History Main / SameStoryDifferentNames

28th Apr '16 7:39:30 AM aye_amber
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* KingCrimson tends to cycle with two-three albums sounding similar to each other, followed by a NewSoundAlbum. Examples being the similarities for ''Lark's Tongue in Aspic'', ''Red'', and ''Starless and Bible Black''.

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* KingCrimson Music/KingCrimson tends to cycle with two-three albums sounding similar to each other, followed by a NewSoundAlbum. Examples being the similarities for ''Lark's Tongue in Aspic'', ''Red'', and ''Starless and Bible Black''.
18th Apr '16 11:39:08 PM Kid
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* Most of David Gemmels books feature and old hero who becomes a mentor to a young hero, a fiery damsel who is rarely in distress, a magical order, and a hopeless battle.

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* Most of David Gemmels books feature and an old hero who becomes a mentor to a young hero, a fiery damsel who is rarely in distress, a magical order, and a hopeless battle.
29th Mar '16 8:21:28 PM eowynjedi
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* The 1940 ''Literature/HoratioHornblower'' short story "Hornblower and the Hand of Destiny" can read like a prototype for Forester's later novel ''Lieutenant Hornblower''. Junior lieutenant Hornblower is faced with a tyrannical captain, a mutiny, a victorious action on a Spanish target which distracts from the mutinous atmosphere, and the captain being permanently incapacitated by one of his victims. In the short story, Captain Courtney is shot by abused seaman Fletcher; Hornblower is the only one to see it and chooses not to intervene, nor does he ever tell anyone who really shot Courtney in the leg. He ends the story as the first lieutenant of the ship. The book expands on the abuses a captain could inflict unchecked at sea and makes it ambiguous if Captain Sawyer was pushed by abused Midshipman Wellard, Hornblower himself, or if it was a real accident; Hornblower insists that he didn't see and it must have been the last, but it remains an open question. Sawyer's fall breaks his mind and he's later killed during a prisoner uprising (though perhaps not by the prisoners). The action is against a Spanish fort, and the victory allows the court of inquiry to declare he died in battle. Hornblower ends the book with a promotion to commander.[[note]]though it has to happen twice thanks to the Peace of Amiens[[/note]]

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* The 1940 ''Literature/HoratioHornblower'' short story "Hornblower and the Hand of Destiny" can read reads like a prototype for Forester's later novel ''Lieutenant Hornblower''. Junior lieutenant Hornblower is faced with a tyrannical captain, a mutiny, a victorious action on a Spanish target which distracts from the mutinous atmosphere, and the captain being permanently incapacitated by one of his victims. In the short story, Captain Courtney is shot by abused seaman Fletcher; Hornblower is the only one to see it and chooses not to doesn't intervene, nor does he ever tell anyone who really shot Courtney in the leg. tell. He ends the story as the first lieutenant of the ship. The book expands on the abuses a captain could inflict unchecked at sea and makes it ambiguous if Captain Sawyer was Sawyer's incapacitating fall a mystery: pushed by abused Midshipman Wellard, Hornblower himself, or if it was a real accident; accident. Hornblower insists that he didn't see and it must have been claims it's the last, but it remains an open question. Sawyer's fall breaks his mind and he's later killed during a prisoner uprising (though perhaps last which he did not by the prisoners). personally witness. The action is against a Spanish fort, fort and the victory allows the court of inquiry to declare he died captain dies in battle.a prisoner uprising. Hornblower ends the book with a promotion to commander.[[note]]though it has to happen twice thanks to the Peace of Amiens[[/note]]
29th Mar '16 8:14:15 PM eowynjedi
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* The 1940 ''Literature/HoratioHornblower'' short story "Hornblower and the Hand of Destiny" can read like a prototype for Forester's later novel ''Lieutenant Hornblower''. Junior lieutenant Hornblower is faced with a tyrannical captain, a mutiny, a victorious action on a Spanish target which distracts from the mutinous atmosphere, and the captain being permanently incapacitated by one of his victims. In the short story, Captain Courtney is shot by abused seaman Fletcher; Hornblower is the only one to see it and chooses not to intervene, nor does he ever tell anyone who really shot Courtney in the leg. He ends the story as the first lieutenant of the ship. The book expands on the abuses a captain could inflict unchecked at sea and makes it ambiguous if Captain Sawyer was pushed by abused Midshipman Wellard, Hornblower himself, or if it was a real accident; Hornblower insists that he didn't see and it must have been the last, but it remains an open question. Sawyer's fall breaks his mind and he's later killed during a prisoner uprising (though perhaps not by the prisoners). The action is against a Spanish fort, and the victory allows the court of inquiry to declare he died in battle. Hornblower ends the book with a promotion to commander.[[note]]though it has to happen twice thanks to the Peace of Amiens[[/note]]
4th Jan '16 3:44:48 PM rjung
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* Most of Brian Jacques' ''Literature/{{Redwall}}'' plots are ''very'' similar. Redwall's in trouble. A hero carries Martin's legendary sword and [[{{Badass}} kicks ass]]. FamilyUnfriendlyViolence occurs. [[SacrificialLion Someone important]] (or not important, but [[SacrificialLamb very kind or innocent]]) dies. More FamilyUnfriendlyViolence. The BigBad gets a daily dosage of LaserGuidedKarma and dies. Redwall is saved. The end. All interspersed with lots of FoodPorn.
30th Dec '15 12:12:41 PM igordebraga
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* The critically/fan-acclaimed albums for Music/{{Metallica}} tend to be down to an 8-9 song formula. ''Ride the Lightning'', ''Master of Puppets'', ''...And Justice For All'', and ''Death Magnetic'' all follow a similar structure to the music, with varying music lengths based on how advanced CD/LP technology is at the time. Each opens with a song that sounds like most of the rest of the album that also has an unusual intro (acoustic, fade-in, heartbeat) before the album's title track if it has one. Track four is generally lighter or slower ("One"[[note]] ''...And Justice For All''[[/note]] and "The Day That Never Comes"[[note]]''Death Magnetic''[[/note]] have identical song structures) and the peniltimate track is an instrumental.

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* The critically/fan-acclaimed albums for Music/{{Metallica}} tend to be down to an 8-9 song formula. ''Ride the Lightning'', ''Master of Puppets'', ''...And Justice For All'', and ''Death Magnetic'' all follow a similar structure to the music, with [[EpicRocking varying music lengths lengths]] based on how advanced CD/LP technology is at the time. Each opens with a song that sounds like most of the rest of the album that also has an unusual intro (acoustic, fade-in, heartbeat) before the album's title track if it has one. Track four is generally lighter or slower ("One"[[note]] ''...And Justice For All''[[/note]] and "The Day That Never Comes"[[note]]''Death Magnetic''[[/note]] have identical song structures) and the peniltimate penultimate track (or last, in the case of ''Lightning'') is an instrumental.instrumental before a fast-paced song that's not as long as the ones preceding it.
15th Dec '15 1:37:25 AM gallium
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* Ken Follett's ''Literature/ThePillarsOfTheEarth'' and ''Literature/WorldWithoutEnd'' both take place in the same fictional priory in medieval England, in the 12th and 14th centuries respectively. They are both about a genius architect whose building project and love life are constantly threatened by conservative townsfolk, the church, politics, and petty rivalries. In both, the female lead and the architect's lover is a strangely liberated woman who is awfully assertive and independent for the middle ages. Both feature as an antagonist an evil rapist knight. Both turn on a closely guarded secret about the royal family (the sinking of the "White Ship" and death of Henry the Young King in the first, the murder of Edward II in the second). Both have the female lead traveling to the site of a great battle (Lincoln in the first, Crecy in the 2nd) to ask a boon of the king; both have the evil knight fighting in that battle. And his novels ''The Eye of the Needle'' and ''The Key To Rebecca'' both feature elite German spies who have information that could turn the war in the favour of the Axis. Both are are handy with hidden blades.

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* Ken Follett's Follett is prone to this.
**
''Literature/ThePillarsOfTheEarth'' and ''Literature/WorldWithoutEnd'' both take place in the same fictional priory in medieval England, in the 12th and 14th centuries respectively. They are both about a genius architect whose building project and love life are constantly threatened by conservative townsfolk, the church, politics, and petty rivalries. In both, the female lead and the architect's lover is a strangely liberated woman who is awfully assertive and independent for the middle ages. Both feature as an antagonist an evil rapist knight. Both turn on a closely guarded secret about the royal family (the sinking of the "White Ship" and death of Henry the Young King in the first, the murder of Edward II in the second). Both have the female lead traveling to the site of a great battle (Lincoln in the first, Crecy in the 2nd) to ask a boon of the king; both have the evil knight fighting in that battle.
**
And his novels ''The Eye of the Needle'' and ''The Key To Rebecca'' both feature elite German spies who have information that could turn the war in the favour of the Axis. Both are are handy with hidden blades.
6th Dec '15 3:29:42 PM Nohbody
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* As the ''WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation'' quote up on top suggests, the ''Franchise/BioShock'' and ''SystemShock'' games shows elements of this. ''[=BioShock=]'' is quite close to ''System Shock 2'' in particular: [[spoiler:Atlas is Polito, seemingly benevolent ''VoiceWithAnInternetConnection'' helping you against the apparent enemy (The Many or Ryan). But then there is a midgame reveal and (Polito or Atlas) is shown to have been using you and to be the ''BigBad'' (Fontaine or SHODAN) after all.]] In the beginning, you get yourself out of a plane about to sink or a section about to decompress, visit a truly remarkable place (an underwater Objectivist utopia or humanity's first FTL ship), and spend most of your time there fighting people who have turned into zombies (Splicers or Hybrids). You make use of both weapons and magic (Plasmids or Psionics) while working your way first to one central enemy, [[spoiler: Ryan or The Many]] and then to another [[spoiler: Fontaine or SHODAN]]. On the way to the second enemy, you come across a helpful scientist or her logs (Delacroix or Tenenbaum) in a place that's otherwise devoid of non-hostiles.

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* As the ''WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation'' quote up on top suggests, the ''Franchise/BioShock'' ''VideoGame/BioShock'' and ''SystemShock'' ''VideoGame/SystemShock'' games shows elements of this. ''[=BioShock=]'' is quite close to ''System Shock 2'' in particular: [[spoiler:Atlas is Polito, seemingly benevolent ''VoiceWithAnInternetConnection'' helping you against the apparent enemy (The Many or Ryan). But then there is a midgame reveal and (Polito or Atlas) is shown to have been using you and to be the ''BigBad'' (Fontaine or SHODAN) after all.]] In the beginning, you get yourself out of a plane about to sink or a section about to decompress, visit a truly remarkable place (an underwater Objectivist utopia or humanity's first FTL ship), and spend most of your time there fighting people who have turned into zombies (Splicers or Hybrids). You make use of both weapons and magic (Plasmids or Psionics) while working your way first to one central enemy, [[spoiler: Ryan or The Many]] and then to another [[spoiler: Fontaine or SHODAN]]. On the way to the second enemy, you come across a helpful scientist or her logs (Delacroix or Tenenbaum) in a place that's otherwise devoid of non-hostiles.
16th Nov '15 6:00:43 PM MyFinalEdits
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* Ken Follett's ''Literature/ThePillarsOfTheEarth'' and ''Literature/WorldWithoutEnd'' both take place in the same fictional priory in medieval England, in the 12th and 14th centuries respectively. They are both about a genius architect whose building project and love life are constantly threatened by conservative townsfolk, the church, politics, and petty rivalries. In both, the female lead and the architect's lover is a strangely liberated woman who is awfully assertive and independent for the middle ages. Both feature as an antagonist an evil rapist knight. Both turn on a closely guarded secret about the royal family (the sinking of the "White Ship" and death of Henry the Young King in the first, the murder of Edward II in the second). Both have the female lead traveling to the site of a great battle (Lincoln in the first, Crecy in the 2nd) to ask a boon of the king; both have the evil knight fighting in that battle.
** And his novels ''The Eye of the Needle'' and ''The Key To Rebecca'' both feature elite German spies who have information that could turn the war in the favour of the Axis. Both are are handy with hidden blades.

to:

* Ken Follett's ''Literature/ThePillarsOfTheEarth'' and ''Literature/WorldWithoutEnd'' both take place in the same fictional priory in medieval England, in the 12th and 14th centuries respectively. They are both about a genius architect whose building project and love life are constantly threatened by conservative townsfolk, the church, politics, and petty rivalries. In both, the female lead and the architect's lover is a strangely liberated woman who is awfully assertive and independent for the middle ages. Both feature as an antagonist an evil rapist knight. Both turn on a closely guarded secret about the royal family (the sinking of the "White Ship" and death of Henry the Young King in the first, the murder of Edward II in the second). Both have the female lead traveling to the site of a great battle (Lincoln in the first, Crecy in the 2nd) to ask a boon of the king; both have the evil knight fighting in that battle.
**
battle. And his novels ''The Eye of the Needle'' and ''The Key To Rebecca'' both feature elite German spies who have information that could turn the war in the favour of the Axis. Both are are handy with hidden blades.
15th Nov '15 10:07:59 PM gallium
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* Ken Follet's ''ThePillarsOfTheEarth'' and ''WorldWithoutEnd'' both take place in the same fictional priory in medieval England. They are both about a genius architect whose building project and love life are constantly threatened by conservative townsfolk, the church, politics, and petty rivalries. And his novels ''The Eye of the Needle'' and ''The Key To Rebecca'' both feature elite German spies who have information that could turn the war in the favour of the Axis. Both are are handy with hidden blades.

to:

* Ken Follet's ''ThePillarsOfTheEarth'' Follett's ''Literature/ThePillarsOfTheEarth'' and ''WorldWithoutEnd'' ''Literature/WorldWithoutEnd'' both take place in the same fictional priory in medieval England.England, in the 12th and 14th centuries respectively. They are both about a genius architect whose building project and love life are constantly threatened by conservative townsfolk, the church, politics, and petty rivalries. In both, the female lead and the architect's lover is a strangely liberated woman who is awfully assertive and independent for the middle ages. Both feature as an antagonist an evil rapist knight. Both turn on a closely guarded secret about the royal family (the sinking of the "White Ship" and death of Henry the Young King in the first, the murder of Edward II in the second). Both have the female lead traveling to the site of a great battle (Lincoln in the first, Crecy in the 2nd) to ask a boon of the king; both have the evil knight fighting in that battle.
**
And his novels ''The Eye of the Needle'' and ''The Key To Rebecca'' both feature elite German spies who have information that could turn the war in the favour of the Axis. Both are are handy with hidden blades.
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