History Main / RougeAnglesOfSatin

26th Aug '16 9:55:59 AM LadyNorbert
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* ''Fanfic/ThePrayerWarriors'' has quite a few of them, as seen in the below passage, emphasis added. There's also an in-universe example in which the Prayer Warriors travel to "Stalin Town" in ''"Threat of Satanic Commonism"'' only to find that Stalin mis-spelled it "Satan Town", although this is quickly forgotten about.

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* ''Fanfic/ThePrayerWarriors'' has quite a few of them, as seen in the below passage, emphasis added. There's also an in-universe example in which the Prayer Warriors travel to "Stalin Town" in ''"Threat of Satanic Commonism"'' only to find that Stalin mis-spelled misspelled it "Satan Town", although this is quickly forgotten about.



* FanFic/LightAndDarkDEUXTheNewAdventuresOfDarkSoichiro intentionally does this. The author has joked that there are no typos, and that he is [[ConLang writing in his own invented English language]].

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* FanFic/LightAndDarkDEUXTheNewAdventuresOfDarkSoichiro ''FanFic/LightAndDarkDEUXTheNewAdventuresOfDarkSoichiro'' intentionally does this. The author has joked that there are no typos, and that he is [[ConLang writing in his own invented English language]].


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* Happens a lot in fanfics for ''Film/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', where characters' names are constantly being misspelled, but easily the weirdest example is a fic where Tom Sawyer's first name is repeatedly misspelled as ''Tow.''


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* The DVD subtitles of ''Film/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' contain an odd example. While describing his last mission for the crown to Agent Sawyer, Allan Quatermain remarks that "I even took my son along." Somehow, this was transcribed in the subtitles as "I even took my ''son-in-law''."


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* In the GoldenEnding slide for ''VideoGame/MatchesAndMatrimony'', the protagonist observes that "[[Literature/PrideAndPrejudice Lady Catherine]] denounced the bands." What she denounced were the ''banns'' - the formal public announcement of the heroine's engagement to Mr. Darcy, Lady Catherine's nephew.
22nd Aug '16 8:22:56 AM higgledypiggledy
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** "Rite" is short for ritual, e.g. a ''rite'' of passage. (Which is why [[Creator/TerryPratchett Terry Pratchett's]] aspiring women wizards wanted ''EqualRites''.)

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** "Rite" is short for ritual, e.g. a ''rite'' of passage. (Which is why [[Creator/TerryPratchett Terry Pratchett's]] aspiring women wizards female wizard wanted ''EqualRites''.''[[Discworld/EqualRites Equal Rites]]''.)
22nd Aug '16 8:20:51 AM higgledypiggledy
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*** [[LiesToChildren This is technically incorrect]] (both spellings can be nouns or verbs); however, the noun "affect" and the verb "to effect" are much less common. "Affect" as a noun (pronounced AFF-ect) is a technical psychological term referring to the outward expression of emotion; "A classic symptom of schizophrenia is 'flattened affect,' i.e. blunted emotional response." So: mental illness could ''affect'' your ''affect.''
The verb "to effect" means "to cause, to succeed in bringing about." You can ''effect'' change in a situation, if your actions are sufficiently ''effective.''

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*** [[LiesToChildren This is technically incorrect]] (both spellings can be nouns or verbs); however, the noun "affect" and the verb "to effect" are much less common.
****
"Affect" as a noun (pronounced AFF-ect) is a technical psychological term referring to the outward expression of emotion; "A classic symptom of schizophrenia is 'flattened affect,' i.e. blunted emotional response." So: mental illness could ''affect'' your ''affect.''
''
****
The verb "to effect" means "to cause, to succeed in bringing about." You can ''effect'' change in a situation, if your actions are sufficiently ''effective.'''' (There is also an adjective "affective," meaning "related to affect or emotion," as in "seasonal affective disorder.")



** "Annals" are year-by-year chronologies. "Anal" is what you are when you're way too picky about your year-to-year chronologies.
** [[FridgeBrilliance Incidentally]], someone who compiles annals is an ''annalist'', but if you behave in an anal manner you might want to see an ''analyst''.

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** "Annals" are year-by-year chronologies. "Anal" (thanks to [[AllPsychologyIsFreudian Freud]]) is what you are when you're way too picky about your year-to-year chronologies.
** [[FridgeBrilliance Incidentally]], someone who compiles annals is an ''annalist'', but if you behave in an anal manner you might want to see an ''analyst''.''analyst'' (no etymological relation).



** "A part" means to be part of a certain something. "Apart" means being separate[[note]]Which, by the way, it's spelled sepArate, not "seperate"[[/note]], and therefore it means the '''opposite'''. This (and the included note) might be the most infuriatingly common mistakes in everyday Internet talk.

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** "A part" means to be part of a certain something. "Apart" means being separate[[note]]Which, by the way, it's is spelled sepArate, not "seperate"[[/note]], and therefore it means the '''opposite'''. This (and the included note) might be the most infuriatingly common mistakes in everyday Internet talk.



* Atheist: a person who doesn't believe in gods / athiest: the most athy person. Now if only "athy" ''meant'' something...

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* Atheist: a person who doesn't believe in gods / athiest: the most athy person. [[PerfectlyCromulentWord Now if only "athy" ''meant'' something...]]



** "aught" can mean either everything ("for aught we know"), or nothing ("The decade from 2000 to 2009 is sometimes called the aughties, due to the zero in the second digit position").

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** "aught" can mean either everything anything ("for aught we know"), or nothing ("The decade from 2000 to 2009 is sometimes called the aughties, due to the zero in the second digit position").



** The Navy song is "Anchors Aweigh", meaning to weigh anchor.
* ball/bawl: If you use "ball" as a verb, you're probably writing porn.

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** The Navy song is "Anchors Aweigh", meaning to weigh anchor.
anchor. (When the command "anchors aweigh" is given, the sailors ''weigh anchor,'' i.e. haul the anchors back up. If a command "anchors away" meant anything, the sailors would be ''discarding'' the anchors. Compare "chocks away," an aviation command meaning "remove the chocks (wedges) that are blocking the plane's landing gear wheels so that it can take off.")
* ball/bawl: If you use "ball" as a verb, you're probably writing porn. (In fairness, it can also mean "to make into a ball," as in "to ball one's fists.")



*** The word "banzai" literally translates as "ten thousand years," in the context of hoping the Emperor is blessed with surviving to a hyperbolically-old age. Therefore a (less-literal) translation would be "long life" (or "long live the Emperor!"), not "[[HeroicSacrifice kill yourself]] now!"

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*** The word "banzai" literally translates as "ten thousand years," in years" (of life to the context of hoping the Emperor is blessed with surviving to a hyperbolically-old age. Emperor). Therefore a (less-literal) translation would be "long life" (or "long live the Emperor!"), Emperor!", not "[[HeroicSacrifice kill yourself]] now!"



** The drought forecast meant there would barely be enough of the barley crop to grow & harvest.

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** The drought forecast meant there would barely be enough of the barley crop to grow & and harvest.



*** For anyone who may be confused as to how these get confused, these three words are all homophones in many dialects of English. For anyone who's confused about the need for this note, there are many dialects of English in which these ''aren't'' homophones. Likewise for "Mary/marry/merry" (in linguistics, it's actually known as the "Mary/marry/merry merger").



** Bass (the fish) is pronounced differently from bass (the musical instrument/voice).

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** Bass (the fish) is pronounced differently from bass (the musical instrument/voice). The fish rhymes with "class;" the musical instrument rhymes with, well, "base."



** Bias is an intangible concept. A person cannot be "bias" any more than they can be "anger" or "happiness". They may, however, be ''biased'', and possess bias.

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** Bias is an intangible concept.a noun. A person cannot be "bias" any more than they can be "anger" or "happiness". They may, however, be ''biased'', and possess bias.



** The former holds fire. The latter holds boobies.

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** The former holds fire.fire (it's a grill or burner for offerings). The latter holds boobies.



** Modern rifles are ''breech loading'', in that you load the ammunition where the rifle would wear pants, if it were a person. Old-fashioned rifles are muzzle-loading, the muzzle being the end you point towards the target.

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** Modern rifles are ''breech loading'', in that you load the ammunition where the rifle would wear pants, if it were a person. Old-fashioned rifles are muzzle-loading, the muzzle being the end you point towards the target. There's also a "breech birth," where the baby is trying to come out butt-first rather than head-first.



** "What happened to that old diamond brooch of yours," asked Rose's grandchildren, broaching the subject of the ''Film/{{Titanic|1997}}'' once again.

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** "What happened to that old diamond brooch of yours," yours?" asked Rose's grandchildren, broaching the subject of the ''Film/{{Titanic|1997}}'' once again.



** "Bullion" means precious metal in ingot form, as in gold bullion or silver bullion.
** "Bouillon" is French for broth, as in chicken bouillon or beef bouillon.

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** "Bullion" means precious metal in ingot form, as in gold bullion or silver bullion.
bullion. (pronounced "BULL-yun")
** "Bouillon" is French for broth, as in chicken bouillon or beef bouillon. (pronounced "BOO-yon" or "BOOL-yon")



** ''Cavalry'' are troops on horseback. ''Calvary'' is a hill outside Jerusalem (also known as "Golgotha").

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** ''Cavalry'' are troops on horseback. ''Calvary'' is a hill outside Jerusalem (also known as "Golgotha")."Golgotha"), on which Jesus is supposed to have been crucified.



** The hot peppers can be referred to as "chile" or "chili", but the meat dish made with said peppers is always called "chili". Unless you're in the American Southwest (Arizona, Nevada, California, Colorado or New Mexico) where the stew is often made with green peppers, and is called "chile".

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** The hot peppers can be referred to as "chile" (the Spanish spelling) or "chili", but the meat dish made with said peppers is always called "chili". Unless you're in the American Southwest (Arizona, Nevada, California, Colorado or New Mexico) where the stew is often made with green peppers, and is called "chile".



** Cloth is a fabric made from fibers, twisted, knitted, knotted, matted, or otherwise entwined together. Cloth is what you make cloth'''ing''' out of to cloth'''e''' yourself with. [[ModestyBedsheet Putting on cloth]]'''[[ModestyBedsheet s]]''' [[ModestyBedsheet would not necessarily or likely leave one clothed]]; [[PleasePutSomeClothesOn for that, one would need to wear cloth]]'''[[PleasePutSomeClothesOn es]]'''.

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** Cloth is a fabric made from fibers, twisted, knitted, knotted, matted, or otherwise entwined together. Cloth is what you make cloth'''ing''' out of to cloth'''e''' yourself with. [[ModestyBedsheet Putting on cloth]]'''[[ModestyBedsheet s]]''' [[ModestyBedsheet would not necessarily or likely leave one clothed]]; [[PleasePutSomeClothesOn for that, one would need to wear cloth]]'''[[PleasePutSomeClothesOn es]]'''.



** A clew is a ball of thread/yarn/string/etc..
** "Clue" started as an alternate spelling of clew in 1596, used in the sense of following a thread.

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** A clew is a ball of thread/yarn/string/etc..
thread/yarn/string/etc.
** "Clue" started as an alternate spelling of clew in 1596, used in the sense of following a thread.thread (as in the myth of Theseus following Ariadne's clew of thread out of the Minotaur's labyrinth).



** Colombia, with an "o", is the nation in South America. Columbia, with an "u", is a poetic name for the Americas and the feminine personification of the United States of America, which fell out of use in the 20th century, but remains in many place names in the USA (most notably, the District of Columbia).

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** Colombia, with an "o", is the nation in South America. Columbia, with an "u", is a poetic name for the Americas and the feminine personification of the United States of America, which fell out of use in the 20th century, but remains in many place names in the USA (most notably, the District of Columbia).Columbia), as well as the Canadian province of British Columbia.



** "Compliment" means to say something flattering about someone. "Complement" means to complete, suit, or go together with something.



** Likewise, a ''councilor'' is someone who sits on a council. A ''counselor'' is someone who gives counsel (advice), especially a lawyer or a therapist.



** While UsefulNotes/CharlesDarwin's ''The Descent of Man'' is a decent treatment of hominid evolution, many creationists still dissent to its claims.

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** While UsefulNotes/CharlesDarwin's ''The Descent of Man'' is a decent treatment of hominid evolution, many creationists still dissent to from its claims.



*** Defiantly - Rebellious. ("The rival king defiantly overthrew Jeremiah's empire.")

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*** Defiantly - Rebellious. ("The rival king defiantly overthrew Jeremiah's empire.")") This mistake is probably most common because of spellcheckers correcting the misspelling "definately" to "defiantly."



** Despite having a prereader for most of the story, ''FanFic/MyFamilyAndOtherEquestrians'' still manages to make this error in chapter 73 (desert spoon just sounds silly, so it's obvious what the correct word is). Despite this being pointed out, Blade Star still hasn't fixed it (the prereader acknowledged how stupid this mistake was though).



** "Discreet" means "showing discretion, not obvious or conspicuous, tactful;" "discrete" means "separate, readily distinguished."



** This one made it even to the renowned science journal "Nature" in a letter pointing out that only Captain Kirk's phaser can phase you.

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** This one made it even to the renowned science journal "Nature" in a letter pointing out that only Captain Kirk's phaser can phase you. (It is also sometimes used as an intransitive verb meaning "to pass through phases," and as a transitive verb in the phrase "to phase something out.")



** Yes, these are two different words in English (in French they're the same word, only gender declinated). The one with the extra 'e' applies to a woman who is engaged to be married.

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** Yes, these are two different words in English (in French they're the masculine and feminine orms of the same word, only gender declinated). The one with the extra 'e' applies to word). A man is a fiancé; a woman who is engaged a fiancée.
*** Not
to be married.confused with Beyoncé, who at one point was Jay Z's fiancée.



** "To flaunt" is "to defiantly ''show something off.''" "To flout" is "to defiantly ''disregard.''"



** The latter is an outdated/ poetic word for a lit fire place. Unusually confused in the idiom "Home is where the hearth is." Many people use the word heart in that phrase, but finding a warm hearth in your home would be a pleasant surprise whereas finding a warm heart in your home would be rather nasty surprise.
* here/hear (the incorrect "Here! Here!" is, if anything, ''more'' common than the correct "Hear! Hear!")

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** "Hearth" means a fireplace, or poetically, the centre of a home. The latter is an outdated/ poetic word for a lit fire place. Unusually confused in the idiom is "Home is where the hearth is." Many people use the word heart in that phrase, but finding a warm hearth in your is" (i.e. home would be a pleasant surprise whereas finding a warm heart in your is where our emotional priorities lie), but "away from home would be rather nasty surprise.and hearth" (i.e. travelling and therefore deprived of the comforts of home).
* here/hear (the incorrect "Here! Here!" is, if anything, ''more'' common than the correct "Hear! Hear!")here/hear



** The cry of approval is "Hear, hear!" It's a translation of the Norman French ''Oyez, oyez!'', from the verb ''ouir,'' to hear.



** An argumentum ad hominem means dismissing another's argument because of who said it rather than because of what was being said.

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** An argumentum ''argumentum ad hominem hominem'' (not "hominum") means dismissing another's argument because of who said it rather than because of what was being said.



* lo/low (As in "Lo and Behold", virtually the only remaining use of the otherwise obsolete word "lo".)

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* lo/low (As in "Lo "lo and Behold", behold", virtually the only remaining use of the otherwise obsolete word "lo".)



*** It's confusing because both derive from the French ''parler'', "to talk."



** "Peke" is colloquial shorthand for Pekingese (either a native of Beijing or the dog breed). Since it's short and convenient, knowing our luck it's probably also racist.

to:

** "Peke" is colloquial shorthand for Pekingese (either a native of Beijing or the (the dog breed). Since it's short and convenient, knowing our luck it's probably also racist.



** "Pearl" is a shiny round bauble made by an oyster. "Perl" is a programming language. "Purl" is what you do when you're knitting.

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** "Pearl" is a shiny round bauble made by an oyster. "Perl" is a programming language. "Purl" is what you do when you're knitting.knitting (ripples on the water also do this metaphorically).



** A bicycle has pedals, not peddles. What Lance Armstrong et al. do is pedal their bicycles, not peddle them. Peddle is a verb, meaning to ''sell'', and a peddler is an itinerant salesman.

to:

** A bicycle has pedals, not peddles. What Lance Armstrong et al. do is pedal their bicycles, not peddle them. Peddle is a verb, meaning to ''sell'', and a peddler (or pedlar) is an itinerant salesman.



*** "Rime" is also an archaic spelling of "rhyme."



** "Rite" is short for ritual, e.g. a ''rite'' of passage.

to:

** "Rite" is short for ritual, e.g. a ''rite'' of passage. (Which is why [[Creator/TerryPratchett Terry Pratchett's]] aspiring women wizards wanted ''EqualRites''.)
22nd Aug '16 7:27:06 AM higgledypiggledy
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** Usually, to affect something is to cause an effect in it; the verb "to affect" can also mean to assume a mannerism (as in "to affect an accent").



** Usually, to affect something is to cause an effect in it.
*** Even simpler: most of the time, '''a'''ffect is a verb, '''e'''ffect is a noun. (Mnemonic: R'''A'''V'''E'''N; a=verb, e=noun.) [[LiesToChildren Although this is technically incorrect]] (both words can be nouns or verbs), "affect" as a noun is not commonly used. "A classic symptom of schizophrenia is "flattened affect," i.e. blunted emotional response." So: due to the effects of mental illness, your affect could be affected. Affect (pronounced AFF-ekt), as a noun, means the same thing as affectation. It's where we get the word "affection."
*** You can also ''effect'' change in a situation. It might even be effective.

to:

** Usually, to affect something is to cause an effect in it.
***
Even simpler: most of the time, '''a'''ffect is a verb, '''e'''ffect is a noun. (Mnemonic: R'''A'''V'''E'''N; a=verb, e=noun.) [[LiesToChildren Although this )
***[[LiesToChildren This
is technically incorrect]] (both words spellings can be nouns or verbs), verbs); however, the noun "affect" and the verb "to effect" are much less common. "Affect" as a noun (pronounced AFF-ect) is not commonly used. a technical psychological term referring to the outward expression of emotion; "A classic symptom of schizophrenia is "flattened affect," 'flattened affect,' i.e. blunted emotional response." So: due to the effects of mental illness, your affect illness could be affected. Affect (pronounced AFF-ekt), as a noun, ''affect'' your ''affect.''
The verb "to effect"
means the same thing as affectation. It's where we get the word "affection."
***
"to cause, to succeed in bringing about." You can also ''effect'' change in a situation. It might even be effective.situation, if your actions are sufficiently ''effective.''
20th Aug '16 9:19:39 PM TheCuza
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* ''Series/CornerGas''
** In a way, an episode lampshades this trope: when confronted with a badly-spelled newspaper headline (which reads "HANK IS PHYCIC"), Wanda dryly cracks a joke about buying a spellchecker. Brent then follows this up by saying that he's going to continue reading, and that the story is "contunied on page 30".
** In another episode, Karen says that the criminal Davis caught was barely a thief. Cue the SpinningPaper, which inverts two letters in "Cop Nabs Barley Thief".

to:

* ''Series/CornerGas''
** In
''Series/CornerGas'': The local newspaper, the ''Dog River Howler'', is known for its [[YouMakeMeSic crappy spelling]]. It was only a way, an episode lampshades this trope: when confronted with a badly-spelled newspaper headline (which reads "HANK IS PHYCIC"), Wanda dryly cracks a joke about buying a spellchecker. Brent then follows this matter of time before one of their many typos ended up by saying being the correct spelling of a different word.
-->'''Davis:''' You remember
that he's going to continue reading, and guy who stole that the story is "contunied on page 30".
** In another episode, Karen says that the criminal Davis caught
grain truck?\\
'''Karen:''' ''That'' guy? Pfft. He
was barely a thief.\\
''[A SpinningPaper shows the headline "COP NABS BARELY THIEF"]''\\
'''Davis:''' He was a ''barley''
thief. Cue the SpinningPaper, which inverts two letters in "Cop Nabs Barley Thief".That was a typo.
17th Aug '16 10:32:01 AM Morgenthaler
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** Many of these are also seen on Website/FundiesSayTheDarndestThings although there the most common misspelling of "Bible" is "Babble" as in "Wholly Babble"[[labelnote:*]](and please don't say that's an accurate label of it; that's just FlameBait in its purest form)[[/labelnote]].
13th Aug '16 9:00:12 PM genesisxx
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** Let's make this easier:
*** Definitely - Something is of no doubt. ("That's definitely my cat!")
*** Defiantly - Rebellious. ("The rival king defiantly overthrew Jeremiah's empire.")
12th Aug '16 10:45:51 AM Pinokio
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* In the UsefulNotes/MobilePhoneGame ''Magic Evolution'', one can encounter a "Rougue" enemy.
11th Aug '16 11:23:36 PM DastardlyDemolition
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*** But one can also spell "sick 'em" as "sic 'em" and still be gramaticly correct.
11th Aug '16 8:36:38 PM DastardlyDemolition
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* cant (slope (of a road or racetrack); lingo of a particular group; insincere talk) versus can't (cannot)

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* cant (slope (of [of a road or racetrack); racetrack]; lingo of a particular group; insincere talk) versus can't (cannot)
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