History Main / RunForTheBorder

29th Apr '16 7:41:16 PM RustyBill
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* In ''Film/{{Tank}}'', the hero must drive his son across a state border in order to escape the jurisdiction of a corrupt sheriff who'd framed his boy for drug dealing. In a [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Sherman tank]] he'd bought and restored.



* In a Run For The State Line variation, the ex-military father of ''Film/{{Tank}}'' uses his UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Sherman tank to free his son from the corrupt Georgia sheriff who'd framed him, then drives it to the Tennessee border where the governor has promised they'll all get a fair trial.

to:

* In a Run For The State Line variation, the ex-military father of ''Film/{{Tank}}'' uses his UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Sherman tank tank]] to free his son from the corrupt Georgia sheriff who'd framed him, him for drug dealing, then drives it to the Tennessee border where the governor has promised they'll all get a fair trial.
29th Apr '16 7:34:59 PM billybobfred
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Added DiffLines:

* In the film adaptation of ''{{Film/Matilda}}'', the Wormwoods flee to Guam when Harry catches on to the FBI team that's about to expose his [[HonestJohnsDealership extremely illegal used-car sales practices]]. Ironically, Guam is a territory of the US, so this won't do them much good.
27th Apr '16 11:16:45 PM Homemaderat
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* Sheriff Ricochet Rabbit pursued a criminal named El Loco Lobo until Lobo crossed the border [[spoiler:and was arrested by Ricochet's Mexican counterpart]].

to:

* On WesternAnimation/RicochetRabbitAndDroopALongCoyote, Sheriff Ricochet Rabbit pursued a criminal named El Loco Lobo until Lobo crossed the border [[spoiler:and was arrested by Ricochet's Mexican counterpart]].cousin counterpart, Ricochet Chavez]].
24th Apr '16 9:08:10 AM LeedsKing
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A character, on the run from the law, has only one chance left at evasion: escape the juristiction entirely. Their crime might be addressed as a FugitiveArc, a GreatEscape, or escaping DayOfTheJackboot. Regardless of their crime (or lack of), they've resolved to escape the jurisdiction because of the pursuit.

to:

A character, on the run from the law, has only one chance left at evasion: escape the juristiction jurisdiction entirely. Their crime might be addressed as a FugitiveArc, a GreatEscape, or escaping DayOfTheJackboot. Regardless of their crime (or lack of), they've resolved to escape the jurisdiction because of the pursuit.
28th Mar '16 5:54:39 PM eroock
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[[folder:Web Comics]]
* ''Webcomic/ZeroPercentDiscount'' has a character head for the [[http://zeropercentdiscountcomic.tumblr.com/post/49013715934 Mexican border]].
[[/folder]]



----

to:

----
1st Mar '16 1:36:23 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Fortress'' (1992) has the protagonist John Brenneck (Christopher Lambert) and his pregnant wife try to leave a dystopian US after it implements a no-births policy to fight the increasing population growth. The film even opens with shots of the heavily crowded international bridges between the US and Mexico.

to:

* ''Fortress'' (1992) ''Film/{{Fortress 1992}}'' has the protagonist John Brenneck (Christopher Lambert) and his pregnant wife try to leave a dystopian US after it implements a no-births policy to fight the increasing population growth. The film even opens with shots of the heavily crowded international bridges between the US and Mexico.
1st Mar '16 1:14:40 AM Morgenthaler
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A character desires to escape something in his home country, and resolves to flee or relocate to a neighboring one.

This usually manifests itself in one of two ways:

* Your standard getaway for criminals and malcontents after they rob a bank or engage in a crime spree, to escape arrest and prosecution. This can even include travel ''within'' the same country. In the US for instance, the criminal will cross a "state line" (border between states) because the police of the state they were in has no jurisdiction in adjoining states. Especially common in {{Western}}s, and other old U.S. movies. This also includes Prisoners of War who have escaped to an allied or neutral country as their goal after an escape attempt. Whether these types make it or not varies: it's an almost even split between those who do (and live in a lazy beach town HappilyEverAfter) and those who don't (usually dying in a BolivianArmyEnding).
* The sufficiently more noble version, where a character's home country is either going CrapsackWorld by way of AfterTheEnd, or is [[DayOfTheJackboot taken over by a totalitarian movement]] which quickly brings an end to the previous civil liberties, and escape is the only sane alternative. Fleeing the country is usually the end goal, and they'll likely either have to escape or avoid capture by the roving death-gangs or evil repressive authorities to leave.

May end in a RoadBlock or BorderCrossing scene, or perhaps a TropicalEpilogue. For another method of evading the law by escaping their jurisdiction, see DiplomaticImpunity.

to:

A character desires character, on the run from the law, has only one chance left at evasion: escape the juristiction entirely. Their crime might be addressed as a FugitiveArc, a GreatEscape, or escaping DayOfTheJackboot. Regardless of their crime (or lack of), they've resolved to escape something in his home country, and resolves to flee or relocate to a neighboring one.

This usually manifests itself in one of two ways:

* Your standard getaway for criminals and malcontents after they rob a bank or engage in a crime spree, to escape arrest and prosecution. This can even include travel ''within''
the same country. In the US for instance, the criminal will cross a "state line" (border between states) because the police of the state they were in has no jurisdiction in adjoining states. Especially common in {{Western}}s, and other old U.S. movies. This also includes Prisoners because of War who have escaped to an allied or neutral country as their goal after an escape attempt. Whether these types make it or not varies: it's an almost even split between those who do (and live in a lazy beach town HappilyEverAfter) and those who don't (usually dying in a BolivianArmyEnding).
* The sufficiently more noble version, where a character's home country is either going CrapsackWorld by way of AfterTheEnd, or is [[DayOfTheJackboot taken over by a totalitarian movement]] which quickly brings an end to
the previous civil liberties, and escape is pursuit.

When
the only sane alternative. Fleeing law enforcement is actively looking for the country is usually the end goal, and they'll likely either have to escape or avoid capture by the roving death-gangs or evil repressive authorities to leave.

May end in
characters, a RoadBlock or is common to prevent their escape. When the law enforcement is unaware of the evasion, a BorderCrossing scene, or perhaps a TropicalEpilogue. For scene may serve as climax. If the entire work is about the escape, you may see multiples of both.

See also
another method of evading the law by escaping their jurisdiction, see law, DiplomaticImpunity.
28th Jan '16 10:15:49 AM ParkedCarAnne
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Added DiffLines:

*''Robotomy'': Mr. Dreadnot attempts this when he learns that he'll be teaching puberty to his class after draining his bank account, burning his apartment, disguising himself in drag, and changing his name. He ends up chained to two robots and escorted to school.
22nd Jan '16 3:11:07 PM Prfnoff
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'''Type A''' is your standard getaway for criminals and malcontents after they rob a bank or engage in a crime spree, to escape arrest and prosecution. This can even include travel ''within'' the same country. In the US for instance, the criminal will cross a "state line" (border between states) because the police of the state they were in has no jurisdiction in adjoining states. Especially common in {{Western}}s, and other old U.S. movies. This also includes Prisoners of War who have escaped to an allied or neutral country as their goal after an escape attempt. Whether these types make it or not varies: it's an almost even split between those who do (and live in a lazy beach town HappilyEverAfter) and those who don't (usually dying in a BolivianArmyEnding).

'''Type B''' is the sufficiently more noble version, where a character's home country is either going CrapsackWorld by way of AfterTheEnd, or is [[DayOfTheJackboot taken over by a totalitarian movement]] which quickly brings an end to the previous civil liberties, and escape is the only sane alternative. Fleeing the country is usually the end goal, and they'll likely either have to escape or avoid capture by the roving death-gangs or evil repressive authorities to leave.

to:

'''Type A''' is your * Your standard getaway for criminals and malcontents after they rob a bank or engage in a crime spree, to escape arrest and prosecution. This can even include travel ''within'' the same country. In the US for instance, the criminal will cross a "state line" (border between states) because the police of the state they were in has no jurisdiction in adjoining states. Especially common in {{Western}}s, and other old U.S. movies. This also includes Prisoners of War who have escaped to an allied or neutral country as their goal after an escape attempt. Whether these types make it or not varies: it's an almost even split between those who do (and live in a lazy beach town HappilyEverAfter) and those who don't (usually dying in a BolivianArmyEnding).

'''Type B''' is the
BolivianArmyEnding).
* The
sufficiently more noble version, where a character's home country is either going CrapsackWorld by way of AfterTheEnd, or is [[DayOfTheJackboot taken over by a totalitarian movement]] which quickly brings an end to the previous civil liberties, and escape is the only sane alternative. Fleeing the country is usually the end goal, and they'll likely either have to escape or avoid capture by the roving death-gangs or evil repressive authorities to leave.



'''Type A:'''

to:

'''Type A:'''
[[folder:Anime and Manga]]
* ''LightNovel/ACertainMagicalIndex'': Hamazura is forced to flee Academy City when he learns that he has topped Aleister's hit list. He certainly escapes in style: stealing a supersonic plane and auto-piloting it to Russia. Then WorldWarThree happens and AC forces continue pursuing him, so he has to make a run for the Elizalina Alliance border... but that doesn't stop the AC forces either, since it's a ''World War'' and he's only twenty meters inside the border anyway. He kicks himself mentally for thinking that such things as national borders would deter Academy City.
[[/folder]]



* In Marvel's ''Comicbook/CivilWar'', [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Ben Grimm]] took off for France when the government passed a SuperRegistrationAct, forcing him to take up sides against friends and colleagues. He [[TakeAThirdOption took a third option]].



[[folder:Films]]

to:

[[folder:Films]][[folder:Film]]



* Happened in ''Film/TheDayAfterTomorrow'' because Mexico was far enough south that the new ice age would be less deadly to people from northern United States. One especially snarky [[http://community.livejournal.com/m15m/2025.html#cutid1 web review]] put it thusly:
-->'''TV NEWS:''' In other developments tonight, millions of Americans are evacuating to Mexico, which briefly closed the borders while drunk on the incredible irony of the situation, but then the administration forgave all Latin American debt. ''¡Buenos dí­as a nuestros nuevos amigos!''
* ''Fortress'' (1992) has the protagonist John Brenneck (Christopher Lambert) and his pregnant wife try to leave a dystopian US after it implements a no-births policy to fight the increasing population growth. The film even opens with shots of the heavily crowded international bridges between the US and Mexico.
* Inverted in the opening of ''Film/TheATeam'' movie featuring the newly formed team from fleeing a Mexican drug lord and his mooks to the U.S. border. The result?
-->'''Hannibal''': General Tuco. You are engaged in unauthorized combat with United States military personnel... OVER U.S. AIRSPACE.\\
''Cue OhCrap looks from the Mexicans... followed by an air strike.''
* In ''Film/{{Monsters|2010}}'', the protagonists are stranded in Mexico, which is overrun by gigantic aliens. They are trying to sneak across the American border without getting arrested or eaten.
* In a Run For The State Line variation, the ex-military father of ''Film/{{Tank}}'' uses his UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Sherman tank to free his son from the corrupt Georgia sheriff who'd framed him, then drives it to the Tennessee border where the governor has promised they'll all get a fair trial.



* The implied ending of ''[[TheHandmaidsTale The Handmaid's Tale]]''.
* In ''Literature/DragonBones'', there is a not-anymore-slave who fled to Hurog because she heard that there is no slavery in Hurog. This law hasn't been enforced for quite some time, and Ward's father would have happily sent her back to her "owners" but Ward is different. Later in the series, someone flees to Hurog for political reasons. In both those examples, the person is not strictly speaking safe because she has crossed the border, but because ''Ward'' is willing to enforce the law of his land, with the sword, if need be - his neighbours are not very respectful of borders, overall.
* Pretty much the entire second half of ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'' is the Arrandas and their uncle, having foiled an Imperial plot, trying to find a place outside of the jurisdiction of the Empire. But space doesn't have tremendously clear borders, so any place that looks safe generally isn't after a while.
* ''On Wings of Eagles'' by Ken Follet dramatises the true story of Electronic Data Systems employees escaping from Iran after the revolution.



* ''Series/DueSouth'' had a rather interesting variant of type A. Ray was accused of killing a perp, though he actually didn't, and it looked worse because he had GSR on his hands from spending the morning at the range. Ray runs into the Canadian consulate and because it's technically Canadian territory, extradition proceedings have to be done before he can be removed. That gives Fraser time to find the evidence to clear him.

to:

* ''Series/DueSouth'' had a rather interesting variant of type A.variant. Ray was accused of killing a perp, though he actually didn't, and it looked worse because he had GSR on his hands from spending the morning at the range. Ray runs into the Canadian consulate and because it's technically Canadian territory, extradition proceedings have to be done before he can be removed. That gives Fraser time to find the evidence to clear him.



* Americans flee to Mexico in the MadeForTVMovie ''Super Volcano'', where Yellowstone Park erupts, covers much of the US in ash, and plunges the world into a nuclear winter. They are forced to close the border here too.
* Series/TopGear:
** After [[{{Troll}} painting their cars with the most anti-Southern slurs they could think of]], driving through Alabama and subsequently getting rocks thrown at them and [[ChasedByAngryNatives nearly beaten]], the crew made a run for the Louisiana border, which was the designated 'finish line' for the challenge.
** In the Patagonia Special, rumors surrounded Jeremy's Porsche with the license plate "H982 FKL", which many claimed was a jab at the Argentinean [[UsefulNotes/TheFalklandsWar invasion of the Falklands in 1982]] [[note]]though interviews stated that it would have required a ''massive'' amount of work to intentionally acquire said license plate, let alone one on a V8 car for the challenge[[/note]]. Come the end of the special, a mob of nationalists surround the crew's hotel and threaten violence if they do not leave. The police escort them towards Chile, where they are attacked by a mob that hurls stones at the the windows of the camera trucks and injure two cameramen. When word reaches the crew of an even larger mob at the next city, they go offroad and cross into Chile.



-->Made a good run, but I run too slow
-->They overtook me down in Juarez, Mexico.

to:

-->Made a good run, but I run too slow
-->They
slow\\
They
overtook me down in Juarez, Mexico.
* The Music/BillyJoel song "Miami 2017" tells of a future in which New York City is destroyed and everyone flees to Florida. They can't Run For The Border because "TheMafia took over
Mexico."
* Music/ChrisDeBurgh's song "Borderline" is about this (probably the Nazi takeover of Germany, judging by the context of the sequel song "Say Goodbye to it All").



* ''Border Crossing'', an adventure for ''[[HeroSystem Espionage]]'' and ''Mercenaries, Spies & Private Eyes'', is closest to a Type A. The player characters are Western spies who infiltrate East Germany during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar to investigate a mysterious "factory", and then have to get themselves '''out''' of East Germany. Unless the players have done an incredible job (or the GM has incredibly lousy die rolls), the secret police will be coming after the characters at some point in the mission.

to:

* ''Border Crossing'', an adventure for ''[[HeroSystem Espionage]]'' and ''Mercenaries, Spies & Private Eyes'', is closest to a Type A.Eyes''. The player characters are Western spies who infiltrate East Germany during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar to investigate a mysterious "factory", and then have to get themselves '''out''' of East Germany. Unless the players have done an incredible job (or the GM has incredibly lousy die rolls), the secret police will be coming after the characters at some point in the mission.



* ''Theatre/TheSoundOfMusic'', after Austria has been taken over by UsefulNotes/NaziGermany. [[YouFailGeographyForever From Salzburg]].



[[folder:Video Games]]
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' begins with [[PlayerCharacter Hawke]] and his/her family fleeing the monstrous invasion of darkspawn. [[spoiler: It potentially ends with Hawke on the run with his/her LoveInterest, who may be a highly wanted criminal.]]
* In ''VideoGame/PapersPlease'', you play a border inspector in the FictionalCountry of Arstotzka, and you may encounter a number of desperate refugees (including a few asylum seekers later on) coming through your check point. The Inspector will have to turn them away if their paperwork isn't in order, or face increasingly severe pay deductions. You eventually get the ability to detain suspicious characters. [[spoiler: One ending even has you and however many family members you can afford flee to Obristan with forged passports.]]
[[/folder]]



* ''HongKongPhooey'': One of his fellow superheroes had to let a criminal go because said criminal had crossed the state border.

to:

* ''HongKongPhooey'': ''WesternAnimation/HongKongPhooey'': One of his fellow superheroes had to let a criminal go because said criminal had crossed the state border.



* Amusingly inverted in ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'''s "Last of the Meheecans" episode. Butters inspires a resurgence of nostalgia, homesickness, and nationalism that causes Mexican emigrants to the United States to cross the border ''back'' into Mexico. Border patrol guards eventually have to guard the border on the U.S. side instead to prevent the loss of menial labourers to the American economy.
* In ''WesternAnimation/AlfredJKwak'', Alfred and his friends flee to neighbouring Broad Reedland when their home Great Waterland is turned into a fascist dictatorship by Dolf and his [[ANaziByAnyOtherName National Crows Party]].



* The southwestern United States play host to a ton of illegal immigrants who fled Mexico in search of higher wages.
** With the new immigration laws passed by Arizona in 2010, there's been a lot of news hubbub about Mexican immigrants moving back (or at least out of state), along with lifelong legal residents of Hispanic descent who didn't feel like staying around and risk harassment.
* During the [[RedChina Cultural Revolution]], there were many Chinese who fled to North Korea. Some even chose to swim to Hong Kong or Taiwan. According to the non-fiction book ''Nothing to Envy'' detailing the lives of North Korean defectors, one path out has a double example. For political reasons, South Korean Consulates in China cannot accept North Korean defectors as refugees, but the Korean Embassy in Ulanbattor, Mongolia ''can''. After making it to China, they then have to try and cross another border into Mongolia. As long as they've crossed the border, even if they don't make it all the way, Mongolian authorities will deport them South Korea rather than back to North Korea like Chinese authorities would.
* When Germany transformed into UsefulNotes/NaziGermany in the 1930s, many intellectuals, political opponents, and Jewish people emigrated to escape persecution. Those that fled to other European countries usually found themselves in the same situation all over again when the German army overran these states several years later.
* The northern free states in the US were this way for escaped slaves, until the Fugitive Slave Law (which allowed slave catchers to arrest escaped slaves in free states and transport them back down south) and the ''Dred Scott'' decision (which declared that slaves are not technically ''people'') effectively forced them to keep running all the way to Canada.
* After being forced to flee Paris, {{Creator/Voltaire}} lived near borders for just this reason.
* Faced with the choice between exile and death (either by firing squad after a botched trial or by Royalist mob), many of Napoleon's most prominent supporters during the Hundred Days chose exile after the Bourbons returned. The remaining Bourbons and their few core partisans found themselves forced into exile as well fifteen years later during the July Revolution.
* In late 2015, refugees are fleeing to Turkey, the European Union, and the United States to escape from the Syrian civil war.




'''Type B:'''

[[folder:Anime and Manga]]
* ''LightNovel/ACertainMagicalIndex'': Hamazura is forced to flee Academy City when he learns that he has topped Aleister's hit list. He certainly escapes in style: stealing a supersonic plane and auto-piloting it to Russia. Then WorldWarThree happens and AC forces continue pursuing him, so he has to make a run for the Elizalina Alliance border... but that doesn't stop the AC forces either, since it's a ''World War'' and he's only twenty meters inside the border anyway. He kicks himself mentally for thinking that such things as national borders would deter Academy City.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Comicbooks]]
* In Marvel's ''Comicbook/CivilWar'', [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Ben Grimm]] took off for France when the government passed a SuperRegistrationAct, forcing him to take up sides against friends and colleagues. He [[TakeAThirdOption took a third option]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films]]
* Happened in ''TheDayAfterTomorrow'' because Mexico was far enough south that the new ice age would be less deadly to people from northern United States. One especially snarky [[http://community.livejournal.com/m15m/2025.html#cutid1 web review]] put it thusly:
-->'''TV NEWS:''' In other developments tonight, millions of Americans are evacuating to Mexico, which briefly closed the borders while drunk on the incredible irony of the situation, but then the administration forgave all Latin American debt. ''¡Buenos dí­as a nuestros nuevos amigos!''
* The movie ''Film/{{Fortress}}'' (with ''Film/{{Highlander}}'' star Christopher Lambert) has the protagonist and his pregnant wife try to leave a dystopian US after it implements a no-births policy to fight the increasing population growth. The film even opens with shots of the heavily crowded international bridges between the US and Mexico.
* Inverted in the opening of ''Film/TheATeam'' movie featuring the newly formed team from fleeing a Mexican drug lord and his mooks to the U.S. border. The result?
-->'''Hannibal''': General Tuco. You are engaged in unauthorized combat with United States military personnel... OVER U.S. AIRSPACE.
--> Cue OhCrap looks from the Mexicans... followed by an air strike.
* In ''Film/{{Monsters|2010}}'', the protagonists are stranded in Mexico, which is overrun by gigantic aliens. They are trying to sneak across the American border without getting arrested or eaten.
* In a Run For The State Line variation, the ex-military father of ''Film/{{Tank}}'' uses his WWII Sherman tank to free his son from the corrupt Georgia sheriff who'd framed him, then drives it to the Tennessee border where the governor has promised they'll all get a fair trial.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* The implied ending of ''[[TheHandmaidsTale The Handmaid's Tale]]''.
* In ''Literature/DragonBones'', there is a not-anymore-slave who fled to Hurog because she heard that there is no slavery in Hurog. This law hasn't been enforced for quite some time, and Ward's father would have happily sent her back to her "owners" but Ward is different. Later in the series, someone flees to Hurog for political reasons. In both those examples, the person is not strictly speaking safe because she has crossed the border, but because ''Ward'' is willing to enforce the law of his land, with the sword, if need be - his neighbours are not very respectful of borders, overall.
* Pretty much the entire second half of ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'' is the Arrandas and their uncle, having foiled an Imperial plot, trying to find a place outside of the jurisdiction of the Empire. But space doesn't have tremendously clear borders, so any place that looks safe generally isn't after a while.
* ''On Wings of Eagles'' by Ken Follet dramatises the true story of Electronic Data Systems employees escaping from Iran after the revolution.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* Americans flee to Mexico in the MadeForTVMovie ''Super Volcano'', where Yellowstone Park erupts, covers much of the US in ash, and plunges the world into a nuclear winter. They are forced to close the border here too.
* Series/TopGear:
** After [[{{Troll}} painting their cars with the most anti-Southern slurs they could think of]], driving through Alabama and subsequently getting rocks thrown at them and [[ChasedByAngryNatives nearly beaten]], the crew made a run for the Louisiana border, which was the designated 'finish line' for the challenge.
** In the Patagonia Special, rumors surrounded Jeremy's Porsche with the license plate "H982 FKL", which many claimed was a jab at the Argentinean [[UsefulNotes/TheFalklandsWar invasion of the Falklands in 1982]] [[note]]though interviews stated that it would have required a ''massive'' amount of work to intentionally acquire said license plate, let alone one on a V8 car for the challenge[[/note]]. Come the end of the special, a mob of nationalists surround the crew's hotel and threaten violence if they do not leave. The police escort them towards Chile, where they are attacked by a mob that hurls stones at the the windows of the camera trucks and injure two cameramen. When word reaches the crew of an even larger mob at the next city, they go offroad and cross into Chile.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Music]]
* The BillyJoel song "Miami 2017" tells of a future in which New York City is destroyed and everyone flees to Florida. They can't Run For The Border because "TheMafia took over Mexico."
* Chris de Burgh's song ''Borderline'' is about this (probably the Nazi takeover of Germany, judging by the context of the sequel song ''Say Goodbye to it All'').
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Theatre]]
* ''Theatre/TheSoundOfMusic'', after Austria has been taken over by UsefulNotes/NaziGermany. [[YouFailGeographyForever From Salzburg]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' begins with this version, as [[PlayerCharacter Hawke]] and his/her family flee the monstrous invasion of darkspawn. [[spoiler: It potentially ends with Type A, as Hawke goes on the run with his/her LoveInterest, who may be a highly wanted criminal.]]
* In ''VideoGame/PapersPlease'', you play a border inspector in the FictionalCountry of Arstotzka, and you may encounter a number of desperate refugees (including a few asylum seekers later on) coming through your check point. The Inspector will have to turn them away if their paperwork isn't in order, or face increasingly severe pay deductions. You'll also encounter a fair number of Type A entrants, and you eventually get the ability to detain suspicious characters. [[spoiler: One ending even has you and however many family members you can afford flee to Obristan with forged passports.]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* Amusingly inverted in ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'''s "Last of the Meheecans" episode. Butters inspires a resurgence of nostalgia, homesickness, and nationalism that causes Mexican emigrants to the United States to cross the border ''back'' into Mexico. Border patrol guards eventually have to guard the border on the U.S. side instead to prevent the loss of menial labourers to the American economy.
* In ''WesternAnimation/AlfredJKwak'', Alfred and his friends flee to neighbouring Broad Reedland when their home Great Waterland is turned into a fascist dictatorship by Dolf and his [[ANaziByAnyOtherName National Crows Party]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life]]
* The southwestern United States play host to a ton of illegal immigrants who fled Mexico in search of higher wages.
** With the new immigration laws passed by Arizona in 2010, there's been a lot of news hubbub about Mexican immigrants moving back (or at least out of state), along with lifelong legal residents of Hispanic descent who didn't feel like staying around and risk harassment.
* North Korean defectors fall on the far end of type B.
** During the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, much the same situation was the case for East Germany.
** During the [[RedChina Cultural Revolution]], there were many Chinese who fled to North Korea. Some even chose to swim to Hong Kong or Taiwan.
** According to the non-fiction book ''Nothing to Envy'' detailing the lives of North Korean defectors, one path out has a double example. For political reasons, South Korean Consulates in China cannot accept North Korean defectors as refugees, but the Korean Embassy in Ulanbattor, Mongolia ''can''. After making it to China, they then have to try and cross another border into Mongolia. As long as they've crossed the border, even if they don't make it all the way, Mongolian authorities will deport them South Korea rather than back to North Korea like Chinese authorities would.
* When Germany transformed into UsefulNotes/NaziGermany in the 1930s, many intellectuals, political opponents, and Jewish people emigrated to escape persecution. Those that fled to other European countries usually found themselves in the same situation all over again when the German army overran these states several years later.
* The northern free states in the US were this way for escaped slaves, until the Fugitive Slave Law (which allowed slave catchers to arrest escaped slaves in free states and transport them back down south) and the ''Dred Scott'' decision (which declared that slaves are not technically ''people'') effectively forced them to keep running all the way to Canada.
* After being forced to flee Paris, {{Creator/Voltaire}} lived near borders for just this reason.
* Faced with the choice between exile and death (either by firing squad after a botched trial or by Royalist mob), many of Napoleon's most prominent supporters during the Hundred Days chose exile after the Bourbons returned. The remaining Bourbons and their few core partisans found themselves forced into exile as well fifteen years later during the July Revolution.
* In late 2015, refugees are fleeing to Turkey, the European Union, and the United States to escape from the Syrian civil war.
[[/folder]]



<<|{{Plots}}|>>
30th Dec '15 9:59:50 AM StFan
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* Subverted in real life: During WorldWarII, German {{POW}}s were imprisoned in Kansas. A few of them managed to escape ... for three days. They asked how close they'd gotten to Mexico. They were very disappointed to discover that they hadn't gotten out of the ''state'', let alone the country. This relates to how a lot of Europeans don't seem to realize how truly ''gigantic'' the United States really is; Americans for their part have the same problem when it comes to Canada.

to:

* Subverted in real life: life:
**
During WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, German {{POW}}s [=POWs=] were imprisoned in Kansas. A few of them managed to escape ...escape... for three days. They asked how close they'd gotten to Mexico. They were very disappointed to discover that they hadn't gotten out of the ''state'', let alone the country. This relates to how a lot of Europeans don't seem to realize how truly ''gigantic'' the United States really is; Americans for their part have the same problem when it comes to Canada.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.RunForTheBorder