History Main / RunDontWalk

31st Mar '16 12:04:28 PM StFan
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life|1}}'' (and most of its mods and games with the same engine), it was possible to walk by holding shift, which would slow you down, and crouch by holding control, which would slow you down even further. Either option made you silent.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life|1}}'' ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' (and most of its mods and games with the same engine), it was possible to walk by holding shift, which would slow you down, and crouch by holding control, which would slow you down even further. Either option made you silent.



* ''VideoGame/GarrysMod'', however, has walking be of very little use outside of precision adjustments with the physics gun, which can be similarly accomplished with crouching. Indeed, in earlier versions, while a key was bound to walking by default the corresponding function didn't even ''exist'' (likely since ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life 2}}'', with which [=GMod=] shares its engine, didn't have a walk function either), and now that it does players have to bind it themselves if they want to use it.

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* ''VideoGame/GarrysMod'', however, has walking be of very little use outside of precision adjustments with the physics gun, which can be similarly accomplished with crouching. Indeed, in earlier versions, while a key was bound to walking by default the corresponding function didn't even ''exist'' (likely since ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life 2}}'', ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', with which [=GMod=] shares its engine, didn't have a walk function either), and now that it does players have to bind it themselves if they want to use it.
10th Feb '16 6:26:26 AM MegaMarioMan
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* In the HD remake of ''VideoGame/{{Spelunky}}'', you default to walking and have to hold a button to run. In the options menu, you can change that setting so that running is default and you hold the button to walk.
13th Nov '15 11:34:46 AM HeraldAlberich
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Once upon a time, player characters walked by default. So, players held the run button down in action games, or counseled new players in MMORPG to hit the run/walk toggle. For convenience, many games now have the player characters constantly running unless they deliberately switch to walking -- if that's even an option -- since that's what players would do anyway. Sometimes, the only choices are run or run ''faster''.

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Once upon a time, player characters walked by default. So, players held the run button down in action games, or counseled new players in MMORPG to hit the run/walk toggle. For convenience, many games now have the player characters constantly running unless they deliberately switch to walking -- if walking--if that's even an option -- since option--since that's what players would do anyway. Sometimes, the only choices are run or run ''faster''.



* Played with in ''VideoGame/GodHand'' - Gene moves pretty fast as a default, but tapping twice and holding makes him run... which is his walking animation sped up.

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* Played with in ''VideoGame/GodHand'' - Gene ''VideoGame/GodHand''--Gene moves pretty fast as a default, but tapping twice and holding makes him run... which is his walking animation sped up.



* ''[[VideoGame/{{Metroid}} Super Metroid]]'' used a run button, which made Samus go faster than normal and also triggered the Speed Booster power when she collected it later. This button was notorious for being frequently overlooked; new players would inevitably get stuck on the [[http://www.metroid2002.com/3/other_noob_bridge_without_run_button.php noob bridge,]] where it was first required. The later 2D installments, ''Fusion'' and ''Zero Mission'', do away with this system; instead, you run all the time (especially fast in ''Zero Mission'') and the Speed Booster kicks in on its own when you run far enough. This was done to accomodate the GBA's fewer buttons, and it's convenient, but unfortunately eliminates the GoodBadBugs from ''Super'' that work by monkeying around with the run button to hit top speed faster.

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* ''[[VideoGame/{{Metroid}} Super Metroid]]'' used ''VideoGame/SuperMetroid'' uses a run button, which made makes Samus go faster than normal and also triggered triggers the Speed Booster power when she collected collects it later. This button was is notorious for being frequently overlooked; new players would inevitably get stuck on the [[http://www.metroid2002.com/3/other_noob_bridge_without_run_button.php noob bridge,]] bridge]], where it was is first required. The later 2D installments, ''Fusion'' ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'' and ''Zero Mission'', ''VideoGame/MetroidZeroMission'', do away with this system; instead, you run all the time (especially fast in ''Zero Mission'') and the Speed Booster kicks in on its own when you run far enough. This was done to accomodate accommodate the GBA's [[UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance GBA]]'s fewer buttons, and it's convenient, but unfortunately eliminates the GoodBadBugs from ''Super'' that work by monkeying around with the run button to hit top speed faster.



* There is a bonus in the ''SuperSmashBrothers'' games with the same name as this trope. As you might guess, it's awarded for never walking during the entire battle.

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* There is a bonus in the ''SuperSmashBrothers'' ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' games with the same name as this trope. As you might guess, it's awarded for never walking during the entire battle.



* You can't walk in ''GuildWars'' unless you've got some spell or something slowing you down. Or walking backwards, which doesn't really count. But if you are slowed, then you ''walk'', with a perfectly fine walking animation... and probably some mob on your case. A shame, since the game is [[SceneryPorn kind of pretty (in some places)]]. Granted, it would probably be quite the unhelpful feature given how it's much, much easier to [[{{Griefer}} grief]] in the game by being intentionally bad at it than by being unevenly matched....

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* You can't walk in ''GuildWars'' ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' unless you've got some spell or something slowing you down. Or walking backwards, which doesn't really count. But if you are slowed, then you ''walk'', with a perfectly fine walking animation... and probably some mob on your case. A shame, since the game is [[SceneryPorn kind of pretty (in some places)]]. Granted, it would probably be quite the unhelpful feature given how it's much, much easier to [[{{Griefer}} grief]] in the game by being intentionally bad at it than by being unevenly matched....



* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'' was one of the earliest games to make running the default, and very slow walking (which was done by holding down the shift key). Notably, the game does have a ''reason'' for walking slowly - it enables you to get past spike traps without setting them off, and to step right on the edge of a ledge without falling off.

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* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'' was one of the earliest games to make running the default, and very slow walking (which was done by holding down the shift key). Notably, the game does have a ''reason'' for walking slowly - it slowly--it enables you to get past spike traps without setting them off, and to step right on the edge of a ledge without falling off.



* The ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' games used B as a run button in the overworld. Later games introduced a Navi Customizer program that you can install into [=MegaMan.EXE=] to make him run all the time (With the useful side effect of not increasing the random encounter rate like holding B to run does). The sequel series ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce'' has dispensed with this -- now you just run all the time.

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* The ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' games used use B as a run button in the overworld. Later games introduced introduce a Navi Customizer program that you can install into [=MegaMan.EXE=] to make him run all the time (With the useful side effect of not increasing the random encounter rate like holding B to run does). The sequel series ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce'' has dispensed with this -- now this--now you just run all the time.



* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''
** The ''Pokemon'' series has, from the beginning, had a bike item that can be used to travel faster, as well as access an optional bike-only area. However, the bike usually took until well after the second PlotCoupon to get, so the third generation introduced the ability to run, which you gained earlier on. Neither the bike nor running could be done indoors (save a dungeon or three), which the fourth generation fixed. The bike has now morphed to being part of puzzles, as well, with certain areas requiring its usage.
** ''Pokemon Ranger 2'' has lampshaded this by the fact that one of the teachers [[spoiler:and villian]] hates the fact that the protagonist runs all the time.

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* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''
''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'':
** The ''Pokemon'' ''Pokémon'' series has, from the beginning, had a [[SprintShoes bike item item]] that can be used to travel faster, as well as access an optional bike-only area. However, the bike usually took takes until well after the second PlotCoupon to get, so the third generation introduced the ability to run, which you gained gain earlier on. Neither the bike nor running could be done indoors (save a dungeon or three), which the fourth generation fixed. The bike has now morphed to being part of puzzles, as well, with certain areas requiring its usage.
** ''Pokemon Ranger ''VideoGame/PokemonRanger 2'' has lampshaded this by the fact that one of the teachers [[spoiler:and villian]] hates the fact that the protagonist runs all the time.



** This trope was [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}''. In a city inhabited entirely by Ghouls, you run into an old Ghoul who previously lived in ''another'' all-ghoul city that featured heavily in the original Fallout. When talking about the Hero from the previous game, he mentions that what stood out the most about him was that he was always ''running'', all over the place, which left quite an impression on the ghouls -- since they couldn't manage much more than a [[ZombieGait shamble]].

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** This trope was [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}''. In a city inhabited entirely by Ghouls, you run into an old Ghoul who previously lived in ''another'' all-ghoul city that featured heavily in the original Fallout. When talking about the Hero from the previous game, he mentions that what stood out the most about him was that he was always ''running'', all over the place, which left quite an impression on the ghouls -- since ghouls--since they couldn't manage much more than a [[ZombieGait shamble]].
23rd Jul '15 9:23:01 AM Azaram
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** The game has an annoying tendency for EscortMission characters to walk, as opposed to the running (or even mounted) players. They do walk faster than the players normal walk speed aswell, forcing the player stop every once in a while or switch between run and walk mode. It is, however, worse when the NPC decides to run. E.g., one of the final quests on Bloodmyst Isle, where you follow this running demolitions expert, who manages to aggro guys, helps you fight them, and then runs ahead at top speed while you're trying to recoup your mana.
** At least ''WOW'' has a run/walk switch for player characters, although most people probably aren't even aware it exists, and it finds its primary use in roleplaying. Walking might as well ''be'' the roleplaying mode flag since no one except for the roleplayers use the walk toggle for extended periods.

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** The game has an annoying tendency for EscortMission characters to walk, as opposed to the running (or even mounted) players. They do walk faster than the players normal walk speed aswell, forcing the player stop every once in a while or switch between run and walk mode. [[note]]You can often run backward, and match their speed.[[/note]] It is, however, worse when the NPC decides to run. E.g., one of the final quests on Bloodmyst Isle, where you follow this running demolitions expert, who manages to aggro guys, helps you fight them, and then runs ahead at top speed while you're trying to recoup your mana.
mana. (see also bad [=PUG=] tanks..)
** At least ''WOW'' has a run/walk switch for player characters, although most people probably aren't even aware it exists, and it finds its primary use in roleplaying. Walking might as well ''be'' the roleplaying mode flag since no one except for the roleplayers use the walk toggle for extended periods. It's occasionally useful in short bursts for the now-common jumping puzzles, to let you drop down the side of a hill instead of flinging yourself into oblivion.
4th May '15 5:11:45 AM Schnutzel
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* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'' was one of the earliest games to make running the default, and very slow walking (which was done by holding down the shift key). Notably, the game does have a ''reason'' for walking slowly - it enables you to get past spike traps without setting them off.

to:

* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'' was one of the earliest games to make running the default, and very slow walking (which was done by holding down the shift key). Notably, the game does have a ''reason'' for walking slowly - it enables you to get past spike traps without setting them off, and to step right on the edge of a ledge without falling off.
14th Apr '15 3:09:33 PM WillKeaton
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* ''[[VideoGame/{{Metroid}} Super Metroid]]'' used a run button, which made Samus go faster than normal and also triggered the Speed Booster power when she collected it later. This button was notorious for being frequently overlooked; new players would inevitably get stuck on the [[http://www.metroid2002.com/3/other_noob_bridge_without_run_button.php noob bridge]], where it was first required. The later 2D installments, ''Fusion'' and ''Zero Mission'', do away with this system; instead, you run all the time (especially fast in ''Zero Mission'') and the Speed Booster kicks in on its own when you run far enough. This was done to accomodate the GBA's fewer buttons, and it's convenient, but unfortunately eliminates the GoodBadBugs from ''Super'' that work by monkeying around with the run button to hit top speed faster.

to:

* ''[[VideoGame/{{Metroid}} Super Metroid]]'' used a run button, which made Samus go faster than normal and also triggered the Speed Booster power when she collected it later. This button was notorious for being frequently overlooked; new players would inevitably get stuck on the [[http://www.metroid2002.com/3/other_noob_bridge_without_run_button.php noob bridge]], bridge,]] where it was first required. The later 2D installments, ''Fusion'' and ''Zero Mission'', do away with this system; instead, you run all the time (especially fast in ''Zero Mission'') and the Speed Booster kicks in on its own when you run far enough. This was done to accomodate the GBA's fewer buttons, and it's convenient, but unfortunately eliminates the GoodBadBugs from ''Super'' that work by monkeying around with the run button to hit top speed faster.
9th Dec '14 3:13:11 PM Saber15
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* In ''Videogame/PlanetSide 1'', soldiers would jog (or walk quickly with a weapon drawn) by default - sprinting required a [[SprintMeter dedicated implant]] - which would cause them to show up on sensors. Crouch-walking and walking would make them invisible to motion sensors. In the sequel, players move at a fast walk and have infinite sprint, but the only way to remain invisible to motion sensors is to crouch-walk as there isn't a walk button.


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[[AC:Simulation]]
* In ''[[Videogame/MechWarrior MechWarrior Living Legends]]'', tanks and [[FutureCopter VTOLs]] default to digital throttle controls; holding forward is 100% throttle, while letting go is 0%. Tanks have an additional overdrive mode to increase their speed at the cost of generating heat. Pressing K switches them to the boat/airplane-style throttle that the [[HumongousMecha Battlemechs]] and [[SpacePlane aerospace fighters]] use, where holding forward or reverse gradually adjusts the speed, though it grants no inherent benefit to tanks aside from a less jittery ride at lower speeds.
6th Dec '14 2:33:37 PM Creek719
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** VideoGame/{{Bully}} uses a similar control scheme: tilt the stick to run, ''slightly'' tilt the stick to run slower, tilt the stick while holding X on Playstation to run faster/tapping X to run ''even faster'', press R3 to go into stealth mode (crouching and Walking slowly), tap X after crouching to crouch-walk faster.
18th Sep '14 7:13:06 PM spaceace72
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*** When Richter returns as a side character in [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin Portrait of Ruin]], he simply ''cannot'' walk, he's set on run all the time.


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** You can get SprintShoes in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadow'' that let Gabe tear forward and make big jumps, but it reduced his horizontal movement, very few areas are big enough for it, and it wears off after a short while.
*** Also present in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadowMirrorOfFate Mirror of Fate]]'' but as the very last item you get, so you can't abuse it too much. Then again, you're pretty fast on your own without it.
18th Apr '14 10:35:39 PM Lightning4119
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* Averted by ''[[VideoGame/{{STALKER}} the STALKER titles]]''. The default speed is walking or a light jog if you're not carrying much weight. Sprinting depletes your stamina bar quickly.

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* Averted by the ''[[VideoGame/{{STALKER}} the STALKER titles]]''.STALKER]]'' titles. The default speed is walking or a light jog if you're not carrying much weight. Sprinting depletes your stamina bar quickly.
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