1 Days Left to Support a Troper-Created Project : Personal Space (discuss)

History Main / SaveGameLimits

7th Apr '16 10:22:05 AM DavidCowie
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* ''VideoGame/ResidentEvilRevelations2:'' only has one save file, and it's AutoSave only -- you cannot save manually.
29th Feb '16 10:21:18 AM OmegaMetroid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** For the 3DS ones, if you got the twenty games from the Ambassador Program, the restore points are absent. Some of the NES games were given a proper release for the Virtual Console, and Ambassadors upgrading to that version (no extra cost) would get the restore points. Sadly, this upgrade will only apply to the NES games; the GBA games were stated to be Ambassador exclusive, and haven't been updated to provide restore points (or indeed, ''any'' of the standard Virtual Console functionality).[[note]][[http://ds.about.com/od/nintendods101/fl/Why-Arent-Game-Boy-Advance-Games-on-the-Nintendo-3DSs-Virtual-Console.htm This is actually due]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/ to a technical limitation]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/#comment-4998 of the original 3DS]]. While the system is able to properly emulate, say, an NES, Game Boy, or Game Gear, it isn't actually powerful enough to properly emulate a GBA. Instead, it uses a variation of the trick that the DS & DS Lite used, and essentially turns itself into a more expensive GBA by simulating the hardware; more specifically, by using both of its main CPU's cores to emulate the GBA's CPU and running a slightly modified version of the DS' actual GBA firmware to provide the games with access to the 3DS' hardware. ...Unfortunately, the main CPU's second core is also responsible for running all of the background tasks, such as networking, sleep mode, and the like; since the 3DS' processor (an [=ARM11=]; specifically, a dual-core [=ARM11=] running at 268 [=MHz=]) isn't powerful enough to emulate a GBA processor with just one core, and the secondary processor is seemingly too weak to emulate it ''at all'' (the 3DS' secondary processor, the [=ARM9=], is the same chip as the DS' main processor, with the only difference being that the 3DS' runs at 134 [=MHz=] and the DS' runs at 67 [=MHz=]; since the DS slows down its own secondary processor, an overclocked [=ARM7=] running at ~33.5 [=MHz=], to run GBA games on (as the GBA's processor is an [=ARM7=] running at ~16.8 [=MHz=]), this suggests that the DS' [=ARM9=] isn't able to properly emulate an [=ARM7=] running at normal clock speeds, and Nintendo either wasn't able to get it running on the 3DS' faster [=ARM9=], or willing to sacrifice quality to do so), it needs to use both the "game" core and the "background tasks" core, which leaves it unable to devote any processor time to background tasks; this is also why the 3DS can't automatically go into sleep mode when closed while in GBA mode, but games (such as ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'') are able to manually put it into sleep mode if they had that function on the original GBA. In essence, the 3DS has to switch into "GBA mode" instead of running Virtual Console or something like [=VisualBoy Advance=], and while it's in GBA mode, the only options available to it are 1) be a more expensive GBA, or 2) exit GBA mode. The New 3DS shouldn't have this issue (in theory, it's powerful enough to fully emulate the GBA, instead of having to simulate GBA hardware; specifically, its processor is a quad-core [=ARM11=] that normally runs at 268 [=MHz=], but can ramp up to 804 [=MHz=] for [=New3DS=] exclusives that set the appropriate flag, which should give it more than enough resources to emulate a GBA while keeping a dedicated "background tasks" core), but time will tell if Nintendo will take advantage of this.[[/note]]

to:

** For the 3DS ones, if you got the twenty games from the Ambassador Program, the restore points are absent. Some of the NES games were given a proper release for the Virtual Console, and Ambassadors upgrading to that version (no extra cost) would get the restore points. Sadly, this upgrade will only apply to the NES games; the GBA games were stated to be Ambassador exclusive, and haven't been updated to provide restore points (or indeed, ''any'' of the standard Virtual Console functionality).[[note]][[http://ds.about.com/od/nintendods101/fl/Why-Arent-Game-Boy-Advance-Games-on-the-Nintendo-3DSs-Virtual-Console.htm This is actually due]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/ to a technical limitation]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/#comment-4998 of the original 3DS]]. While the system is able to properly emulate, say, an NES, Game Boy, or Game Gear, it isn't actually powerful enough to properly emulate a GBA. Instead, it uses a variation of the trick that the DS & DS Lite used, and essentially turns itself into a more expensive GBA by simulating the hardware; more specifically, by using both of its main CPU's cores to emulate the GBA's CPU and running a slightly modified version of the DS' actual GBA firmware to provide the games with access to the 3DS' hardware. ...Unfortunately, the main CPU's second core is also responsible for running all of the background tasks, such as networking, sleep mode, and the like; since the 3DS' processor (an [=ARM11=]; specifically, a dual-core [=ARM11=] running at 268 [=MHz=]) isn't powerful enough to emulate a GBA processor with just one core, and the secondary processor is seemingly too weak to emulate it ''at all'' (the 3DS' secondary processor, the [=ARM9=], is the same chip as the DS' main processor, with the only difference being that the 3DS' runs at 134 [=MHz=] and the DS' runs at 67 [=MHz=]; since the DS slows down its own secondary processor, an overclocked [=ARM7=] running at ~33.5 [=MHz=], to run GBA games on (as the GBA's processor is an [=ARM7=] running at ~16.8 [=MHz=]), this suggests that the DS' [=ARM9=] isn't able to properly emulate an [=ARM7=] running at normal clock speeds, and Nintendo either wasn't able to get it running on the 3DS' faster [=ARM9=], or willing to sacrifice quality to do so), it needs to use both the "game" core and the "background tasks" core, which leaves it unable to devote any processor time to background tasks; this is also why the 3DS can't automatically go into sleep mode when closed while in GBA mode, but games (such as ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'') are able to manually put it into sleep mode if they had that function on the original GBA. In essence, the 3DS has to switch into "GBA mode" instead of running Virtual Console or something like [=VisualBoy Advance=], and while it's in GBA mode, the only options available to it are 1) be a more expensive GBA, or 2) exit GBA mode. The New 3DS shouldn't have this issue (in theory, it's powerful enough to fully emulate the GBA, instead of having to simulate GBA hardware; specifically, its processor is a quad-core [=ARM11=] that normally runs at 268 [=MHz=], but can ramp up to 804 [=MHz=] (artificially limited to 268 [=MHz=] for [=New3DS=] exclusives that set backwards compatibility, unless the current application sets the appropriate flag, flag), which should give it more than enough resources to emulate a GBA while keeping a dedicated "background tasks" core), but time will tell if Nintendo will take advantage of this.[[/note]]
29th Feb '16 10:17:13 AM OmegaMetroid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** For the 3DS ones, if you got the twenty games from the Ambassador Program, the restore points are absent. Some of the NES games were given a proper release for the Virtual Console, and Ambassadors upgrading to that version (no extra cost) would get the restore points. Sadly, this upgrade will only apply to the NES games; the GBA games were stated to be Ambassador exclusive, and haven't been updated to provide restore points (or indeed, ''any'' of the standard Virtual Console functionality).[[note]][[http://ds.about.com/od/nintendods101/fl/Why-Arent-Game-Boy-Advance-Games-on-the-Nintendo-3DSs-Virtual-Console.htm This is actually due]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/ to a technical limitation]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/#comment-4998 of the original 3DS]]. While the system is able to properly emulate, say, an NES, Game Boy, or Game Gear, it isn't actually powerful enough to properly emulate a GBA. Instead, it uses a variation of the trick that the DS & DS Lite used, and essentially turns itself into a more expensive GBA by simulating the hardware; more specifically, by using both of its main CPU's cores to emulate the GBA's CPU and running a slightly modified version of the DS' actual GBA firmware to provide the games with access to the 3DS' hardware. ...Unfortunately, the main CPU's second core is also responsible for running all of the background tasks, such as networking, sleep mode, and the like; since the 3DS' processor (an ARM11; specifically, a dual-core ARM11 running at 268 MHz) isn't powerful enough to emulate a GBA processor with just one core, and the secondary processor is seemingly too weak to emulate it ''at all'' (the 3DS' secondary processor, the ARM9, is the same chip as the DS' main processor; since the DS slows down its own secondary processor, an overclocked ARM7, to run GBA games on (as the GBA's processor is an ARM7 that ''isn't'' overclocked), this suggests that the ARM9 isn't able to properly emulate an ARM7 running at normal clock speeds), it needs to use both the "game" core and the "background tasks" core, which leaves it unable to devote any processor time to background tasks; this is also why the 3DS can't automatically go into sleep mode when closed while in GBA mode, but games (such as ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'') are able to manually put it into sleep mode if they had that function on the original GBA. In essence, the 3DS has to switch into "GBA mode" instead of running Virtual Console or something like [=VisualBoy Advance=], and while it's in GBA mode, the only options available to it are 1) be a more expensive GBA, or 2) exit GBA mode. The New 3DS shouldn't have this issue (in theory, it's powerful enough to fully emulate the GBA, instead of having to simulate GBA hardware; specifically, its processor is a quad-core ARM11 that normally runs at 268 MHz, but can ramp up to 804 MHz for [=New3DS=] exclusives that set the appropriate flag, which should give it more than enough resources to emulate a GBA while keeping a dedicated "background tasks" core), but time will tell if Nintendo will take advantage of this.[[/note]]

to:

** For the 3DS ones, if you got the twenty games from the Ambassador Program, the restore points are absent. Some of the NES games were given a proper release for the Virtual Console, and Ambassadors upgrading to that version (no extra cost) would get the restore points. Sadly, this upgrade will only apply to the NES games; the GBA games were stated to be Ambassador exclusive, and haven't been updated to provide restore points (or indeed, ''any'' of the standard Virtual Console functionality).[[note]][[http://ds.about.com/od/nintendods101/fl/Why-Arent-Game-Boy-Advance-Games-on-the-Nintendo-3DSs-Virtual-Console.htm This is actually due]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/ to a technical limitation]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/#comment-4998 of the original 3DS]]. While the system is able to properly emulate, say, an NES, Game Boy, or Game Gear, it isn't actually powerful enough to properly emulate a GBA. Instead, it uses a variation of the trick that the DS & DS Lite used, and essentially turns itself into a more expensive GBA by simulating the hardware; more specifically, by using both of its main CPU's cores to emulate the GBA's CPU and running a slightly modified version of the DS' actual GBA firmware to provide the games with access to the 3DS' hardware. ...Unfortunately, the main CPU's second core is also responsible for running all of the background tasks, such as networking, sleep mode, and the like; since the 3DS' processor (an ARM11; [=ARM11=]; specifically, a dual-core ARM11 [=ARM11=] running at 268 MHz) [=MHz=]) isn't powerful enough to emulate a GBA processor with just one core, and the secondary processor is seemingly too weak to emulate it ''at all'' (the 3DS' secondary processor, the ARM9, [=ARM9=], is the same chip as the DS' main processor; processor, with the only difference being that the 3DS' runs at 134 [=MHz=] and the DS' runs at 67 [=MHz=]; since the DS slows down its own secondary processor, an overclocked ARM7, [=ARM7=] running at ~33.5 [=MHz=], to run GBA games on (as the GBA's processor is an ARM7 that ''isn't'' overclocked), [=ARM7=] running at ~16.8 [=MHz=]), this suggests that the ARM9 DS' [=ARM9=] isn't able to properly emulate an ARM7 [=ARM7=] running at normal clock speeds), speeds, and Nintendo either wasn't able to get it running on the 3DS' faster [=ARM9=], or willing to sacrifice quality to do so), it needs to use both the "game" core and the "background tasks" core, which leaves it unable to devote any processor time to background tasks; this is also why the 3DS can't automatically go into sleep mode when closed while in GBA mode, but games (such as ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'') are able to manually put it into sleep mode if they had that function on the original GBA. In essence, the 3DS has to switch into "GBA mode" instead of running Virtual Console or something like [=VisualBoy Advance=], and while it's in GBA mode, the only options available to it are 1) be a more expensive GBA, or 2) exit GBA mode. The New 3DS shouldn't have this issue (in theory, it's powerful enough to fully emulate the GBA, instead of having to simulate GBA hardware; specifically, its processor is a quad-core ARM11 [=ARM11=] that normally runs at 268 MHz, [=MHz=], but can ramp up to 804 MHz [=MHz=] for [=New3DS=] exclusives that set the appropriate flag, which should give it more than enough resources to emulate a GBA while keeping a dedicated "background tasks" core), but time will tell if Nintendo will take advantage of this.[[/note]]
29th Feb '16 10:05:57 AM OmegaMetroid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** For the 3DS ones, if you got the twenty games from the Ambassador Program, the restore points are absent. Some of the NES games were given a proper release for the Virtual Console, and Ambassadors upgrading to that version (no extra cost) would get the restore points. Sadly, this upgrade will only apply to the NES games; the GBA games were stated to be Ambassador exclusive, and haven't been updated to provide restore points (or indeed, ''any'' of the standard Virtual Console functionality).[[note]][[http://ds.about.com/od/nintendods101/fl/Why-Arent-Game-Boy-Advance-Games-on-the-Nintendo-3DSs-Virtual-Console.htm This is actually due]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/ to a technical limitation]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/#comment-4998 of the original 3DS]]. While the system is able to properly emulate, say, an NES, Game Boy, or Game Gear, it isn't actually powerful enough to properly emulate a GBA. Instead, it uses a variation of the trick that the DS & DS Lite used, and essentially turns itself into a more expensive GBA by simulating the hardware; more specifically, by using both of its main CPU's cores to emulate the GBA's CPU and running the a slightly modified version of the DS' actual GBA firmware to provide the games with access to the 3DS' hardware. ...Unfortunately, the main CPU's second core is also responsible for running all of the background tasks, such as networking, sleep mode, and the like; since the 3DS' processor isn't powerful enough to emulate a GBA processor with just one core, it needs to use both the "game" core and the "background tasks" core, which leaves it unable to devote any processor time to background tasks. In essence, the 3DS has to switch into "GBA mode" instead of running Virtual Console or something like [=VisualBoy Advance=], and while it's in GBA mode, the only options available to it are 1) be a more expensive GBA, or 2) exit GBA mode. The New 3DS shouldn't have this issue (in theory, it's powerful enough to fully emulate the GBA, instead of having to simulate GBA hardware), but time will tell if Nintendo will take advantage of this.[[/note]]

to:

** For the 3DS ones, if you got the twenty games from the Ambassador Program, the restore points are absent. Some of the NES games were given a proper release for the Virtual Console, and Ambassadors upgrading to that version (no extra cost) would get the restore points. Sadly, this upgrade will only apply to the NES games; the GBA games were stated to be Ambassador exclusive, and haven't been updated to provide restore points (or indeed, ''any'' of the standard Virtual Console functionality).[[note]][[http://ds.about.com/od/nintendods101/fl/Why-Arent-Game-Boy-Advance-Games-on-the-Nintendo-3DSs-Virtual-Console.htm This is actually due]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/ to a technical limitation]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/#comment-4998 of the original 3DS]]. While the system is able to properly emulate, say, an NES, Game Boy, or Game Gear, it isn't actually powerful enough to properly emulate a GBA. Instead, it uses a variation of the trick that the DS & DS Lite used, and essentially turns itself into a more expensive GBA by simulating the hardware; more specifically, by using both of its main CPU's cores to emulate the GBA's CPU and running the a slightly modified version of the DS' actual GBA firmware to provide the games with access to the 3DS' hardware. ...Unfortunately, the main CPU's second core is also responsible for running all of the background tasks, such as networking, sleep mode, and the like; since the 3DS' processor (an ARM11; specifically, a dual-core ARM11 running at 268 MHz) isn't powerful enough to emulate a GBA processor with just one core, and the secondary processor is seemingly too weak to emulate it ''at all'' (the 3DS' secondary processor, the ARM9, is the same chip as the DS' main processor; since the DS slows down its own secondary processor, an overclocked ARM7, to run GBA games on (as the GBA's processor is an ARM7 that ''isn't'' overclocked), this suggests that the ARM9 isn't able to properly emulate an ARM7 running at normal clock speeds), it needs to use both the "game" core and the "background tasks" core, which leaves it unable to devote any processor time to background tasks.tasks; this is also why the 3DS can't automatically go into sleep mode when closed while in GBA mode, but games (such as ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'') are able to manually put it into sleep mode if they had that function on the original GBA. In essence, the 3DS has to switch into "GBA mode" instead of running Virtual Console or something like [=VisualBoy Advance=], and while it's in GBA mode, the only options available to it are 1) be a more expensive GBA, or 2) exit GBA mode. The New 3DS shouldn't have this issue (in theory, it's powerful enough to fully emulate the GBA, instead of having to simulate GBA hardware), hardware; specifically, its processor is a quad-core ARM11 that normally runs at 268 MHz, but can ramp up to 804 MHz for [=New3DS=] exclusives that set the appropriate flag, which should give it more than enough resources to emulate a GBA while keeping a dedicated "background tasks" core), but time will tell if Nintendo will take advantage of this.[[/note]]
29th Feb '16 9:53:20 AM OmegaMetroid
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* ''VideoGame/DistortedTravesty 3'' allows you to save at (almost) any time in (almost) any room. However, doing so only saves which entrance you used or which checkpoint you've reached, and your condition when entering the room/reaching it; it doesn't save what you've done since then, or your current position in the room (with the exception that items & secrets collected in the current room will also be saved).



** For the 3DS ones, if you got the twenty games from the Ambassador Program, the restore points are absent. Some of the NES games were given a proper release for the Virtual Console, and Ambassadors upgrading to that version (no extra cost) would get the restore points. Sadly, this upgrade will only apply to the NES games; the GBA games were stated to be Ambassador exclusive.

to:

** For the 3DS ones, if you got the twenty games from the Ambassador Program, the restore points are absent. Some of the NES games were given a proper release for the Virtual Console, and Ambassadors upgrading to that version (no extra cost) would get the restore points. Sadly, this upgrade will only apply to the NES games; the GBA games were stated to be Ambassador exclusive.exclusive, and haven't been updated to provide restore points (or indeed, ''any'' of the standard Virtual Console functionality).[[note]][[http://ds.about.com/od/nintendods101/fl/Why-Arent-Game-Boy-Advance-Games-on-the-Nintendo-3DSs-Virtual-Console.htm This is actually due]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/ to a technical limitation]] [[http://www.vooks.net/why-the-game-boy-advance-isnt-on-the-3ds-virtual-console/#comment-4998 of the original 3DS]]. While the system is able to properly emulate, say, an NES, Game Boy, or Game Gear, it isn't actually powerful enough to properly emulate a GBA. Instead, it uses a variation of the trick that the DS & DS Lite used, and essentially turns itself into a more expensive GBA by simulating the hardware; more specifically, by using both of its main CPU's cores to emulate the GBA's CPU and running the a slightly modified version of the DS' actual GBA firmware to provide the games with access to the 3DS' hardware. ...Unfortunately, the main CPU's second core is also responsible for running all of the background tasks, such as networking, sleep mode, and the like; since the 3DS' processor isn't powerful enough to emulate a GBA processor with just one core, it needs to use both the "game" core and the "background tasks" core, which leaves it unable to devote any processor time to background tasks. In essence, the 3DS has to switch into "GBA mode" instead of running Virtual Console or something like [=VisualBoy Advance=], and while it's in GBA mode, the only options available to it are 1) be a more expensive GBA, or 2) exit GBA mode. The New 3DS shouldn't have this issue (in theory, it's powerful enough to fully emulate the GBA, instead of having to simulate GBA hardware), but time will tell if Nintendo will take advantage of this.[[/note]]
6th Feb '16 8:59:53 PM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''{{Okamiden}}'' has only one save file. Unfortunately, there's a good deal of collectibles that can be LostForever -- some of which are tied into NewGamePlus functionality. These limits do not apply to [[VideoGame/{{Okami}} its predecessor]].

to:

* ''{{Okamiden}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Okamiden}}'' has only one save file. Unfortunately, there's a good deal of collectibles that can be LostForever -- some of which are tied into NewGamePlus functionality. These limits do not apply to [[VideoGame/{{Okami}} its predecessor]].
17th Jan '16 10:42:54 AM Steven
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* ''VideoGame/Goldeneye1997'' only saves your progress after completing a mission and doesn't have any form of checkpoints, so if you screw up at the last leg of the mission, it's back to the very start of the level for you. The remake adds checkpoints.
23rd Dec '15 11:52:27 AM GuyYouMetOnline
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros'' for NintendoDS has once of the worst save systems ever to disgrace a portable system. You can save only after beating a boss or mini-boss, or collecting and spending 5 star coins to open a bonus area. The game's supply of star coins and bonus areas is finite. There's no temporary save system like that other DS offender ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII''. (As with any DS game, you can suspend ''New Super Mario Bros.'' by simply closing the DS to put the game in Sleep Mode, and plugging the DS into an AC adapter.) Your "reward" for finishing the game is the ability to save after every level, proving that this save system was not a technical limitation. \\

to:

** ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros'' for NintendoDS has once of the worst save systems ever to disgrace a portable system. You can save only after beating a boss or mini-boss, or collecting and spending 5 star coins to open a bonus area. The game's supply of star coins and bonus areas is finite. There's no temporary save system like that other DS offender ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII''. (As with any DS game, you can suspend ''New Super Mario Bros.'' by simply closing the DS to put the game in Sleep Mode, and plugging the DS into an AC adapter.) Your "reward" for finishing the game is the ability to save after every level, proving that this save system was not a technical limitation. limitation (it was, in fact, done deliberately as a throwback to older Mario games).\\
19th Nov '15 5:11:11 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The ''{{RuneFactory}}'' series was getting infamous because of this, Rune Factory, Rune Factory 2 and Rune Factory Frontier not only give you a small number of save files (two on the first two, three in Frontier) but they also required that every subsequent save always overwrote your file with no way to keep multiple active saves for a single campaign. This was an particularly big problem for Frontier, since it basically forced you to complete the game more than 10 times from the very beginning (around 50 hours each, at least) if you wanted 100% completion. The latter games thankfully averted this, Rune Factory 3 reverted back to 2 save files but you could overwrite both at any time, and Rune Factory Tides of destiny not only discarded the restriction but also gives you around a dozen of save files to use.

to:

* The ''{{RuneFactory}}'' ''VideoGame/RuneFactory'' series was getting infamous because of this, Rune Factory, Rune Factory 2 ''Rune Factory'', ''VideoGame/RuneFactory2'' and Rune Factory Frontier ''VideoGame/RuneFactoryFrontier'' not only give you a small number of save files (two on the first two, three in Frontier) but they also required that every subsequent save always overwrote your file with no way to keep multiple active saves for a single campaign. This was an particularly big problem for Frontier, since it basically forced you to complete the game more than 10 times from the very beginning (around 50 hours each, at least) if you wanted 100% completion. The latter games thankfully averted this, Rune Factory 3 reverted back to 2 save files but you could overwrite both at any time, and Rune Factory Tides of destiny not only discarded the restriction but also gives you around a dozen of save files to use.
11th Nov '15 4:57:43 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''RiverCityRansom EX'' has a weird save system, in that your character's ''stats'' are preserved, but his progress through the game isn't. That mirrors how the passwords worked in the original, and it isn't ''that'' terrible, as the game isn't very long.

to:

* ''RiverCityRansom ''VideoGame/RiverCityRansom EX'' has a weird save system, in that your character's ''stats'' are preserved, but his progress through the game isn't. That mirrors how the passwords worked in the original, and it isn't ''that'' terrible, as the game isn't very long.
This list shows the last 10 events of 98. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SaveGameLimits