History Main / RoguesGalleryTransplant

21st Aug '16 11:24:51 PM MegaJ
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* With Peter Parker becoming head of Parker Industries during the ComicBook/AllNewAllDifferentMarvel event, his previous streel-level Rogues Gallery is now being handled by Comicbook/MilesMorales, Spider-Woman, and Comicbook/{{Silk}}. Silk in particular has been dealing with Black Cat.

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* With Peter Parker becoming head of Parker Industries during the ComicBook/AllNewAllDifferentMarvel event, event and Spider-Man dealing with bigger foes; his previous streel-level Rogues Gallery is now being handled by Comicbook/MilesMorales, Spider-Woman, and Comicbook/{{Silk}}. Both Silk in particular has been dealing and Miles have dealt with Black Cat.Cat, and Spider-Woman has gone up against Hobgoblin.
21st Aug '16 12:59:09 PM MegaJ
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* With Peter Parker becoming head of Parker Industries during the ComicBook/AllNewAllDifferentMarvel event, his previous streel-level Rogues Gallery is now being handled by Comicbook/MilesMorales, Spider-Woman, and Comicbook/{{Silk}}. Silk in particular has been dealing with Black Cat.
8th Aug '16 4:59:12 PM Homemaderat
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* In the past, it was common for ''Creator/HannaBabrera'' tv shows to get comic book adaptions. A lot of which just retold stories straight from the tv episodes. But one story chose to feature, Reducto an antagonist of one episode of ''WesternAnimation{{Birdman}}'' fight the ''WesternAnimation/TheHerculoids''.

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* In the past, it was common for ''Creator/HannaBabrera'' ''Creator/HannaBarbera'' tv shows to get comic book adaptions. A lot of which just retold stories straight from the tv episodes. But one story chose to feature, Reducto an antagonist of one episode of ''WesternAnimation{{Birdman}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Birdman}}'' fight the ''WesternAnimation/TheHerculoids''.
8th Aug '16 4:58:23 PM Homemaderat
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* In the past, it was common for ''Creator/HannaBabrera'' tv shows to get comic book adaptions. A lot of which just retold stories straight from the tv episodes. But one story chose to feature, Reducto an antagonist of one episode of ''WesternAnimation{{Birdman}}'' fight the ''WesternAnimation/TheHerculoids''.
8th Aug '16 9:59:50 AM Technomaru
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* According to the ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' episode "Bought and Scold", Quackor the Fowl from ''WesternAnimation/DextersLabratory'' is one of their enemies.
** On A Similar note, Huntor from "Dial M for Monkey" appeared as a bounty hunter in a episode of "WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' called "Episode VIII: Jack vs Mad Jack"
18th Jul '16 12:59:59 PM DragonRanger
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** ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' makes liberal use of this trope since most of the main characters are {{Canon Foreigner}}s, and thus have no existing rogues from the comics. You have enemies of Iron Man (Blizzard, [[LegacyCharacter (a)]] Whiplash), Thor (the Absorbing Man, Lorelei), the Hulk (General Talbot), the Avengers (Graviton), and even Comicbook/{{Nova}} (Blackout). Special mention goes to [[spoiler:Mister Hyde]], who has noted above has bounced around between multiple superheroes in the comics but is here made specifically a S.H.I.E.L.D. villain by capitalizing on the development in the comics that [[ComicBook/DaisyJohnson his daughter]] is a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent. Lash could also qualify, being an ''[[ComicBook/TheInhumans Inhumans]]'' villain transplanted to S.H.I.E.L.D., but then again a lot of other ''Inhumans'' concepts were transplanted to S.H.I.E.L.D. so he fits.
** ''Series/AgentCarter'' likewise stars someone who in the comics was merely a supporting character and had no specific enemies of her own. So far the show's villains have been [[spoiler:Dr. Faustus]] and the Secret Empire (renamed the Council of Nine in this show) from ''Captain America'', Madame Masque from ''Iron Man'', and [[spoiler:an evil ComicBook/BlackWidow, who is technically a CanonForeigner but draws on the heroic ComicBook/BlackWidow's backstory that she wasn't the first such Soviet agent.]]

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** ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' makes liberal use of this trope since most of the main characters are {{Canon Foreigner}}s, and thus have no existing rogues from the comics. You have enemies of Iron Man (Blizzard, [[LegacyCharacter (a)]] Whiplash), Thor (the Absorbing Man, Lorelei), Captain America (the Watchdogs), the Hulk (General Talbot), the Avengers (Graviton), and even Comicbook/{{Nova}} (Blackout). Special mention goes to [[spoiler:Mister Hyde]], who has noted above has bounced around between multiple superheroes in the comics but is here made specifically a S.H.I.E.L.D. villain by capitalizing on the development in the comics that [[ComicBook/DaisyJohnson his daughter]] is a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent. Lash could also qualify, being an ''[[ComicBook/TheInhumans Inhumans]]'' villain transplanted to S.H.I.E.L.D., but then again a lot of other ''Inhumans'' concepts were transplanted to S.H.I.E.L.D. so he fits.
** ''Series/AgentCarter'' likewise stars someone who in the comics was merely a supporting character and had no specific enemies of her own. So far the The show's villains have been were [[spoiler:Dr. Faustus]] and the Secret Empire (renamed the Council of Nine in this show) from ''Captain America'', Madame Masque from ''Iron Man'', and [[spoiler:an evil ComicBook/BlackWidow, who is technically a CanonForeigner but draws on the heroic ComicBook/BlackWidow's backstory that she wasn't the first such Soviet agent.]]
16th Jul '16 3:18:32 PM universalperson
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* Comicbook/{{Thanos}} first appeared as an enemy of Iron Man, though he is now more commonly linked with the ''ComicBook/SilverSurfer'' mythos, (Marvel Comics') [[ComicBook/CaptainMarVell Captain Marvel]], and then with Comicbook/AdamWarlock. Like Mephisto, he's now pretty much a general enemy of the entire lineup of "Cosmic Marvel" characters, if not the whole Marvelverse. Thanos's creator, Jim Starlin, was offered to write an issue of Iron Man's comic. Starlin created Thanos to be the villain for that issue. When Starlin began writing Captain Marvel he reintroduced Thanos and the rest is history.

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* Comicbook/{{Thanos}} first appeared as an enemy of Iron Man, though Man. This is because Thanos's creator, Jim Starlin, was offered to write an issue of Iron Man's comic and created Thanos to be the villain for that issue. When Starlin began writing Captain Marvel he reintroduced Thanos and the rest is history. Thanos is now more commonly linked with the ''ComicBook/SilverSurfer'' mythos, (Marvel Comics') [[ComicBook/CaptainMarVell Captain Marvel]], and then with Comicbook/AdamWarlock. Like Mephisto, he's now pretty much a general enemy of the entire lineup of "Cosmic Marvel" characters, if not the whole Marvelverse. Thanos's creator, Jim Starlin, was offered to write an issue of Iron Man's comic. Starlin created Thanos to be the villain for that issue. When Starlin began writing Captain Marvel he reintroduced Thanos and the rest is history.
11th Jul '16 8:29:33 AM DesertDragon
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* Doctor Doom was created to be the main nemesis of the ComicBook/FantasticFour. While he still maintains that role to the present day, he has since become one of the overall Big Bads of the Marvel universe and has fought pretty much every single Marvel hero. Most prevalent are his tussles with Comicbook/BlackPanther. He is also known for his roles in classic ComicBook/IronMan stories and the graphic novel ''Triumph & Torment'' where he meets ComicBook/DoctorStrange. Even other villains are not safe from Doom. He will gladly co-op with the heroes if he feels it serves his interests. [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder Of course, once the interests are served...]] This is so pronounced that it's even reflected in marketing. For instance, Creator/{{Hasbro}}'s "Titan Hero" action figure line usually references the installment each hero or villain comes from (''Film/IronMan3'', ''WesternAnimation/AvengersAssemble'', ''Film/ThorTheDarkWorld'', ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'', etc.), but the packaging for the Doctor Doom figure contains no indication that he belongs to the Fantastic Four franchise.

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* Doctor Doom was created to be the main nemesis of the ComicBook/FantasticFour. While he still maintains that role to the present day, he has since become one of the overall Big Bads of the Marvel universe and has fought pretty much every single Marvel hero. Most prevalent are his tussles with Comicbook/BlackPanther. He Comicbook/BlackPanther, which makes sense because BP was originally introduced as a Fantastic Four ally and a GoodCounterpart to Doom in the first place. Doom is also known for his roles in classic ComicBook/IronMan stories and the graphic novel ''Triumph & Torment'' where he meets ComicBook/DoctorStrange. Even other villains are not safe from Doom. He will gladly co-op with the heroes if he feels it serves his interests. interests (of course, [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder Of course, once the interests are served...]] ]]) This is so pronounced that it's even reflected in marketing. For instance, Creator/{{Hasbro}}'s "Titan Hero" action figure line usually references the installment each hero or villain comes from (''Film/IronMan3'', ''WesternAnimation/AvengersAssemble'', ''Film/ThorTheDarkWorld'', ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'', etc.), but the packaging for the Doctor Doom figure contains no indication that he belongs to the Fantastic Four franchise.


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* While Magneto is primarily known for his [[HeelFaceRevolvingDoor complicated]] relationship with the X-Men, he has tangled with all of Marvel's major heroes as well, particularly the Avengers, Fantastic Four, Thor, and Spider-man.
11th Jul '16 8:18:53 AM DesertDragon
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* The Marvel Comic story arc "Acts of Vengeance" best describes this trope. It involves the very idea of [[OpponentSwitch a wide array of super-villains facing heroes they had never met (or at least were villains that weren't part of the heroes' regular gallery)]]. Such examples were Comicbook/AlphaFlight fighting Scorpion, Spider-Man (who was granted cosmic powers at the time) fought Goliath, The Brothers Grimm, Titania, Magneto, Graviton, Trapster, Dragon-Man, and the Tri-Sentinel. Daredevil fought Ultron, Thor fought Juggernaut, Mandarin appears in the X-Men issues, and Rusty and Skids of the ComicBook/NewMutants battle the Vulture. Even Magneto went against the ComicBook/RedSkull for very obvious reasons.

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* The Marvel Comic story arc crossover event "Acts of Vengeance" best describes this trope. It involves the very idea of [[OpponentSwitch a wide array of super-villains facing heroes they had never met (or at least were villains that weren't part of the heroes' regular gallery)]]. Such examples were Comicbook/AlphaFlight fighting Scorpion, Spider-Man (who was granted cosmic powers at the time) fought Goliath, The Brothers Grimm, Titania, Magneto, Graviton, Trapster, Dragon-Man, and the Tri-Sentinel. Daredevil fought Ultron, Thor fought Juggernaut, Mandarin appears in the X-Men issues, and Rusty and Skids of the ComicBook/NewMutants battle the Vulture. Even Magneto went against the ComicBook/RedSkull for very obvious reasons.


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* In ''Series/{{Supergirl}}'', most of the bad guys she fights are actually Superman villains in the comics: Toyman, Silver Banshee, Livewire, Master Jailer, etc. However, this trope is only directly invoked when she fights Reactron, whom Clark recognizes as one of his more powerful enemies. Ironically, Reactron in the comics is primarily a Supergirl villain.
8th Jul '16 6:37:54 AM AnotherGuy
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* Solomon Grundy was originally specifically an enemy of the ([[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]]) Franchise/GreenLantern. However, due to his appearances in various animated series (particularly ''WesternAnimation/{{Superfriends}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague''), and the fact that several comic book creators still identify him as a Golden Age villain, Grundy is now more of a standard DC Universe villain.

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* Solomon Grundy was originally specifically an enemy of the ([[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]]) Franchise/GreenLantern. However, due to his appearances in various animated series (particularly ''WesternAnimation/{{Superfriends}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague''), and the fact that several comic book creators still identify him as a Golden Age villain, Grundy is now more of a standard DC Universe villain. Lately, he's been a Batman nemesis.
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