History Main / SaveGameLimits

3rd May '18 9:46:58 AM ZuTheSkunk
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* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'' allows {{Suspend Save}}s at [[SavePoint owl statues]], but the resulting save disappears once restored. Permanent saves only occur when returning to the Dawn of the First Day, losing all disposable items, un-deposited Rupees, and unfinished quests. The game taxes the UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}} to its limit, even with the included RAM expansion. Thankfully, the game's GroundhogDayLoop mechanic doubled as a way to take some pressure off the console by simplifying the save system -- only Link's weapons, {{Plot Coupon}}s, and banked Rupees need to be saved; where Link can go in the game world is [[EquipmentBasedProgression determined entirely by what he is carrying]], not by the status of the world itself. The Suspend Save was added as an Western-only AntiFrustrationFeature, but further taxes the console as a trade-off and drops the amount of save files from three to two, with the save RAM presumably being allocated in a manner that makes room for the additional owl save data -- indeed, the Suspend Save feature was absent from the Japanese release, which did have 3 save files.[[note]]This can be averted if you copy your owl statue file over to the other

to:

* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'' allows {{Suspend Save}}s at [[SavePoint owl statues]], but the resulting save disappears once restored. Permanent saves only occur when returning to the Dawn of the First Day, losing all disposable items, un-deposited Rupees, and unfinished quests. The game taxes the UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}} to its limit, even with the included RAM expansion. Thankfully, the game's GroundhogDayLoop mechanic doubled as a way to take some pressure off the console by simplifying the save system -- only Link's weapons, {{Plot Coupon}}s, and banked Rupees need to be saved; where Link can go in the game world is [[EquipmentBasedProgression determined entirely by what he is carrying]], not by the status of the world itself. The Suspend Save was added as an Western-only AntiFrustrationFeature, but further taxes the console as a trade-off and drops the amount of save files from three to two, with the save RAM presumably being allocated in a manner that makes room for the additional owl save data -- indeed, the Suspend Save feature was absent from the Japanese release, which did have 3 save files.[[note]]This can be averted if you copy your owl statue file over to the otherother[[/note]]
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3rd May '18 9:35:47 AM ZuTheSkunk
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* In ''VideoGame/RavenswordShadowlands'', the game only allows you to make a single save per character while playing, and does not allow loading a save unless you're in the main menu. While in the main menu, you ''do'' have an option to go to an earlier save, but the game can only store 10 of them for one character at a time; if the point you wanted to go back to happened to be placed earlier than the earliest save available, then you're out of luck.



* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'' allows {{Suspend Save}}s at [[SavePoint owl statues]], but the resulting save disappears once restored. Permanent saves only occur when returning to the Dawn of the First Day, losing all disposable items, un-deposited Rupees, and unfinished quests. The game taxes the UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}} to its limit, even with the included RAM expansion. Thankfully, the game's GroundhogDayLoop mechanic doubled as a way to take some pressure off the console by simplifying the save system -- only Link's weapons, {{Plot Coupon}}s, and banked Rupees need to be saved; where Link can go in the game world is [[EquipmentBasedProgression determined entirely by what he is carrying]], not by the status of the world itself. The Suspend Save was added as an Western-only AntiFrustrationFeature, but further taxes the console as a trade-off and drops the amount of save files from three to two, with the save RAM presumably being allocated in a manner that makes room for the additional owl save data -- indeed, the Suspend Save feature was absent from the Japanese release, which did have 3 save files.[[note]]This can be averted if you copy your owl statue file over to the other file, resulting in a form of SaveScumming. This almost has to be done on the GCN version, which suffers from freezing.[[/note]] The save system was revamped for the [[UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS 3DS]] [[VideoGameRemake remake]], now making saving at the owl (and feather) statues permanent. The trade-off is that the game no longer saves when you go back in time as well, but this is more than mitigated by several additional statues to save at. A majority of them also act as WarpWhistle destinations, so they're easy to come by once you learn the Song of Soaring.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'' allows saving at [[SavePoint bird statues]]. Likewise, ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkBetweenWorlds A Link Between Worlds]]'' allows saving at weather vanes (which are bird-themed).
* In ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaCircleOfTheMoon'', a game for the Game Boy Advance, save points are particularly far away from each other, and you have no way of quicksaving, making the game very un-portable.
** ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDissonance'' attempted to correct this with a "Quick Save" feature, but all that did was save any changes since you last used a savepoint, so you still have to restart from a savepoint. This is both borderline useless for it's intended purpose of letting people take breaks, and ''highly abusable'' as a way to escape danger or quickly get back from one of the game's many dead ends.
** ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaChroniclesOfSorrow Aria of Sorrow]]'' finally gets this right; its quick save feature "suspends" your game and restarts you at the room you were in when you load up your file again.
* The last FPS to use the Doom engine, ''{{VideoGame/Strife}}'', had only ''one'' save slot. You could save as often as you wanted, but good luck if you saved next to a boss while being low on health or ammo and with no suitable powerups in sight. Even the producers found this to be too harsh, and removed the limit in a later patch.
* In the original ''Videogame/CrashBandicoot1996'', the only way to save your game (or collect a password) was to go from the overworld map into a level, collect a series of hidden bonus tokens and beat the ensuing bonus level, or collecting a gem by beating a level without dying while breaking all the crates in the area. And when you restored the game, you snapped back to just three lives. Fortunately, the sequels made it easy to save your progress in-between levels and keep your lives, and the remake in the ''VideoGame/CrashBandicootNSaneTrilogy'' allows you to save whenever on the world map, abandoning the password system.
* In the ''VideoGame/HarryPotter'' game series, there are completely made up "save books" in games one through three. In the first game, there was the annoying limit that generally there were only two to three save books on a level, and none throughout the extremely difficult, tedious, and easy-to-die endless-pit jumping puzzle. On another note, the jumping puzzle has lethal pits in it, despite the fact that it was made by a teacher to train you how to use spells. You'd think that the SPCC would start suing Hogwarts. Oh, and the level was completely silent, except every few minutes, at which point an evil laugh would sound.
** Also, in the first game, save books could only be used once. They would never reappear. This wasn't normally a problem since you couldn't return to previous levels, but the last save point in the game is a few feet in front of a treasure chest containing a few chocolate frogs (this game's healing items). And every single time you die at the final boss, you have to open the treasure chest again (which takes about 5 seconds of animation, plus actually collecting the chocolate frogs, which move around randomly).
** Unless you go for debug mode, you also have to watch the cutscene before fighting the boss again, which takes 30-40 seconds. The two subsequent games replenished the saving books after a short while, and they auto-saved your progress before most battles.
* ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' games:
** The original NES platformers have ''no saving whatsoever.'' ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'', without {{Warp Whistle}}s, takes the average player several hours to complete. In theory, ''[=SMB3=]'' tells you the location of one of the warp whistles so you can skip almost half of the game with it next time. In practice, it doesn't, as the whistle is said to be at "the end of the third world". It's actually the end of the third level of the first world, and even knowing that, [[GuideDangIt outside information]] is needed to know how to get to it.
** The ''VideoGame/SuperMarioAllStars'' remake isn't much better. Aside from saving the current world, the only completed levels saved are fortresses, so only some levels can be skipped (via shortcuts opened after completing said fortresses) after restarting after a game over. (As with ''Super Mario World'', this is averted in the GBA version.)
** ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'':
*** This SNES cart is the first Mario game with a save system, but one can only save after beating specific levels. Some save points work only once. A switch palace, castle or fortress has a save point when first clearing it, but not when replaying it. A ghost house is better; one can replay a ghost house to save again. Many players walk the long way back to Donut Ghost House, the easiest save point (and the one closest to the Top Secret Area, [[GameBreaker where you can restock on power-ups and extra lives indefinitely]]). One can also save again at Sunken Ghost Ship or in half the [[BrutalBonusLevel Special Zone]]. This save system is a form of FakeDifficulty, because there is no technical limitation for why the other levels are not save points.
*** SMW does not save extra lives. You say you have 99 lives on that file? Say goodbye to 94 of them if you save and quit! Of course, you can always [[InfiniteOneUps just go get more]], but still!
*** This is averted in the GBA port, which allows saving anywhere, and does save extra lives.
** ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros'' for UsefulNotes/NintendoDS has once of the worst save systems ever to disgrace a portable system. You can save only after beating a boss or mini-boss, or collecting and spending 5 star coins to open a bonus area. The game's supply of star coins and bonus areas is finite. There's no temporary save system like that other DS offender ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII''. (As with any DS game, you can suspend ''New Super Mario Bros.'' by simply closing the DS to put the game in Sleep Mode, and plugging the DS into an AC adapter.) Your "reward" for finishing the game is the ability to save after every level, proving that this save system was not a technical limitation (it was, in fact, done deliberately as a throwback to older Mario games).\\
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Its successors, starting with ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosWii'', added a SuspendSave system, so players can make a temporary save after any level. The limits on permanent saves, and the reward for finishing the game, are the same as in the DS game. The Wii game has no bonus areas where one can save, but the 3DS game has them again.
** ''Videogame/PaperMario'' has only save points, which means you have to continue from the last place where you saved. You better save frequently, as not only is this game long, it also has many side-missions that could require you to battle lots of enemies, and seeing as Mario's stats stay very small (Maximum 50 HP) for the whole game, it's easy to get a Game Over. Luckily, there is a save point just before all "dungeons", just before all rooms where a boss is fought (optional bosses not included), and in all towns.\\
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The sequels also have save points. ''Videogame/PaperMarioStickerStar'' has a better save system because it saves automatically after every level.
** ''Videogame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga'' and its two following sequels also need you to save on save points. The fourth game in the series, ''Videogame/MarioAndLuigiDreamTeam'' finally adds a save-whenever-you-want feature, but keeps the save blocks as a reminder, [[SuspiciousVideogameGenerosity specially before boss rooms]].
* ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' has an interesting aversion, in that the game seems to ''pretend'' that it's just a suspend save- you have to quit to save, and it calls it "suspending play", but it's really just a save ([[SaveScumming and you can abuse it by continually re-loading if you make mistakes]]).
** In the original GBA titles, [[ArtifactTitle it was indeed a suspend save]], making the games a fair bit more difficult.
* In ''Franchise/SilentHill'' games, you can only save at notepads (first game), red "squares" (second game), red symbols (third game), and Henry's diary/journal (fourth game). Unless you're playing the PC versions, which allow you to save at any point.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Cadaver}}'', you have to pay the gods to save your game, requiring an exponentially larger sacrifice each time. Thus, save too often and you won't be able to save on the last level.
* ''VideoGame/ViewtifulJoe''. Besides being able to save in-between each chapter, you can only do so ''once'' in the middle of each one, even if there are more checkpoints. So, those endless swarms of ultra-strong enemies? Those bosses that you can't seem to get any good hits in? Those time-consuming puzzles? And god forbid, the dreaded boss rush near the end of the game? Yeah, you'll be seeing them again in the same levels. A lot.
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' games will only let you [[StealthPun get saved at church]] (or a king in the first three games), and make you read through long repetitive dialogues when you do so.
** The portable remakes of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIII'' and ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIV'' offer a suspend save you can use outside of dungeons, but III's erases itself when you reload. IV's DS remake (possibly due to a GoodBadBug) does not, and the remake of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestV'' on the same system works the same way with its quick-save feature. (On the other hand, ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX'' has the typical one-time quick-save feature.) On the plus side, if your party gets wiped out, you go back to the last save point with half your gold and all your exp and items, making this less annoying than FF III.
** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' had a 'Dragon Potion' which allowed you to save anywhere... but only once. However, a player can replay this game for years and possibly NEVER get one, with the item being a rare drop from a specific kind of Babble. In fact, one would only know of their existence if they [[GuideDangit read about it form a guide]].
** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestMonsters'' lets you save any time you are in town (although it auto-saves when you breed a monster, something which was thankfully removed from the sequel). In order to keep the feel and tension of other [=DWs=], saving is mostly disabled in dungeons however. Luckily, there are certain randomly generated rooms you can save in that may spawn every 3 floors, and in longer dungeons you will definitely run into them at least once. Additionally there is an single-use item called a 'Bookmark' that allows saving in the middle of a dungeon, you can buy as many of them as needed once you get about halfway through the main game.
*** ''Dragon Warrior Monsters: Joker'' pointlessly changed the dungeon system, and only allows you to save at checkpoints on the island. Fortunately these are usually fairly easy to reach. ''Dragon Warrior Monsters: Joker 2'' then turns around and allows you to save at almost any location in the game.
** The Android / iOS port of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII'' mercifully adds a quick-save system that allows you to save anywhere in dungeons and the overworld.
** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX'' has only one main save slot, however, making separate adventuring files impossible.
* ''VideoGame/{{Turok}} 2'' features long maze-like worlds that can take hours to finish. Which wouldn't be entirely horrible if there were more than 3 save points in the entire level! Nothing like being ready to quit but either having to backtrack 15 minutes to the last save point first or forcing yourself to press on for another half hour instead. The PC version (at least the remastered version) averts this, as you can save normally as well.
* ''VideoGame/{{Kuon}}'' had a stipulation that you could only save at certain points near a river, and even then only by collecting 'vessels'; every save consumed one of these vessels.
* ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' has a long CheckpointStarvation at the beginning, but allows you to save pretty much any time outside of battle and cutscenes...except for a prolonged duration at the end where you have to go through three boss fights and multiple cutscenes. It's an ObviousRulePatch against an {{Unwinnable}} situation, since you can't leave the area and there are no baddies to LevelGrind against; if you go back after beating the game, you will be able to save there since beating the game unlocks what's essentially a level select.
* ''VideoGame/LegacyOfKain: Soul Reaver'' had an interesting savegame system: You could save anywhere in the world and the game would store the entire game world as it is when you do, but restoring the game throws you back into the starting room, requiring players to use the many teleport gates spread across Nosgoth to get back to where they were.
* ''VideoGame/FarCry'':
** ''VideoGame/FarCry1'' uses a checkpoint system of saving, with check points scattered around the levels... and, rather infamously, offers no other save options whatsoever. However, since the levels are fairly big and can't account for every path taken, it's quite possible to miss checkpoints, or go stumbling around an area trying to find the arbitrary threshold that enables the checkpoint. Furthermore, some checkpoints are spaced far enough apart that you have to go through several tough fights before reaching the next checkpoint, making these sequences examples of TrialAndErrorGameplay. Quicksaving is [[DummiedOut only available]] through usage of the console or editing a configuration file to actually bind the function to a key.
** ''VideoGame/FarCry2'', on consoles, only allowed you to save at safe houses or after fast-traveling via bus station. Averted in the PC version, where you can save (and quicksave) whenever, wherever, and as many times as you want.
** ''VideoGame/FarCry3'' and on have a variation, where you can save wherever you want so long as you're not in the middle of a mission, but loading the save will place you at the nearest safe area rather than leaving you exactly where you were. The games also have limited numbers of save files, ''3'' and ''[[VideoGame/FarCry3BloodDragon Blood Dragon]]'' limited to three... and ''VideoGame/FarCry4'' limited to just ''one''.
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' allows you to save at Tartarus' foyer, which you can access at any time (provided you find the teleporter back to the first floor). Sensible enough. However, outside Tartarus, you can only save at the dorm; exiting the dorm and reentering it immediately (even in daylight) will make it nighttime immediately. This forces you to play a whole day of choices, [[RelationshipValues Social Links]], and shopping, without saving. In extreme cases (such as weekdays) making a bad choice during an afternoon quest will force the player to replay the entire schoolday, plus the previous night - or worse, if it's an exam week (which runs uninterrupted from Monday to Saturday), the ''entire week''. The PSP version mitigates this somewhat by adding a save point in the classroom, providing a more convenient opportunity to save during the day.
* ''VideoGame/TimeCrisis'', Pick one. Any one. While in the arcade it makes sense not to allow saving all of the home versions also have ridiculous saving systems. You can save after each section, but that only allows you to play that section. You have to play the entire game through in one if you want to unlock every stage.
* ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'' and ''VideoGame/MakaiKingdom'' has a fairly reasonable save limit in that you can as many times as you like in as many slots as you like (so long as you have the system memory to do so), but only outside of battle. The only place where this gets tricky are the Item Worlds where you have to make your way through at least 10 battles in a row (Assuming you don't use your [[StealthPun Mr. Gency's Exit]] item to exit early, which also saved your progress in the item). No continues, so you quickly learn to save often and before every battle.
** Though, the point of the item world levels is that [[MarathonLevel you have to go through them without a chance to heal]]. The place you can heal is usually in the spot you can save, so saving is a required sacrifice.
** And then the Item World concept goes from tricky to plain horrific when you're aspiring after the Hyprdrive item which in the remakes of the game can ''only'' be obtained after clearing 100 floors (without quitting once!) and destroying an overpowered boss on top of that, all with no chance to save. Granted the game's mechanics, if you are actually trying to get said item you're either TooDumbToLive or can complete most of the floors without major problems, unless you get some unfortunate set of "Enemy Boost x 6" or "Ally Damage 80%" [[GeoEffects Geo Panels]], but it's still very time-consuming.
* ''VideoGame/IWannaBeTheGuy'': While this [[NintendoHard notoriously hard]] PlatformHell game has four difficulty modes, the gameplay doesn't actually change at all between the modes. The only thing that does change is how many save points you'll come across. Harder difficulty modes have fewer points, which just means that you'll have to traverse through more areas without dying in order to be able to save your progress and avoid having to redo the areas that you've just finished. Culminates in the "Impossible" difficulty mode, in which there are no save points at all and you are therefore expected to beat the whole game in one life. In a game where you're a OneHitPointWonder and [[EverythingTryingToKillYou Everything's Trying To Kill You.]] [[ThisIsGonnaSuck Have fun with that.]]
** And the one save point in Hard Mode, right before the final boss, actually attacks you.
* Aversion: All games on the Wii's UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole (with the exception of N64 and Neo Geo games) have a built-in quicksave--just quit the game through the Home menu. On the other hand, the Virtual Consoles on the UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS and the UsefulNotes/WiiU allow permanent (unless overwritten with a new one, at least) save files (called restore points) to be made at any time in addition to borrowing the Wii's quicksave feature, which makes SaveScumming quite easy even for games that didn't originally ''have'' a save feature.
** Much like other emulation software, which generally allows an infinite number of saved virtual machine states (sometimes called "images" or "freezes") to be created and restored at any time.
** For the 3DS ones, if you got the twenty games from the Ambassador Program, the restore points are absent. Some of the NES games were given a proper release for the Virtual Console, and Ambassadors upgrading to that version (no extra cost) would get the restore points. Sadly, this upgrade will only apply to the NES games; the GBA games were stated to be Ambassador exclusive, and haven't been updated to provide restore points (or indeed, ''any'' of the standard Virtual Console functionality).[[note]][[http://ds.about.com/od/nintendods101/fl/Why-Arent-Game-Boy-Advance-Games-on-the-Nintendo-3DSs-Virtual-Console.htm This is actually due]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/ to a technical limitation]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/#comment-4998 of the original 3DS]]. While the system is able to properly emulate, say, an NES, Game Boy, or Game Gear, it isn't actually powerful enough to properly emulate a GBA. Instead, it uses a variation of the trick that the DS & DS Lite used, and essentially turns itself into a more expensive GBA by simulating the hardware; more specifically, by using both of its main CPU's cores to emulate the GBA's CPU and running a slightly modified version of the DS' actual GBA firmware to provide the games with access to the 3DS' hardware. Unfortunately, the main CPU's second core is also responsible for running all of the background tasks, such as networking, sleep mode, and the like; since the 3DS' processor (an [=ARM11=]; specifically, a dual-core [=ARM11=] running at 268 [=MHz=]) isn't powerful enough to emulate a GBA processor with just one core, and the secondary processor is seemingly too weak to emulate it ''at all'' (the 3DS' secondary processor, the [=ARM9=], is the same chip as the DS' main processor, with the only difference being that the 3DS' runs at 134 [=MHz=] and the DS' runs at 67 [=MHz=]; since the DS slows down its own secondary processor, an overclocked [=ARM7=] running at ~33.5 [=MHz=], to run GBA games on (as the GBA's processor is an [=ARM7=] running at ~16.8 [=MHz=]), this suggests that the DS' [=ARM9=] isn't able to properly emulate an [=ARM7=] running at normal clock speeds, and Nintendo either wasn't able to get it running on the 3DS' faster [=ARM9=], or willing to sacrifice quality to do so), it needs to use both the "game" core and the "background tasks" core, which leaves it unable to devote any processor time to background tasks; this is also why the 3DS can't automatically go into sleep mode when closed while in GBA mode, but games (such as ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'') are able to manually put it into sleep mode if they had that function on the original GBA. In essence, the 3DS has to switch into "GBA mode" instead of running Virtual Console or something like [=VisualBoy Advance=], and while it's in GBA mode, the only options available to it are 1) be a more expensive GBA, or 2) exit GBA mode. The New 3DS shouldn't have this issue (in theory, it's powerful enough to fully emulate the GBA, instead of having to simulate GBA hardware; specifically, its processor is a quad-core [=ARM11=] at 804 [=MHz=] (artificially limited to 268 [=MHz=] for backwards compatibility, unless the current application sets the appropriate flag), which should give it more than enough resources to emulate a GBA while keeping a dedicated "background tasks" core), but time will tell if Nintendo will take advantage of this.[[/note]]
* ''VideoGame/GranTurismo 4'' has Endurance races, including one that runs for 24 hours. If you screw up on the last lap and get passed, tough luck, it'll take another day to beat the race and win the awesome F1 car.
** Only maniacs race those races themselves. Most people ran them in B-Spec Mode (a sort of race director strategy mode) with "B-Spec Bob" in the most powerful car available and [[LevelGrinding Level Ground]] enough to beat even the strongest AI, turned off the TV, and came back the next day to pick up their new car.
*** The Japanese version was released without B-Spec mode. 24 hour races, you damn well raced them.
* ''[[VideoGame/DarkCastle Beyond Dark Castle]]'' only lets you save from the "Computer Room", where you can record up to five save states by pulling levers hooked up to a [[ComputerEqualsTapedrive mainframe with a tape drive]].
* Bungie's ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' has reusable "pattern buffer" save terminals scattered about, usually one or two (but occasionally none) per level.
** One or two particularly evil levels require you to reroute power from one system to another, inadvertently disabling the level's only save terminal in the process.
** But [[FridgeLogic why can't the AIs just use the pattern buffer to make lots of copies of you and your munitions]]?
*** Because [[AIIsACrapshoot Durandal is an asshole.]]
* ''VideoGame/SimCity'' for the SNES limited you to ''two'' savefiles; if you really liked two of your cities and wanted to start another, tough luck!
* ''[[VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon F.E.A.R. 2]]: Project Origin'' - With respect to the PC versions, the original ''F.E.A.R.'' game and its two non-canon expansions allowed the player to save (and quicksave) at any time. However, the sequel irritatingly only allows for automatic saves at set checkpoints. The game is broken up into several missions which can be selected at will, but if the player wants to see a specific game event or explore an certain area, they have to play through the entire mission to get to that point.
** The console version of the first game only allows autosaves, and you don't get to keep multiple saves, so if you wind up in an {{Unwinnable}} situation, you have to restart the game, which is easier to do than its sounds because of the fact that the game can be NintendoHard and be very averse to [[SuspiciousVideoGameGenerosity giving you nice big caches of health kits and supplies before difficult segments.]] In later missions, you might think that things are going a bit rough, and then suddenly, you're in a fight with a [[HeavilyArmoredMook Heavy Armor Trooper]], an [[PoweredArmor REV walker]], or a [[MiniMecha Powered Armor]].
** ''FEAR 3'' doesn't let you save manually at all, no matter if you're playing PC or console, as part of its push towards more action, which includes more distinctly-separate levels.
* Not so much in the later VideoGame/WingCommander games, but there were only a limited number of save slots. In ''Wing Commander IV'' and ''Prophecy'', however, there were two-stage missions, and you weren't allowed to save between the stages, resulting in an annoyingly long stretch of gameplay if you were pressed for time.
* The original ''VideoGame/{{Makai Toshi SaGa}}'' (''The Final Fantasy Legend'' to us American folk) allows you to save anywhere. You get exactly one save slot, however, and God (er, the Creator) help you if you wind up saving in an {{Unwinnable}} situation. Death in that game was [[ContinuingIsPainful anything but a slap on the wrist]].
* ''VideoGame/SoldierOfFortune'' gives you a limited number of manual saves per level depending on the difficulty. On the first game's Unfair difficulty, you cannot manually save at all, and on Soldier of Fortune difficulty in the second game, you can only save once per level.
* ''[[VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork MegaMan BattleChip Challenge]]''. While the game is pretty simple and you can set the game to run "Automatically" with slight chance of failure (once you get the hang of it), the 100-battle arena at the near end of the game (granting the optional super navi of doom that wasn't so super anyway), where if you mess up once or find someone that trumps your strategy you have to start all over again makes things a pain, since you can't save, and even automated, the battles take a bit. Time to run through: over 10 hours. For a GBA GAME.
* ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon'' has a quicksave function that let's you save mid-dungeon. However, if you try SaveScumming, the game treats it as a defeat - even if the gamecard was removed, or the game crashed - In other words, if it was an accident that you shut the game off after a quicksave restart, ''The game still treats it as a loss.'' Worse still, the game ''Took all your items away,''(Except for your Bow - Which, considering the thing can never be obtained more then once is a small merit on their part) Making the quick save feature a risk if you were taking the DS anywhere where the card might be knocked out - Which, for some people, is ANYWHERE. Thanks a lot for that.
* In ''VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising'', you can't save in the middle of a stage, mostly because the game saves ''just about any time you do '''anything.''''' Including ''turning off the game.'' This means that if you die for the first time and immediately turn the game off in an attempt to [[SaveScumming save scum]] and avoid [[ContinuingIsPainful a painful continue]], when you get back to the menu, the first thing you see is the achievement for dying! So the trope is inverted -- instead of you being unable to save when you want, the game saves when you don't want it to, leading to anger on your part.
* All racing games with a betting system automatically saves your game the moment you put something on the line. You got one chance, mate, don't blow it.
** Although, this can be twisted slightly in the Need for Speed games; players can simply disable the autosave and save the game before racing, so that if they don't win their rivals car which they need, they can simply reset the system and do it again until they get the reward.
* The ''FireEmblem'' series is a mixed gab of different forms of this.
** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Geneaology of the Holy War]]'' lets you permanently save at the beginning of your turn... until you make one of your units do something. Then you must wait until next turn to save. While it lets you [[SaveScumming Save Scum]], considering the complex and grandiose scale of the game, that's not such a bad thing.
** In [[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe the GBA]] games, the game autosaves EVERYWHERE in a chapter, at every significant action. If say, a character is killed or any otherwise unpleasant scenario occurs, turning the game off does nothing, because resuming that file will instantly put you in the same battle, with the same result (even if the attack had low accuracy), though you can make a permanent save before every chapter and choose to restart the chapter from there.
*** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones Sacred Stones]]'' includes two optional multi-level dungeons with NO chance to save between levels.
** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance]]'' removed the constant auto saving (understandable considering it's a console release that relies on memory cards), meaning that you could ONLY save at the beginning of the chapter, though you could suspend data in the middle. This can become frustrating as the chapters increase in length, as one bad move could force you to restart an hour of gameplay. In addition, the fight against [[LuckBasedMission The]] [[TimedMission Black]] [[ThatOneBoss Knight]] took place after a long chapter, and if you failed that fight you had to restart the chapter all over again.
** ''Radiant Dawn'' gave you the option to save whenever you pleased during your turn, which invited SaveScumming, but also made the chapters a lot less frustrating as you could continue from wherever you last saved. If you hope to scrape your way through Hard mode though, you don't get that luxury (only ''[=PoR=]'''s options).
** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Shadow Dragon]]'' and ''[[NoExportForYou New Mystery of the Emblem]]'' introduced permanent save spots in most of the chapters, where any character could save your progress for that chapter by stepping on them, but the spots disappeared once used.
* Both ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' games limited the number of saves you were allowed per level on the hardest level, "[[IdiosyncraticDifficultyLevels Dead on Arrival]]".
* One of the worst examples of this trope comes from the 2000 action-adventure game, ''The New Adventures Of The Time Machine''. Saving your game cost you half of an in-game magic point- magic which was essential to progress and which could only be restored by incredibly rare items. Oh, and did I mention that you only had six points at the beginning of the game?
* The original ''VideoGame/RedFaction'' had the ability to save anywhere; this was replaced by autosaves starting with the second game.
* ''VideoGame/MaximoGhostsToGlory'', while already NintendoHard in some areas, requires you to pay 100 coins every time you use a SavePoint. Of course, you can always go back and do the first level of the first world a few times in a row, which isn't really that hard and nets you a sizable amount of coin each time, but it does get tedious.
* ''VideoGame/SteelBattalion'' handles saving like a Roguelike. One file per pilot, automatically saved when you do ANYTHING. Lose a VT in combat? The supply points spent on it are [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost forever]] (albeit easily replaced). Run out of supply points? Prepare to start from the very beginning. Also expect to start a new game if your pilot dies by not [[EjectionSeat ejecting in time]] when the VT is [[CriticalExistenceFailure about to explode]] or is [[SuperDrowningSkills sinking in deep water while the cockpit floods.]]
* ''VideoGame/EtrianOdyssey'', taking its inspiration from 8-bit {{RPG}}s, only allows for saving in the town. The third installment adds a suspend save feature.
* ''VideoGame/LEGORacers'' for the Nintendo 64 required you to have a nearly-empty Memory Pak in your controller to save your data. Children left consoles on for days just so they can beat it on a more lenient schedule.
* ''[[VideoGame/WarioMasterOfDisguise Wario: Master of Disguise]]'' autosaves whenever you exit a level. If you needed to take a break while in a level, you'd either have to find a SavePoint or use a suspend-save from the pause menu. However, if you have a suspend in play, you can't play a different save slot without losing it.
* ''VideoGame/{{Hydorah}}'' puts a limit of saving only up to three times during a playthrough, unless you start from scratch. [[NintendoHard This game is not supposed to be merciful anyway.]]
** You can get extra saves by beating certain levels.
* ''VideoGame/OperationFlashpoint'' limits the player to ''one'' save per mission. Some missions can be more than an hour long, and all the missions are NintendoHard, which makes the game brutal. Fortunately, there is a cheat code that saves the game, overwriting any previous save. This cheat is almost required for especially long and/or difficult missions.
* ''VideoGame/ResonanceOfFate'' has a SavePoint-based normal saving system and a separate "suspend" save that's available at any time except during battle, that quits the game when you use it and deletes the save after loading it.
* The early ''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}'' games would only allow you to save on the world map. One of the upgrades of ''VideoGame/UltimaV'' was the ability to save in towns, dungeons, etc.
** ''VideoGame/UltimaIII'' would save automatically when you returned to the overworld from a towne, castle or dungeon - or, more devastatingly, when any character's status changes (when anyone gets poisonned, dead, or turned to ash). Fortunately, you could always disband the current party and form a new one from your ranks of backups - or even just reselect your current party - and start again outside Lord British's castle.
* ''VideoGame/DeadSpace2'' introduces 'Hardcore Mode' which, while being about as difficult as the 'Veteran' setting, only allows three saves. There's one 'gimme' save that triggers when swapping discs about halfway through, and it doesn't count towards your three allotted. This wouldn't be too bad, if Hardcore Mode didn't also ''completely remove checkpoints''. If you die against ThatOneBoss? Prepare to lose those three or four hours since you last saved!
* ''VideoGame/InazumaEleven'' lets you save everywhere except in the middle of a training center course, likely because of their nature as RandomlyGeneratedLevels where you have to win multiple battles in a row without losing a single one. Also, from the second game onward, there's only one save slot. The EU version of the first game also reduces the default 3 save slots into one.
* [[VideoGame/LivePowerfulProBaseball Powerful Pro Baseball Advance series]]'s save system in [[VisualNovel the success mode]] is a pain. There's only one save slot each, the file will erase itself when you either clear the story or get a game over, and those games themselves heavily rely on [[LuckBasedMission luck,]] making some of the games' bad ends possible in every corner. Also, every time you load a data, you lose some of your stats.
* ''O.D.T. : Or Die Trying'', an obscure NintendoHard [=PS1=] game, had a particularly brutal save system: you could only save your progress at specific saving spots, which are not only rare and often located in secret areas, but also only allowed you ''one single save'' per saving spot.
* The ''VideoGame/MitsumeteKnight'' games have a save system needing only 1 block (2 for the RPG game), but allowing you only three saves per Memory Card.
* The PSP versions of ''[[Music/{{Vocaloid}} Project Diva]]'' is limited to 3 save files. Not that it's much of a hassle with this kind of game.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Glider}}'', you can save anywhere but resumed games are ineligible for high scores.
* ''VideoGame/EpicMickey'' deliberately invoked this--the player is never allowed to choose when to save the game; the game saves itself automatically after the player completes major decisions. [[WordOfGod The developers said]] that they set it up this way to force the player to deal with the implications of their actions.
* The ''Videogame/IndianaJonesAndTheLastCrusade'' computer game features a particularly fourth-wall-breaking example. Throughout most of the game, you can save whenever you want, but once you get to the final area, the save function is disabled for no discernible reason. This means that if you fail any of the challenges in the cave after that point (one of which is a PixelHunt and another of which is a LuckBasedMission if you happened to miss a vital clue earlier in the game), you have to start the whole thing over again. There's even a sign right outside that tells you you can't save.
* ''VideoGame/EternalDarkness'' will let you save only if there are no enemies nearby. Weakly justified in-universe by the fact that said enemies are basically mini cthulhus and it's not safe to save around them, still annoying when this means frequently you cannot save for over half of a level and have to start the whole thing over if you die.
* ''VideoGame/LuigisMansionDarkMoon'' has an interesting variant, in that you can't COPY the save files. You can save three of them, continue at any time, save after any mission and delete them, but for whatever reason the copy functionality doesn't exist.
* VideoGame/{{D}} not only has no saving, but no ''pausing'', and a two-hour [[TimedMission time limit.]] Fortunately, that last part means that the game is relatively short.
* ''VideoGame/EscapeVelocity'' series combines One Save File Per Campaign (pilot in this case) with ''only'' having auto-save -- every time you leave a planet or station, the pilot-file updates to take into account any changes that have occurred since the last time you left a planet/station. This renders SaveScumming (which you might want to do, since ''all'' the games have at least two mutually exclusive storylines, which can only be begun once you've got some experience) possible only by manually backing up a pilot-file.
* This is the difference between ''VideoGame/{{Unrest}}'''s two [[IdiosyncraticDifficultyLevels difficulty settings]]. "Myth" allow the player to maintain multiple save files of that playthrough, while "Mortal" is an in-game Iron Man Mode. A "Mortal" playthrough means you only have one save file, and have to live with the consequences of your decisions.
* There is no save feature on the ''Franchise/{{Animorphs}}'' Game Boy Color game. To understand why this is so insane, you have to realize the game itself is a ShoddyKnockoffProduct of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', with the same basic menu screen and gameplay mechanics. Instead, you are given a password (either by hitting "select" or reaching a checkpoint) that when entered at the title screen will return you to something approaching your current "party" (i.e. group of morphs) and location next time you start the game. Imagine playing Pokemon with the save function replaced by a password that returns you to the last Pokemon Center you visited with the last group of Pokemon you healed there (and only six Pokemon allowed at a time, with no PC), and you'll quickly realize how this flaw (among others) makes the game virtually unplayable.
* ''VideoGame/Goldeneye1997'' only saves your progress after completing a mission and doesn't have any form of checkpoints, so if you screw up at the last leg of the mission, it's back to the very start of the level for you. The remake adds checkpoints.
* ''VideoGame/TheMaidOfFairewellHeights'': Can save basically anywhen, even in the middle of conversations, and there are 15 save slots.
* ''VideoGame/AVeryLongRopeToTheTopOfTheSky'': You save at {{Save Point}}s located all over the world and there are 4 save slots to put your saves in.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Non-Video Game Examples]]
* The manga ''Manga/GamerzHeaven'' has a FictionalVideoGame of the same name in which the number of times you can save your game is limited to 3 due to it being a Beta Release. Unfortunately, the game automatically saves every time you exit, and it can only be played by transferring your physical body to {{Cyberspace}}. This means if you start up the game more than 3 times, you can't get home, and you're stuck. Ironically, the characters, after [[spoiler:inadvertently saving twice]], decide to conserve their last save until they really, ''really'' need it. That [[spoiler:ends up never happening ([[SeriesHiatus or at least to our current knowledge]]) as they fail epically and lose for good before using it]].
* The story "[[http://notalwaysright.com/gotta-catch-his-son/24609 Gotta Catch His Son]]" on ''Website/NotAlwaysRight'' shows the negative consequences of the strict one-save-per-cartridge limit in ''VideoGame/{{Pokemon}}'' games.
[[/folder]]
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* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'' allows {{Suspend Save}}s at [[SavePoint owl statues]], but the resulting save disappears once restored. Permanent saves only occur when returning to the Dawn of the First Day, losing all disposable items, un-deposited Rupees, and unfinished quests. The game taxes the UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}} to its limit, even with the included RAM expansion. Thankfully, the game's GroundhogDayLoop mechanic doubled as a way to take some pressure off the console by simplifying the save system -- only Link's weapons, {{Plot Coupon}}s, and banked Rupees need to be saved; where Link can go in the game world is [[EquipmentBasedProgression determined entirely by what he is carrying]], not by the status of the world itself. The Suspend Save was added as an Western-only AntiFrustrationFeature, but further taxes the console as a trade-off and drops the amount of save files from three to two, with the save RAM presumably being allocated in a manner that makes room for the additional owl save data -- indeed, the Suspend Save feature was absent from the Japanese release, which did have 3 save files.[[note]]This can be averted if you copy your owl statue file over to the other file, resulting in a form of SaveScumming. This almost has to be done on the GCN version, which suffers from freezing.[[/note]] The save system was revamped for the [[UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS 3DS]] [[VideoGameRemake remake]], now making saving at the owl (and feather) statues permanent. The trade-off is that the game no longer saves when you go back in time as well, but this is more than mitigated by several additional statues to save at. A majority of them also act as WarpWhistle destinations, so they're easy to come by once you learn the Song of Soaring.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'' allows saving at [[SavePoint bird statues]]. Likewise, ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkBetweenWorlds A Link Between Worlds]]'' allows saving at weather vanes (which are bird-themed).
* In ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaCircleOfTheMoon'', a game for the Game Boy Advance, save points are particularly far away from each other, and you have no way of quicksaving, making the game very un-portable.
** ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDissonance'' attempted to correct this with a "Quick Save" feature, but all that did was save any changes since you last used a savepoint, so you still have to restart from a savepoint. This is both borderline useless for it's intended purpose of letting people take breaks, and ''highly abusable'' as a way to escape danger or quickly get back from one of the game's many dead ends.
** ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaChroniclesOfSorrow Aria of Sorrow]]'' finally gets this right; its quick save feature "suspends" your game and restarts you at the room you were in when you load up your file again.
* The last FPS to use the Doom engine, ''{{VideoGame/Strife}}'', had only ''one'' save slot. You could save as often as you wanted, but good luck if you saved next to a boss while being low on health or ammo and with no suitable powerups in sight. Even the producers found this to be too harsh, and removed the limit in a later patch.
* In the original ''Videogame/CrashBandicoot1996'', the only way to save your game (or collect a password) was to go from the overworld map into a level, collect a series of hidden bonus tokens and beat the ensuing bonus level, or collecting a gem by beating a level without dying while breaking all the crates in the area. And when you restored the game, you snapped back to just three lives. Fortunately, the sequels made it easy to save your progress in-between levels and keep your lives, and the remake in the ''VideoGame/CrashBandicootNSaneTrilogy'' allows you to save whenever on the world map, abandoning the password system.
* In the ''VideoGame/HarryPotter'' game series, there are completely made up "save books" in games one through three. In the first game, there was the annoying limit that generally there were only two to three save books on a level, and none throughout the extremely difficult, tedious, and easy-to-die endless-pit jumping puzzle. On another note, the jumping puzzle has lethal pits in it, despite the fact that it was made by a teacher to train you how to use spells. You'd think that the SPCC would start suing Hogwarts. Oh, and the level was completely silent, except every few minutes, at which point an evil laugh would sound.
** Also, in the first game, save books could only be used once. They would never reappear. This wasn't normally a problem since you couldn't return to previous levels, but the last save point in the game is a few feet in front of a treasure chest containing a few chocolate frogs (this game's healing items). And every single time you die at the final boss, you have to open the treasure chest again (which takes about 5 seconds of animation, plus actually collecting the chocolate frogs, which move around randomly).
** Unless you go for debug mode, you also have to watch the cutscene before fighting the boss again, which takes 30-40 seconds. The two subsequent games replenished the saving books after a short while, and they auto-saved your progress before most battles.
* ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' games:
** The original NES platformers have ''no saving whatsoever.'' ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'', without {{Warp Whistle}}s, takes the average player several hours to complete. In theory, ''[=SMB3=]'' tells you the location of one of the warp whistles so you can skip almost half of the game with it next time. In practice, it doesn't, as the whistle is said to be at "the end of the third world". It's actually the end of the third level of the first world, and even knowing that, [[GuideDangIt outside information]] is needed to know how to get to it.
** The ''VideoGame/SuperMarioAllStars'' remake isn't much better. Aside from saving the current world, the only completed levels saved are fortresses, so only some levels can be skipped (via shortcuts opened after completing said fortresses) after restarting after a game over. (As with ''Super Mario World'', this is averted in the GBA version.)
** ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'':
*** This SNES cart is the first Mario game with a save system, but one can only save after beating specific levels. Some save points work only once. A switch palace, castle or fortress has a save point when first clearing it, but not when replaying it. A ghost house is better; one can replay a ghost house to save again. Many players walk the long way back to Donut Ghost House, the easiest save point (and the one closest to the Top Secret Area, [[GameBreaker where you can restock on power-ups and extra lives indefinitely]]). One can also save again at Sunken Ghost Ship or in half the [[BrutalBonusLevel Special Zone]]. This save system is a form of FakeDifficulty, because there is no technical limitation for why the other levels are not save points.
*** SMW does not save extra lives. You say you have 99 lives on that file? Say goodbye to 94 of them if you save and quit! Of course, you can always [[InfiniteOneUps just go get more]], but still!
*** This is averted in the GBA port, which allows saving anywhere, and does save extra lives.
** ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros'' for UsefulNotes/NintendoDS has once of the worst save systems ever to disgrace a portable system. You can save only after beating a boss or mini-boss, or collecting and spending 5 star coins to open a bonus area. The game's supply of star coins and bonus areas is finite. There's no temporary save system like that other DS offender ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII''. (As with any DS game, you can suspend ''New Super Mario Bros.'' by simply closing the DS to put the game in Sleep Mode, and plugging the DS into an AC adapter.) Your "reward" for finishing the game is the ability to save after every level, proving that this save system was not a technical limitation (it was, in fact, done deliberately as a throwback to older Mario games).\\
\\
Its successors, starting with ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosWii'', added a SuspendSave system, so players can make a temporary save after any level. The limits on permanent saves, and the reward for finishing the game, are the same as in the DS game. The Wii game has no bonus areas where one can save, but the 3DS game has them again.
** ''Videogame/PaperMario'' has only save points, which means you have to continue from the last place where you saved. You better save frequently, as not only is this game long, it also has many side-missions that could require you to battle lots of enemies, and seeing as Mario's stats stay very small (Maximum 50 HP) for the whole game, it's easy to get a Game Over. Luckily, there is a save point just before all "dungeons", just before all rooms where a boss is fought (optional bosses not included), and in all towns.\\
\\
The sequels also have save points. ''Videogame/PaperMarioStickerStar'' has a better save system because it saves automatically after every level.
** ''Videogame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga'' and its two following sequels also need you to save on save points. The fourth game in the series, ''Videogame/MarioAndLuigiDreamTeam'' finally adds a save-whenever-you-want feature, but keeps the save blocks as a reminder, [[SuspiciousVideogameGenerosity specially before boss rooms]].
* ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' has an interesting aversion, in that the game seems to ''pretend'' that it's just a suspend save- you have to quit to save, and it calls it "suspending play", but it's really just a save ([[SaveScumming and you can abuse it by continually re-loading if you make mistakes]]).
** In the original GBA titles, [[ArtifactTitle it was indeed a suspend save]], making the games a fair bit more difficult.
* In ''Franchise/SilentHill'' games, you can only save at notepads (first game), red "squares" (second game), red symbols (third game), and Henry's diary/journal (fourth game). Unless you're playing the PC versions, which allow you to save at any point.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Cadaver}}'', you have to pay the gods to save your game, requiring an exponentially larger sacrifice each time. Thus, save too often and you won't be able to save on the last level.
* ''VideoGame/ViewtifulJoe''. Besides being able to save in-between each chapter, you can only do so ''once'' in the middle of each one, even if there are more checkpoints. So, those endless swarms of ultra-strong enemies? Those bosses that you can't seem to get any good hits in? Those time-consuming puzzles? And god forbid, the dreaded boss rush near the end of the game? Yeah, you'll be seeing them again in the same levels. A lot.
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' games will only let you [[StealthPun get saved at church]] (or a king in the first three games), and make you read through long repetitive dialogues when you do so.
** The portable remakes of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIII'' and ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIV'' offer a suspend save you can use outside of dungeons, but III's erases itself when you reload. IV's DS remake (possibly due to a GoodBadBug) does not, and the remake of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestV'' on the same system works the same way with its quick-save feature. (On the other hand, ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX'' has the typical one-time quick-save feature.) On the plus side, if your party gets wiped out, you go back to the last save point with half your gold and all your exp and items, making this less annoying than FF III.
** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' had a 'Dragon Potion' which allowed you to save anywhere... but only once. However, a player can replay this game for years and possibly NEVER get one, with the item being a rare drop from a specific kind of Babble. In fact, one would only know of their existence if they [[GuideDangit read about it form a guide]].
** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestMonsters'' lets you save any time you are in town (although it auto-saves when you breed a monster, something which was thankfully removed from the sequel). In order to keep the feel and tension of other [=DWs=], saving is mostly disabled in dungeons however. Luckily, there are certain randomly generated rooms you can save in that may spawn every 3 floors, and in longer dungeons you will definitely run into them at least once. Additionally there is an single-use item called a 'Bookmark' that allows saving in the middle of a dungeon, you can buy as many of them as needed once you get about halfway through the main game.
*** ''Dragon Warrior Monsters: Joker'' pointlessly changed the dungeon system, and only allows you to save at checkpoints on the island. Fortunately these are usually fairly easy to reach. ''Dragon Warrior Monsters: Joker 2'' then turns around and allows you to save at almost any location in the game.
** The Android / iOS port of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII'' mercifully adds a quick-save system that allows you to save anywhere in dungeons and the overworld.
** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX'' has only one main save slot, however, making separate adventuring files impossible.
* ''VideoGame/{{Turok}} 2'' features long maze-like worlds that can take hours to finish. Which wouldn't be entirely horrible if there were more than 3 save points in the entire level! Nothing like being ready to quit but either having to backtrack 15 minutes to the last save point first or forcing yourself to press on for another half hour instead. The PC version (at least the remastered version) averts this, as you can save normally as well.
* ''VideoGame/{{Kuon}}'' had a stipulation that you could only save at certain points near a river, and even then only by collecting 'vessels'; every save consumed one of these vessels.
* ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' has a long CheckpointStarvation at the beginning, but allows you to save pretty much any time outside of battle and cutscenes...except for a prolonged duration at the end where you have to go through three boss fights and multiple cutscenes. It's an ObviousRulePatch against an {{Unwinnable}} situation, since you can't leave the area and there are no baddies to LevelGrind against; if you go back after beating the game, you will be able to save there since beating the game unlocks what's essentially a level select.
* ''VideoGame/LegacyOfKain: Soul Reaver'' had an interesting savegame system: You could save anywhere in the world and the game would store the entire game world as it is when you do, but restoring the game throws you back into the starting room, requiring players to use the many teleport gates spread across Nosgoth to get back to where they were.
* ''VideoGame/FarCry'':
** ''VideoGame/FarCry1'' uses a checkpoint system of saving, with check points scattered around the levels... and, rather infamously, offers no other save options whatsoever. However, since the levels are fairly big and can't account for every path taken, it's quite possible to miss checkpoints, or go stumbling around an area trying to find the arbitrary threshold that enables the checkpoint. Furthermore, some checkpoints are spaced far enough apart that you have to go through several tough fights before reaching the next checkpoint, making these sequences examples of TrialAndErrorGameplay. Quicksaving is [[DummiedOut only available]] through usage of the console or editing a configuration file to actually bind the function to a key.
** ''VideoGame/FarCry2'', on consoles, only allowed you to save at safe houses or after fast-traveling via bus station. Averted in the PC version, where you can save (and quicksave) whenever, wherever, and as many times as you want.
** ''VideoGame/FarCry3'' and on have a variation, where you can save wherever you want so long as you're not in the middle of a mission, but loading the save will place you at the nearest safe area rather than leaving you exactly where you were. The games also have limited numbers of save files, ''3'' and ''[[VideoGame/FarCry3BloodDragon Blood Dragon]]'' limited to three... and ''VideoGame/FarCry4'' limited to just ''one''.
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' allows you to save at Tartarus' foyer, which you can access at any time (provided you find the teleporter back to the first floor). Sensible enough. However, outside Tartarus, you can only save at the dorm; exiting the dorm and reentering it immediately (even in daylight) will make it nighttime immediately. This forces you to play a whole day of choices, [[RelationshipValues Social Links]], and shopping, without saving. In extreme cases (such as weekdays) making a bad choice during an afternoon quest will force the player to replay the entire schoolday, plus the previous night - or worse, if it's an exam week (which runs uninterrupted from Monday to Saturday), the ''entire week''. The PSP version mitigates this somewhat by adding a save point in the classroom, providing a more convenient opportunity to save during the day.
* ''VideoGame/TimeCrisis'', Pick one. Any one. While in the arcade it makes sense not to allow saving all of the home versions also have ridiculous saving systems. You can save after each section, but that only allows you to play that section. You have to play the entire game through in one if you want to unlock every stage.
* ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'' and ''VideoGame/MakaiKingdom'' has a fairly reasonable save limit in that you can as many times as you like in as many slots as you like (so long as you have the system memory to do so), but only outside of battle. The only place where this gets tricky are the Item Worlds where you have to make your way through at least 10 battles in a row (Assuming you don't use your [[StealthPun Mr. Gency's Exit]] item to exit early, which also saved your progress in the item). No continues, so you quickly learn to save often and before every battle.
** Though, the point of the item world levels is that [[MarathonLevel you have to go through them without a chance to heal]]. The place you can heal is usually in the spot you can save, so saving is a required sacrifice.
** And then the Item World concept goes from tricky to plain horrific when you're aspiring after the Hyprdrive item which in the remakes of the game can ''only'' be obtained after clearing 100 floors (without quitting once!) and destroying an overpowered boss on top of that, all with no chance to save. Granted the game's mechanics, if you are actually trying to get said item you're either TooDumbToLive or can complete most of the floors without major problems, unless you get some unfortunate set of "Enemy Boost x 6" or "Ally Damage 80%" [[GeoEffects Geo Panels]], but it's still very time-consuming.
* ''VideoGame/IWannaBeTheGuy'': While this [[NintendoHard notoriously hard]] PlatformHell game has four difficulty modes, the gameplay doesn't actually change at all between the modes. The only thing that does change is how many save points you'll come across. Harder difficulty modes have fewer points, which just means that you'll have to traverse through more areas without dying in order to be able to save your progress and avoid having to redo the areas that you've just finished. Culminates in the "Impossible" difficulty mode, in which there are no save points at all and you are therefore expected to beat the whole game in one life. In a game where you're a OneHitPointWonder and [[EverythingTryingToKillYou Everything's Trying To Kill You.]] [[ThisIsGonnaSuck Have fun with that.]]
** And the one save point in Hard Mode, right before the final boss, actually attacks you.
* Aversion: All games on the Wii's UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole (with the exception of N64 and Neo Geo games) have a built-in quicksave--just quit the game through the Home menu. On the other hand, the Virtual Consoles on the UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS and the UsefulNotes/WiiU allow permanent (unless overwritten with a new one, at least) save files (called restore points) to be made at any time in addition to borrowing the Wii's quicksave feature, which makes SaveScumming quite easy even for games that didn't originally ''have'' a save feature.
** Much like other emulation software, which generally allows an infinite number of saved virtual machine states (sometimes called "images" or "freezes") to be created and restored at any time.
** For the 3DS ones, if you got the twenty games from the Ambassador Program, the restore points are absent. Some of the NES games were given a proper release for the Virtual Console, and Ambassadors upgrading to that version (no extra cost) would get the restore points. Sadly, this upgrade will only apply to the NES games; the GBA games were stated to be Ambassador exclusive, and haven't been updated to provide restore points (or indeed, ''any'' of the standard Virtual Console functionality).[[note]][[http://ds.about.com/od/nintendods101/fl/Why-Arent-Game-Boy-Advance-Games-on-the-Nintendo-3DSs-Virtual-Console.htm This is actually due]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/ to a technical limitation]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/#comment-4998 of the original 3DS]]. While the system is able to properly emulate, say, an NES, Game Boy, or Game Gear, it isn't actually powerful enough to properly emulate a GBA. Instead, it uses a variation of the trick that the DS & DS Lite used, and essentially turns itself into a more expensive GBA by simulating the hardware; more specifically, by using both of its main CPU's cores to emulate the GBA's CPU and running a slightly modified version of the DS' actual GBA firmware to provide the games with access to the 3DS' hardware. Unfortunately, the main CPU's second core is also responsible for running all of the background tasks, such as networking, sleep mode, and the like; since the 3DS' processor (an [=ARM11=]; specifically, a dual-core [=ARM11=] running at 268 [=MHz=]) isn't powerful enough to emulate a GBA processor with just one core, and the secondary processor is seemingly too weak to emulate it ''at all'' (the 3DS' secondary processor, the [=ARM9=], is the same chip as the DS' main processor, with the only difference being that the 3DS' runs at 134 [=MHz=] and the DS' runs at 67 [=MHz=]; since the DS slows down its own secondary processor, an overclocked [=ARM7=] running at ~33.5 [=MHz=], to run GBA games on (as the GBA's processor is an [=ARM7=] running at ~16.8 [=MHz=]), this suggests that the DS' [=ARM9=] isn't able to properly emulate an [=ARM7=] running at normal clock speeds, and Nintendo either wasn't able to get it running on the 3DS' faster [=ARM9=], or willing to sacrifice quality to do so), it needs to use both the "game" core and the "background tasks" core, which leaves it unable to devote any processor time to background tasks; this is also why the 3DS can't automatically go into sleep mode when closed while in GBA mode, but games (such as ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'') are able to manually put it into sleep mode if they had that function on the original GBA. In essence, the 3DS has to switch into "GBA mode" instead of running Virtual Console or something like [=VisualBoy Advance=], and while it's in GBA mode, the only options available to it are 1) be a more expensive GBA, or 2) exit GBA mode. The New 3DS shouldn't have this issue (in theory, it's powerful enough to fully emulate the GBA, instead of having to simulate GBA hardware; specifically, its processor is a quad-core [=ARM11=] at 804 [=MHz=] (artificially limited to 268 [=MHz=] for backwards compatibility, unless the current application sets the appropriate flag), which should give it more than enough resources to emulate a GBA while keeping a dedicated "background tasks" core), but time will tell if Nintendo will take advantage of this.[[/note]]
* ''VideoGame/GranTurismo 4'' has Endurance races, including one that runs for 24 hours. If you screw up on the last lap and get passed, tough luck, it'll take another day to beat the race and win the awesome F1 car.
** Only maniacs race those races themselves. Most people ran them in B-Spec Mode (a sort of race director strategy mode) with "B-Spec Bob" in the most powerful car available and [[LevelGrinding Level Ground]] enough to beat even the strongest AI, turned off the TV, and came back the next day to pick up their new car.
*** The Japanese version was released without B-Spec mode. 24 hour races, you damn well raced them.
* ''[[VideoGame/DarkCastle Beyond Dark Castle]]'' only lets you save from the "Computer Room", where you can record up to five save states by pulling levers hooked up to a [[ComputerEqualsTapedrive mainframe with a tape drive]].
* Bungie's ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' has reusable "pattern buffer" save terminals scattered about, usually one or two (but occasionally none) per level.
** One or two particularly evil levels require you to reroute power from one system to another, inadvertently disabling the level's only save terminal in the process.
** But [[FridgeLogic why can't the AIs just use the pattern buffer to make lots of copies of you and your munitions]]?
*** Because [[AIIsACrapshoot Durandal is an asshole.]]
* ''VideoGame/SimCity'' for the SNES limited you to ''two'' savefiles; if you really liked two of your cities and wanted to start another, tough luck!
* ''[[VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon F.E.A.R. 2]]: Project Origin'' - With respect to the PC versions, the original ''F.E.A.R.'' game and its two non-canon expansions allowed the player to save (and quicksave) at any time. However, the sequel irritatingly only allows for automatic saves at set checkpoints. The game is broken up into several missions which can be selected at will, but if the player wants to see a specific game event or explore an certain area, they have to play through the entire mission to get to that point.
** The console version of the first game only allows autosaves, and you don't get to keep multiple saves, so if you wind up in an {{Unwinnable}} situation, you have to restart the game, which is easier to do than its sounds because of the fact that the game can be NintendoHard and be very averse to [[SuspiciousVideoGameGenerosity giving you nice big caches of health kits and supplies before difficult segments.]] In later missions, you might think that things are going a bit rough, and then suddenly, you're in a fight with a [[HeavilyArmoredMook Heavy Armor Trooper]], an [[PoweredArmor REV walker]], or a [[MiniMecha Powered Armor]].
** ''FEAR 3'' doesn't let you save manually at all, no matter if you're playing PC or console, as part of its push towards more action, which includes more distinctly-separate levels.
* Not so much in the later VideoGame/WingCommander games, but there were only a limited number of save slots. In ''Wing Commander IV'' and ''Prophecy'', however, there were two-stage missions, and you weren't allowed to save between the stages, resulting in an annoyingly long stretch of gameplay if you were pressed for time.
* The original ''VideoGame/{{Makai Toshi SaGa}}'' (''The Final Fantasy Legend'' to us American folk) allows you to save anywhere. You get exactly one save slot, however, and God (er, the Creator) help you if you wind up saving in an {{Unwinnable}} situation. Death in that game was [[ContinuingIsPainful anything but a slap on the wrist]].
* ''VideoGame/SoldierOfFortune'' gives you a limited number of manual saves per level depending on the difficulty. On the first game's Unfair difficulty, you cannot manually save at all, and on Soldier of Fortune difficulty in the second game, you can only save once per level.
* ''[[VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork MegaMan BattleChip Challenge]]''. While the game is pretty simple and you can set the game to run "Automatically" with slight chance of failure (once you get the hang of it), the 100-battle arena at the near end of the game (granting the optional super navi of doom that wasn't so super anyway), where if you mess up once or find someone that trumps your strategy you have to start all over again makes things a pain, since you can't save, and even automated, the battles take a bit. Time to run through: over 10 hours. For a GBA GAME.
* ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon'' has a quicksave function that let's you save mid-dungeon. However, if you try SaveScumming, the game treats it as a defeat - even if the gamecard was removed, or the game crashed - In other words, if it was an accident that you shut the game off after a quicksave restart, ''The game still treats it as a loss.'' Worse still, the game ''Took all your items away,''(Except for your Bow - Which, considering the thing can never be obtained more then once is a small merit on their part) Making the quick save feature a risk if you were taking the DS anywhere where the card might be knocked out - Which, for some people, is ANYWHERE. Thanks a lot for that.
* In ''VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising'', you can't save in the middle of a stage, mostly because the game saves ''just about any time you do '''anything.''''' Including ''turning off the game.'' This means that if you die for the first time and immediately turn the game off in an attempt to [[SaveScumming save scum]] and avoid [[ContinuingIsPainful a painful continue]], when you get back to the menu, the first thing you see is the achievement for dying! So the trope is inverted -- instead of you being unable to save when you want, the game saves when you don't want it to, leading to anger on your part.
* All racing games with a betting system automatically saves your game the moment you put something on the line. You got one chance, mate, don't blow it.
** Although, this can be twisted slightly in the Need for Speed games; players can simply disable the autosave and save the game before racing, so that if they don't win their rivals car which they need, they can simply reset the system and do it again until they get the reward.
* The ''FireEmblem'' series is a mixed gab of different forms of this.
** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Geneaology of the Holy War]]'' lets you permanently save at the beginning of your turn... until you make one of your units do something. Then you must wait until next turn to save. While it lets you [[SaveScumming Save Scum]], considering the complex and grandiose scale of the game, that's not such a bad thing.
** In [[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe the GBA]] games, the game autosaves EVERYWHERE in a chapter, at every significant action. If say, a character is killed or any otherwise unpleasant scenario occurs, turning the game off does nothing, because resuming that file will instantly put you in the same battle, with the same result (even if the attack had low accuracy), though you can make a permanent save before every chapter and choose to restart the chapter from there.
*** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones Sacred Stones]]'' includes two optional multi-level dungeons with NO chance to save between levels.
** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance]]'' removed the constant auto saving (understandable considering it's a console release that relies on memory cards), meaning that you could ONLY save at the beginning of the chapter, though you could suspend data in the middle. This can become frustrating as the chapters increase in length, as one bad move could force you to restart an hour of gameplay. In addition, the fight against [[LuckBasedMission The]] [[TimedMission Black]] [[ThatOneBoss Knight]] took place after a long chapter, and if you failed that fight you had to restart the chapter all over again.
** ''Radiant Dawn'' gave you the option to save whenever you pleased during your turn, which invited SaveScumming, but also made the chapters a lot less frustrating as you could continue from wherever you last saved. If you hope to scrape your way through Hard mode though, you don't get that luxury (only ''[=PoR=]'''s options).
** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Shadow Dragon]]'' and ''[[NoExportForYou New Mystery of the Emblem]]'' introduced permanent save spots in most of the chapters, where any character could save your progress for that chapter by stepping on them, but the spots disappeared once used.
* Both ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' games limited the number of saves you were allowed per level on the hardest level, "[[IdiosyncraticDifficultyLevels Dead on Arrival]]".
* One of the worst examples of this trope comes from the 2000 action-adventure game, ''The New Adventures Of The Time Machine''. Saving your game cost you half of an in-game magic point- magic which was essential to progress and which could only be restored by incredibly rare items. Oh, and did I mention that you only had six points at the beginning of the game?
* The original ''VideoGame/RedFaction'' had the ability to save anywhere; this was replaced by autosaves starting with the second game.
* ''VideoGame/MaximoGhostsToGlory'', while already NintendoHard in some areas, requires you to pay 100 coins every time you use a SavePoint. Of course, you can always go back and do the first level of the first world a few times in a row, which isn't really that hard and nets you a sizable amount of coin each time, but it does get tedious.
* ''VideoGame/SteelBattalion'' handles saving like a Roguelike. One file per pilot, automatically saved when you do ANYTHING. Lose a VT in combat? The supply points spent on it are [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost forever]] (albeit easily replaced). Run out of supply points? Prepare to start from the very beginning. Also expect to start a new game if your pilot dies by not [[EjectionSeat ejecting in time]] when the VT is [[CriticalExistenceFailure about to explode]] or is [[SuperDrowningSkills sinking in deep water while the cockpit floods.]]
* ''VideoGame/EtrianOdyssey'', taking its inspiration from 8-bit {{RPG}}s, only allows for saving in the town. The third installment adds a suspend save feature.
* ''VideoGame/LEGORacers'' for the Nintendo 64 required you to have a nearly-empty Memory Pak in your controller to save your data. Children left consoles on for days just so they can beat it on a more lenient schedule.
* ''[[VideoGame/WarioMasterOfDisguise Wario: Master of Disguise]]'' autosaves whenever you exit a level. If you needed to take a break while in a level, you'd either have to find a SavePoint or use a suspend-save from the pause menu. However, if you have a suspend in play, you can't play a different save slot without losing it.
* ''VideoGame/{{Hydorah}}'' puts a limit of saving only up to three times during a playthrough, unless you start from scratch. [[NintendoHard This game is not supposed to be merciful anyway.]]
** You can get extra saves by beating certain levels.
* ''VideoGame/OperationFlashpoint'' limits the player to ''one'' save per mission. Some missions can be more than an hour long, and all the missions are NintendoHard, which makes the game brutal. Fortunately, there is a cheat code that saves the game, overwriting any previous save. This cheat is almost required for especially long and/or difficult missions.
* ''VideoGame/ResonanceOfFate'' has a SavePoint-based normal saving system and a separate "suspend" save that's available at any time except during battle, that quits the game when you use it and deletes the save after loading it.
* The early ''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}'' games would only allow you to save on the world map. One of the upgrades of ''VideoGame/UltimaV'' was the ability to save in towns, dungeons, etc.
** ''VideoGame/UltimaIII'' would save automatically when you returned to the overworld from a towne, castle or dungeon - or, more devastatingly, when any character's status changes (when anyone gets poisonned, dead, or turned to ash). Fortunately, you could always disband the current party and form a new one from your ranks of backups - or even just reselect your current party - and start again outside Lord British's castle.
* ''VideoGame/DeadSpace2'' introduces 'Hardcore Mode' which, while being about as difficult as the 'Veteran' setting, only allows three saves. There's one 'gimme' save that triggers when swapping discs about halfway through, and it doesn't count towards your three allotted. This wouldn't be too bad, if Hardcore Mode didn't also ''completely remove checkpoints''. If you die against ThatOneBoss? Prepare to lose those three or four hours since you last saved!
* ''VideoGame/InazumaEleven'' lets you save everywhere except in the middle of a training center course, likely because of their nature as RandomlyGeneratedLevels where you have to win multiple battles in a row without losing a single one. Also, from the second game onward, there's only one save slot. The EU version of the first game also reduces the default 3 save slots into one.
* [[VideoGame/LivePowerfulProBaseball Powerful Pro Baseball Advance series]]'s save system in [[VisualNovel the success mode]] is a pain. There's only one save slot each, the file will erase itself when you either clear the story or get a game over, and those games themselves heavily rely on [[LuckBasedMission luck,]] making some of the games' bad ends possible in every corner. Also, every time you load a data, you lose some of your stats.
* ''O.D.T. : Or Die Trying'', an obscure NintendoHard [=PS1=] game, had a particularly brutal save system: you could only save your progress at specific saving spots, which are not only rare and often located in secret areas, but also only allowed you ''one single save'' per saving spot.
* The ''VideoGame/MitsumeteKnight'' games have a save system needing only 1 block (2 for the RPG game), but allowing you only three saves per Memory Card.
* The PSP versions of ''[[Music/{{Vocaloid}} Project Diva]]'' is limited to 3 save files. Not that it's much of a hassle with this kind of game.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Glider}}'', you can save anywhere but resumed games are ineligible for high scores.
* ''VideoGame/EpicMickey'' deliberately invoked this--the player is never allowed to choose when to save the game; the game saves itself automatically after the player completes major decisions. [[WordOfGod The developers said]] that they set it up this way to force the player to deal with the implications of their actions.
* The ''Videogame/IndianaJonesAndTheLastCrusade'' computer game features a particularly fourth-wall-breaking example. Throughout most of the game, you can save whenever you want, but once you get to the final area, the save function is disabled for no discernible reason. This means that if you fail any of the challenges in the cave after that point (one of which is a PixelHunt and another of which is a LuckBasedMission if you happened to miss a vital clue earlier in the game), you have to start the whole thing over again. There's even a sign right outside that tells you you can't save.
* ''VideoGame/EternalDarkness'' will let you save only if there are no enemies nearby. Weakly justified in-universe by the fact that said enemies are basically mini cthulhus and it's not safe to save around them, still annoying when this means frequently you cannot save for over half of a level and have to start the whole thing over if you die.
* ''VideoGame/LuigisMansionDarkMoon'' has an interesting variant, in that you can't COPY the save files. You can save three of them, continue at any time, save after any mission and delete them, but for whatever reason the copy functionality doesn't exist.
* VideoGame/{{D}} not only has no saving, but no ''pausing'', and a two-hour [[TimedMission time limit.]] Fortunately, that last part means that the game is relatively short.
* ''VideoGame/EscapeVelocity'' series combines One Save File Per Campaign (pilot in this case) with ''only'' having auto-save -- every time you leave a planet or station, the pilot-file updates to take into account any changes that have occurred since the last time you left a planet/station. This renders SaveScumming (which you might want to do, since ''all'' the games have at least two mutually exclusive storylines, which can only be begun once you've got some experience) possible only by manually backing up a pilot-file.
* This is the difference between ''VideoGame/{{Unrest}}'''s two [[IdiosyncraticDifficultyLevels difficulty settings]]. "Myth" allow the player to maintain multiple save files of that playthrough, while "Mortal" is an in-game Iron Man Mode. A "Mortal" playthrough means you only have one save file, and have to live with the consequences of your decisions.
* There is no save feature on the ''Franchise/{{Animorphs}}'' Game Boy Color game. To understand why this is so insane, you have to realize the game itself is a ShoddyKnockoffProduct of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', with the same basic menu screen and gameplay mechanics. Instead, you are given a password (either by hitting "select" or reaching a checkpoint) that when entered at the title screen will return you to something approaching your current "party" (i.e. group of morphs) and location next time you start the game. Imagine playing Pokemon with the save function replaced by a password that returns you to the last Pokemon Center you visited with the last group of Pokemon you healed there (and only six Pokemon allowed at a time, with no PC), and you'll quickly realize how this flaw (among others) makes the game virtually unplayable.
* ''VideoGame/Goldeneye1997'' only saves your progress after completing a mission and doesn't have any form of checkpoints, so if you screw up at the last leg of the mission, it's back to the very start of the level for you. The remake adds checkpoints.
* ''VideoGame/TheMaidOfFairewellHeights'': Can save basically anywhen, even in the middle of conversations, and there are 15 save slots.
* ''VideoGame/AVeryLongRopeToTheTopOfTheSky'': You save at {{Save Point}}s located all over the world and there are 4 save slots to put your saves in.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Non-Video Game Examples]]
* The manga ''Manga/GamerzHeaven'' has a FictionalVideoGame of the same name in which the number of times you can save your game is limited to 3 due to it being a Beta Release. Unfortunately, the game automatically saves every time you exit, and it can only be played by transferring your physical body to {{Cyberspace}}. This means if you start up the game more than 3 times, you can't get home, and you're stuck. Ironically, the characters, after [[spoiler:inadvertently saving twice]], decide to conserve their last save until they really, ''really'' need it. That [[spoiler:ends up never happening ([[SeriesHiatus or at least to our current knowledge]]) as they fail epically and lose for good before using it]].
* The story "[[http://notalwaysright.com/gotta-catch-his-son/24609 Gotta Catch His Son]]" on ''Website/NotAlwaysRight'' shows the negative consequences of the strict one-save-per-cartridge limit in ''VideoGame/{{Pokemon}}'' games.
[[/folder]]
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other
24th Apr '18 12:31:01 PM LlamaAdventure
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* ''VideoGame/NierAutomata'' only allows saving within range of an activated Access Point. This is fairly generous (these are found in the field and activated to reveal the map too), but as the game repeatedly hammers into you, it will '''not''' autosave. While DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist, a shocking amount of the game's MultipleEndings are triggered by a single action, and those will dump you back at the main menu with no chance to update one's save file.

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* ''VideoGame/NierAutomata'' only allows saving within range of an activated Access Point. This is fairly generous (these are found in the field and activated to reveal the map too), but as the game repeatedly hammers into you, it will '''not''' autosave. While DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist, a shocking amount of the game's MultipleEndings are triggered by a single action, and those will dump you back at the main menu with no chance to update one's save file. These save game restrictions also mean you have to clear the entirety of the prologue (which includes an UnexpectedShmupLevel, a miniboss, an entire stage, and a prolonged multi-stage boss fight) without dying once.
24th Apr '18 12:28:23 PM LlamaAdventure
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Added DiffLines:

** [[spoiler: After the destruction of the Bunker (where 2B and 9S' backup data is kept,) DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist no longer applies, and dying will [[PermaDeath end the game right then and there]] instead of allowing you to carry your experience and money into your next life and retrieve your chips from your dead body. Saving frequently thus becomes more important than ever.]]
24th Apr '18 5:57:28 AM rjd1922
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On the flipside, an unrestricted ability to save one's game literally ''anywhere'' can (as players using emulators can attest) leave the player stranded in an {{Unwinnable}} condition should they choose to save at the wrong time, and placing limits on the player's ability to save can prevent this, making it a two-sided coin. Properly spaced {{Save Point}}s can also serve as useful hints about when the player should save.

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On the flipside, an unrestricted ability to save one's game literally ''anywhere'' can (as players using emulators save states on [[UsefulNotes/{{Emulation}} emulators]] can attest) leave the player stranded in an {{Unwinnable}} condition should they choose to save at the wrong time, and placing limits on the player's ability to save can prevent this, making it a two-sided coin. Properly spaced {{Save Point}}s can also serve as useful hints about when the player should save.



** As of Diamond/Pearl and on, the game now flat out tells you that you can't save when starting a new game. In order to actually ''start'' a new game (as opposed for playing however much you could manage in a single sitting and being unable to do anything that ''requires'' you to save first, like online play), you have to enter a secret combination of buttons ([[AllThereInTheManual listed in the manual]]) to first erase the saved game. This might have been intended as an AntiFrustrationFeature -- ''Pokémon'' is largely a child-oriented franchise, which means that if your little cousin wants to borrow your 3DS, it's probably a ''Pokémon'' game they want to play, and this prevents them from overwriting your save file accidentally.

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** As of Diamond/Pearl ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' and on, onward, the game now flat out flat-out tells you that you can't save when starting a new game. In order to actually ''start'' a new game (as opposed for playing however much you could manage in a single sitting and being unable to do anything that ''requires'' you to save first, like online play), you have to enter a secret combination of buttons ([[AllThereInTheManual listed in the manual]]) to first erase the saved game. This might have been intended as an AntiFrustrationFeature -- ''Pokémon'' is largely a child-oriented franchise, which means that if your little cousin wants to borrow your 3DS, it's probably a ''Pokémon'' game they want to play, and this prevents them from overwriting your save file accidentally.
24th Apr '18 5:54:10 AM rjd1922
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* ''VideoGame/EnemyZero'' has the player save and load their game using a handheld recorder. Using the recorder to do ''anything'' consumes battery life, meaning that too much saving ''or'' loading could force you to start over.

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* ''VideoGame/EnemyZero'' has the player save and load their game using a handheld recorder. Using the recorder to do ''anything'' consumes battery life, which starts with 64 charges on its battery. Saving uses up three charges, while loading uses one, meaning that too much saving ''or'' loading could force you to start over.
14th Apr '18 4:38:18 AM REV6Pilot
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* The ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' series, wherein you must find typewriter tapes in order to save your game. Though most typewriters have tape next to them, they are a finite-use item. And you will frequently want to save more often than merely once or twice per typewriter. This is made even worse when ''not saving at all'' is one of the requirements for receiving an A or S rank when you finish the games. When ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4'' added autosaves between each chapter and did away with needing tapes to use typewriters to save in the middle of one, the fans hailed it as a breath of fresh air. ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'' finally ditched the typewrtiers entirely in favor of the between-chapter autosaves.

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* The ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' series, wherein you must find typewriter tapes Ink Ribbons in order to save your game. Though most typewriters have tape those next to them, they are a finite-use item. And item, and you will frequently want to save more often than merely once or twice per typewriter. This is made even worse when ''not saving at all'' is one of the requirements for receiving an A or S rank when you finish the games. When game. ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4'' added autosaves between each chapter and did away with needing tapes Ink Ribbons to use typewriters to save in the middle of one, the fans hailed it as a breath of fresh air. one. ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'' finally ditched the typewrtiers typewriters entirely in favor of the between-chapter autosaves.autosaves. ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil7'' brought back save points, in the shape of tape recorders.
8th Apr '18 5:13:11 AM Dere
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* Every entry in the ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series until ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild Breath of the Wild]]'' had a limit of three save files. Rough times if the game is shared by a large family or in a dorm. Save files can be copied from the file select screen. [[note]]Since the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube installments (and ports) save to memory cards, you can avoid this limit by having several. On the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS, this takes some creative work with an SD card.[[/note]]

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* Every entry in the ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series until ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild Breath of the Wild]]'' had a limit of three save files. Rough times if the game is shared by a large family or in a dorm. Save files can be copied from the file select screen. [[note]]Since the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube installments (and ports) save to memory cards, you can avoid this limit by having several. On the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS, this takes some creative work with an SD card.[[/note]][[/note]] Breath of the Wild, on the other hand, has ''one'' permanent save per account, and a few extra slots reserved for autosaves that get automatically overwritten.
7th Apr '18 2:50:01 PM Albert3105
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* The original ''VideoGame/{{Makai Toshi SaGa}}'' (''The Final Fantasy Legend'' to us American folk) allows you to save anywhere. You get exactly one save slot, however, and God (er, the Creator) help you if you wind up saving in an {{Unwinnable}} situation. Death in that game was anything but [[DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist a slap on the wrist]].

to:

* The original ''VideoGame/{{Makai Toshi SaGa}}'' (''The Final Fantasy Legend'' to us American folk) allows you to save anywhere. You get exactly one save slot, however, and God (er, the Creator) help you if you wind up saving in an {{Unwinnable}} situation. Death in that game was [[ContinuingIsPainful anything but [[DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist a slap on the wrist]].
7th Apr '18 2:46:03 PM Albert3105
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** In the original GBA titles, it was a suspend save, making the games a fair bit more difficult.

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** In the original GBA titles, [[ArtifactTitle it was indeed a suspend save, save]], making the games a fair bit more difficult.
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