History Main / RomanticPlotTumor

21st May '17 2:23:12 PM HighCrate
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* ''Film/XMen'' had the ridiculous plot of Logan's obsessive love for Jean Grey, despite knowing her for a few days, at the most.
** The sequels also give us rather unfounded relationships between Erik/Raven and Charles/Moira. While both of them only show up for short little scenes, damn if those scenes don't drag.
21st May '17 12:33:26 PM mutents
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** The sequels also give us rather unfounded relationships between Erik/Raven and Charles/Moira. While both of them only show up for short little scenes, damn if those scenes don't drag.
10th May '17 2:29:30 PM DarkPhoenix94
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* The ''Franchise/XMen'' series loves to drum up romantic tension between two seemingly randomly selected characters. Usually it only leads to one or two scenes of flirtation -- a "Romantic Plot Freckle" if you will; sometimes it leads to an actual ongoing relationship - a "Romantic Plot Appendage," say; but sometimes it ends up as a full-fledged Romantic Plot Tumor, with an inordinate page count being devoted to a relationship that ends up being dropped as soon as the writer loses interest (or left the book) to be rarely, if ever, mentioned again. The one example of this which hasn't gone into remission, despite one side of it being ''dead'', would be Comicbook/{{Wolverine}} and Comicbook/{{Jean|Grey}}. Canon-wise, [[Comicbook/{{Cyclops}} Scott]] and Jean were the OneTruePairing, with Wolverine housing a crush on Jean and Scott being jealous. But, eventually they included Jean being attracted to Wolverine despite Scott's existence, though any time Scott got overly jealous he'd be called out on this, despite, you know, actually having good reason to be annoyed. Wolverine basically ends up with the only thing going for him is his love for Jean, and he'll angst about his inability to have her because of Cyclops despite the fact he has a lot more things to complain about, and Jean will all-but cheat on Cyclops without actually consummating anything with Wolverine, until it ends up with her almost stringing them both. Basically, whenever this gets played up, usually at least one of these three end up being driven entirely by this in characterization. To make matters worse, it seeped into the films, being the biggest defining romance in the series.

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* The ''Franchise/XMen'' series loves to drum up romantic tension between two seemingly randomly selected characters. Usually it only leads to one or two scenes of flirtation -- a "Romantic Plot Freckle" if you will; sometimes it leads to an actual ongoing relationship - a "Romantic Plot Appendage," say; but sometimes it ends up as a full-fledged Romantic Plot Tumor, with an inordinate page count being devoted to a relationship that ends up being dropped as soon as the writer loses interest (or left the book) to be rarely, if ever, mentioned again. The one example of this which hasn't gone into remission, despite one side ''both'' sides of it being ''dead'', would be Comicbook/{{Wolverine}} and Comicbook/{{Jean|Grey}}.Comicbook/{{Jean|Grey}} (Old Man Logan and Teen Jean are around, but have more of an IntergenerationalFriendship than anything else - which is good, because as observed in comic, anything else would be creepy). Canon-wise, [[Comicbook/{{Cyclops}} Scott]] and Jean were the OneTruePairing, with Wolverine housing a crush on Jean and Scott being jealous. But, eventually they included Jean being attracted to Wolverine despite Scott's existence, though any time Scott got overly jealous he'd be called out on this, despite, you know, actually having good reason to be annoyed. Wolverine basically ends up with the only thing going for him is his love for Jean, and he'll angst about his inability to have her because of Cyclops despite the fact he has a lot more things to complain about, and Jean will all-but cheat on Cyclops without actually consummating anything with Wolverine, until it ends up with her almost stringing them both. Basically, whenever this gets played up, usually at least one of these three end up being driven entirely by this in characterization. To make matters worse, it seeped into the films, being the biggest defining romance in the series.series - though they did at least have the sense to have Jean be fond of Logan, but not be inclined to do anything more than flirt a little and, as Logan puts it, she ultimately chose Scott.
30th Apr '17 9:07:48 AM pinkdalek
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* ''Series/DoctorWho'''s GenreShift between the Classic and New series from a NoBudget children's horror-comedy serial to a reasonably-budgeted flagship export under the BBC's "Original British Drama" imprint means that the show focuses a ''lot'' more on romance now than in the old days. Sometimes for better and for worse. A lot of this was [[ExecutiveMeddling necessary to get the show made at all]] -- in 2005 the BBC was not making science fiction shows ''or'' family shows and everyone with experience making them had left the industry. Creator/RussellTDavies had to pitch the revival by associating it with the SoapOpera that was the 'family show' of the time. This did help [[OldGuardVersusNewBlood boost the show's popularity]] and achieve a similar MultipleDemographicAppeal as the show had had during its '60s and '70s heyday, but ''every'' season arc ends up having romance and ThePowerOfLove as a key, if not overwhelming, focus, which many Classic series fans find alienating (they'd long been used to NoHuggingNoKissing), and even many non-Classic fans find cheesy and poorly executed. The relationship - later confirmed by WordOfSaintPaul as a romance - between the Tenth Doctor and Rose Tyler was the first to attract controversy over this, with the Doctor spending ''an entire season'' moping over Rose being trapped in an alternate universe. Creator/StevenMoffat's dislike of villains and fondness for relationship development (as if this is a bad thing) possibly exacerbated this once he became showrunner with Series 5:

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* ''Series/DoctorWho'''s GenreShift between the Classic and New series from a NoBudget children's horror-comedy serial to a reasonably-budgeted flagship export under the BBC's "Original British Drama" imprint means that the show focuses a ''lot'' more on romance now than in the old days. Sometimes days - both for better and for worse. A lot of this was [[ExecutiveMeddling necessary to get the show made at all]] -- in 2005 the BBC was not making science fiction shows ''or'' family shows and everyone with experience making them had left the industry. Creator/RussellTDavies had to pitch the revival by associating it with the SoapOpera that was the 'family show' of the time. This did help [[OldGuardVersusNewBlood boost the show's popularity]] and achieve a similar MultipleDemographicAppeal as the show had had during its '60s and '70s heyday, but ''every'' season arc ends up having romance and ThePowerOfLove as a key, if not overwhelming, focus, which many Classic series fans find alienating (they'd long been used to NoHuggingNoKissing), and even many non-Classic fans find cheesy and poorly executed. The relationship - later confirmed by WordOfSaintPaul as a romance - between the Tenth Doctor and Rose Tyler was the first to attract controversy over this, with the Doctor spending ''an entire season'' moping over Rose being trapped in an alternate universe. Creator/StevenMoffat's dislike of disinterest in writing active villains (preferring malfunctioning machines or time loops gone wrong) and fondness for relationship development (as if this is a bad thing) possibly exacerbated this once he became background in romantic comedy meant that his promotion to showrunner with Series 5:made the romance elements even more prominent:
28th Apr '17 9:25:50 PM Pinokio
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* In ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'', the relationships of Chakotay and Janeway and the Doctor and Seven were totally relevant to the ...yawn... plot.
16th Apr '17 5:34:21 PM nombretomado
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* The tendency for this kind of behavior in radio soap operas was famously skewered by StanFreberg in a skit called [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ajPbgklMNxA ''John And Marsha'']]. An entire intelligible narrative made solely out of the two actors [[SayMyName saying each others' names in different tones]]. It actually works pretty well.

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* The tendency for this kind of behavior in radio soap operas was famously skewered by StanFreberg Creator/StanFreberg in a skit called [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ajPbgklMNxA ''John And Marsha'']]. An entire intelligible narrative made solely out of the two actors [[SayMyName saying each others' names in different tones]]. It actually works pretty well.
14th Apr '17 8:49:46 AM dmcreif
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* ''Film/EnemyAtTheGates'' keeps taking time away from a fascinating and incredibly taut plot centered around a sniper duel in besieged Stalingrad to focus on a tepid and uninteresting love triangle between three principals with zero chemistry. Ironically, the love triangle ''did'' happen in real life and the sniper duel ''didn't'', but that still doesn't change the fact that the sniper duel was what most people [[JustHereForGodzilla came to see]]. RealityIsUnrealistic sometimes.

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* ''Film/EnemyAtTheGates'' keeps taking time away from a fascinating and incredibly taut plot centered around a sniper duel in besieged Stalingrad to focus on a tepid and uninteresting love triangle between three principals with zero chemistry. Ironically, This one is more ironic than others: the love triangle ''did'' happen in real life and life, but the sniper duel ''didn't'', but that ''didn't''. That still doesn't change the fact that the sniper duel was what most people [[JustHereForGodzilla came to see]]. RealityIsUnrealistic sometimes.



* This happens in ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheHalfBloodPrince''. While the romantic subplots ''were'' in the book, they're forced to the forefront in the movie, making it seem like that was the most important part of the movie. What's even worse is the fact that by the time they revealed who the Half-Blood Prince was, the audience (at least, those who hadn't read the book) had no clue why it was important. In other words, the romantic plot made people forget what the main plot was. Granted, for some at least, the romantic subplots weren't much better in the book, either.

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* This happens in ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheHalfBloodPrince''. While the romantic subplots ''were'' in the book, they're forced to the forefront in the movie, making it seem like that was they are the most important part of the movie. What's even worse is the fact that by the time they revealed who the Half-Blood Prince was, the audience (at least, those who hadn't read the book) had no clue why it was important. In other words, the romantic plot made people forget what the main plot was. Granted, for some at least, the romantic subplots weren't much better in the book, either.



* Purposely averted in ''Film/PacificRim''. Guillermo del Toro stated in numerous interviews that he dislikes how movies -- particularly big-budget action movies -- tend to shoehorn a romance in simply because one lead is male and the other is female. Despite a few ShipTease moments, Raleigh and Mako end up close friends and partners, but not romantically involved.

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* Purposely averted avoided in ''Film/PacificRim''. Guillermo del Toro stated in numerous interviews that he dislikes how movies -- particularly big-budget action movies -- tend to shoehorn a romance in simply because one lead is male and the other is female. Despite a few ShipTease moments, Raleigh and Mako end up close friends and partners, but not romantically involved.



* A common criticism of ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' is how much unneeded drama is mined from the romantic foibles, especially Oliver's, mostly because a lot of it comes down to one party lecturing the other (often with them presented as right to do so, [[InformedWrongness while the audience often disagrees]]) or them arguing over issues that could be avoided by talking it out like adults.

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* A common criticism of ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' is how much unneeded drama is mined from the romantic foibles, especially Oliver's, Oliver Queen's, mostly because a lot of it comes down to one party lecturing the other (often with them presented as right to do so, [[InformedWrongness while the audience often disagrees]]) or them arguing over issues that could be avoided by talking it out like adults.



** The only romantic couples that seem to be universally liked are Diggle/Lyla and Roy/Thea, in large part because of their comparatively less drama (at least, Roy/Thea grew out of their drama and became probably the healthiest couple on the show, while Diggle/Lyla apparently worked out their drama before the show started), with Sara/Oliver and Tommy/Laurel being mostly well liked (with the exception of shipping-related issues), for similarly having little drama that they didn't work through in a healthy manner and only breaking up due to plot reasons. As a result though, the show has became ''infamous'' for its focus on complex romance, to the point that talking about shipping among fans of ''Series/TheFlash2014'', ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'', ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'', and/or any other comics book show, to result in arguments due to it 'ruining' ''Arrow''.

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** The only romantic couples that seem to be universally liked are Diggle/Lyla and Roy/Thea, in large part because of their comparatively less drama (at least, Roy/Thea grew out of their drama and became probably the healthiest couple on the show, while Diggle/Lyla apparently worked out their drama before the show started), with Sara/Oliver and Tommy/Laurel being mostly well liked (with the exception of shipping-related issues), for similarly having little drama that they didn't work through in a healthy manner and only breaking up due to plot reasons. As a result though, the show has became ''infamous'' for its focus on complex romance, to the point that talking about shipping among fans of ''Series/TheFlash2014'', ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'', ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'', and/or any other comics book show, to result in arguments due to it 'ruining' "ruining" ''Arrow''.



* While the Richard Castle[=/=]Kate Beckett relationship dynamic on ''Series/{{Castle}}'' is arguably ''not'' one of these, since the relationship dynamic between the two has for better or worse been a central driving engine of the show since the early days, one of the frequent criticisms of the 'significant other' arcs of seasons three and four of ''Series/{{Castle}}'' was that splitting Castle and Beckett up to be with other romantic partners damaged the chemistry between them and just bogged the show down with unnecessarily angsty and predictable subplots that ultimately didn't really go anywhere.

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* While the Richard Castle[=/=]Kate Beckett relationship dynamic on ''Series/{{Castle}}'' is arguably ''not'' one of these, since the relationship dynamic between the two has for better or worse been a the central driving engine of the show since the early days, show, one of the frequent criticisms of the 'significant other' arcs of seasons three and four of ''Series/{{Castle}}'' was that splitting Castle and Beckett up to be with other romantic partners damaged the chemistry between them and just bogged the show down with unnecessarily angsty and predictable subplots that ultimately didn't really go anywhere.



** Some feel this way about Karen and Matt in season 2. While the build-up and initial execution is sweet, the fact that it's ended so abruptly just as it was getting started due to Elektra's re-entrance into Matt's life, ''and'' the fact that there are some viewers seem to prefer him with Elektra, made people feel like it was kind of pointless. Matt coming clean with Karen about his secret identity in the last scene of season 2 doesn't help, as many interpreted it as Matt settling for Karen.
*** On the flip side, though many fans liked Elektra's portrayal, some didn't feel convinced by the relationship between her and Matt. Other detractors state that it only added an unnecessary [[BettyAndVeronica love triangle to the plot]], or took up too much screen time when a slew of other interesting events were going on. The fact that her hijacking of Matt both directly and inadvertently plays a role in the breaking up of Nelson & Murdock also doesn't help.

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** Some feel this way about Karen and Matt and Karen's brief dating arc in season 2. While the build-up and initial execution is sweet, the fact that it's ended so abruptly just as it was getting started due to Elektra's re-entrance into Matt's life, ''and'' the fact that there are some viewers seem to prefer him with Elektra, made some people feel like it was kind of pointless. Matt coming clean with Karen about his secret identity in the last scene of season 2 doesn't help, as many interpreted it as (especially the Matt / Elektra shippers) believed that Matt was only settling for Karen.
with Karen because of Elektra getting killed by the Hand.
*** On the flip side, though many fans liked Elektra's portrayal, Creator/ElodieYung's performance as Elektra, some didn't feel convinced by the relationship between her and Matt. Other detractors state that it only added an unnecessary [[BettyAndVeronica love triangle to the plot]], or took up too much screen time when a slew of other interesting events were going on. The fact that her hijacking of Matt both directly and inadvertently plays indirectly played a role in the breaking up of Nelson & Murdock also doesn't help.



** Various seasons are afflicted with this, such as 2 and 5, but the grandaddy of them all must be Season 4. We're repeatedly taken away from what is arguably the best A-Plot of the series to concentrate on [=LaGuerta=] and Batista's relationship. It's particularly galling because there's no build up to this romance: they're already lovey-dovey by the time we see them and Batista's previous relationship is merely handwaved away. Oh, and this plotline affects the A-Plot in precisely one instance. Even worse is that it combined [=LaGuerta=], whom many fans can't stand, and Angel, who is a fan favorite and perhaps the most likable person on the series.
** And there's [=Hannah McKay=], whose relationship with Dexter in Seasons 7 '''and''' 8 took focus away from more interesting characters like Isaak Sirko and Evelyn Vogel. It eventually swallowed the plot to the point that it becomes Dexter's main arc and the fight with the antagonist and Dexter's hobby feels more like the B-plot instead.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'''s GenreShift between the Classic and New series from a NoBudget children's horror-comedy serial to a reasonably-budgeted flagship export under the BBC's "Original British Drama" imprint means that the show focuses a ''lot'' more on romance now than in the old days, for better and for worse. A lot of this was [[ExecutiveMeddling necessary to get the show made at all]] -- in 2005 the BBC was not making science fiction shows ''or'' family shows and everyone with experience making them had left the industry. Creator/RussellTDavies had to pitch the revival by associating it with the SoapOpera that was the 'family show' of the time. This did help [[OldGuardVersusNewBlood boost the show's popularity]] and achieve a similar MultipleDemographicAppeal as the show had had during its '60s and '70s heyday, but ''every'' season arc ends up having romance and ThePowerOfLove as a key, if not overwhelming, focus, which many Classic series fans find alienating (they'd long been used to NoHuggingNoKissing), and even many non-Classic fans find cheesy and poorly executed. The relationship - later confirmed by WordOfSaintPaul as a romance - between the Tenth Doctor and Rose Tyler was the first to attract controversy over this, with the Doctor spending ''an entire season'' moping over Rose being trapped in an alternate universe. Creator/StevenMoffat's dislike of villains and fondness for relationship development (as if this is a bad thing) possibly exacerbated this once he became showrunner with Series 5:

to:

** Various seasons are afflicted with this, this to different degrees, such as 2 and 5, but the grandaddy of them all must be Season 4. We're repeatedly taken away from what is arguably the best A-Plot of the series to concentrate on [=LaGuerta=] and Batista's relationship. It's particularly galling because there's no build up to this romance: they're already lovey-dovey by the time we see them and Batista's previous relationship is merely handwaved away. Oh, and this plotline affects the A-Plot in precisely one ''one'' instance. Even worse is that it combined [=LaGuerta=], whom many fans can't stand, and Angel, who is a fan favorite and perhaps the most likable person on the series.
** And there's [=Hannah McKay=], Hannah [=McKay=], whose relationship with Dexter in Seasons 7 '''and''' 8 took focus away from more interesting characters like Isaak Sirko and Evelyn Vogel. It eventually swallowed the plot to the point that it becomes Dexter's main arc and the fight with the antagonist and Dexter's dark passenger hobby feels more like the B-plot instead.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'''s GenreShift between the Classic and New series from a NoBudget children's horror-comedy serial to a reasonably-budgeted flagship export under the BBC's "Original British Drama" imprint means that the show focuses a ''lot'' more on romance now than in the old days, days. Sometimes for better and for worse. A lot of this was [[ExecutiveMeddling necessary to get the show made at all]] -- in 2005 the BBC was not making science fiction shows ''or'' family shows and everyone with experience making them had left the industry. Creator/RussellTDavies had to pitch the revival by associating it with the SoapOpera that was the 'family show' of the time. This did help [[OldGuardVersusNewBlood boost the show's popularity]] and achieve a similar MultipleDemographicAppeal as the show had had during its '60s and '70s heyday, but ''every'' season arc ends up having romance and ThePowerOfLove as a key, if not overwhelming, focus, which many Classic series fans find alienating (they'd long been used to NoHuggingNoKissing), and even many non-Classic fans find cheesy and poorly executed. The relationship - later confirmed by WordOfSaintPaul as a romance - between the Tenth Doctor and Rose Tyler was the first to attract controversy over this, with the Doctor spending ''an entire season'' moping over Rose being trapped in an alternate universe. Creator/StevenMoffat's dislike of villains and fondness for relationship development (as if this is a bad thing) possibly exacerbated this once he became showrunner with Series 5:



** Series 8, despite having a brand-new Doctor played by a charismatic and well-liked actor, focused strongly on the romantic relationship between the companion Clara and her new boyfriend Danny, meaning the Doctor and the monsters were often pushed to the sidelines. Even "Listen", the CharacterDevelopment episode pitched as being about the Doctor having a mental breakdown, gives most of the screen time to Clara going on a bad date with Danny and using time travel to meet his child self and IdenticalGrandson. Ameliorating this somewhat is that from "The Caretaker", the midpoint of the season, onward a LoveTriangle situation is established (as confirmed via WordOfSaintPaul -- the director of the episode -- in the DVD commentary), putting an implied romance between Clara and the Doctor ''on top of'' the ongoing scenario with Danny. This plot is wrapped up in the SeasonFinale with a coda in the ChristmasEpisode "Last Christmas", and from there...

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** Series 8, despite having a brand-new Doctor played by a charismatic and well-liked actor, Peter Capaldi, focused strongly on the romantic relationship between the companion Clara and her new boyfriend Danny, meaning the Doctor and the monsters were often pushed to the sidelines. Even "Listen", the CharacterDevelopment episode pitched as being about the Doctor having a mental breakdown, gives most of the screen time to Clara going on a bad date with Danny and using time travel to meet his child self and IdenticalGrandson. Ameliorating this somewhat is that from "The Caretaker", the midpoint of the season, onward a LoveTriangle situation is established (as confirmed via WordOfSaintPaul -- the director of the episode -- in the DVD commentary), putting an implied romance between Clara and the Doctor ''on top of'' the ongoing scenario with Danny. This plot is wrapped up in the SeasonFinale with a coda in the ChristmasEpisode "Last Christmas", and from there...
13th Apr '17 2:08:17 PM pinkdalek
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* Many critics of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV'' pointed out that the romance between Noctis and Luna gets a lot of screentime, but never feels convincing or satisfying, with the characters mostly communicating via scrapbook, exposition or anguished pleas. It might have passed muster by the standards of average {{Eastern RPG}}s, and Luna's lines about 'wanting to be by his side' and Noct's anguish over not being able to protect her come right out of the well-regarded Cloud/Tifa romance in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', but because the NotLoveInterest relationship between Noct and his friends is very well-done and moving, it stands out as weak.
9th Apr '17 10:16:44 AM ThomasVeggieDramaFan
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''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad!'' has a very bizarre one in the form of Steve and Snot's relationship, which has had the Ho Yay ramped up or outright confirmed them gay or together the future. It becomes jarring when nearly every episode with Snot in it will mention or hint at this, no matter how unfitting or unnecessary it is.

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''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad!'' * ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' has a very bizarre one in the form of Steve and Snot's relationship, which has had the Ho Yay ramped up or outright confirmed them gay or together the future. It becomes jarring when nearly every episode with Snot in it will mention or hint at this, no matter how unfitting or unnecessary it is.
9th Apr '17 10:15:29 AM ThomasVeggieDramaFan
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''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad!'' has a very bizarre one in the form of Steve and Snot's relationship, which has had the Ho Yay ramped up or outright confirmed them gay or together the future. It becomes jarring when nearly every episode with Snot in it will mention or hint at this, no matter how unfitting or unnecessary it is.
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