwistEnding, EveryoneDidIt, EverybodyDidIt, FakingTheDead, LittleOldLadyInvestigates, NeverFoundTheBody, and UnreliableNarrator; no less than Isaac Asimov once commented that it was impossible for a crime author to come up with an "original" solution to a mystery, because Christie ''had already done them all.'' She also [[ShownTheirWork took the time to research make her books]], books accurate]], using her real-life time as a physician's assistant to research and memorize poisons for her villains to use. In addition to all of this, Christie was among the first writers to explore the psychology of a criminal criminals and explain their motives rather than simply treating them as scheming villains. villains; she was also among the first authors to create a "universe" in her books, as both Poirot and Miss Marple, her other famed detective, age over the course of her novels, with recurring characters falling in love/getting married and children growing from babies to adults. And if this wasn't enough, she was ALSO was one of the first novelists to use the AuthorAvatar trope in the form of Ariadne Oliver, a popular crime novelist who's created a Finnish detective (to match Christie's Belgian sleuth Hercule Poirot); Christie was even willing to [[SelfDeprication [[SelfDeprecation poke fun at herself]] for mistakes in her previous books, complain about her fictional detective being a headache, demystify the writing process, and even [[TakeThatAudience take potshots at her fans]] for being overly obsessed with minutia through Oliver. But despite this ''massive'' list of incredible accomplishments that would make any author swoon, her books are shuttled to the mystery section of most libraries and bookstores, often squeezed between every other author on the shelf (they ''are'' mysteries, true, but you'd think they'd get more prominence), and her name rarely comes up in discussions of the greatest authors ever. Sigh...
26th Mar '18 12:10:45 PM Gravidef
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Added DiffLines:

* [[Creator/AgathaChristie Dame Agatha Christie]] won the title of "The Queen of Crime," but she's also in the running for the Queen of Underappreciated Authors. Here is a short list of her many, ''many'' achievements. She published 66 mystery novels and 14 crime short story collections in her lifetime; the Guinness Book of World Records lists her as the best-selling novelist ''ever'' (it's joked that the only people that outsell her are "God and Shakespeare," as the Bible and the Bard's collected works are the only things above her books on the list); she wrote ''Theatre/TheMousetrap'', which is the longest continually-running play in the history of the world; she was the first recipient of the Mystery Writers of America's "Grand Master" Award, their highest honor (and she's not even American!); her novel ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'' was voted the best mystery novel of all time by 600 fellow crime writers in 2016; she holds the record for most-translated novelist in history, with her books written in 103 languages at least--to put this one into perspective, the second-most translated author is Jules Verne, and her books outdo his on that scale by over 2,500; and she's one of only eight authors (and one of only two women, the other being [[Creator/JKRowling]]) to have an individual book (in her case, ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'') to sell over 100 million copies. Christie also invented and codified countless mystery and, in some cases, overall fiction tropes, including the TwistEnding, EveryoneDidIt, FakingTheDead, NeverFoundTheBody, and UnreliableNarrator; no less than Isaac Asimov once commented that it was impossible for a crime author to come up with an "original" solution to a mystery, because Christie ''had done them all.'' She also [[ShownTheirWork took the time to research her books]], using her real-life time as a physician's assistant to research and memorize poisons for her villains to use. In addition to all of this, Christie was among the first writers to explore the psychology of a criminal and explain their motives rather than simply treating them as scheming villains. And if this wasn't enough, she ALSO was one of the first novelists to use the AuthorAvatar trope in the form of Ariadne Oliver, a popular crime novelist who's created a Finnish detective (to match Christie's Belgian sleuth Hercule Poirot); Christie was even willing to [[SelfDeprication poke fun at herself]] for mistakes in her previous books, demystify the writing process, and even [[TakeThatAudience take potshots at her fans]] for being overly obsessed with minutia through Oliver. But despite this ''massive'' list of incredible accomplishments that would make any author swoon, her books are shuttled to the mystery section of most libraries and bookstores, often squeezed between every other author on the shelf (they ''are'' mysteries, true, but you'd think they'd get more prominence), and her name rarely comes up in discussions of the greatest authors ever. Sigh...
16th Mar '18 11:30:47 AM BeingofUniverse
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Inversions of the ghetto occur too. One example of such a case is with the label "postmodern", which is often lumped with critically acclaimed authors, regardless whether or not their work actually is this. Some authors that critics considered to be "postmodern" even had spoken out publicly that their works do not fit that genre. To most critics, "postmodern" works can not even be genre writing. The term does have an actual use (ThisVeryWiki is postmodernist since its picking apart tropes and use LampshadeHanging on them, constantly breaks the fourth wall, uses quotations and is switching from perspective to perspective depending on the article--these are just a few elements of the vast genre that postmodernism actually is), but only those who take the term for what it actually is will tell you that there are genres that can be defined by their usage of postmodern elements (such as RealityTV).

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Inversions of the ghetto occur too. One example of such a case is with the label "postmodern", which is often lumped with critically acclaimed authors, regardless whether or not their work actually is this. Some authors that critics considered to be "postmodern" even had spoken out publicly that their works do not fit that genre. To most critics, "postmodern" works can not even be genre writing. The term does have an actual use (ThisVeryWiki is postmodernist since its picking apart tropes and use LampshadeHanging on them, constantly breaks the fourth wall, uses quotations and is switching from perspective to perspective depending on the article--these are just a few elements of the vast genre that postmodernism actually is), use, but only those who take the term for what it actually is will tell you that there are genres that can be defined by their usage of postmodern elements (such as RealityTV).
5th Mar '18 6:17:08 AM JamesAustin
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* ''Film/GetOut'' averted this and MinorityShowGhetto so far. It gets rave reviews from critics, is a huge commercial success, and touted as the ''most'' succesful directorial debut by a black director. It is classified as horror by both critics and Peele himself repeatedly, altough some classified it as "social thriller".
** And now the movie ''impressively'' broke OutOfTheGhetto with a whooping ''four'' Oscar nominations for Best Actor, Screenplay, Director, and ''Best Picture'', a first for horror movies since the below-mentioned ''Film/SilenceOfTheLambs'' and ''Film/TheSixthSense'', and both was released in ''the nineties''.

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* ''Film/GetOut'' ''Film/GetOut2017'' averted this and MinorityShowGhetto so far. It gets rave reviews from critics, is a huge commercial success, and touted as the ''most'' succesful directorial debut by a black director. It is classified as horror by both critics and Peele himself repeatedly, altough some classified it as "social thriller".
**
thriller". And now the movie ''impressively'' broke OutOfTheGhetto with a whooping ''four'' Oscar nominations for Best Actor, Screenplay, Director, and ''Best Picture'', a first for horror movies since the below-mentioned ''Film/SilenceOfTheLambs'' and ''Film/TheSixthSense'', and both was released in ''the nineties''.
4th Feb '18 7:33:31 AM moloch
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* The novels of Kazuo Ishiguro get this pretty hard, and their author seems to agree. The New York Times book reviewer who tackled ''Literature/NeverLetMeGo'' expresses distaste that Ishiguro would write anything remotely resembling a "pop genre -- sci-fi thriller" novel, then claims that it "quietly upends [the genre's] banal conventions." With the publication of his new novel ''The Buried Giant'' just around the corner, Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin herself [[http://bookviewcafe.com/blog/2015/03/02/are-they-going-to-say-this-is-fantasy/ tears into Ishiguro for endorsing the ghetto.]]

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* The novels of Kazuo Ishiguro get this pretty hard, and their author seems to agree. hard. The New York Times book reviewer who tackled ''Literature/NeverLetMeGo'' expresses expressed distaste that Ishiguro would write anything remotely resembling a "pop genre -- sci-fi thriller" novel, then claims claimed that it "quietly upends [the genre's] banal conventions." With the publication of his new novel When ''The Buried Giant'' just around the corner, was being published, Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin herself [[http://bookviewcafe.com/blog/2015/03/02/are-they-going-to-say-this-is-fantasy/ tears tore into Ishiguro for endorsing the ghetto.]]ghetto,]] leading Ishiguro to [[https://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/mar/08/kazuo-ishiguro-rebuffs-genre-snobbery write a rebuttal]].
4th Feb '18 6:27:58 AM moloch
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* ''Charley's War''. It's probably the most underestimated British graphic novel/magazine comic series sold in the States, made worse by bookstores stacking them along with ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'' and other ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'' titles - because Pat Mills wrote the plot. It's an extremely realistic series of WWI war stories.

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* ''Charley's War''. ''[[Comicbook/{{Battle}} Charley's War]]''. It's probably the most underestimated British graphic novel/magazine comic series sold in the States, made worse by bookstores stacking them along with ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'' and other ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'' titles - because Pat Mills wrote the plot.it. It's an extremely realistic series of WWI war stories.
2nd Feb '18 6:53:10 PM nombretomado
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** The ghetto probably contributed to the belief by everyone involved in the production (even Creator/GeorgeLucas) that the original film would flop; in the midst of the NewHollywood era, it was assumed audiences wanted to see [[TrueArtIsAngsty mature films about mature subjects]], not some silly SpaceOpera fluff.

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** The ghetto probably contributed to the belief by everyone involved in the production (even Creator/GeorgeLucas) that the original film would flop; in the midst of the NewHollywood UsefulNotes/NewHollywood era, it was assumed audiences wanted to see [[TrueArtIsAngsty mature films about mature subjects]], not some silly SpaceOpera fluff.
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