History Main / SadlyMythtaken

12th Apr '18 8:53:08 AM FlekSiner
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** They also got some of his parentage wrong. Loki is known as Laufeysen in the original myths, but not because Laufey is his father like in the comics. Laufey is actually the name of his ''mother''. Loki has to use a matronymic rather than a patronymic because his father Farbaurti disowned him for being a midget (by Jotun standards).

to:

*** They also got some of his parentage wrong. Loki is known as Laufeysen in the original myths, but not because Laufey is his father like in the comics. Laufey is actually the name of his ''mother''. Loki has to use a matronymic rather than a patronymic because his father Farbaurti disowned him for being a midget (by being, by Jotun standards).standards, small.
10th Mar '18 5:19:57 AM CthonisPrincess
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The story of ''[[Film/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians Percy Jack and the Olympians: Lightning Thief]]'' centers around a summer solstice deadline, but Persephone is shown living in the underworld with Hades--something that's supposed to happen during the fall and winter months. What makes it stand out more is that she ''does'' acknowledge that she gets time away from Hades... though exactly ''when'' that is never expanded on. Part of why this is especially aggravating is because in the book the movie claims to be based on this problem doesn't exist. Percy takes notice that Persephone's throne in the underworld is empty. Also the movie adds EverybodyHatesHades where in the books that trope is subverted, Hades may not be the friendliest dude, and can be kind of harsh, but fair and generally true to his word.

to:

* The story of ''[[Film/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians Percy Jack and the Olympians: Lightning Thief]]'' centers around a summer solstice deadline, but Persephone is shown living in the underworld with Hades--something that's supposed to happen during the fall and winter months. What makes it stand out more is that she ''does'' acknowledge that she gets time away from Hades... though exactly ''when'' that is never expanded on. Part of why this is especially aggravating is because in the book the movie claims to be based on this problem doesn't exist. Percy takes notice that Persephone's throne in the underworld is empty.
**
Also the movie adds EverybodyHatesHades where in the books that trope is subverted, Hades may not be the friendliest dude, and can be kind of harsh, but fair and generally true to his word.word. In the original mythology Hades was actually the ''nicest'' god in the entire pantheon apart from Hestia.
** Not only that but the movie mentions that not only does Persephone hate Hades, but she has so many affairs that she had to come up with a way to get her lovers out without Hades finding out. Neither Hades nor Persephone ''ever'' had an affair in the original mythology (The story of Adonis actaully features her as a mother figure rather than a lover, and Minthe & Leuce didn't exist in Greek Mythology all three stories are also ''Roman'' inventions) but Persephone is occasionally mentioned to prefer the company of Hades over that of ''her own mother''.
5th Mar '18 11:42:09 AM TheMountainKing
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In one issue of ''ComicBook/TheSandman'', Loki is making a BadassBoast, and he references his children but claims that Fenrir is called "Sun-Eater". In Norse myth, Fenrir is destined to kill Odin at Ragnarok. His ''son'' Skoll is the one that eats the sun (his other son, Hati eats the moon). Might be slightly justifiable: fathers are notorious for constantly mashing their children's birthdays, hobbies and friends together and getting the wrong answers without a bit of help via being given the stink-eye to keep things straight. And, in Loki's defense: he had a lot of children as both Dad ''and'' Mom: must be a bit hard to keep track...

to:

* In one issue of ''ComicBook/TheSandman'', Loki is making a BadassBoast, and he references his children but claims that Fenrir is called "Sun-Eater". In Norse myth, Fenrir is destined to kill Odin at Ragnarok. His ''son'' Skoll is the one that eats the sun (his other son, Hati Hati, eats the moon). Might be slightly justifiable: fathers are notorious for constantly mashing their children's birthdays, hobbies and friends together and getting the wrong answers without a bit of help via being given the stink-eye to keep things straight. And, in Loki's defense: he had a lot of children as both Dad ''and'' Mom: must be a bit hard to keep track...
5th Mar '18 11:41:37 AM TheMountainKing
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In one issue of ComicBook/TheSandman, Loki is making a BadassBoast, and he references his children but claims that Fenrir is called "Sun-Eater". In Norse myth, Fenrir is destined to kill Odin at Ragnarok. His ''son'' Skoll is the one that eats the sun (his other son, Hati eats the moon). Might be slightly justifiable: fathers are notorious for constantly mashing their children's birthdays, hobbies and friends together and getting the wrong answers without a bit of help via being given the stink-eye to keep things straight. And, in Loki's defence: he had a lot of children as both Dad ''and'' Mum: must be a bit hard to keep track...

to:

* In one issue of ComicBook/TheSandman, ''ComicBook/TheSandman'', Loki is making a BadassBoast, and he references his children but claims that Fenrir is called "Sun-Eater". In Norse myth, Fenrir is destined to kill Odin at Ragnarok. His ''son'' Skoll is the one that eats the sun (his other son, Hati eats the moon). Might be slightly justifiable: fathers are notorious for constantly mashing their children's birthdays, hobbies and friends together and getting the wrong answers without a bit of help via being given the stink-eye to keep things straight. And, in Loki's defence: defense: he had a lot of children as both Dad ''and'' Mum: Mom: must be a bit hard to keep track...
3rd Mar '18 10:26:43 PM MagnusForce
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* '''The peryton'''. This stag-headed, bird-bodied monster that casts a human shadow and consumes human hearts appears in countless fantasy and mythology series, which will tell you it originated from Myth/GreekMythology. The truth? It was an invention of Argentinean writer Creator/JorgeLuisBorges for his book of mythical creatures ''The Book of Imaginary Beings''. His fondness of scholarly humour inspired him to create a "mythical" mythical creature, with another infamous example being the A Bao A Qu, a formless entity which he claimed was from Indian mythology.



** A few of the monsters lifted straight from the medieval bestiaries are given heavy artistic license. Bestiary 4's Barometz refers to a gigantic ram-shaped mass of vegetation created by druids as a nature guardian whereas the mythical one was simply a very odd plant with a lamb attached to it like an umbilical cord. Also from Bestiary 4, the Myremecoleon is an elephant-sized insect that spews acid while the mythical inspiration was a giant ant with a lion's head whose gimmick was it could not eat plants or meat, so it always starved to death.

to:

** A few of the monsters lifted straight from the medieval bestiaries are given heavy artistic license.license due to RuleOfCool. Bestiary 4's Barometz refers to a gigantic ram-shaped mass of vegetation created by druids as a nature guardian whereas the mythical one was simply a very odd plant with a lamb attached to it like an umbilical cord. Also from Bestiary 4, the Myremecoleon is an elephant-sized insect that spews acid while the mythical inspiration was a giant ant with a lion's head whose gimmick was it could not eat plants or meat, so it always starved to death.
21st Feb '18 6:34:06 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Norse myths continued to suffer: In Victorian times, the ''Literature/PoeticEdda'' -- an ancient collection of the Norse heroic legend -- was re-discovered. Creator/RichardWagner made them into operas, threw in some German myths, and we get the ''[[Theatre/DerRingDesNibelungen Ring]]'' cycle, which... well, it resembles the originals in places, but it's essentially a complete rewrite of the myths. And Wagner's SpiritualSuccessor to the Ring cycle, ''Parsifal'', is the myth of the Holy Grail remade in the image of the Bayreuth Theater. At least Wagner didn't invent the sadly mythtaken Arabic etymology of Parsifal's name. Wagner's Ring is something of a cross between two versions of the same story, and Wagner's own personal sensibilities (the stories being the Middle High German ''Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}'' and the Scandinavian ''Literature/VolsungaSaga'') It is very likely that the two stories share a common origin. Both purportedly feature the Burgundian realm by the Rhine and feature Attila as a minor character (Etzel in the ''Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}'', Atle in the Scandinavian version).

to:

* Norse myths continued to suffer: In Victorian times, the ''Literature/PoeticEdda'' -- an ancient collection of the Norse heroic legend -- was re-discovered. Creator/RichardWagner Music/RichardWagner made them into operas, threw in some German myths, and we get the ''[[Theatre/DerRingDesNibelungen Ring]]'' cycle, which... well, it resembles the originals in places, but it's essentially a complete rewrite of the myths. And Wagner's SpiritualSuccessor to the Ring cycle, ''Parsifal'', is the myth of the Holy Grail remade in the image of the Bayreuth Theater. At least Wagner didn't invent the sadly mythtaken Arabic etymology of Parsifal's name. Wagner's Ring is something of a cross between two versions of the same story, and Wagner's own personal sensibilities (the stories being the Middle High German ''Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}'' and the Scandinavian ''Literature/VolsungaSaga'') It is very likely that the two stories share a common origin. Both purportedly feature the Burgundian realm by the Rhine and feature Attila as a minor character (Etzel in the ''Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}'', Atle in the Scandinavian version).
18th Feb '18 4:48:00 PM IamTheCaligula
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** Naming a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leanan_sídhe Leanan Sídhe]] or [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baobhan_sith Baobhan Sith]] Nevan makes a whole lot more sense, though.
10th Feb '18 2:33:01 AM valar55
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Sometimes this is the result of cultural appropriation where the cultural practices one group are picked up by other people which sometimes causes myths or rituals to take on new meanings. This is one of the reasons why OurMonstersAreDifferent is what it is.

to:

Sometimes this is the result of cultural appropriation where the cultural practices of one group are picked up by other people which sometimes causes myths or rituals to take on new meanings. This is one of the reasons why OurMonstersAreDifferent is what it is.
1st Feb '18 10:05:27 PM FF32
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In one early episode of ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark,'' the boys ask Mr. Garrison what a homosexual is. Garrison describes a creature very much like a vampire.
26th Jan '18 1:33:05 PM Tomodachi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Manga/SaintSeiya'' did so with Greek and Norse myth.

to:

* %%* ''Manga/SaintSeiya'' did so with Greek and Norse myth.myths.
This list shows the last 10 events of 292. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SadlyMythtaken